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    EYEWITNESS TRAVEL

    TOP 10

    HONG KONG

    10
    10
    10
    10
    10
    10
    10
    10
    10
    10
    10

    Best views of the skyline
    Ways to experience the real China
    Unmissable museums & galleries
    Liveliest bars, clubs & casinos
    Most thrilling festivals
    Best hotels for every budget
    Greatest modern buildings
    Best places to buy anything
    Best sights on Macau
    Insider tips for every visitor

    YOUR GUIDE TO THE 10 BEST OF EVERYTHING

    Hong Kong Area by Area
    This Top 10 Travel Guide to Hong Kong is divided into Hong Kong
    Island (Northwest, Northeast and South), Kowloon (Tsim Sha Tsui;
    Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward; and New
    Kowloon), the New Territories, Outlying Islands,
    Macau and the mainland China cities of Shenzhen
    and Guangzhou. Each area is colour coded; the
    colour bands of the chapters correspond to
    the colours shown on the maps here. Almost
    every place mentioned in the book has a
    map reference, which takes you to the
    maps opening out from the flaps.

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    EYEWITNESS TRAVEL top 10

    HONG KONG

    LIAM FITZPATRICK,
    JASON GAGLIARDI AND
    ANDREW STONE

    Contents

    Left Star Ferry Centre Bird Garden Right View from the Peak

    Contents
    Hong Kong’s Top 10
    Hong Kong’s Highlights
    Produced by
    Blue Island Publishing, London

    6

    The Peak

    8

    Central’s Statue Square

    10

    Reproduced by Colourscan,�����������
    Singapore�
    Printed and bound in China by
    Leo Paper Products Ltd

    Happy Valley Races

    12

    Star Ferry

    14

    First published in Great Britain in 2002
    by Dorling Kindersley Limited
    80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL

    Stanley

    16

    Temple Street
    Night Market

    18

    Heritage Museum

    20

    A Penguin Company
    Copyright 2002, 2006 © Dorling
    Kindersley Limited, London
    ,/.$/. .%79/2+
    Reprinted-%,"/52.% -5.)#(!.$$%,()
    with
    revisions 2005, 2006
    WWWDKCOM

    All rights reserved, No part of this
    publication may be reproduced, stored
    in a retrieval system, or transmitted in
    any form or by any means, electronic,
    mechanical, photocopying, recording or
    otherwise, without the prior written
    permission of the copyright owner.
    A CIP catalogue record is available from
    the British Library.
    ISBN 978 14053 1638 5
    Within each Top 10 list in this book, no
    hierarchy of quality or popularity is
    implied. All 10 are, in the editor’s
    opinion, of roughly equal merit.

    Tai Long Wan
    Coastline

    22

    Cheung Chau Island

    24

    Big Buddha and
    Po Lin Monastery

    28

    Moments in History

    30

    Ways to Experience
    the Real China

    32

    Peoples and Cultures
    in Hong Kong

    34

    Festivals and Events

    36

    Markets

    38

    The information in this DK Eyewitness Top 10 Travel Guide is checked regularly.
    Every effort has been made to ensure that this book is as up-to-date as possible at the time
    of going to press. Some details, however, such as telephone numbers, opening hours,
    prices, gallery hanging arrangements and travel information are liable to change. The
    publishers cannot accept responsibility for any consequences arising from the use of this
    book, nor for any material on third party websites, and cannot guarantee that any website
    address in this book will be a suitable source of travel information. We value the views and
    suggestions of our readers very highly. Please write to: Publisher, DK Eyewitness Travel
    Guides, Dorling Kindersley, 80 Strand, London, Great Britain WC2R 0RL.
    Cover: All photographs specially commissioned except: Corbis: Bob Krist main; DK Main Images; Chris
    Stowers cl, bl, Back ��–� DK Images: Chris Stowers tr; Hong Kong Tourism Board: tl, tc. Spine – Alamy Images;
    Robert Harding World Imagery.

    Transports of Delight

    40

    Around the Region

    Modern Buildings

    42

    The New Territories

    Areas of Natural Beauty 44
    Walking Routes
    and Promenades

    46

    Restaurants

    48

    Hong Kong Dishes

    50

    Nightclubs

    52

    Places for Children

    54

    Around Hong Kong
    Island
    Northwest

    58

    Northeast

    66

    South

    72

    Around Kowloon

    100

    Outlying Islands

    112

    Macau

    118

    Shenzhen

    126

    Guangzhou

    130

    Streetsmart
    Planning

    136

    Things to Avoid

    140

    Health and Security Tips 141
    Banking and
    Communications

    142

    Hong Kong on a Budget 143
    Shopping Tips

    144

    Tours

    145

    88

    Places to Stay

    146

    94

    Index

    155

    Tsim Sha Tsui

    80

    Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok
    and Prince Edward
    New Kowloon

    Left Hong Kong skyline Right Temple guardian deity

    Following pages Central district at night

    Contents

    Left Ten Thousand Buddhas Temple Centre Lantau Right Window of the World, Shenzhen

    HONG
    KONG’S
    TOP 10
    The Peak
    8–9
    Central’s
    Statue Square
    10–11
    Happy Valley Races
    12–13
    Star Ferry
    14–15
    Stanley
    16–17
    Temple Street
    Night Market
    18–19
    Heritage Museum
    20–21
    Tai Long Wan
    Coastline
    22–23
    Cheung Chau Island
    24–25
    Big Buddha and
    Po Lin Monastery
    28–29
    Top 10 of Everything
    30–55

    HONG KONG’S TOP 10

    Hong Kong’s Highlights
    6–7

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Hong Kong’s Highlights
    “A dream of Manhattan, arising from the South China
    Sea.” For succinctness, modern travel writer Pico Iyer’s
    description of Hong Kong has yet to be bettered.
    From opium port to Cold War enclave to frenetic
    financial capital, Hong Kong has never been boring.
    This is the hedonistic engine room of cultural fusion:
    East meets West in high style, and the results astonish
    and delight. Prepare to experience one of the most
    dramatic urban environments ever conceived.

    Peak
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    Victoria Peak for an
    amazing view of the
    city (see pp8–9).

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    the region’s admin­­­istrative centre.
    Colonial remnants
    and exciting modern
    architecture stand
    next to each other
    around Statue
    Square (see
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    and rail links between Hong Kong
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    way to cross the water is on the
    Star Ferry (see pp14–15).

    

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    Near Sha Tin in the
    New Territories,
    Hong Kong’s best
    museum is a
    must. Splendid
    high-tech audiovisual displays cover
    the region’s rich
    cultural heritage and
    natural history (see
    pp20–21).

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    Museum

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Kowloon is at its
    most atmospheric
    at night. Head up
    the peninsula to
    the narrow lanes
    Stanley
    of Yau Ma Tei for
    An old fort steeped in colonial
    some serious
    history and reminders of World War
    haggling (see
    II, Stanley on the Southside of Hong
    pp18–19).
    Kong Island is a peaceful diversion
    from the frenetic city (see pp16–17).

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    Tai Long
    Wan
    Coastline

    *

    The remote,
    rugged Sai Kung
    Peninsula in the
    New Territories is
    the place to find
    Hong Kong’s
    finest beaches
    (see pp22–3).

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    Chau
    ( Cheung
    Island

    Of the many islands
    around Hong Kong, tiny
    Cheung Chau is arguably
    the loveliest, with traces
    of old China (see pp24–5).

    Buddha and Po Lin Monastery
    ) Big
    In the middle of hilly Lantau Island, Po Lin

    Monastery is a major destination for devotees and
    tourists alike. The extraordinary seated Big Buddha
    image facing the monastery can be seen from
    miles away (see pp28–9).

    

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    The Peak
    With Hong Kong’s most spectacular views, cooler
    climes and quiet wooded walks, it’s no wonder Victoria Peak is so popular with tourists and the super rich
    who occupy the exclusive properties clinging to its
    high slopes. The Peak Tram takes under 10 minutes
    to reach Victoria Gap, pinning you to your seat as it’s
    hauled up the sheer slope at the end of a single
    cable (don’t worry, its safety record is spotless).
    Terrace dining
    Top 10 Sights

    The Peak Tram

    If the weather is
    misty or there’s low
    cloud, put off a visit
    to the Peak until a
    clearer day as the
    chances are you’ll be
    able to see very little.
    In the Peak Tower,
    Café Deco’s smart
    interior, wide food
    choices and good
    service make it an
    excellent drinking
    and dining stop. For
    fantastic sea views
    over to Lamma
    Island dine or drink
    in the Peak Lookout’s
    lovely garden terrace.
    • Map E5 • Peak Tram
    7am–midnight daily
    • Single/return
    HK$20/$30 • Bus 15C
    from Central Star Ferry
    • 2849 7654
    • www.thepeak.com.hk

    

    1 Peak Tower
    2 Galleria
    3 The Peak Lookout
    4 Barker and Plantation
    Roads
    5 Pok Fu Lam Country Park
    6 World’s Most Expensive
    House
    7 Victoria Peak Garden
    8 Old Peak Rd
    9 View near Summit
    0 Lugard and Harlech Roads

    Tower
    ! Peak
    The Peak Tram

    empties into this ugly
    anvil-shaped mall
    (below), revamped in
    2005, containing shops,
    cafés, restaurants and
    viewing gallery. The
    refreshment and tourist
    trinkets inside don’t
    inspire, but children may
    enjoy the fantastical
    motion simulator Peak
    Explorer ride or Madame
    Tussaud’s waxworks.

    @ Galleria
    Although the imposing

    Peak Tower mall is hardly
    sensitive to its grand setting
    there is a good range of places to eat and drink inside its
    Galleria, with great views
    down onto city and harbour,
    and across to Lamma Island.

    Peak
    £ The
    Lookout

    The new incarnation of this muchloved, up-market
    drinking and dining
    favourite retains a
    lovely garden
    terrace, great food
    and friendly
    ambience.

      

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    These usually quiet
    (although pavement-free)
    roads are worth wandering for a peep at some of
    the Peak’s pricier properties, including 23 Severn
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    ramble, head down Pok
    Fu Lam Reservoir Road,
    then catch a bus back
    into town.

    near
    ( View
    Summit

    The summit itself is
    fenced off and covered
    by telecom masts, but
    the views from the edges
    of Victoria Peak Garden
    are excellent (above).

    and
    ) Lugard
    Harlech Roads

    Most
    Peak Rd
    ^ World’s
    * Old
    Expensive House
    The old footpath up
    In 1997 an offer of
    HK$900m for the newly
    built property at 23 Severn
    Road was incredibly refused. Weeks later, prices
    crashed, and by 2001 the
    house was valued at a
    “mere” third of the price.

    Victoria Peak
    Garden

    &

    The steep struggle up
    Mount Austin Road or the
    longer route along the
    Governor’s Walk to these
    well-tended gardens
    (right) is worth the effort.
    The viewing platform
    faces Lamma Island.

    to the Peak before the
    Peak Tram arrived is
    pleasant and shaded. But
    the traffic can be busy at
    the bottom of Peak Road
    so it’s best to detour
    onto Tregunter Path near
    the bottom.

    The effortless way to see
    most of the best views
    on offer from the Peak is
    on the shaded, wellpaved, 2-mile (3-km) circular walk along Lugard
    Road and Harlech Road.
    It also makes a terrific
    jogging track with a view.

    The Peak Tram
    Despite the fact that a
    single steel cable hauls
    the tram up a long and
    incredibly steep track,
    the Peak Tram has a
    faultless safety record
    since the service
    opened in 1888. The
    most severe disruption
    to services came in the
    1960s when torrents of
    water from an
    especially violent
    typhoon washed part of
    the track away.

    

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Central’s Statue Square
    Stand in Central district’s Statue Square and you’re right in
    the region’s financial, political, historical and social heart.
    Among the steel and glass of sleek skyscrapers surrounding
    the square are a few colonial remnants, including the
    handsome Neo-Classical Legislation Council Building where
    Hong Kong’s usually low-key political demonstrations take
    place. Shopping, a much more popular Hong Kong pursuit
    than politics, goes on inside the swanky boutiques opposite.

    Thomas Jackson
    statue

    Top 10 Sights
    1 Bank of China Tower
    2 Shopping Malls
    3 The Cenotaph
    4 Chater Garden
    5 Court of Appeal
    6 The Legislative Council
    Building
    7 Mandarin Oriental
    8 Thomas Jackson Statue
    9 HSBC Bank Headquarters
    0 Sunday Filipino Fiesta

    Bank of China Tower

    For a terrific bird’seye view over
    Central and the
    harbour, head to the
    viewing gallery on
    the 47th floor of the
    Bank of China Tower.
    If you fancy
    picnicking in the
    square or in nearby
    Chater Garden, try
    the fantastic pastries,
    cakes and quiches
    from the Mandarin
    Oriental’s Cake Shop,
    which is at the edge
    of the square.
    • Map L5

    of
    ! Bank
    China Tower

    Looming over the HSBC
    building is the imposing
    70-storey Bank of China
    Tower. It was designed
    by the renowned architect
    I M Pei. The tower is a
    dizzying 368 m (1,207 ft)
    high. It doesn’t please
    everyone – those who
    know about feng shui say
    it projects negative vibes
    onto other buildings.

    @ Shopping
    Malls

    Two of Hong Kong’s most
    upmarket and, of course,
    pricey shopping malls – the
    busy Landmark Centre and
    the less busy Prince’s Building (see p63) – sit next to
    Statue Square. Within these
    hallowed temples to conspicuous overspending are
    many of the city’s most exclusive and elegant boutiques,
    including the likes of Armani,
    Gucci and Prada.

    Cenotaph
    £ The
    Standing at the northern

    edge of Statue Square, the
    Cenotaph (left) is a memorial
    to those who died in the two
    World Wars.

    10

    For more about Hong Kong’s modern buildings See pp42–3

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    $ Chater
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    colony’s first Government House. Today it
    serves as one of Hong
    Kong’s courts of law.

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    Bank
    ( HSBC
    Headquarters

    On its completion in
    1985, Sir Norman
    Foster’s bold building
    was the most expensive
    ever built, costing more
    than HK$5bn. The edifice
    is said to have the
    strongest feng shui in
    Hong Kong. Rubbing the
    paws of the bank’s handsome lions (above) is
    said to bring good luck.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    real-estate value on the
    site of what used to be
    the old pitch of the Hong
    Kong Cricket Club, the
    small but well-tended
    Chater Garden (below)
    sprang up instead of a
    skyscraper. It’s free to
    enter and makes a good
    place to enjoy a cold
    drink and rest tired legs.

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    % Court
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    Filipino
    ) Sunday
    Fiesta

    The Legislative
    Council Building

    Hundreds of young Filipinos
    and Indonesians, mostly
    domestic workers enjoying
    their only day off, occupy
    almost every spare bit of
    public space in Central.

    ^

    One of Hong Kong’s last
    remaining colonial
    buildings, the elegant
    Neo-Classical Legislative
    Council building (right),
    which used to house the
    Supreme Court, now
    serves as Hong Kong’s
    parliament.

    Suffocating
    Suffrage

    Oriental
    Jackson
    & Mandarin
    * Thomas
    It’s hard to believe,
    Statue
    but the Mandarin Oriental
    was once Hong Kong’s
    tallest building. Today its
    graceful exterior seems
    overwhelmed by the
    ceaseless traffic, but inside
    it’s still one of Hong
    Kong’s finest hotels.

    Appropriately enough,
    one of Hong Kong’s few
    remaining statues, of a
    19th-century banker, is in
    Statue Square. The Japanese army removed one of
    Queen Victoria, which
    gave the square its name.

    During Handover negotiations (see p31), China
    was adamant that Hong
    Kong’s Legislative Council would be as democratic under Chinese
    rule as under the British
    (in other words, it could
    be argued, hardly at all).
    When Chris Patten, the
    last governor, tried introducing greater representation, China dubbed
    Patten, among other
    things, “a strutting prostitute” and “serpent”.

    For key moments in Hong Kong history See pp30-31

    11

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Happy Valley Races
    Feel the earth move beneath thundering hooves as
    you cheer the finishers home in the ultimate Hong
    Kong night out. Races have been held at Happy
    Valley – the widest stretch of flat land on Hong
    Kong Island, originally a swamp – since 1846.
    Today the action takes place beneath twinkling
    high-rises making for one of the most atmospheric
    horseracing tracks in the world.
    A winner

    Top 10 Sights

    Pre-race parade

    If you don’t want to
    spend the whole
    evening at the races,
    arrive after the first
    few races have been
    run, when admission
    is free.
    Moon Koon Restaurant (2966 7111),
    on the second floor
    of the main stand,
    offers good, reasonably priced food.
    Advance booking is
    required on race
    nights.
    • Less than a mile (1 km)
    south of Causeway Bay
    and Wanchai on Hong
    Kong Island • Map P6
    • Regular meetings
    Wed, Sat & Sun • Dial
    1817 for race details •
    www.hongkongjockey
    club.com • Adm HK$10
    • Racing Museum 2966
    8065, free
    • Come Horseracing
    Tour 2366 3995, 2368
    7111, HK$190–460

    12

    1 Wednesday Night
    Races
    2 The Big Screen
    3 Racing Museum
    4 View from Moon Koon
    5 Come Horseracing
    Tour
    6 Silver Lining
    Skeleton
    7 The Crowd
    8 Types of Bet
    9 Where to Bet
    0 Jockey Club Booths

    ! Wednesday
    Night Races

    The most exciting
    scheduled races are
    fortnightly on Wednesday
    evenings. For the full
    atmosphere, jump on a
    Happy Valley-bound tram
    and bone up on the form
    in the Wednesday Racing
    Post on the way. The first
    race is usually at 7:30pm.

    Big Screen
    @ The
    The huge screen

    facing the stand (below)
    carries all the statistics
    racegoers need
    from the results
    of the last race
    to odds on the
    upcoming one.
    There are also
    live race pictures
    or replays,
    ensuring no one
    misses any of
    the action.

    Museum
    # Racing
    The small and neat mus-

    eum at Happy Valley details
    Hong Kong’s racing history
    along with a selection of
    Chinese art celebrating the
    horse. Learn the story of the
    old trade in prized Mongolian
    and Chinese ponies. Don’t
    aim to combine it with an
    evening at the races, however.
    It is closed during meetings.

    Crowd
    & The
    Happy Valley has a

    For a fantastic track-side
    view while you eat, head
    to the Moon Koon Restaurant. Racing and dining
    packages are available.

    to Bet
    ( Where
    Bets are placed at

    the counters at the back
    of each floor of the main
    stand. Pick up the right
    betting slips next to the
    counters, fill them in and
    take them to the counter
    with your stake money.
    If you win, wait for a few
    minutes after the race,
    then go to the same
    counter to collect your
    winnings.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    from
    $ View
    Moon Koon

    55,000 capacity but is so
    popular that it sometimes
    sells out before the day.
    The enthusiasm among
    the big-betting, chainsmoking punters is
    infectious. Stand in the
    open next to the track
    where you’ll get the full
    effect of the roar from
    the stands and a good
    view of the finishing line.

    Club
    ) Jockey
    Booths

    Horse­
    % Come
    racing Tour

    Splendid Tours and Grey
    Line both run the Come
    Horseracing Tour during
    scheduled race meetings
    on Wednesdays,
    Saturdays and Sundays.
    Tours include entry to the
    Members’ Enclosure,
    welcome drink, buffet
    meal and guide service.

    Lining
    ^ Silver
    Skeleton

    Silver Lining, Hong
    Kong’s most famous
    horse, was the first to
    win more than HK$1m.
    The equine skeleton
    takes pride of place in a
    glass cabinet at the
    Racing Museum.

    of Bet
    * Types
    Different ways to bet

    include simply guessing
    the winner; a place
    (betting your horse
    comes 1st or 2nd, or 1st,
    2nd or 3rd if seven or
    more horses race); a
    quinella (picking 1st and
    2nd in any order); and a
    quinella place (predicting
    any two of the first three
    horses in any order).

    For help and advice on
    placing bets go to the
    friendly, helpful Jockey
    Club officials at the
    booths between the
    main entrance and the
    racetrack. The Jockey
    Club is the only organization allowed to take
    bets in Hong Kong. The
    tax it collects makes up a
    small but significant percentage of government
    revenue, but is being
    threatened by illegal and
    online betting. Jockey
    Club profits go to local
    charities.

    Hong Kong’s
    biggest payout
    A world record total of
    US$92m was paid out
    at Happy Valley’s sister
    track at Sha Tin in 1997.
    More than 350 bets of
    HK$1.30 each collected
    HK$260,000.

    13

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Star Ferry
    One of Hong Kong’s best-loved institutions, the Star
    Ferries have plied between Kowloon and Hong Kong
    Island since 1888. The portly green and white 1950s and
    60s relics are still used by commuters despite the advent
    of rail and road tunnels beneath the harbour. A ferry ride
    offers a thrilling perspective on the towering skyscrapers
    and the jungle-clad hills of Hong Kong Island. Take an
    evening voyage for the harbour’s neon spectacle, especially the elaborate light displays at Christmas.
    Top 10 Sights

    Crewmen, Star Ferry

    The HKTB office in
    the Tsim Sha Tsui
    Star ferry building is
    the most convenient
    place to pick up
    brochures, get help
    and advice, and to
    buy Star Ferry
    models and other
    souvenirs.
    The Pacific Coffee
    Company inside the
    terminal serves a
    reasonable cup of
    coffee. Alternatively
    try the HK$10 fresh
    lemonade and free
    cookie samples from
    Mrs Fields.
    • Map L5–M4 • Ferries
    6:30am–11:30pm daily.
    Frequency varies from
    5 to 10 minutes • Ferry
    tours of the harbour also
    available
    • www.starferry.com.hk
    • 2367 7065

    14

    Batwing junk

    1 The Fleet
    2 Clocktower
    3 Star Ferry Crew
    4 Star Ferry Routes
    5 Skyline South
    6 Victoria Harbour
    7 Sightseeing Bargain
    8 Ferry Decks
    9 Ocean Terminal
    0 Skyline North

    Fleet
    ! The
    In the early days,

    four coal-fired boats went
    back and forth between
    Hong Kong and Kowloon.
    Today 12 diesel-powered
    vessels operate, each
    named after a particular
    star (with the night-time
    glare and pollution, they
    may be the only stars
    you’re likely to see from
    the harbour).

    Star Ferry
    Crew

    #

    Many Star Ferry
    crew members
    still sport oldfashioned sailorstyle uniforms,
    making popular
    subjects for
    camera-toting
    visitors. Watch
    out, too, for the
    pier crewmen
    catching the
    mooring rope
    with a long
    billhook.

    @ Clocktower
    Standing next to the

    Tsim Sha Tsui Star Ferry, the
    landmark clocktower is the
    last remnant of
    the old Kowloon railway
    terminus. This
    was the poetic
    final stop for
    trains from the
    mainland, including the Orient
    Express from
    London. The
    terminus has
    since moved
    east to prosaic
    Hung Hom.

    ^ Victoria
    Harbour

    routes: between Tsim Sha Tsui
    and Central; Tsim Sha Tsui and
    Wanchai; Central and Hung Hom;
    and Hung Hom and Wanchai.

    Decks
    * Ferry
    The lower and upper
    decks used to be first
    (upper) and second
    (lower) class compart­
    ments. Today the extra
    cents buy access to the
    air-conditioning section
    during the hottest
    months, and afford a
    better view of the city
    and refuge from sea
    spray on choppy days.

    Terminal
    ( Ocean
    Just north of the

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Ferry Routes
    $ Star
    The Star Ferries run four

    Victoria harbour
    is the busiest
    stretch of water
    in Hong Kong,
    teeming with
    activity. Keep
    your eyes peeled
    at the weekend
    for the last remaining batwing
    sailing junk to be
    found in this part
    of China.

    Tsim Sha Tsui terminal,
    Hong Kong’s cruise ships
    dock, including, on occasion, the QE2. Some US
    warships also dock here
    during port calls.

    North
    ) Skyline
    As you approach

    South
    % Skyline
    & Sightseeing
    As you cross Victoria
    Bargain
    Harbour, on the far left
    are the glass and flowing
    lines of the Convention
    Centre (right) in Wanchai
    and above it the 373-m
    (1,223-ft) tower of Central
    Plaza. Further left are the
    Bank of China’s striking
    zig-zags, and the struts
    and spars of the HSBC
    building. The new kid on
    the block is Two International Finance Centre (see
    pp42–3), the island’s tallest skyscraper, towering
    a colossal 420 m (1,378
    ft) above Star Ferry Pier.

    At HK$1.7 to ride on the
    lower deck and HK$2.2
    to ride the top deck, the
    Star Ferry is Hong Kong’s
    best sightseeing bargain.

    Kowloon with Hong Kong
    Island behind you, you’ll
    see the Arts and Cultural
    Centre, closest to the
    shore. Behind it rises the
    grand extension of the
    Peninsula Hotel and the
    tapering tower at No. 1
    Peking Rd. The craggy
    hills of the New Territories
    loom in the background.

    For more ways to get around Hong Kong See p138

    15

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Stanley
    Originally a sleepy fishing haven, Stanley was the
    largest settlement on Hong Kong Island before the
    British moved in. The modern town, hugging the
    southern coast, still makes a peaceful, pleasant
    escape from the bustle of the city. Traffic is minimal,
    and the pace of life relaxed, with plenty of excellent
    places to eat, good beaches and a large market to
    search for clothes, silks and souvenirs. Stanley is also
    the place to glimpse colonial Hong Kong and an
    older Chinese tradition seen at the Tin Hau Temple.
    Top 10 Sights

    Murray Building

    If you hate crowds,
    avoid Stanley at
    weekends when the
    town and market
    become very busy
    and the buses to and
    from Central fill up.
    Sit at the front of the
    top deck of the bus
    to fully appreciate
    the dramatic coast
    road out to Stanley.
    For great al fresco
    dining, El Cid in the
    Murray building
    offers good tapas
    and the best views
    (see p77).
    • Map F6 • Buses 6,
    6A, 6X, 66 or 260 from
    Central • Stanley market
    9am–6pm daily

    16

    Stanley market

    1 Market
    2 Murray House
    3 Old Police Station
    4 Waterfront
    5 Stanley Beach
    6 Tin Hau Temple
    7 War Cemetery
    8 Stanley Fort
    9 St Stephen’s Beach
    0 Pubs and Restaurants

    ! Market
    Reasonably priced

    clothes, shoes and
    accessories as well as
    plenty of tourist tat are
    to be found among Stanley’s pleasant, ramshackle
    market stalls. Although
    it’s not the cheapest or
    best market in Hong Kong,
    you may as well potter
    among the hundred or so
    stalls before heading to a
    café or one of the
    seafront eateries.

    Murray House

    @

    This venerable NeoClassical relic dating from
    1843, originally served as
    British Army quarters on
    the site now occupied by
    the Bank of China Tower
    in Central (see p10). It
    was dismantled and
    reassembled here and
    now houses a number of
    restaurants (right).

    Police Station
    # Old
    The handsome building

    was built in 1859 and is
    Hong Kong’s oldest surviving
    police station building. The
    Japanese used it as a headquarters during World War II.
    Today it houses a restaurant.

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    Tin Hau Temple

    ^ Lined with the

    grimacing statues of
    guards to the sea goddess Tin Hau, the gloomy
    interior of this temple is
    one of the most evocative in Hong Kong. It’s
    also one of the oldest Tin
    Hau temples in the region,
    dating back to 1767.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    sand is perfect for a dip
    and a paddle. It’s the
    venue for the fiercely
    contested dragon boat
    races in June when the
    beach fills with competitors and revellers.

    $ .

    

    
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    makes a pleasant promen­
    ade between the market
    area and Murray House.
    The harbour was once
    home to a busy fleet of
    junks and fishing boats,
    but is now empty.

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    Stanley Beach
    $ Waterfront
    The pretty waterfront % This fine stretch of

    
    $'

    3TANLEY

    Cemetery
    & War
    Most of the graves

    * Stanley
    Fort

    The old British
    army barracks at
    the end of the
    peninsula is now
    occupied by the
    Chinese People’s
    Liberation Army
    (closed to public).

    Stephen’s
    and
    ( St
    ) Pubs
    Beach
    Restaurants
    Another good stretch
    of sand, St Stephen’s
    is also the place for
    sailing and canoeing.
    The small pier is the
    departure point for the
    Sunday boat bound
    for the remote island
    of Po Toi (see p114).

    One of Stanley’s best attractions is its excellent range of
    restaurants and bars (see
    p77). A host of eateries, from
    Italian to Vietnamese, are lined
    along Stanley Main Road, facing the sea, many with outdoor seating. Murray House
    also contains good restaurants.

    are the resting place of
    residents who died
    during World War II.
    Others date back to early
    colonial days, when many
    settlers, young and old,
    succumbed to a range of
    tropical illnesses.

    The War Dead
    After Japan overran
    Hong Kong in 1941
    (see p74), captured
    civilians suffered for
    three years under a
    regime of neglect,
    starvation and torture.
    The remains of
    thousands of servicemen and civilians who
    died here during the
    war are buried at
    Stanley cemetery.

    17

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Temple Street Night Market
    Beneath the bleaching glare of a thousand naked light
    bulbs, tourists and locals alike pick their way among the
    stalls crowding the narrow lanes of Yau Ma Tei’s Temple
    Street. The overwhelming array of cheap goods includes
    clothes, shoes, accessories, designer fakes, copy CDs, brica-brac and a generous helping of junk. Prices here may
    be a bit higher than in Shenzhen, just over the Chinese
    border or in some of Hong Kong’s less well-known
    markets, but Temple Street is unbeatable for atmosphere.

    Silk jacket

    Top 10 Sights

    Browsing shoppers

    A good way to tackle
    the night market is
    to start at the top by
    taking the MTR to
    Yau Ma Tei and walk
    south from Portland
    Street. This way
    you’ll end up closer
    to the restaurants,
    hotels and bars of
    Tsim Sha Tsui when
    you’ve finished
    shopping.
    Snack at the dai pai
    dongs (street stalls).
    • Map M1–2 • The
    market opens at 4pm
    but really gets going
    after 7pm and goes on
    until as late as midnight.

    1 Fortune Tellers
    2 Canto Opera Street
    Performers
    3 Dai Pai Dong
    4 Reclamation St Canteens
    5 Best Watches
    6 Best Clothes
    7 Best Leather Goods
    8 Best Shoes
    9 Best Accessories
    0 Best Knick-knacks

    ! Fortune
    Tellers

    A dozen fortune tellers
    operate around the
    junction of Temple and
    Market streets. Most are
    face and palm readers.
    The caged white finches
    are trained to pick a fortune card from the pack
    in return for some seeds.

    Opera
    @ Canto
    Street Performers

    On some evenings musicians and singers perform
    popular Cantonese Opera
    numbers next door to the
    fortune tellers.

    Pai Dong
    £ Dai
    Tighter health regulations

    have made dai pai dong food
    stalls a rare sight, but they are
    alive and well at Temple Street,
    selling a variety of Chinese
    snacks, savoury pancakes,
    fishballs, seafood kebabs and
    unspecified meat offerings.

    18

    For more markets See pp38–9

    $ Reclamation
    St Canteens

    Haggling

    Clothes
    ^ Best
    Amid the naff and

    poly-fabric horrors (beware
    naked flames), good buys
    include cheap t-shirts,
    elaborate silks, beaded
    tops and cotton dresses.
    Have a look at the stall
    on the corner of Kansu St.
    Further down, tailored
    trousers can be ordered
    with a four-day turnaround.

    Leather
    & Best
    Goods

    Leather is not really
    Temple Street’s strong
    point. But belts are
    cheap, and there are
    plenty of leather
    handbags and shoulder
    bags, including fake
    Gucci, Elle and Burberry
    items. Some are more
    convincing than others.

    Remember, prices given
    are mostly starting points
    and the mark-ups are
    significant. The merchandise here is far cheaper
    in China, so haggle hard
    (but do it with a smile),
    and remember the vendor is making a profit
    whatever price you both
    agree on. Begin below
    half the asking price and
    you should be able to
    knock 50% off many
    items, and often a good
    deal more.

    ( Best
    Accessories

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    If you haven’t had
    your fill from the dai
    pai dong, try the
    cheap noodles and
    rice-based food at
    the covered stalls
    on Reclamation
    Street. Don’t mind your
    neighbour’s table
    manners, it’s the done
    thing to drop or spit
    gristle and bone onto the
    table-tops here.

    Cheap sunglasses are
    easy to find in the
    market. Embroidered and
    beaded handbags and
    shoulder bags are also
    worth looking out for.

    * Best
    Shoes

    From the very cheap flip
    flops to the reasonable
    suede or leather shoes,
    bargain footwear is
    available almost
    everywhere on Temple
    Street, although the
    variety is not huge and
    the styles not that
    elegant. Don’t forget to
    check the shops behind
    the stalls. A few stalls
    sell designer fakes.

    Best Watches

    Knick-knacks
    ) Best
    Mao memorabilia,

    old posters, coins, opium
    pipes and jade are found
    on Public Square Street.
    Temple Street’s northern
    extremity is rich in kitsch
    plastic Japanese cartoon
    merchandise, including
    Hello Kitty clocks, Afro
    Ken and Pokémon.

    %

    It’s likely to be a
    decent timekeeper but
    with no guarantees. The
    local makes and Western
    fakes are usually good
    value for money. One stall
    offers genuine,
    secondhand watches.

    19

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Heritage Museum
    Hong Kong’s newest museum, on the outskirts
    of Sha Tin in the New Territories, is by far its
    best (although the revamped History Museum
    in Kowloon is also worth a visit). Opened in
    2000, the Heritage Museum covers the culture,
    arts and natural history of Hong Kong and the
    New Territories. Exciting audio-visual exhibits
    and a good interactive section for children
    make for a fun day out.
    Top 10 Features

    Museum entrance

    Combine a visit to
    the museum with a
    trip to the races at
    Sha Tin if you can
    (see p101).

    1 Architecture and Design
    2 Orientation Theatre
    3 Children’s Discovery
    Gallery
    4 Cantonese Opera Hall
    5 Thematic Exhibitions
    6 Chao Shao-an Gallery
    7 Courtyard
    8 New Territories Culture
    9 New Territories History
    0 TT Tsui Gallery

    Admission to the
    Heritage Museum is
    free on Wednesdays.
    There is a small
    café and gift shop
    in the lobby.
    • Map E3 • 1 Man Lam
    Road, Sha Tin, New
    Territories • 2180 8188
    • KCR East to Tai Wai,
    then bus 30K or 38K
    • Free shuttle bus from
    Sha Tin KCR Sat & Sun
    pm only • www.heritage
    museum.gov.hk
    • 10am–6pm Mon,
    Wed–Sat, 10am–7pm
    Sun & public hols
    • Adm HK$10

    # Children’s
    Discovery Gallery

    The brightly coloured gallery
    is a vibrant, fun way to
    introduce children to local
    nature and archaeology, and
    the history of toys. Interactive
    exhibits and the child-size 3-D
    models are very popular with
    young children.

    Theatre
    @ Orientation
    For a brief overview of

    the museum, visit the Orientation Theatre on the ground
    floor opposite the ticket
    office. A short film in
    English and Cantonese
    (in rotation) explains
    5
    the exhibits and
    the main aims
    6
    of the
    5
    museum.

    5

    5

    ! Architecture
    and Design

    The Heritage Museum building
    is based on the traditional
    Chinese si he yuan style,
    built around a courtyard.
    The style is still visible in
    the walled villages of the
    New Territories (see p104).

    Key

    20

    Photograph of Tai O in 1966




    Ground
    floor



    floor
    1st




    2nd
    floor

    7

    3
    2
    1

    Exhibitions
    % Thematic
    Five halls on the first and second

    subject. However, the sumptuous
    costumes, intricate stage sets
    and snatches of song from
    the elaborate operas of
    Guangdong and Guanxi
    go some way to
    illustrating the
    attraction.

    0

    Shao^ Chao
    an Gallery

    The delicate ink on
    scroll paintings of
    artist and one-time
    Hong Kong resident
    Chao Shao-an are
    known far beyond
    China. There are
    dozens of fine
    examples in the
    gallery (left).

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Opera Hall
    $ Cantonese
    Cantonese opera is an obscure

    floors house temporary exhibitions
    focusing on subjects varying from
    popular culture, contemporary art and
    social issues in Hong Kong, to traditional
    Chinese art and history.

    5

    89

    4

    Territo* New
    ries Culture

    Large mock-ups of old
    maritime and village
    scenes (below) recreate
    the pre-colonial days. The
    growth of the new
    towns, such as Sha Tin,
    are also covered.

    5

    Territories
    ( New
    History

    The rich fauna and flora
    of the region are exhibited
    along with 6000-year-old
    artifacts from the early
    days of human habitation
    in Hong Kong.

    Tsui Gallery
    ) TT
    The works of art

    dating from Neolithic
    times to the 20th century
    include porcelain, bronze,
    jade and stone artifacts,
    furniture, laquerware and
    Tibetan religious statues.

    & Courtyard
    For fresh air and

    interesting surroundings,
    head to the shaded
    courtyard (above) in the
    centre of the complex.

    Hong Kong’s
    Earliest Settlers
    The New Territories
    History hall tells the
    scant story of Hong
    Kong’s original inhabitants. Bronze Age
    people left behind axe
    and arrowheads in
    various parts of the
    territory more than
    4,000 years ago, along
    with some mysterious
    rock carvings. Excavations on Lamma Island
    have turned up artifacts
    from an older Stone
    Age civilisation, dating
    back about 6,000 years.

    21

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Tai Long Wan Coastline
    Although only a few miles from urban Hong Kong, the remote, pristine beaches on the eastern edge of the rugged
    Sai Kung Peninsula seem like another country. There is no
    rail link and few roads, so you will have to make an early
    start, taking a bus to Sai Kung town, another bus to Pak
    Tam Au, then walk the hilly 4-mile (6-km) footpath to the
    beach. Alternatively, hire a junk. The reward for your effort
    will be glorious surf, delightful
    Bridge from Ham Tin
    hidden pools and shaded cafés.
    village

    Top 10 Sights

    Ham Tin beach

    Buy the HKTB’s
    Sai Kung Explorer’s
    Guide for its
    detailed map and
    information.
    The only eating
    options are beach
    cafés, or you can
    stock up for a picnic
    at Sai Kung town.
    • Map G3 • Take the
    frequent 92 bus from
    Diamond Hill KCR
    terminating at Sai Kung
    town, then the halfhourly 94 bus (or 96R on
    Sun) to Pak Tam Au.
    Allow about 90 minutes
    from Kowloon or Central
    to the start of the path,
    plus at least an hour
    each way to hike to and
    from the beach
    • Daily junk hire from
    HK$3000, see Yellow
    Pages for listings

    22

    1 Beaches
    2 Natural Swimming Pools
    3 Beach Cafés
    4 Ham Tin to Tai Long Path
    5 Surf Action
    6 Pleasure Junks
    7 Hakka Fisherfolk
    8 Campsite
    9 Sharp Peak
    0 Ham Tin Bridge

    ! Beaches
    There are three

    excellent beaches at Tai
    Long Wan. Tai Wan is the
    most remote and
    unspoiled; the smallest
    beach, Ham Tin, has a
    good café and camping
    area; Tai Long Sai Wan is
    the busiest.

    @ Natural
    Swimming Pools

    A lovely series of waterfalls
    and natural swimming pools
    (left) is the area’s best-kept
    secret. Reach them from the
    path running alongside the
    small river at the northwestern
    end of Tai Long Sai Wan beach.

    Beach Cafés

    #

    Noodles, fried rice and
    hot and cold drinks are
    available from the modest,
    reasonably priced cafés on
    Tai Long Sai Wan and the
    Hoi Fung café at Ham Tin.

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    $

    Take the steep halfmile (1-km) path
    between Ham Tin and
    Tai Long Sai Wan for
    lovely views down onto
    Ham Tin, Tai Wan and
    the mountains behind.

    % Tai Wan usually has
    reasonably good surf.
    Gentle body-boarding
    should always be
    possible, and you may
    even be able to surf
    properly when storms
    raise bigger swells.

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    ^ Pleasure
    Junks

    Most privately hired
    junks drop anchor at Tai
    Long Sai Wan, and their
    passengers head to the
    beach in smaller craft,
    making this the busiest
    of the three beaches.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Ham Tin to Tai
    Long Path

    Fisherfolk
    & Hakka
    Tai Long village

    Campsite

    (above) may have been
    first settled in prehistoric
    times. It was a thriving
    Hakka fishing village until
    the 1950s, when most
    people migrated to the
    city or abroad. A few
    elderly residents remain.

    *

    The area just east
    of Ham Tin village is
    the best place for
    overnight campers
    (right), with flat ground,
    public toilets and a
    stream for fresh water.
    There are no hotels.

    The Route Out

    Peak
    Ham Tin Bridge
    ( Sharp
    The prominent 468-m ) If you want to keep
    (1,497-ft) summit of Sharp
    Peak is clearly visible
    from Ham Tin and Tai
    Wan. The arduous climb
    up its very steep slopes
    rewards with spectacular
    views over the peninsula.

    your feet dry, the only
    way onto the beach from
    Ham Tin village is via a
    rickety bridge. Marvel at
    the makeshift engineering from nailed-together
    driftwood and offcuts.

    A good route out of Tai
    Long Wan is the lovely,
    scenic path heading
    southwest from Sai
    Wan village, winding in
    gentle gradients around
    the edge of High Island
    Reservoir. Once you hit
    the main road outside
    Pak Tam Chung, you’ve
    a good chance of picking up a bus or taxi back
    into Sai Kung town.

    23

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Cheung Chau Island
    This tiny, charming island, a half-hour ferry ride west of
    Hong Kong, makes a great escape from the heat and hassles of the city, except maybe at weekends when everyone
    else has the same idea. The sense of an older, traditional
    Hong Kong is pervasive among the narrow streets, tiny
    shops and temples of this old pirate and fishing haven.
    It’s possible to see most of the island in a day, and there
    are some lovely secluded walks. The seafood is cheap and
    Lion, Pak Tai Temple
    there are small but excellent stretches of beach.
    Top 10 Sights

    Cheung Chau harbour

    To really nip around
    the island, hire a
    bicycle from opposite
    the basketball courts
    close to Pak Tai
    Temple.
    Look out for Cheung
    Chau’s miniature fire
    engine and ambulance (see p116).
    If you’ve had your fill
    of seafood, try
    Morocco’s (2986
    9767), by the ferry
    pier, which serves
    decent Indian, Thai
    and Western (but not
    Moroccan) fare in
    the evenings.
    • Map C6 • Daily ferries
    hourly or half-hourly
    from Outlying Islands
    ferry piers

    24

    1 Pak Tai Temple
    2 Harbour
    3 Venerable Banyan Tree
    4 Tung Wan Beach
    5 “The Peak”
    6 Pirates Cave
    7 Windsurfing Centre
    8 Boatbuilding Yard
    9 Seafood Restaurants
    0 Ancient Rock Carving

    Tai Temple
    ! Pak
    This recently renova-

    ted temple is dedicated to
    Pak Tai, Cheung Chau’s
    patron deity who is credited with saving islanders
    from plague. The temple is
    the centre for the annual
    bun festival celebrations
    (see p36), when mounds
    of buns are piled up to be
    offered to resident ghosts.
    The festival dates from the
    time of plagues in the 19th
    century, which were
    considered to be the
    vengeance of those killed
    by local pirates.

    @ Harbour
    Although Hong

    # Venerable
    Banyan Tree

    On Tung Wan Road is a tree
    (below) that is thought to be
    the source of Cheung Chau’s
    good fortune. It is so revered
    by islanders that in recent
    years a restaurant opposite
    was knocked down instead
    of the tree to make way for
    a road extension.

    Kong’s fishing
    industry has dwindled
    from its heyday,
    plenty of commercial
    fishing boats still
    operate from Cheung
    Chau’s typhoon
    shelter. Cheap cycle
    hire is available along
    the waterfront.

    For more about Cheung Chau’s bun festival See p36


    

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    Peak”
    % “The
    A walk up the hill

    along Don Bosco and
    Peak roads will take
    you past some lovely
    old colonial houses
    and beautiful sea
    views. The cemetery
    on Peak Road has especially fine vistas.

    5$
    <$
    

    6 7 

    The island’s finest
    beach is on the east
    coast, 150 m (500
    ft) from the west
    coast’s ferry pier
    (above). It is tended
    by lifeguards and
    has a shark net.

    3

    6+(

    Wan
    $ Tung
    Beach

    

    3$ .

    3$ .6 + (

    

    Cave
    ^ Pirates
    The place where a

    19th-century buccaneer
    Cheung Po-tsai supposedly stashed his booty,
    this “cave” is more of a
    hole or crevice. Take a
    torch to explore. The sea
    views nearby are lovely.

    & Windsurfing
    Centre
    Yard
    * Boatbuilding
    At the harbour’s nor-

    thern end is a busy yard
    where junks are built and
    nets mended. Look out for
    the slabs of ice sliding
    along the overhead chute,
    down a mini-helter-skelter
    and onto the boats.

    ( Seafood
    Restaurants

    If you want to dine on
    fish or shellfish, there’s
    plenty of choice along the
    seafront on She Praya
    Road north and south of
    the ferry pier. The restaurants are cheaper than
    other seafood centres
    such as Lamma. Choose
    from the live tanks (above).

    Rock
    ) Ancient
    Carving

    In the Hong Kong region
    are several rock carvings
    in close proximity to the
    sea. Cheung Chau has
    one facing the sea just
    below the Warwick Hotel.
    Nothing is known of the
    people who carved these
    shapes about 3,000
    years ago.

    The family of Olympic
    gold-medalist Lee LaiShan operates the
    windsurfing centre and
    café near Tung Wan.

    Paths and Walks
    A footpath weaves
    around the southern
    edge of the island,
    taking in clifftop
    walks and a small Tin
    Hau Temple at the
    tiny Moring Beach.
    Heading southwest
    from here will take
    you along Peak Road
    past the cemetery to
    Sai Wan’s small
    harbour. From here
    you can take a sampan shuttle back to
    the ferry pier at
    Cheung Chau village.

    Following pages The Big Buddha at Po Lin, Lantau

    25

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery
    Once a humble house built by three monks to worship
    Buddha, Po Lin Monastery on Lantau Island is now a
    large and important temple. Its crowning glory, the giant
    Buddha statue facing the monastery, is an object of
    veneration for devotees and one of Hong Kong’s most
    popular tourist sights. The statue dominates the area
    from a plinth reached by more than 260 steps. On a
    clear day, the view across the valleys, reservoirs and
    Main courtyard
    peaks of Lantau makes the climb worthwhile.
    Top 10 Sights

    View of the Big Buddha

    If you can face an
    early start, stay
    overnight at the Hong
    Kong Bank Foun­­­dation S G Davis
    Hostel (2985 5610)
    close to the Tea Gar­dens and rise before
    dawn to see the sun­rise from the summit
    of nearby Lantau Peak.
    If you don’t fancy the
    cheap vegetarian
    food available inside
    the temple, take a
    picnic and wander
    the nearby footpaths
    for a good spot.
    • Map B5 • MTR to Tung
    Chung, then No. 23 bus,
    or No. 2 bus from
    Lantau Island’s Mui Wo
    ferry terminal
    • Monastery: 9am–6pm
    daily; Big Buddha:10am–
    6pm daily • Free

    1 The Big Buddha
    2 Monastery
    3 Tea Gardens
    4 Vegetarian Restaurants
    5 Great Hall
    6 Bodhisattvas
    7 Relic Inside the Buddha
    8 Footpath Down to Tung
    Chung
    9 Monks and Nuns
    0 Temple Gateway

    Big Buddha
    ! The
    Standing a lofty 26 m

    (85 ft) high, this mighty
    bronze statue is among
    the largest seated
    Buddha images in the
    world. The statue, which
    was cast in more than
    220 pieces, sits on a
    throne of lotus – the Buddhist symbol of purity.

    @ Monastery
    Attracted by its

    seclusion, Buddhist monks
    began arriving on Lantau in
    the early 20th century. The
    Po Lin or “precious lotus”
    monastery really developed
    as a place for pilgrimage in
    the 1920s when the Great
    Hall was built and the first
    abbot appointed.

    Gardens
    £ Tea
    The Tea Gardens just

    west of the Buddha statue
    boast their own modest tea
    plantation. The café sells tea
    leaves from the bushes and
    makes a pleasant shaded
    place to enjoy a drink or
    cheap Chinese meal away
    from the crowds.

    28

    For other sights on Lantau See pp112–17

    Hall
    % Great
    The main temple houses

    $

    Meal tickets for three
    good-value restaurants
    are sold at the entrance
    to the Buddha statue
    (they also allow access
    to the displays inside the
    Buddha). The vegetarian
    food includes convincing
    mock meat dishes.

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    ^ Bodhisattvas
    On each side of

    the staircase are statues
    of Buddhist saints.
    They are venerated for
    deferring heaven in order
    to help mortals reach
    enlightenment. Throw a
    coin into their cupped
    hands for luck.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Vegetarian
    Restaurants

    three large golden Buddha
    images. Don’t miss the
    ceiling paintings, the
    elaborate friezes
    around the exterior
    and the elegant lotus- 7DL2
    shaped floor tiles.

    .GONGŽ0ING

    Inside the
    & Relic
    Buddha

    Down to
    * Footpath
    Tung Chung

    Walk back down to Tung
    Chung MTR via the lovely
    4-mile (7-km) wooded path
    through the Tung Chung
    Valley. You will pass some
    small monasteries including
    Lo Hon, which serves cheap
    vegetarian lunches.

    Monks and
    Nuns

    (

    You may glimpse the
    grey-robed, shavenheaded nuns and
    monks at prayers in
    the old temple
    behind the main one.
    Entry is forbidden to
    tourists during the
    3pm prayers.

    ) Temple
    Gateway

    Guarded by twin lions,
    the temple gateway is
    said to replicate the
    southern gate to
    Buddhist heaven.
    As found elsewhere in
    the temple, the
    gateway is
    decorated
    with reverse
    swastikas,
    which is the
    holy sign of
    Buddhism.
    The three
    Chinese
    characters
    at the top
    read “Po Lin
    Monastery”.

    A sacred relic of the real
    Buddha (a tooth in a crys­tal container) is enshrined
    within the Buddha image,
    but is difficult to make
    out. Below the statue is
    a display about the life of
    the Buddha and his path
    to enlightenment.

    Falun Gong at the
    Big Buddha
    In 2000, during an
    official meeting on the
    mainland, Po Lin’s abbot
    spoke out against the
    Falun Gong, the semireligious sect that’s out­lawed and repressed in
    China. As a result, local
    members of the so-called
    “evil cult” held a big dem­onstration near the Big
    Buddha, protesting that
    their promotion of phy­sical and spiritual health
    through tai-chi style
    exercises is not evil.

    29

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Colonial view Centre Chinese refugees at border, 1950 Right Last governor, Chris Patten

    Moments in History
    BC: Early Peoples
    ! 4000
    For many years, the

    Britain continue to fight over
    other Chinese trading cities.
    The 1842 Treaty of Nanking
    cedes Hong Kong Island to
    Britain.

    popular version of history was
    that Hong Kong was a
    “barren rock” devoid of
    people when the British
    arrived. In fact, archaeology
    1860: Land Claim
    19th-century
    pirate
    now shows that scattered
    The good times are
    primitive clans had settled by
    rolling in Hong Kong, where
    the seaside on Hong Kong Island
    the population has now swelled
    and the New Territories six
    to more than 86,000. The island
    millennia ago. Their diet was not
    is becoming cramped, however,
    politically correct by today’s
    and after a series of further
    standards: bone fragments show
    skirmishes between Britain and
    they liked to eat dolphin.
    China, the Kowloon Peninsula
    and Stonecutter’s Island are
    AD 1127: Local Clans
    ceded to Britain.
    When marauding Mongols
    drive the Song dynasty emperor’s
    1898: The 99-Year Lease
    family out of the imperial capital
    Britain digs in, turning Hong
    of Kaifeng, one princess escapes
    Kong into a mighty fort. Lyemun
    to the walled village of Kam Tin
    at the eastern end of the island
    in the New Territories, where she
    bristles with guns and the world’s
    marries into the powerful Tang clan.
    first wire-guided torpedo. Breath­ing space and water supplies are
    1841: The British
    assured when on July 1, the 99Take Hong Kong Island
    year lease of the New Territories
    In a decisive move during the First
    is signed in Peking.
    Opium War between China and
    Britain, Captain Charles Elliot of
    1941: Japanese
    the British Royal Navy lands on
    Occupation
    Hong Kong Island and plants the
    Hong Kong has guns
    Union Jack on January 25. The
    galore defending the
    8,000-odd locals seem to take it
    sea, but the Japanese
    in their stride, but China and

    $

    @

    %

    £

    ^

    Left Japanese soldiers captured by the British, 1945 Right View of downtown Hong Kong, 1950s

    30

    Top 10 Movers and
    Shakers
    Alvares
    ! Jorge
    In 1513 the Portuguese

    come by land. They have little
    trouble breaching the aptly named
    Gin Drinkers Line – a motley
    string of pillboxes. Hong Kong is
    surrendered two days before
    Christmas, beginning a brutal
    three-year occupation.

    Economic Miracle
    & 1950:
    The territory’s economic

    miracle begins to unfold, as
    incoming refugees from China
    provide an eager workforce, and
    British rule keeps things on an
    even keel. Hong Kong’s transfor­mation into a manufacturing
    centre begins.

    Handover Agreed
    * 1984:
    The Sino-British Joint Decla­-

    ration is promulgated, after years
    of secret talks between Margaret
    Thatcher and Deng Xiaoping. Deng
    coins the phrase “one country,
    two systems” to quell fears.

    Handover
    ( 1997:
    Handover night on 30 June

    is widely regarded as an anticlimax after years of anticipation.
    The media focuses on soggy
    Union Jacks, last governor Chris
    Patten’s tears, Prince Charles and
    his yacht, and Jiang Zemin’s
    triumphant toast. The following
    dawn sees armoured cars rolling
    across the border.

    Financial Crisis
    ) 1998:
    Asia’s economic “tigers” are

    humbled as years of living on
    borrowed money finally take their
    toll. Hong Kong is not as badly
    hit as some countries, but the
    financial crisis bites nonetheless.

    navigator Alvares becomes
    the first European to visit
    Hong Kong.

    Po-tsai
    @ Cheung
    The Lantau-based pirate

    king Cheung Po-Tsai wreaks
    havoc with international
    traders in 1810.

    Zexu
    # Lin
    Commissioner Lin Zexu

    is appointed by China in 1839,
    with the task of ending the
    trade in imported opium.

    $ Captain
    Charles Elliot

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Chinese soldiers, morning after Handover

    Flag-planter Captain Charles
    Elliot claims Hong Kong Island
    for Britain in 1841.

    Henry Pottinger
    % Sir
    Pottinger becomes Hong

    Kong’s first governor. He turns
    a blind eye to illicit shipments
    of opium.

    Sun Yat-sen
    ^ Dr
    The reformer blasts China

    as “chaotic and corrupt”
    during a lecture at Hong Kong
    University in 1923. Economic
    boycott of the colony follows.

    Isogai
    & Rensuke
    In 1941 the military com­mander begins his barbaric
    reign as Japan’s wartime
    governor of Hong Kong.

    Xiaoping
    * Deng
    The Chinese premier

    sticks to his principles during
    Handover talks in 1984.

    Patten
    ( Chris
    Lachrymose last governor
    Chris Patten waves goodbye
    to Hong Kong in 1997.

    Chee-hwa
    ) Tung
    The shipping magnate

    Tung Chee-hwa takes Hong
    Kong’s helm after Handover.

    31

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Traditional tonics Centre Junk Right Tai chi

    Ways to Experience the Real China
    a Night
    ! Spend
    at the Opera

    a Market
    $ Visit
    Hong Kong’s wet

    Cantonese opera might
    markets can bring on
    sound like discordant
    instant culture shock for
    screeching to the
    those tourists who are
    untrained ear, but make
    more used to the
    no mistake, this is a
    orderly atmosphere of
    fine and ancient art. It
    supermarkets. Tiptoe
    combines song, mime,
    through rivers of blood,
    dancing, martial arts
    past gizzards and buzz­and fantastic costumes
    ing flies as hawkers yell
    Operatic figures
    and make-up and can
    and housewives bargain.
    go on for six hours or more. Call
    the HKTB (see p139) for details
    Go for a
    of performances.
    Traditional Tonic
    For a taste of the real China, try
    Ride on a Junk
    a tonic restaurant. Chefs whip
    We’ve all seen that iconic
    up dishes with all sorts of herbs
    image of the junk, blood-red bat­and spices, in accordance with
    wing sails unfurled as the sun sets
    the principles of “heating” or
    over Victoria Harbour. Unfortunately,
    “cooling” foods. A tonic lunch at
    it’s usually the same boat. �The
    the Treasure Inn Seafood
    Duk Ling is one of the few masted
    Restaurant includes fried
    sailing junks left. d Free trips depart
    snowfrog and bamboo fungi. d

    %

    @

    from Queen’s Pier, Central, 3pm &
    5pm Thu, 11am & 1pm Sat; and from
    Kowloon Public Pier, Tsim Sha Tsui,
    2pm & 4pm Thu, 10am &12 noon Sat
    • Advance booking advisable •
    2508 1234

    2/F Western Market, 323 Des Voeux Rd,
    Sheung Wan • Map J4 • 2850 7780 • $$

    Foot
    ^ Try
    Reflexology

    Vice-like hands seek out
    pressure points linked
    to vital organs. The
    procedure is painful,
    and you might be
    embarrassed about your
    feet, but you will feel
    so good when they
    stop. Reflexologists
    abound in Happy Valley.
    Try On Wo Tong. d1/F

    on Dim Sum
    # Feast
    Dim sum is

    commonly translated as
    “touch the heart”,
    although in some
    establishments it may
    also touch your wallet.
    The small steamed
    snacks in bamboo
    baskets are delivered
    by grumpy old ladies
    with trolleys.

    32

    Dim sum

    Lai Shing Bldg, 13–19 Sing
    Woo Rd (and three other
    branches) • 2893 0199

    For 10 favourite dim sum appetizers See p51

    Top 10 Ways to
    Pamper Yourself
    Bout
    ! Spa-ing
    Check into the Peninsula

    Aim for
    Everything Zen

    &

    For a modern take on ancient
    China, check out the Chi Lin
    Nunnery in Kowloon. This
    gorgeous replica of a seven-hall
    Tang Dynasty (AD 618–907)
    complex took 10 years to build,
    using traditional techniques and
    materials. Bliss out as stubbleheaded nuns chant to the
    Sakyamuni Buddha (see p96).

    * Experience
    Unbelievable Gall

    She Wong Lam in the northeast
    of Hong Kong Island is the place
    to sup on snake wine, a
    traditional winter tonic. The
    speciality is a fiery brew
    containing the gall bladders of
    five deadly snakes. d Hillier St,
    Sheung Wan • Map K5 • 2543 8032

    a
    ( Watch
    Lion Dance

    Lions are thought to ward off evil
    and bring luck, which explains
    why the opening of a new
    building often features a troupe
    of wiry youths prancing about
    beneath a stylised lion’s head.
    Common around Chinese New
    Year (see p36).

    Tai Chi
    ) Practise
    Turn up at the clocktower

    (see p83) near the Star Ferry in
    Tsim Sha Tsui at 8am on
    Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and
    you can enjoy an hour’s free
    instruction in this gentlest of
    martial arts. d Map M4

    the Right Way
    @ Rubbed
    Go for a deep-tissue
    Chinese massage and get the
    blood circulating. d On Wo
    Tong (see Reflexology entry)

    of Fresh Air
    # Breath
    Beat the pollution and

    enjoy the buzz at Oxyvital’s
    Central “oxygen bar”.

    a Lather
    $ InA Shanghai-style
    shave at

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Chinese New Year Right Market produce

    for a stress-busting retreat at
    th brand new ESPA spa. d
    2920 2888

    the Mandarin Oriental will
    leave your face feeling like a
    baby’s bottom. d 2825 4800

    Potion No. 9
    % Love
    Boost your staying power

    with a tonic drink from one of
    the many kerbside Chinese
    medicine shops.

    ^ Geomancing
    the Stone

    Make sure your house and
    garden are in tune with the
    elements with a private feng
    shui consultation. d Raymond
    Lo 2736 9568

    and Needles
    & Pins
    Loosen up with an

    acupuncture session. d On
    Wo Tong (see Reflexology entry)

    * Plateau
    Splash out at the Grand
    Hyatt’s 11th-floor spa with
    outdoor pool. d 2588 1234

    Your Feet Up
    ( Put
    Fans rave about the

    traditional Shanghai pedicure
    at the Mandarin Oriental.
    d 2825 4800

    Doctor Is In
    ) The
    Try some alternative

    medicine from a traditional
    Chinese doctor. d Dr Troy Sing
    2526 7908

    For Hong Kong’s best markets See pp38–9

    33

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Chinese fisherman Right Schoolgirls

    Peoples and Cultures in Hong Kong

    $ Portuguese
    In the Pearl River Delta since

    Chinese chequers

    ! Chinese
    With a history of revolution,

    migration, organized crime and
    incessant trading, the witty and
    streetwise Cantonese are the
    New Yorkers of China, and make
    up the majority of Hong Kong’s
    population. There are also large
    communities of Shanghainese,
    Hakka (Kejia) and Chiu Chow
    (Chaozhou) people.

    @ British
    Colonial power may have

    vanished, but a large British
    population remains, including a
    small but influential community
    of native-born. Influences are
    everywhere, from street names
    (“Lambeth Walk”, “Rutland
    Quadrant”) to school blazers.

    # Eurasian
    The traditional role of this

    community of mixed European
    and Asian descent – as cultural
    and commercial brokers between
    East and West – remains undiminished. If anyone can claim to
    truly embody Hong Kong’s
    intriguing duality, it is this young,
    wealthy and internationallyminded community.

    34

    the arrival of traders in the 16th
    century, the Portuguese have
    inter-married extensively with the
    Cantonese. Aside from a clutch
    of surnames (da Silva, Sequeira,
    Remedios), a lasting influence
    has been the fostering of an
    addiction to egg tarts and pastries.

    % Indian
    The history of Hong Kong’s

    substantial Indian population
    (there are Hindus, Muslims and
    Sikhs) dates from the arrival of
    the British in 1841. Like the
    Eurasians, young Indians have
    rejected purely Western or Asian
    notions of identity, pioneering
    instead a synthesis of both.

    ^ Jewish
    Hong Kong has one of the

    oldest Jewish communities in
    east Asia, producing patrician
    business dynasties (the Sassoons,
    the Kadoories) and one of the
    most colourful colonial governors
    (Sir Matthew Nathan, 1903–1906).

    Top 10 Patois and
    Lingo in Hong Kong

    ! Chinglish
    The local patois, which
    Indian residents, Victoria Peak

    Russian

    & A few now elderly descen-

    dants are all that is left of the
    former émigré community. Hong
    Kong’s White Russians were
    once numerous, and you still find
    borsch on the menu of every
    takeaway and coffee shop.

    Chinese
    * Overseas
    The surging growth in

    British-, American- and Canadianborn Chinese (nicknamed BBCs,
    ABCs and CBCs respectively)
    has been a characteristic of the
    last two decades, as the welleducated children of emigrants
    return in search of roots and
    white-collar work.

    Filipino

    ( Most members of the largest
    ethnic minority stoically perform
    the low-paid occupations that
    Hong Kongers shun, working as
    domestic servants, drivers, waiting staff and bar room
    musicians, and remitting most of
    their income back home to the
    Philippines. Filipinas promenade
    in their thousands every Sunday
    at Statue Square (see p11).

    ) Australian
    Working mostly in business

    and the media, the size of this
    community is reflected in the
    fact that it boasts the largest
    Australian Chamber of Commerce
    outside of Australia, and one of
    only two Australian International
    Schools in the world.

    @ Portuguese
    Many borrowings,

    including praya (waterfront
    road), joss (a corruption of
    deus, or god) and amah (maid).

    # Anglo-Indian/Persian
    Several words, including

    shroff (cashier), nullah
    (channel or watercourse) and
    tiffin (lunch).

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    freely uses sinicized English
    words like sahmunjee (sandwich), bahsee (bus), lumbah
    (number) and kayleem (cream).

    Lei Tau
    $ Mo
    The impenetrable slang

    used by young Cantonese.
    Based on surreal and seemingly nonsensical phrasing.

    % “Jaihng”
    All-purpose slang term

    meaning “cool”, “excellent”.
    (As used in the Hollywood
    film Wayne’s World.)

    Mehr Liu?”
    ^ “Yau
    Translates roughly as

    “What’s your talent?” but
    used as a streetwise
    greeting; a bit like “what’s
    up?” or “wassup?”

    & “Godown”
    Hong Kong English for

    warehouse or storage facility;
    a contraction of “go put your
    load down”.

    Tangos”
    * “Whiskey
    Hong Kong police slang
    for “white trash”.

    ( “Aiyah!”
    The universal exclamation

    of disappointment, surprise or
    regret.

    ) “Ah-”
    Prefix added to names

    when denoting affection, as in
    “Ah-Timothy”, “Ah-Belinda”.

    35

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Flowers for Chinese New Year Centre Bun Festival Right Dragon Dance, Tin Hau

    Festivals and Events
    offerings to Tin Hau, the goddess
    of the sea, hoping for fine weather and full nets. (Her views on
    overfishing and dragnetting
    aren’t clear.) Try the temples at
    Stanley, Joss House Bay or Tin
    Hau Temple Road. d The 23rd day of
    the 3rd moon (Apr)
    Fireworks, Chinese New Year

    New Year
    ! Chinese
    Hong Kong’s most celebrated

    festival is a riot of neon and noise.
    Skyscrapers on both sides of the
    harbour are lit up to varying degrees depending on the vicissitudes
    of the economy, fireworks explode
    over the harbour, shops shut down
    and doormen suddenly turn nice,
    hoping for a handout of lai see
    (lucky money). d Three days from the
    first day of the first moon, usually late Jan
    or early Feb

    Lantern
    @ Spring
    (Yuen Siu) Festival

    Also known as Chinese Valentine’s
    Day, this festival marks the end
    of the traditional Lunar New Year
    celebrations. Canoodling couples
    take to the parks under the gentle
    glow of lanterns and peeping Tom
    arrests surge. d The 15th day of the
    lunar calendar (end Feb)

    Hau
    # Tin
    Festival

    This is the big one if
    you make your living
    from the sea.
    Fishermen make
    floral paper

    36

    Chau Bun Festival
    $ Cheung
    Talk about a bunfight. Young

    men used to scale 8-m (26-ft)
    towers covered in buns until in
    the 1970s they started falling off
    and the practice was banned. It
    was revived in a tamer form in
    2005. d The 6th day of 4th moon (May),
    Cheung Chau • Map C6

    Ming
    % Ching
    Also known as the grave-

    sweeping festival, ching ming
    literally means “clear and bright”.
    Chinese families visit the graves
    of their ancestors to burn “Hell
    money”, which resembles Monopoly money. d First week of Apr

    Boat
    ^ Dragon
    (Tuen Ng) Festival

    Drums thunder and paddles churn
    the less-than-pristine waters of
    Hong Kong as garish craft vie for
    top honours. The festival commemorates Qu Yuan, a
    3rd-century poetstatesman who
    drowned himself to
    protest against
    corrupt rulers. d The

    Tin Hau Festival

    5th day of the 5th moon
    (early June), various
    venues

    Top 10
    Sporting Events
    10s
    ! Rugby
    Beer-swilling mayhem and

    Hungry Ghost
    (Yue Laan) Festival

    &

    Sevens
    @ Rugby
    More of the above.

    d Week in Mar following the 10s

    From the 14th day of the seventh
    moon, Chinese believe the gates
    of hell are thrown open and the
    undead run riot on earth for a
    month. Lots more “Hell money”
    goes up in smoke, as do various
    hillsides. Not a good time for
    hiking. d Roughly Jul, various locations

    Sixes
    # Cricket
    Action around the stumps.

    * Mid-Autumn
    Festival

    % International
    Races

    One of the most picturesque of
    Hong Kong’s festivals. Families
    brave the most appalling traffic
    jams to venture out into the
    country parks to burn candles
    and feast on yolk-centred mooncakes. Unfortunately, the intricate
    paper lanterns have increasingly
    been supplanted by glowing,
    blow-up Hello Kitty, Doraemon
    and Pokémon dolls. d The 15th night
    of the 8th moon (Aug); try Victoria Park

    Yeung
    ( Chung
    Festival

    Put on your hiking boots. This
    festival commemorates a Han
    Dynasty scholar who took his
    family up a hill and came back to
    find the rest of his village
    murdered. d The 9th evening of the

    d Kowloon Cricket Club 2367
    4141 • Nov

    Dragon
    $ International
    Boat Races

    Festive boats compete on the
    Shing Mun River. d Sha Tin
    • mid-Jun

    Pounding equine competition.
    d Sha Tin Racecourse • HK
    Jockey Club 2966 8335 • Dec

    Cup
    ^ Carlsberg
    Soccer action. d Hong

    Kong Football Association 2712
    9122 • Late Jan

    Chartered
    & Standard
    Hong Kong Marathon

    The gruelling race starts at
    the Cultural Centre, Tsim Sha
    Tsui. d 2577 0800 • Early Feb

    * Macau
    Grand Prix

    Formula 3 action on the
    former Portuguese enclave.
    d 796 2268 (Macau); 2838 8680
    (Hong Kong) • 3rd weekend Nov

    ( Trailwalker
    A gruelling 60-mile (100-

    9th moon (usually mid- to late Oct);
    visit any hilltop

    km) walk over MacLehose
    Trail, in aid of the charity
    Oxfam. d Oxfam 2520 2525
    • Nov

    Day
    ) Christmas
    Not a traditional Chinese

    ) Omega
    Hong Kong Open

    festival, of course, but Hong
    Kongers have wholeheartedly
    embraced the more commercial
    aspects of Christmas. d 25th Dec

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Dragon boats

    fast and furious rugby. d HK
    Rugby Football Union �• ������
    2504
    8311 • www.hkrugby.com • Mar

    Asia’s top golfing stars on
    show. d Asian PGA 2330 8227
    • Late Nov

    37

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Temple Street Centre left Western Market Centre right Bird Garden Right Goldfish Market

    Markets
    Street
    ! Temple
    Comes alive at night.

    Hundreds of stalls are jampacked by 9pm, offering pirated
    goods and all manner of, well,
    junk. It used to be known as
    Men’s Street, and many stalls
    still stock less-than-fashionable
    attire. Venture past the market
    and you’ll stumble onto a lamplit
    coterie of fortune-tellers and
    possibly a Chinese Opera recital.
    (See pp18–19.)

    Market
    @ Western
    The Western Market (in the

    northwest of Hong Kong Island)
    is situated in a gorgeous old
    Edwardian building, but the
    pickings are slim. Best bet is the
    excellent selection of antique
    and second-hand watches on the
    ground floor. Also a good range
    of fabric shops, although bargains
    are scarce. In a former life it
    housed a meat and vegetable
    market. d 323 Des Voeux Rd Central,
    Sheung Wan • Map J4 • 10am–7pm

    Market
    # Ladies
    No designer labels – unless
    they’re fake. What you’ll find
    here is inexpensive women’s
    clothing from lingerie to shoes.
    There’s a decent selection of
    jeans, cheap food and knickknacks galore. (See p90.)

    Bazaar and
    $ Jardine’s
    Jardine’s Crescent

    An open-air market area in the
    heart of Causeway Bay, one of
    Hong Kong’s busiest shopping
    districts. All sorts of goodies
    here, from run-of-the-mill fashion
    shops to traditional barbers and
    Chinese medicine sellers.
    Sample a glass of fresh soy bean
    milk. d Jardine’s Bazaar, Causeway Bay,
    Hong Kong Island • Map Q6 • 11am–8pm

    Street
    % Cat
    No, there are no more cats

    here than anywhere else in Hong
    Kong. Cat Street refers instead
    to the Chinese slang for odds
    and ends. It and nearby

    Left Antique Buddha image, Cat Street Right Mao posters, Cat Street

    38

    • 7am–8pm

    ( Goldfish
    Market

    Popular spot for locals, as a
    fishtank in the right spot is
    thought to ward off bad luck.
    Hook a bargain on underwater
    furniture with an oriental flavour.

    Busy Gage Street Market

    d Tung Choi St, Mong Kok • 10am–6pm

    Hollywood Road are chock full of
    antique and curio shops. This is
    the place for silk carpets, elegant
    Chinese furniture, Ming dynasty
    ceramic horsemen and Maoist
    kitsch. d Map J5

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    songbirds and (mostly legal)
    exotica, bounded by elegant
    courtyards, full of old men with
    white singlets rolled up to bare
    their bellies (one of Hong Kong’s
    odder fashion statements). A
    flower market is also nearby (see
    p89). d Yuen Po Street, Mong Kok

    Street
    ) Gage
    This one is worth a peek if

    you happen to be in Central but
    hardly worth a special visit.
    Lots of blood and guts, especially
    for early birds. Trucks disgorge
    fresh pink pig carcasses as
    squawking chickens ponder their
    final hours. d Map K5

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    39

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Mid-Level escalator Centre Rickshaw Right Open-top bus

    Transports of Delight
    Escalator
    ! The
    The series of escalators in

    the steep Mid-Levels district of
    northwest Hong Kong Island is
    designed for commuters, but
    most appreciated by sightseers
    who can rest their legs and enjoy
    the fascinating sights (opposite).
    Take a stately (and free) ascent
    past busy street scenes, traditional shops and apartment
    windows. (See p59.)

    @ Trams
    Hong Kong’s trams date

    back to 1904, making this one of
    the oldest continuously used
    tram systems in existence. They
    are still one of the best ways of
    exploring the Hong Kong Island
    shoreline. Trainspotter’s trivia: it’s
    also the only double-decker tram
    system in the whole world.

    Peak Tram
    # The
    Since 1888, this funicular

    railway has made the jawdropping ascent of Victoria Peak,
    and remains a must for visitors.
    Under the unwritten rules of
    colonial times, certain seats
    were reserved for high officials;
    now, seating is an amiable freefor-all. (See p9.)

    $ Airport
    Express Link

    Should your attention span wane
    on the fleeting 22-minute ride
    from the airport to Central, the
    AEL offers personal TVs in the
    back of every seat. Bright, shiny
    and a joy to use.

    % MTR
    Hong Kong’s underground

    railway is a world leader, handling three million people a day
    with rapid and robotic efficiency.
    Signs are in both English and
    Chinese, delays are almost
    unheard of, and with fares
    starting from the price of a cup
    of coffee, a trip around the city is
    surprisingly affordable, too.

    ^ Ferries
    The fabulous Star Ferry (see

    Old-fashioned tram

    40

    pp14–15) connects Hong Kong
    Island to Kowloon. Pay half the
    price of a cup of coffee for a
    first-class view of one of the
    world’s most remarkable
    harbours and skylines. Other
    ferries connect Hong Kong to the
    outlying islands and parts of the
    New Territories (see p138).

    For more on getting around Hong Kong See p138

    & Rickshaws
    There are just seven

    * Taxis
    Hong Kong cabbies are as

    Itself
    ! Escalator
    The world’s longest

    covered escalator system is a
    sight unto itself.

    @ Commuters
    Some 211,000 people ride
    the system daily, bypassing
    the Mid-Levels’ notorious
    traffic snarls.

    Market
    # Central
    The escalator begins oppo-

    psychotic as big city cabbies
    everywhere. Their rudeness is
    legendary, but you probably
    would be too if you had to deal
    with Hong Kong traffic all day,
    every day. Fortunately, tighter
    policing means that overcharging
    is now a rare occurrence.

    site this agreeably raucous
    fruit and vegetable market.

    ( Limousines
    On a per capita basis, Hong

    Alight at the first stop and
    walk a block uphill for trendy
    bars and eateries (see p60).

    Kong probably has more
    Mercedes and Rolls Royces than
    anywhere else in the world.
    Some 15 of the latter are owned
    by the Peninsula Hotel alone –
    including a Phantom II dating
    from 1934.

    ) Buses
    Hong Kong’s double-decker

    buses are a British legacy,
    although these mostly come airconditioned and (in a universally
    loathed development) with
    onboard TVs blaring ceaseless
    advertising. The low cost of
    using them may help you
    overcome this irritant.

    $ BoHo
    (“Below Hollywood Road”)
    The start of the journey takes
    you through the heart of this
    hip quarter.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    rickshaws left in all Hong Kong,
    their elderly drivers earning a
    living by charging tourists for
    photos. Don’t ask for a ride,
    unless you want richly-deserved
    abuse from passers-by: these old
    guys can’t make their way
    halfway down the road without
    collapsing in an exhausted heap.

    Top 10 Sights from
    the Escalator

    % SoHo
    (“South of Hollywood Road”).
    Road
    ^ Hollywood
    Home to antique shops,

    galleries, nightclubs, bars and
    the historic Man Mo Temple
    (see p61).

    & Galleries
    Several en route, many

    specializing in the bright new
    wave of Chinese art.

    Terrace
    * Rednaxela
    So named because a 19thcentury signwriter wrote
    “Alexander” from right to left,
    in the Chinese manner.
    Uncorrected to this day.

    Masjid Mosque
    ( Jamia
    Also known as the Shelly
    Street Mosque, built in 1915.
    One of three mosques catering to 70,000 Muslims.

    Road
    ) Conduit
    Where SoHo peters out,
    and the Mid-Levels begins
    amid forests of upscale
    apartment blocks.
    Star ferries

    41

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Bank of China, Cheung Kong Centre and HSBC Right Convention Centre

    Modern Buildings
    of China
    @ Bank
    This one is also famous in

    feng shui circles, but more for
    dishing it out than possessing it
    – the glass-skinned tower shoots
    bad vibes at the old Government
    House and other colonial
    entities. Its knife-like edges were
    the inspiration of AmericanChinese master architect I. M.
    Pei. The 70-storey, 368-m (1,207ft) stack of prisms opened in
    1990. Its viewing platform is the
    natural place to go for a sweeping city perspective. d 1 Garden Rd,
    Central • Map L6 • 43/F viewing platform
    9am–6pm Mon–Fri, 9am–1pm Sat
    HSBC interior

    Building
    ! HSBC
    Sir Norman Foster’s striking,

    Bladerunner-esque edifice cost a
    whopping HK$5.2bn, making it
    the world’s priciest pile when it
    opened in 1985. The headquarters
    of the Hong Kong and Shanghai
    Banking Corporation are reputed
    to have some of the
    best feng shui around
    – the building sits on
    a rare confluence of
    five “dragon lines”
    and enjoys unimpeded
    harbour views. The
    soaring atrium feels
    like a cathedral, which
    might explain why on
    Sundays the ground
    level is taken over by
    chattering Filipina
    maids. d 1 Queen’s Rd,
    Central • Map L5

    42

    Ma Bridge
    # Tsing
    The suspension bridge stre-

    tches from Tsing Yi Island to Lantau, a mile and a half (2.2 km) long.
    A striking sight, especially when
    lit up at night, the bridge carries
    the road and rail links to Chek
    Lap Kok airport. It opened in May
    1997, having taken five years to
    build at a cost of HK$7.14 bn.
    Take the MTR to Tsing
    Yi or catch an airport
    bus (but not the
    airport train) to view it.
    There’s also a viewing
    platform at Ting Kau
    (see p116). d Map D4

    Bank of China

    IFC Tower
    $ Two
    Completed in

    2003, the streamlined
    Two International
    Finance Centre Tower
    soars above Victoria
    Harbour. At 420 m

    d Exchange Square, Central • Map L5

    Kong
    % Hong
    International Airport

    Sir Norman Foster strikes again.
    Landing isn’t quite the thrill ride
    it was at the old airport, but the
    new passenger terminal, which
    opened in July 1998, is impressive.
    The airport is constructed on a
    specially flattened island – Chek
    Lap Kok. d Map B4

    Lippo Towers

    lives on the top of this one. Note
    how it’s built perfectly parallel to
    the adjoining Bank of China for
    optimal feng shui. d Map L6

    Towers
    ^ Lippo
    These knobbly megaliths

    Plaza
    ( Central
    Confusingly, this is in Wan

    look like they have koalas clinging to the sides – a reflection of
    the original antipodean owner,
    jailbird Alan Bond�����.���� d 89 Queensway,

    Chai, not Central. At 78 storeys,
    it is two less than The Centre,
    but at 374 m (1,227 ft), it’s taller.
    It’s also the world’s tallest
    reinforced concrete building. d 18

    Admiralty • Map L–M6

    Harbour Rd, Wan Chai • Map N5 • 46/F
    viewing platform 9am–5pm Mon–Fri

    The Centre

    & The one with the pretty col-

    Convention and
    ) HK
    Exhibition Centre

    ours that keep changing all night
    – fantastic, unless you live next
    door. One of tycoon Li Ka-shing’s
    triumphs. d Queen’s Rd • Map K5

    Site of the official Handover
    ceremony in 1997, the Centre
    sprawls over a huge area over
    the harbour and was designed to
    resemble a bird in flight. d 1 Expo

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    * Cheung
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    43

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Sai Kung peninsula Centre Birdlife, Mai Po Marshes Right Ma On Shan

    Areas of Natural Beauty
    D’Aguilar
    ! Cape
    It may be only 7

    of resident and migratory species recorded,
    including many
    endangered ones.
    Other wildlife includes
    otters, civet cats, bats
    and numerous
    amphibians. d Map D2

    miles (11 km) directly
    south of Hong Kong’s
    busy Central district,
    but Cape D’Aguilar
    feels like another
    world. The wild coastline has wave-lashed
    rock formations and a
    marine life so rich that
    researchers have
    discovered 20 species
    “new to science” in
    these waters. d Map F6

    Pool
    $ Bride’s
    The pool is a

    popular picnic spot.
    Weekends are best
    avoided, but visit
    midweek and, with
    Paddy fields, Sha Lo Tung
    luck, you will have this
    Hoi Ha Wan
    glorious, wooded
    The long inlets and sheltered
    course of rockpools and
    coves of this 260 hectare marine
    cascades all to yourself. d Map F2
    park in northern Sai Kung are
    made for snorkelling. Stony coral
    Pat Sin
    and reef fish galore. d Map G2
    Range
    Hong Kong’s countryside
    Mai Po Marsh
    achieves a quiet grandeur among
    Declared a Ramsar site (that
    the empty valleys and sublime
    is, a wetland of international
    uplands of Pat Sin (“eight spirits”).
    importance) in 1995, Mai Po is
    Peaks range up to 639 m
    one of China’s most important
    (2,095 ft), and the views are
    bird sanctuaries, with hundreds
    humbling. d Map F2

    @

    %

    #

    Left Bride’s Pool Centre River valley, Pat Sin

    44

    Dragon’s Back
    ^ The
    This undulating ridge snakes

    Ma On Shan (“Saddle
    Mountain”) allow wide-screen
    views of mountainous country,
    without the insidious intrusion of
    city skyline in the distance. The
    effect is truly majestic. d Map F3

    down Hong Kong Island’s southeast corner, with plunging slopes,
    poetic sea views and (past
    Pottinger’s Gap) deep wooded
    valleys and beaches. d Map F5

    Long
    ) Tai
    Wan

    Jacob’s Ladder

    & Take these steep steps up

    On the Sai Kung Peninsula,
    survive the knuckle-whitening
    ascent of Sharp Peak (all loose
    rocks and narrow paths), and the
    land plunges down to your wellearned reward: the sparkling
    waves and white sand of Hong
    Kong’s finest beach, Tai Long
    Wan (see pp22–3).

    the rock from Three Fathom’s
    Cove, and enter an expanse of
    remote uplands and boulderstrewn paths, leading, in the
    north, to Mount Hallowes. There
    are exquisite views of the Tolo
    Channel. d Map G3

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    * Sha
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    grassy slopes of the
    702-m ((2,302-ft) high

    

    

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    Hong Kong comes to
    stereotypical ideas of
    classical Chinese
    landscape, with its old
    paddy fields, deserted
    villages, flowing
    streams and ancient
    woods. Magical.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Sharp Peak and Ham Tin beach, Tai Long Wan

    

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    45

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Cultural Centre promenade Centre View from the Peak Right Fortune tellers, Temple Street

    Walking Routes and Promenades
    Peak Circuit
    ! The
    Taking about an hour to

    complete at a gentle pace, this
    loop around Victoria Peak, formed
    by Harlech and Lugard Roads,
    offers jaw-dropping city panoramas to the north, boundless sea
    views to the south, and glimpses
    of millionaire homes among the
    greenery en route (see pp8–9).

    Street
    @ Temple
    Night Market

    Allow plenty of time, not for the
    distance (Temple Street is no
    more than half a mile end to
    end), but to explore the funky
    pageantry of hawker stalls,
    fortune tellers, medicine men
    and opera singers that set up
    here every night (see pp18–19).

    MacLehose Trail
    # The
    The trail spans over 60 miles

    (100 km) across the New Territories, so only bona fide outdoor
    types will attempt the whole
    length. But certain sections are
    easily accessible (try the lovely
    part around the High Island
    Reservoir) for visitors who value
    the prospect of being back at the

    hotel bar by nightfall. d Info from
    HKTB (see p139) • Map G3

    to Western via
    $ Central
    Hollywood Road

    Central’s futuristic office towers
    and concrete canyons give way
    to the low-rise charm of antique
    shops, galleries and bars the
    further west you go, ending up
    in Western’s archetypal Chinese
    shopping streets and docksides.
    A must. (See also pp58–61.)

    Centre
    % Cultural
    Promenade

    On weekends this short walkway
    from Kowloon Star Ferry around
    past the Inter-Continental is
    invaded by innumerable families
    and their rampaging children.
    At other times, though, it offers
    one of the most animated
    harbour views you will see
    anywhere (see pp82–3).

    Road
    ^ Nathan
    A joyously tacky and tawdry
    strip, the Golden Mile, Hong
    Kong’s own Broadway, runs up
    the Kowloon peninsula, passing
    hotels and tourist shops at the

    Left Quiet road at the Peak Right Temple Street Night Market

    46

    upscale southern end, before
    downgrading into the sleazy
    karaoke lounges and low-rent
    storefronts of central
    Kowloon. Just don’t buy
    any electronics along the
    way. (See p81.)

    Hong Kong
    & The
    Land Loop

    water carts that are the island’s
    only fire engines (see pp24–5).

    Central Green Trail
    ( The
    Just minutes from the

    banks, malls and offices of
    downtown, this signposted,
    hour-long trail from the tram
    terminus at Hong Kong
    Park opens up a lush
    hillside world of trees,
    ferns and rocks. A
    beautiful, shady surprise.
    Surfer, Cheung

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Nathan Road at night Right Cheung Chau

    Almost all of Central’s
    prestige commercial
    towers are in the portfolio
    of one company, Hong
    d Map L6
    Chau
    Kong Land, which has
    thoughtfully connected its
    Victoria Park
    properties with aerial walkways.
    One of the city’s larger green
    The buildings include Jardine
    sites, Victoria Park is best visited
    House, Mandarin Oriental,
    in the early morning, when tai
    Princes Building and the
    chi devotees exercise. ThroughLandmark Centre. Do the circuit,
    out the day there are peopleif only for the ethereal
    watching opportunities and
    experience of seeing downtown
    restful walks, away from urban
    Hong Kong without touching the
    pressures (see pp68–9).
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    47

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Alibi Right Kam Tak Lam

    Restaurants
    Court
    ! T’ang
    The Langham Hotel com-

    pleted its US$35 million upgrade
    in 2003, and the food at T’ang
    Court continues to astonish.
    Peerless creativity and an
    insistence on wok chi (wok
    cooking at the highest achievable
    temperature) are the keys to
    T’ang Court’s greatness. d 1/F,
    Langham Hotel, 8 Peking Road, Kowloon
    • Map N4 • 2375 1133 ext. 2250 • $$$$

    Verandah
    @ The
    From its epic Sunday brunches, through to the speechless
    aplomb of its candlelit dinners,
    this sleek patrician of the Southside has a stately lead over the
    competition. The details are sheer
    class (when did you last have
    caesar salad made, as it should
    be, at your tableside?) and the
    ambience utterly surfeited with
    the “wow” factor (see p77).

    # Gaddi’s
    Royalty, Hollywood stars and
    heads of state have dined here
    by the worshipful score, for in

    Left T  he Verandah Right One Harbour Road

    48

    For price categories See p65

    terms of French cuisine east of
    Suez, Gaddi’s is unquestionably
    the holy grail. Expect the bigbudget works: from the aristocratic menu to stratospheric service
    levels. If you like it haute, you’ve
    found your heaven (see p87).

    $ Nicholini’s
    You might not foresee your-

    self travelling to Hong Kong in
    order to eat Italian, but you
    might for Nicholini’s. Awarded the
    Insegna del Romano for being
    the best Italian restaurant
    outside of Italy, Nicholini’s sits
    comfortably at the apex of Northern Italian cooking, each dish
    an essay in freshness and charm.
    d 8/F, Conrad International, Pacific Place,
    Admiralty • Map N4 • 2521 3838 • $$$$

    % Alibi
    If there has been one Hong

    Kong restaurateur consistently
    and laudably pushing the style
    envelope over the last decade, it
    has been Nichole Garnaut. But
    with Alibi, her latest venture, she
    succeeds with understatement,

    and the creative take on French
    cuisine has both depth and confidence. The crowd is beautiful,
    the food more so (see p65).

    M at the
    Fringe

    ^

    The totality of M’s undeniable
    quirks – the mismatching cutlery,
    eccentric menu, the arty
    location (above the
    galleries of the Fringe
    Club) – come together in a
    riotously groovy whole.
    The food is Mediterranean
    and Middle Eastern
    influenced, although
    simply stating this does
    no justice to its free form
    improvisation of flavours.
    Superior stuff (see p65).

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    So moneyed, clubbish
    and upholstered, you
    could be sitting in St
    James’s in London.

    If you have longed for the
    day when you would
    stumble on a restaurant
    locked in a parallel 1970s
    universe – where the menu
    offers, without irony, such widecollared classics as chicken Kiev
    and baked Alaska – then rejoice.
    For this is that day; Jimmy’s is
    that restaurant. Don’t pass up on
    a chance like this (see p65).

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    The Mandarin
    Grill

    Causeway Bay • Map N4 • 2890
    3127 • $$

    & $ 1 72

    most artful of Chinese provincial
    varieties, and One Harbour Road
    is among the most artful of
    Cantonese restaurants. Be
    prepared then for a dining
    experience of unusual
    refinement, set off by the Grand
    Hyatt’s art deco fantasies. The restaurant
    endlessly wins
    deserved praise. d 8/F,

    48

    another helping of the slop and
    swill that passes for much
    animal-free cuisine will praise
    the creator for Kung Tak Lam.
    This light and airy Shanghainese
    does things with mere
    vegetables that could not
    be done, could not even
    be imagined, by most
    vegetarian restaurants
    elsewhere. d 31 Yee Wo St,

    Fringe Club

    Harbour Road
    & One
    Cantonese cuisine is the

    Grand Hyatt, 1 Harbour
    Road, Wan Chai • Map N4
    • 2584 7938 • $$$$

    Tak Lam
    ( Kung
    Vegetarians unable to face

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Jimmy’s Kitchen

    Except for the food: no London
    grill room could ever
    approximate the exemplary filets
    and sirloins turned out here. We
    are talking consummate mastery
    of skillet and skewer. No wonder
    the suits linger for hours over
    brandy and cigars (see p65).

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    49

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Cha siu Centre Fish drying, Cheung Chau Right Pak-choi

    Hong Kong Dishes
    Siu
    ! Cha
    This is virtually Hong

    Kong’s national dish. The
    name literally means “fork
    roast”. The tender fillets of
    pork are roasted and
    glazed in honey and
    spices, and hung in the
    windows of specialist
    roast meat shops. Cha siu
    is classically served thinly
    sliced, with steamed rice
    and strips of vegetables.

    Cake
    @ Moon
    Made of moist pastry

    and various fillings, including lotus, taro, adzuki
    bean, whole egg yolk and
    occasionally coconut, the
    delicacy also has a quirky
    history: revolutionaries in
    imperial China used to smuggle
    messages to each other hidden
    in a moon cake’s dense filling.

    freshness, restaurants keep
    live fish in tanks, killing and
    preparing them to order.

    Chicken
    $ Hainan
    Comprising chunks

    of steamed chicken,
    served slightly warm or
    cold, and dipped in an
    aromatic oil made with
    spring onions and ginger,
    this dish has become
    everyday comfort food. It is
    traditionally accompanied by
    a rich chicken broth, a few
    vegetables and rice steamed
    Steamed
    in chicken stock for flavour.
    whole fish

    Whole Fish
    # Steamed
    In Hong Kong, fish is almost

    always dressed very simply, using
    only peanut oil, soya sauce, coriander and chives. To maximize

    of Beef
    % Brisket
    Requiring up to eight hours

    of slow cooking, preparation of
    this Hong Kong classic is an art.
    Households and restaurants
    guard their individual recipes, but
    all involve the classic five
    Chinese spices, rock sugar and
    tangerine peel. It’s served in an
    earthenware pot as a main
    course, or as a topping for rice
    or noodles. Given its richness, it
    is particularly enjoyed in winter.

    Spinach
    ^ Water
    The leafy, hollow-

    Dried meats

    50

    stemmed vegetable
    can be prepared with
    various seasonings,
    from the quotidian
    oyster sauce to garlic
    and shrimp paste. At
    its best when stir-fried
    with potent chillies and
    semi-fermented tofu.

    & Wontons
    Done prop-

    Fish Balls

    * A daily food for many Hong

    Kongers, either on skewers as
    snacks or served with noodles in
    broth to make a meal. Traditional
    restaurants eschew machine
    production methods, and still
    shape these balls of minced fish,
    white pepper and other spices
    by hand, before poaching them
    in seafood or chicken stock.

    Salt and Pepper
    Crusted Squid

    (

    You may have encountered the
    disastrous and greasy travesty of
    fried squid served up in Western
    Chinatowns. Banish that
    unpleasant memory from your
    mind, and prepare to discover
    the gloriously crisp original.
    Fresh squid is scored, lightly
    battered and flash fried with lots
    of salt, white pepper, chilli and
    garlic. The result is an addictive
    combination of tangy textures.

    Lai Wong Bau

    ) Chinese bread is shaped into

    buns, not loaves, and steamed
    rather than baked – giving it a
    beautifully soft and fluffy quality
    (no gritty whole grains here).
    There are many varieties of
    sweet bun, but lai wong bau is
    the reigning favourite, the kind of
    treat that children will clamour
    for. These buns are filled with
    milk, eggs, coconut and sugar.
    Try them piping hot on a cold
    winter morning.

    Gow
    ! Har
    Prawns wrapped in rice
    flour casing – like a very
    plump ravioli.

    Mai
    @ Siu
    Minced pork and shrimp

    parcels, topped with a dab of
    crab roe.

    Juk
    # Seen
    Guen

    Soy pastry, crisp fried with a
    vegetable filling. A savvy
    alternative to the common
    spring roll.

    Jaht
    $ Gai
    Chicken and ham wrapped

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    erly, this marvellous prawn and
    pork ravioli is
    poached in a
    Wonton soup
    stock made
    from shrimp roe, aniseed and
    other spices, and served with
    fresh egg noodles and soup.

    Top 10 Dim Sum
    (Dumplings)

    in soya bean sheets, served
    in rich sauce.

    Bahk
    % Lohr
    Goh

    Mashed turnip, pan-fried with
    chives, dried shrimp and
    Chinese salami.

    Fun
    ^ Cheung
    Rolls of rice pastry, filled

    with shrimp, pork or beef, and
    smothered in sweet soy.

    Chow
    & Chiu
    Fun Gohr

    Soft, pasty-style dumplings
    filled with chopped nuts,
    minced pork and pickled
    vegetables.

    Yeung
    * Chin
    Laht Jiu

    Green pepper stuffed with
    minced fish and prawns and
    served in black bean sauce.

    Ma Wu
    ( JiDecadent,
    treacle-like

    dessert made from sugar and
    mashed sesame. It is served
    warm from the trolley.

    Lai Goh
    ) Ma
    Wonderfully light,

    steamed sponge cake, made
    with eggs and walnuts.

    51

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left The Jazz Club Right Visage Free

    Nightclubs

    ! Felix
    The shining pinnacle of

    Hong Kong bars is set in
    Kowloon’s famous Peninsula Hotel.
    Philippe Starcke designed Felix,
    and the result is coolness
    incarnate. Let the experience
    envelope you, beginning with the
    dedicated elevators and their
    light effects, to the untrammelled
    delights of Felix’s restrooms. The
    harbour views are an added
    bonus. If you plan to visit just
    one bar in Hong Kong, make this
    the one (see p87).

    Corres@ Foreign
    pondents Club

    $ Kee
    A discreet keypad and un-

    marked doorway on Wellington
    Street is the entrance to this
    spanking new and seriously
    happening club. Everyone worth
    knowing in Hong Kong is on its
    members’ list, but this means
    that it can be hard to gain access.
    Inspired by the Enlightenment
    concept of literary and discursive
    salons, Kee can sometimes be
    too arty by half, but it’s always
    worth an invitation. Assuming
    you’re lucky enough to
    score one. d 6/F, 32
    Wellington St, Central • Map
    K5 • 2186 1861

    Any club that has brass
    plaques screwed to the
    bar top, commemorating members who died
    drinking on that spot,
    deserves to be a legend. Open only to members and their guests.

    % DiThisVino
    small tunnel-

    shaped bar crammed
    with beautiful people
    makes the perfect start
    to any evening. But
    with special prices on
    d 2 Lower Albert Rd, Central
    early evening aperitifs
    Di Vino
    • Map K6 • 2521 1511
    and around 40 wines
    available by the glass,
    Dragon-i
    it’s not long before snacks
    Stunning interior design in
    become a look at the menu, a
    mixed Chinese and Japanese
    memorable Italian meal and a
    style but with lots of New York
    rather later than planned move to
    thrown in across two completely
    elsewhere (see p64).
    different rooms. The Red Room
    dining room becomes a VIP
    Bottoms Up
    lounge for the famous as the
    Fulfill your sad James Bond
    evening progresses, with
    fantasies in the padded, crepuseveryone else sinking into the
    cular interior of this 1970s
    booths in the bronze and
    topless bar, which was used as a
    mirrored Playground, drinking
    location in The Man with the
    powerful cocktails, Be stylish, or
    Golden Gun. It had more
    be somewhere else (see p64).
    character under its legendary

    #

    ^

    52

    Boa
    ( Feather
    Away from the rowdy main

    original owner and ex-Windmill
    Girl, Pat Sephton. Don’t despair:
    for kitsch factor alone, Bottoms
    Up will always be a worthy pit
    stop (see p86).

    strip of Staunton Street bars sits
    this unremarked gem, with its
    inconspicuous entrance, fin-desiècle gold drapes and sofas. The
    crowd is young, arts and mediaslanted, and cliquey. One of
    SoHo’s better kept secrets: would
    it could stay that way (see p64).

    Jazz
    & The
    Club

    At ordinary times, this tiny and
    utterly unremarkable bar and
    performance space would hardly
    be worth mentioning. But when
    a maestro is in town, the Jazz
    Club is the scene of legendary,
    impromptu jams. Believe it or
    not, even the likes of Wynton
    Marsalis and Miles Davis have
    played here, right in the faces of
    the 100 or so people lucky
    enough to have been there at
    the time. d 2/F, 34 D’Aguilar St, Lan

    Parties
    ) Dance
    Hong Kong is a prime Asian

    stop on the international DJ
    circuit (everyone from Fat Boy
    Slim to Paul Oakenfold and Carl
    Cox have hit the decks here),
    and the city has nurtured more
    than enough turntable talent of
    its own. Hong Kong’s dance parties, particularly at the cavernous
    HITEC venue, are well-organized
    affairs. Check the local media for
    details. d Various venues

    Kwai Fong • Map K5 • 2845 8477

    

    

    Free
    * Visage
    A slacker alterna-

    

    

    

    

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    tive to the unremitting
    trendiness of SoHo and
    BoHo, Visage Free is
    the kind of bar that
    can disregard commercial imperatives to
    mount monthly poetry
    readings. The crowd is
    loyal and diverse.

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Felix Right Central district at night

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    53

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

    Left Dolphin watching Centre Rollercoaster, Ocean Park Right Child, Kowloon Park

    Places for Children
    Park
    ! Ocean
    It’s not quite

    and shrub-lined paths.
    Not, however, in the
    Disneyland, but most
    monkey house, where
    kids will get a kick out
    the world’s largest
    of the dolphin and sea
    collection of redlion shows and the
    cheeked gibbons shriek
    spectacular chairlift. It’s
    and swing and
    a bit weak on rides,
    copulate. Be prepared
    although this has been
    for some judicious
    remedied somewhat in
    covering of young eyes.
    recent years with the
    Also jaguars, leopards,
    Ocean Park
    advent of Adventure
    kangaroos and 280
    Land, featuring the Mine Train
    species of birds. d Upper Albert Rd,
    rollercoaster and Raging River
    Central • Map K6 • 6am–7pm daily • Free
    ride. Threaten misbehaving brats
    with a dose of Middle Kingdom,
    Dolphin Watching
    the history and culture section.
    Be quick, because the sorry
    (See p73.)
    state of Hong Kong waters is
    fast killing off the rare Chinese
    Science Museum
    white dolphins, which here in the
    There is lots of hands-on
    Pearl River delta are pale pink. d
    stuff here, providing a fun and
    Hong Kong Dolphinwatch 1528A Star
    educational introduction to many
    House,Tsim Sha Tsui • Map B4 (dolphins)
    facets of science. Any child with
    • 2984 1414 • Bus pick-up 8:20am at
    a healthy dose of curiosity will
    Mandarin Oriental in Central and 8:50am
    spend hours pushing buttons,
    at Kowloon Hotel TST • Wed, Fri, Sun • Adm
    pulling levers and marvelling at
    gadgets. (See p82.)
    Hong Kong

    $

    @

    Zoological and
    Botanical Gardens

    #

    Founded in 1864, a modicum of
    Victorian gentility survives here
    in the wrought-iron bandstand

    Left Jaguar, Zoological Gardens Right Peak tram

    54

    % Disneyland

    The mighty mouse wisely used
    feng shui in the design of his
    latest Asian venture, but
    otherwise there are few nods to
    local culture. Adventureland,

    Fantasyland and Tomorrowland
    lie beyond Main Street, USA. d

    and noisy, but they are terrific for
    sightseeing. (See p138.)

    Lantau Island, served by its own MTR
    station • 330 830 for hours and today’s
    tickets • park.hongkongdisneyland.com for
    advance booking (recommended) • Adm

    Park
    ( Kowloon
    The green lungs of Tsim Sha

    Tsui have a huge indoor-outdoor
    swimming pool and lots of
    gardens to wander about. There’s
    also an aviary. (See p83.)

    Nature
    ^ Lions
    Education Centre

    The Lions Nature Education
    Centre is actually much more fun
    than it sounds. There are fruit
    orchards, an arboretum, rock
    gardens and, best of all, an
    insectarium. Big brothers will
    find plenty of interesting creepycrawlies with which to scare
    little sisters. d Tsiu Hang, Sai Kung,

    World
    ) Snoopy’s
    Good grief! Hang out with

    the famous beagle and his
    hapless master Charlie Brown in
    this colourful tribute to the late
    Charles Schulz’s much-loved
    comic strip. Two-metre (6-ft) high
    mechanical characters and 60
    other Peanuts figures inhabit the
    playground. d L3 Podium, New Town

    New Territories • Map G3 • 2792 2234
    • 9:30am–5pm. Closed Tue • Free

    Plaza, Sha Tin, New Territories • Map E3
    • 2684 9175 • 10am–8pm • Free

    & The most

    Shing • Map F5 • Adm

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    roll along the front of
    Hong Kong Island,
    or take a detour
    around Happy Valley.
    Hong Kong’s trams
    may be crowded, slow



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    accessible rink is at
    Taikoo Shing, a big
    shopping centre and
    housing estate on
    Hong Kong Island. You
    can skate for as long
    as you like on
    weekdays. The skating
    school takes over on
    weekends. d Taikoo

    Hong Kong’s Top 10

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    55

    AROUND
    HONG KONG
    ISLAND
    Northeast
    66–71
    South
    72–77

    AROUND
    KOWLOON
    Tsim Sha Tsui
    80–87
    Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok
    and Prince Edward
    88–93
    New Kowloon
    94–99

    AROUND
    THE REGION
    The New Territories
    100–109
    Outlying Islands
    112–117
    Macau
    118–125
    Shenzhen
    126–129
    Guangzhou
    130–133

    HONG KONG’S TOP 10

    Northwest
    58–65

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Left Red lory, Hong Kong Park Centre One of the escalators Right Central district and harbour

    Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    F

    rom the corporate vanities of Central district’s glass towers, through

    the vodka bars and galleries of SoHo, and spilling down flagstone lanes
    to the raucous shophouses and old docksides of Western, the Island’s
    northwest potently concentrates all of Hong Kong’s surreal contradictions.
    In the concrete gullies between futuristic banks and statement office blocks
    you’ll find traditional street markets, temples and herbalists, all carrying on
    like some Hollywood dream of old Chinatown. These are some of the most
    mercantile streets in human history. A shot of snake bile wine, or a fierce
    macchiato? In this part of the city, you can have it all.
    Sights in the Northwest
    1
    2

    Hong Kong Park

    3

    Former Government
    House

    4
    5

    The Escalator

    Exchange Square and
    Two International
    Finance Centre Tower

    6

    Sheung Wan and
    Western

    7
    8
    9
    0

    Lan Kwai Fong
    The Waterfront
    Man Mo Temple
    Hollywood Road

    SoHo

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    Government
    # Former
    House

    Kong Park
    ! Hong
    When you’re tired of Central’s

    relentless bustle, Hong Kong
    Park’s open spaces and mature
    trees make an excellent escape,
    particularly its strikingly elegant
    (and free) walk-through aviary.
    The flowing streams and lush
    plant life of this improbable minirainforest are a peaceful and
    shaded home to scores of exotic
    bird species. The park also has
    lakes, a large conservatory, a viewing tower and the free Museum
    of Teaware, which is located inside
    Flagstaff House. d Map L6

    Square
    @ Exchange
    and Two IFC Tower

    As the name suggests, Exchange
    Square houses Hong Kong’s redcarpeted financial engine room,
    although the stock exchange is
    not open to visitors. However,
    the peaceful square outside it,
    dominated by a large fountain, is
    a great place to eat or drink
    outside. Near the fountain are
    sculptures by Henry Moore and
    Dame Elizabeth Frink. The
    square’s newest building, Two IFC
    Tower (see pp42–3), is a striking
    addition to the island’s already
    impressive skyline. d Map L5

    Escalator
    $ The
    A wonderful feature of Hong

    Kong is its 792-m (2,598-ft) long
    string of escalators, which links
    all the roads between Queen’s
    Road and Conduit Street. It’s the
    best way for pedestrians to get
    around the steep districts of
    Central, the Mid-Levels and SoHo.
    The Escalator runs uphill until
    midnight, except during the
    morning rush hour, when it runs
    downhill. d Map K5

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Aviary, Hong Kong Park

    This grand old building served as
    the British governor’s residence
    from 1855 until 1997, when the
    last governor, Chris Patten,
    handed Hong Kong back to
    China. Patten’s successor, Tung
    Chee-hwa, cited bad feng shui
    created by the needle-like Bank
    of China building (see p42) as
    one reason not to move in,
    opting to remain in his house on
    the Peak. Back in the 1940s, the
    occupying Japanese added the
    Shinto-style towers to the
    Georgian structure, which at one
    time enjoyed harbour views. The
    building is used for official functions, only opening occasionally to
    the public – contact HKTB (see
    p139) for details. d Map L6

    Frink sculpture, Exchange Square

    For the top 10 sights from the Mid-Levels Escalator See p41

    59

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Left Restaurant, SoHo Right Antiques, Hollywood Road

    % SoHo
    In the last few years SoHo

    (so-called for being the area
    south of Hollywood Road) has
    been transformed from a sleepy
    district of traditional Chinese
    shops into a thriving area for hip
    bars, cafés and restaurants. Elgin,
    Shelley and Staunton streets are
    excellent places to find a drink or
    bite to eat. d Map K5

    Wan and Western
    ^ Sheung
    The older, more traditional

    Chinese areas of town, just west
    of Central’s sleek corporate headquarters and the smart shops, are
    worth exploring by foot. The reward is a fascinating array of shops,
    mostly wholesalers, selling dried
    seafood (the pervading smell
    here), ginseng, edible swallows’
    nests, snakes, arcane herbal
    ingredients and paper offerings
    for the dead. Try the streets
    around Bonham Strand. d Map J4

    Plague
    In the 19th century, Hong Kong,
    like many other parts of the world
    in history, suffered devastating
    plagues incubated in filthy,
    crowded slums. It was also in
    Hong Kong where, in 1894, the
    source of the plague was
    identified, almost simultaneously,
    by two doctors. The discovery of
    the bacteria went on to
    revolutionize prevention and
    treatment of plague.

    across to tiny Wing Wah Lane
    just across D’Aguilar Street with
    bars and good-value Thai, Malay
    and Indian restaurants. d Map K5

    Waterfront
    * The
    Turn right out of the Central

    Star Ferry for some (admittedly
    meagre and poorly exploited)
    open waterside space and benches
    with good views across to

    Kwai Fong
    & Lan
    Not much to look

    at during the day, Lan
    Kwai Fong (or Orchid
    Square) only really
    starts to buzz at night
    when office workers,
    including plenty of city
    suits, come here to
    unwind at its many
    bars, clubs and
    restaurants. The street
    is packed with
    revellers on Fridays.
    Man Mo Temple
    The partying spills

    60

    For Central’s Statue Square See pp10–11

    A Day in Central
    Morning

    Kowloon. Behind are the 1,700
    porthole-style windows of Jardine
    House, for many years Asia’s
    tallest building. To the east is the
    giant upturned gin bottle shape
    of the Prince of Wales HQ building,
    now one of the Chinese army’s
    main Hong Kong barracks.
    d Map L–M5

    Mo Temple
    ( Man
    The gloomy red and gold

    interior of the Man Mo Temple,
    dating back to the 1840s, is
    always thick with sandlewood
    smoke from the giant incense
    spirals hanging overhead, which
    take a couple of weeks to burn
    through. The temple is dedicated
    to two deities, Man (the god of
    literature) and Mo (the god of
    war). Some of the scenes from
    the film version of Richard
    Mason’s The World of Suzy
    Wong were filmed here.
    d Western end, Hollywood Rd • Map J5

    Road
    ) Hollywood
    This mecca for Chinese

    antiques and curios may no
    longer offer the bargains it once
    did but Hollywood Road’s
    eastern end is still jammed with
    shops selling ancient ceramics,
    mammoth ivory carvings and
    delicate snuff bottles. The stalls
    and shops on Upper Lascar Row
    are a good hunting ground for
    antiques, trinkets, old coins,
    kitsch and curios. Haggling is
    definitely acceptable here.

    The streets around nearby
    Bonham Strand contain
    dried seafood shops, Chinese apothecaries, and
    paper offering shops. Head
    uphill to the atmospheric
    Man Mo Temple, then
    east past the antique shops
    of Hollywood Road,
    browsing as you go.
    Break for lunch or a
    drink in one of the many
    restaurants and bars on
    the streets to the south
    (SoHo) or below
    Hollywood Road in
    Lan Kwai Fong.

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Central district

    From Des Voeux Road take
    the tram westwards from
    Central and jump off
    outside the handsome
    colonial building housing
    Western Market (see
    p38). Browse among the
    ground floor trinkets,
    select a pattern from the
    many bolts of material on
    the first floor and enjoy
    excellent dim sum at the
    upstairs restaurants.

    Afternoon
    Check out the fresh produce market stalls around
    the Escalator (see p59)
    and Graham Street before
    hitting Statue Square (see
    pp10-11), the Island’s
    colonial heart.
    Choose to visit the upmarket malls (see p63) or for
    some peace and harbour
    views head to Queen’s
    Pier, or for altitude and a
    spectacular city perspective go up to the viewing
    gallery high in the imposing,
    needle-sleek Bank of
    China Building (see p42).
    Quiet and shade are found
    in the nearby Hong Kong
    Park (see p59).

    d Map J–K5

    61

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Left St John’s Cathedral Centre Colonial Police Station Right Legco Building

    Colonial Relics
    John’s Cathedral
    ! StIt may
    resemble a parish

    church more than a cathedral but
    St John’s, completed in 1850, is
    the oldest Anglican church in
    east Asia. d Map L6

    VI Statue
    @ George
    In the Zoological and Botani­cal Gardens, the statue of King
    George VI was erected in 1941,
    to commemorate 100 years of
    British rule. d Map K6

    Colonial Street Names

    # Most colonial buildings have
    been sacrificed to new develop­ment, but the colonial legacy is
    preserved in many of the roads
    named after royals (Queen’s Road),
    politicians (Peel Street), military
    officers (D’Aguilar, Pedder) and
    public servants (Bonham, Des
    Voeux). d Map K5–6

    the Police Station and the old Vic­toria Prison still stand.d Map K5

    House
    & Flagstaff
    Built in the mid-1840s, Flagstaff House is one of the oldest
    colonial buildings on the island
    and today houses the free
    teaware museum. d Hong Kong
    Park • Map L6

    Street
    * Duddell
    While not spectacular, the

    gas lamps and old steps of
    Duddell Street date back to the
    1870s. d Off Ice House St • Map K5

    Building
    ( Legco
    The elegant Neo-Classical

    Legislative building, completed in
    1911, originally served as Hong
    Kong’s Supreme Court and now
    functions as Hong Kong’s wouldbe parliament. d Map L5

    Letter Box
    Etrangères
    $ Old
    ) Mission
    A few traditional green, castThe handsome former
    iron post boxes bearing the British
    Royal Cipher remain. There is one
    at the northern end of Statue
    Square. d Map L5

    Military Hospital
    % Former
    Broken into separate units –

    some abandoned – the huge,
    grand old building between
    Bowen and Borrett roads used to
    serve as a Military Hospital.
    d Bowen Road • Map L6

    Road
    ^ Hollywood
    Police Station

    Bastions of colonial law and order,

    62

    French Mission building (built
    1917) is Hong Kong’s Court of
    Final Appeal, though that’s not
    an apt name given that the court
    has referred some legal wrangles
    to Beijing. d Battery Path • Map L6

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    Up-Market Malls and Boutiques
    Landmark Centre
    ! The
    It’s impossible to miss this

    smart, modern mall, with its
    conspicuous consumables from
    the likes of Chanel, Dior, Zegna,
    Versace, Prada, Vuitton, Bulgari
    and Tiffany. d Pedder St • Map L5

    @ Seibu
    Four floors of designer clothes,
    cosmetics, gifts, household items
    and food. d Pacific Place, 88
    Queensway, Admiralty • Map M6

    Crawford
    # Lane
    Upmarket clothing, with concessions from most big Western
    designer brands, houseware,
    beauty products, glass and
    porcelain ranging from the exotic
    to the naff. d Pacific Place, 88
    Queensway, Admiralty • Map M6

    Prince’s Building
    $ The
    Not as many top names as

    the next-door Landmark, but the
    bright, airy and less crowded
    Prince’s Building is worth a visit
    if big-name clothes and accessory designers are your thing. d
    Statue Square & Des Voeux Rd • Map L5

    Pedder Building
    % The
    Not a top mall, but many shops
    offer clearance stocks of designer
    clothes at sharp mark-downs.
    Most specialise in women’s
    fashions. d Pedder St • Map L5

    Gucci

    ^ This beautiful temple to the

    question of whether you can
    afford to worship here. d The
    Landmark Centre, G1 • Map L5

    Culture
    & Dragon
    Antiques shop with pottery

    from most dynasties, bamboo
    carvings and snuff bottles. d 231
    Hollywood Rd • Map K5

    Fashion
    * Fetish
    Fun and fetish goods go

    together in this smart store
    dedicated to cross-dressers and
    leather lovers. Look out for the
    family of leather teddy bears.
    d Merlin Bldg, 32 Cochrane St • Map K5

    Tang
    ( Shanghai
    Local entrepreneur David

    Tang is the brains behind this
    smart twist on traditional Chinese
    clothes and ornaments. Jackets
    and kitsch Mao watches are
    staples. d The Pedder Bldg • Map L5

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Left The Landmark Centre Right Lane Crawford

    Shirts
    ) David’s
    Off-the-shelf and hand-made

    shirts are the speciality of this
    Hong Kong institution. Allow a
    couple of days for the handmade
    shirts. d Mezzanine Flr, Mandarin
    Oriental, Queen’s Rd • Map L5

    
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    brand of Gucci is tended by
    elegant priestesses. It’s merely a

    63

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Left Fringe Club Centre Boca Right V13

    Bars and Clubs

    ! Dragon-i
    The most happening club in

    Central, where models, movers
    and shakers, and celebrities from
    Jackie Chan to Sting, have been
    spotted. d UG/F The Centrium, 60
    Wyndham St • Map K5 • 3110 1222

    @ DiTheVino
    extensive wine list is

    well-matched by the antipasti in
    this small, tunnel-shaped bar.
    d 73 Wyndham St • Map K5 • 2167 8883

    Fifth
    # One
    Unquestionably, this is one

    of Hong Kong’s buzziest bars of
    the moment. Take in the fabulous
    crowd, soaring ceilings and big
    city vibe. Also written as 1/5.
    d 9 Star St • Map K5 • 2520 2515

    V13

    $ The enormous selection of

    flavoured vodkas will keep the
    most jaded of drinkers occupied.
    Raise a glass to the thirsty
    inmates of Victoria Prison
    opposite. d 13 Old Bailey St • Map K5
    • SoHo • 9803 6650

    % Boca
    Spanish wines by the glass

    or bottle serve as the perfect
    accompaniment to a tapas-cumdim sum menu. Take a table on
    the street. d 65 Peel St • Map K5 •
    2548 1717

    Boa
    ^ Feather
    A former antique shop, now
    a bar, but with much of its old
    stock left in situ. Like drinking in

    64

    a camp relative’s front room. d 38
    Staunton St, Soho • Map 5 • 2857 2586

    ’97’
    & Club
    In its heyday, Madonna and

    Alain Delon drank at what was
    Post ’97. It’s quieter now, but
    that’s no bad thing. d Upper grd flr,
    9–11 Lan Kwai Fong • Map K5 • 2810 9333

    Chater Lounge
    * The
    Whiskey tumblers you need

    two hands to lift, carpets thick
    enough to break ankles, and
    obscene cigars – the setting of
    Sinatran fantasy. For players only.
    d Ritz Carlton, 3 Connaught Rd, Central
    • Map L5 • 2877 6666

    Club
    ( Fringe
    Hong Kong’s alternative arts
    venue offers a respite from Lan
    Kwai Fong’s rowdier beer halls.
    d 2 Lower Albert Rd, Central • Map K6
    • 2521 7251

    Bar
    ) Rice
    Pioneering the trendification

    of this area, the Rice Bar is a
    natural pit stop. It has a gay vibe,
    but straights are welcome.
    d 33 Jervois St, Western • Map K5
    • 2851 4800

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    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Restaurants

    ! Alibi
    The guest list is fabulous

    (Naomi Campbell to Chow Yun-fat);
    the food masterful updates of
    French cuisine. d 73 Wyndham St,
    SoHo • Map K5 • 2167 8989 • $$$

    Mandarin Grill
    @ The
    Benchmark Cantonese cuisine
    of the highest order, vertiginous
    harbour views, and service levels
    that would shame an imperial court.
    d Mandarin Oriental, 5 Connaught Rd
    • Map L5 • 2522 0111 • $$$$

    Fringe
    # MOneatoftheHong
    Kong’s first

    true independents, M has matured
    into a genuinely loved institution
    without losing its original
    funkiness. d 1/F, 2 Lower Albert Rd •
    Map K6 • 2877 4000 • $$$$

    $ Blue
    The glass frontage is integral:

    people come to be seen. But the
    high standard of modern Austra­lian cuisine ensures it an enduring
    reputation. d 43 Lyndhurst Terrace,
    SoHo • Map K5 • 2815 4005 • $$$

    1929
    % IndoChine
    An evocation of old Hanoi: all

    wooden shutters and muted pas­tels. The menu is a deft presenta­tion of Vietnam’s regional cuisines.

    food is the genuine article. d One
    Pacific Place • Map M6 • 2918 9833 • $$$$

    Kitchen
    & Jimmy’s
    A favourite for its naff décor

    (all dark wood and leather) and
    retro menu, Jimmy’s has dished
    out comfort food for generations.
    d 1–3 Wyndham St • Map K5 • 2526
    5293 • $$$

    Kee
    * Yung
    From its headset-toting

    waitresses to its efficient poultry
    kitchen (serving up 300 birds a
    day), Yung Kee is a riotous operation. Try the roast goose. d 32–40
    Wellington St • Map K5 • 2522 1624 • $$$

    ( Joyce
    More of a pageant than a

    restaurant, Joyce is a drop-in cen­tre for Hong Kong’s über-wealthy.

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northwest

    Left Blue Right Yung Kee

    d The Atrium, One Exchange Square
    • Map L5 • 2810 0807 • $$$

    Kee
    ) Kau
    Humble Kau Kee was once

    offered millions for its beef
    brisket noodle recipe. Taste and
    see why. This is a place of
    pilgrimage. d 21 Gough St • Map J5
    • 2850 5967 • No credit cards • $

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    d 2/F, California Tower, 30–32 D’Aguilar St
    • Map K5 • 2869 7399 • $$$$

    ^ YeTheShanghai
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    motifs, but the northern Chinese

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    65

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northeast

    Left Noonday gun Right Revolving restaurant, Hopewell Centre

    Hong Kong Island – Northeast

    T

    he east of the island was the first to take up the population pressures

    of the nascent colonial capital of Victoria, and until the late 1970s had a
    low rent reputation. Some of that survives in the haggard pole-dancing clubs
    and tattoo parlours of Wan Chai, the quarter where Richard Mason wrote The
    World Of Suzie Wong, and where generations of sailors have nursed hangovers.
    But today, you’re far more likely to run into Starbucks, serviced apartments and
    highly expensive office space. The night races at Happy Valley are where you’ll
    see Hong Kongers at their most fevered, while in Causeway Bay is the neon
    of restaurants and boutiques. Further out, there are
    worthy surprises among the unlovely warehouses
    and office blocks of Quarry Bay and Chai Wan – live
    jazz, microbreweries and dance clubs.
    Sights in the Northeast
    1
    2
    3

    Central Plaza

    4
    5

    Lockhart Road

    Noonday Gun
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    # Convention
    Exhibition Centre

    Plaza
    ! Central
    Perhaps the developers fig­-

    ured “Central Plaza” had more
    cachet than “Wan Chai Plaza”, or
    perhaps Wan Chai is more central
    than Central if you’re talking
    about the mid-point of the water­front. Anyway, this is Hong Kong’s
    second tallest building (after the
    new IFC Tower) at 374 m (1,227 ft),
    and has a viewing platform. d 18
    Harbour Rd, Wan Chai • Map N5 • 46/F
    viewing platform 9am–5pm Mon–Fri

    Gun
    @ Noonday
    Immortalised in Noel Coward’s
    famous song about Mad Dogs and
    Englishmen, the famous cannon
    has been fired at midday each
    day since 1860.
    Bigwigs pay for the
    privilege of firing it,
    with money going to
    charity. Otherwise, a
    gunner dressed in
    traditional military
    attire does the
    honours. Originally it
    was fired whenever
    the Taipan arrived or
    departed from Hong
    Kong. d Waterfront near
    the Causeway Bay typhoon
    shelter • Map Q5 • To fire
    gun (for a fee): 2599 6111

    • Map N5 • 2582 8888

    Road
    $ Lockhart
    Made famous in Richard

    Mason’s novel The World of Suzy
    Wong, Wan Chai’s sinful strip is
    these days an odd blend of girlie
    bars with doddery mama-san
    who saw action during the Viet­nam War and will rob you blind
    as soon as look at you; down-atheel discos; mock-British pubs;
    and super-trendy bars and
    restaurants. The road is almost
    always being dug up, adding to
    the hubbub. d Map M–P6

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northeast

    Central Plaza

    The building looks a bit like the
    Sydney Opera House might if its
    roof had just been swatted by a
    giant hammer. The designers,
    however, maintain that the
    flowing lines are meant to evoke
    a bird in flight. It’s certainly a
    study in contrast with the
    upthrust towers scratching the
    sky all around. There was a race
    against time to finish stage two
    of the $5 billion complex in time
    for the 1997 Handover ceremony.
    Britain’s loss and China’s gain is
    commemorated with a big black
    obelisk. The venue also hosts
    occasional raves and pop
    concerts. d 1 Expo Drive, Wan Chai

    Convention and Exhibition Centre

    For more on modern buildings See pp42–3

    67

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northeast

    Left Happy Valley racing Right Hopewell Centre

    Wan Chai
    % “Old”
    This might soon be labelled

    Hong Kong’s “Little Thailand”.
    Dozens of Thai mini-marts and
    hole-in-the-wall Thai restaurants
    have sprung up amid Wan Chai
    market in the narrow warren of
    lanes that run between Johnston
    Road and Queen’s Road East.
    You can find the same dishes
    here for a quarter of what you’ll
    pay in smart Thai restaurants just
    blocks away. d Map N6

    Valley Racecourse
    ^ Happy
    From September to June the
    thud of hooves on turf rings out
    most Wednesday nights from
    this famous racetrack – once a
    malaria-ridden swamp – where
    Hong Kong’s gambling-mad
    public wager more money per
    meeting than at any other track
    in the world. (See pp12–13.)

    Hopewell Centre

    & Construction

    mogul Gordon Wu has
    built roads in China
    and half-built a railway
    in Bangkok, but this
    remains his bestknown erection. The
    66-storey cylinder
    rears up behind Wan
    Chai, making diners
    dizzy in its revolving
    restaurant, R66. The
    food, frankly, is not up
    to much, but the view

    68

    What Became of
    Suzie Wong?
    Many first-time visitors to Hong
    Kong have one image of Wan
    Chai fixed firmly in their heads –
    that of the Luk Kwok Hotel with
    its tarts-with-hearts and rickshawcluttered surrounds from the film
    of Richard Mason’s novel The
    World of Suzie Wong. It’s an
    image that’s at least 40 years out
    of date. The original hotel was
    knocked down in 1988, and the
    soaring glass and steel tower that
    replaced it, bearing the same
    name, is full of offices and
    restaurants. Suzie might still
    survive, but if she does, she has
    gimlet eyes and a harridan’s scowl.

    makes up for it. Nighttimes are
    most spectacular, or perhaps a
    cocktail as the sun dips behind
    the harbour. d 183 Queen’s Rd East,
    Wan Chai • Map N6 • R66: 2862 6166

    Park
    * Victoria
    Hong Kong’s

    Victoria Park

    largest urban park
    opened in 1957, and
    features a bronze
    statue of the killjoy
    British monarch,
    which one “art activist”
    once redecorated with
    a can of red paint.
    There’s a swimming
    pool, tennis courts
    and lawn bowling
    greens. It’s also the

    A Day for Exploring
    Morning

    venue for the Chinese New Year
    Flower Market, and every Sunday
    at noon would-be politicians can
    stand up and shoot their mouths
    off at the forum. d Map Q–R5

    Bay
    ( Causeway
    Typhoon Shelter

    Barnacle-encrusted hulks and
    down-at-heel gin palaces rub
    gunwhales with multi-million
    dollar yachts in this packed haven
    from the “big winds” that
    regularly bear down on the
    South China coast. There are
    also quaint houseboats with
    homely touches like flower
    boxes permanently anchored
    behind the stone breakwater. The
    impressive edifice to the left as
    you look out to sea is the Hong
    Kong Yacht Club. d Map Q5

    Tin Hau Temple

    ) Not the biggest or best-

    known temple to the Chinese
    sea goddess but certainly the
    most accessible on Hong Kong
    Island. Worth a look if you’re in
    the area. This was once the
    waterfront, believe it or not.
    There’s usually a handful of
    worshippers burning incense and
    paying respects, although it may
    be packed during Chinese
    festivals. d Map R6

    Make your way down past
    Citibank’s imposing black
    towers to Pacific Place
    (see p63) for a coffee and
    some window shopping.
    Keep heading towards the
    harbour and you’ll see to
    your right the elegant
    sweep of the Convention
    and Exhibition Centre
    (see p67). Enjoy the
    harbour panorama through
    soaring glass walls.

    Afternoon

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northeast

    Causeway Bay

    Start off with a brisk stroll
    through Hong Kong Park,
    a green haven surrounded
    on all sides by thrusting
    towers of glass and con­crete. Chances are you’ll
    see several caparisoned
    couples awaiting their turn
    to be married at the
    Cotton Tree Drive Registry
    Office. Take time for a look
    through the Edward Youde
    Aviary, a spectacular
    creation of mesh arches
    replete with Southeast
    Asian birdlife.

    Return to Wan Chai for
    lunch. Lockhart Road(see
    p67) is as good a place as
    any. The sleazy joints are
    still slumbering, and there
    is decent pub grub, Thai,
    Mexican and Chinese food
    on offer (see p71).
    Hennessy Road is the
    place to jump on a tram to
    Causeway Bay, due east
    of Wan Chai, or you may
    prefer to go one stop on
    the MTR. If you want to
    go shopping, take the
    Times Square exit, and
    start exploring from there.
    Then leave the crush and
    chaos behind with a
    leisurely afternoon stroll
    through Victoria Park, and
    perhaps a cocktail in Totts,
    the eyrie atop the
    Excelsior hotel.

    69

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northeast

    Left Sogo Right Joe Bananas

    Places to Shop
    One
    ! Page
    The best bookshop in Hong

    Kong, not least because the
    books are all stacked facing
    outwards. Huge range of fiction
    and non-fiction at reasonable
    prices. d B1 Times Square, 1 Matheson
    St, Causeway Bay • Map P6

    Jusco

    @ One of Japan’s biggest dep-

    artment store chains. Lower rents
    to the east of the island translate
    into cheaper fashion, food and
    household goods. d Kornhill Plaza, 2
    Kornhill Rd, Quarry Bay • Map F5

    Sogo

    # With a fine range of mostly

    Japanese goods, Sogo is very
    popular among locals, though not
    up to Seibu’s standards (see
    p63) in the hipness stakes. d 555
    Hennessy Rd, Causeway Bay • Map P6

    Island Beverley

    $ An arcane arcade stuffed

    with tiny boutiques featuring the
    creations of talented young local
    designers. d 1 Great George St,
    Causeway Bay • Map Q5

    Fashion Walk

    % Lots more interesting bou-

    tiques here. The vibe is similar to
    the Island Beverley. Good place
    to find bargain cosmetics. Also,
    check out D-Mop. d Paterson St,
    Causeway Bay • Map Q5

    ^ J-01
    This store is cool bordering

    on crazy. The highlight of the hip

    70

    and happening design collections
    is the “Splatter Collection” by
    Japanese artist Dehara Yukinori.
    It’s hard to say if he’s trying to
    be comical or is seriously deranged. Either way, don’t miss
    his lurid, twisted figurines such
    as Killed Person and Brainman. d
    57 Paterson St, Causeway Bay • Map Q5

    & Mitsukoshi
    Another Japanese department
    store, less swanky than Sogo or
    Seibu. d 500 Hennessy Rd, Causeway
    Bay • Map P6

    * Marathon
    Sports

    Acres of trainers and sporty
    stuff. d Shop 616, 6/F Times Square, 1
    Matheson St, Causeway Bay • Map P6

    Ping
    ( Tai
    Carpets

    Lots of lush and lovely rugs.
    They’ll ship them home for you.
    d Shop 816, 8/F Times Square, Causeway
    Bay • Map P6

    Gardens
    ) Lee
    Prada, Paul Smith, Versace,

    Christian Dior and Cartier for the
    well-heeled. d 33 Hysan Ave,
    Causeway Bay • Map Q6

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    $$$$
    $$$$$

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    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
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    Places to Eat and Drink

    ! Tango
    Martini

    Wan Chai’s hippest bar has
    zebra-striped couches, Dean
    Martin-esque music, the best
    martinis and martini glasses in
    town, and classy food. d 3/F
    Empire Land Commercial Centre, 81-85
    Lockhart Rd • Map N6 • 2528 0855 • $$$

    Time After Time

    @ Tiny bar stuffed full of

    beautiful people. Good wine
    selection and great sounds. d 118
    Jaffe Rd, Wan Chai • Map N6 • 2865 0609

    Bananas
    # Joe
    Notorious meat market by

    night, good pub food by day. Avoid
    at all costs during Rugby Sevens
    week in March (see p37). d Cnr
    Luard and Jaffe Rds, Wan Chai • Map N6
    • 2529 1811 • $$

    Angelo’s
    $ Fat
    Vast servings of pasta. Too

    many trips here and you’ll look
    like the owner. Bread rolls the
    size of loaves. d 414 Jaffe Rd, Wan
    Chai • Map N6 • 2574 6263 • $$

    Orange Tree Bar and Grill

    % The latest evidence of Wan

    Chai’s renaissance. Dutch cuisine
    and wacky modern Dutch art on
    the walls. d 128 Lockhart Rd • Map N6

    leave during the Korean War.
    Excellent Peking duck. d 20
    Lockhart Rd • Map N6 • 2527 1000 • $$

    & YsA fusion Mediterranean-

    Asian menu by Melbourne’s
    award-winning chef Ezard keeps
    Ys buzzing. d JIA Boutique Hotel, 10
    Pennington St, Causeway Bay • Map Q6 •
    3196 9200 • $$

    Asian Grill and Bar
    * Totts
    Totts stands for “talk of the
    town”. It’s not, but it does have
    great fusion food, a sushi bar
    and panoramic views. d Excelsior
    Hotel, Gloucester Rd • Map Q5 • 2837
    6786 • $$$

    Circle
    ( Brecht’s
    Cream of the crop of stylish

    bar-restaurants around Causeway
    Bay. The mixed crowd is watched
    over by pop-art portraits of Hitler,
    Mao and Mussolini. d 123 Leighton
    Rd • Map Q6 • 2577 9636 • $$

    ) Brown
    Happy Valley has also been

    taken over by a host of trendy
    wine bars and eateries. The
    décor is, well, brown. d 18A Sing
    Woo Rd • 2891 8558 • $$

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    • 2866 4545 • $$

    American Peking
    Restaurant

    ^

    Around Hong Kong Island – Northeast

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    going strong. The name was a
    trick to attract US servicemen on
    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    71

    Around Hong Kong Island – South

    Left Giant panda, Ocean Park Right Floating Restaurants

    Hong Kong Island – South

    D

    espite the slow creep of floodlit housing estates to the east
    and west, the south of Hong Kong Island (or “Southside” as everyone
    calls it) retains more than enough rugged coastline, wooded upland and
    sequestered beach to startle anyone whose preconception of Hong Kong was
    wholly urban. Traffic from the city passes through the Aberdeen Tunnel and
    enters a bright and shiny landscape of golf clubs, marinas and opulent homes.
    There is good swimming at Repulse and Deep Water bays, and even, at Big
    Wave Bay, some acceptable surf. Over at Stanley, stallholders set out their
    coral beads and antique opium pipes, while at isolated Shek O, media types
    and young commuters snap up beachfront village
    houses. The Dragon’s Back ridge, plunging down
    the southeast corner, offers some of the island’s
    best walking, with views of the South China Sea.
    Sights in the South
    1 Aberdeen Harbour
    2
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    4
    5

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    Ap Lei Chau
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    Aberdeen Harbour

    Harbour
    ! Aberdeen
    Residential blocks crowd

    Aberdeen’s small, lovely harbour,
    which is still filled with highprowed wooden fishing boats
    despite the fact that overfishing
    and pollution have decimated the
    Hong Kong fishing industry.
    Ignore the ugly town centre and
    instead photograph the tyrefestooned sampans, or walk to
    the busy wholesale fish market
    at the western end of the
    harbour and watch the catches
    being loaded onto trucks and
    vans. d Map E5

    Restaurants
    @ Floating
    Also in Aberdeen Harbour

    are two giant floating restaurants, which are popular but
    garish, production-line eateries.
    The most famous, The Jumbo, is
    said to have served more than
    30 million people. Prices are not
    especially attractive, nor are the
    culinary achievements. Free
    ferries shuttle between these
    restaurants, and pushy sampan
    handlers also lie in wait for
    meandering tourists. Take one of
    these boats if you want to get a

    Park
    # Ocean
    This large theme park is

    Hong Kong’s answer to Disneyland, though when Hong Kong
    gets its own Disneyland in 2005,
    Ocean Park may seem like a poor
    relation. In the meantime, there’s
    enough to keep children and
    adults alike busy for a whole day.
    Attractions range from rollercoas­
    ters to giant pandas and great
    aquatic displays, such as Atoll
    Reef, which recreates the habitats
    and sealife of a coral reef (see
    also p54). d Map E5 • 2552 0291
    • www.oceanpark.com.hk • 10am–6pm
    daily, to midnight in high seasons • Adm

    Around Hong Kong Island – South

    good view of the
    harbour, boats and
    boatyards. However,
    when you want to eat,
    take a ferry from
    Aberdeen to Lamma
    Island’s many seafood
    restaurants instead
    (see p117). d Map E5

    Water Bay
    $ Deep
    There’s an almost Mediter­
    ranean air to the lovely beach
    and waterfront of Deep Water
    Bay, a popular place for beach
    lovers and the well-to-do who
    settle in the Bay’s upmarket
    housing. The smallish beach is
    protected by lifeguards and a
    sharknet, and the water is
    usually clean. As with most
    beaches in Hong Kong, it gets
    crowded in fine weather.
    d Map E5

    Left Fish market, Aberdeen Harbour Centre Aquarium, Ocean Park Right Deep Water Bay

    73

    Around Hong Kong Island – South

    Left Repulse Bay Right Shek O

    Bay
    % Repulse
    Another popular destination,

    Repulse Bay’s beach is clean and
    well-tended, if sometimes overcrowded with thousands of
    visitors. Eating and drinking
    choices range from small cafés
    on the beach to the Verandah
    (see p77), a classy restaurant run
    by the same group as the
    Peninsula Hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui.
    Try afternoon tea here. The Hong
    Kong Life Guards Club at the far
    southern end of the beach is
    also worth a look for its scores
    of statues of gods and fabulous
    beasts. d Map F5

    O
    ^ Shek
    Remote and undeveloped,

    the village of Shek O is worth
    the relatively lengthy train and
    bus ride necessary to reach it.
    The serenity is upset only at
    weekends by droves of sun
    worshippers heading for its
    lovely beach. A short walk to the
    small headland leads to striking
    rock formations, pounding waves
    and cooling South China Sea
    breezes. Surfing and
    body boarding

    House by the sea, Shek O


    74

    The Defence
    of Hong Kong
    The British made sure that Hong
    Kong was well defended from the
    sea, but it was always vulnerable
    to attack from the north. During
    World War II, the island fell to a
    Japanese attack via the mainland.
    Hundreds of civilians were
    interned in Stanley prison, and
    the well-kept cemetery nearby is
    the resting place of many who
    died either trying to defend Hong
    Kong or during the occupation.

    are often viable on Big Wave Bay,
    a short walk or taxi ride north.
    Head to the Black Sheep (see
    p77), a lovely bar and Mediterranean-style restaurant, for a
    post-ramble beer and a bite to
    eat. d Map F5

    Dragon’s Back
    & The
    This 4-mile (6-km) walk looks

    daunting on the map, but the
    route along the gently ascending
    ridge of the Dragon’s Back will
    not mean too much huffing and
    puffing for the reasonably fit. The
    reward is unbeatable views
    down to the craggy coastline of
    the D’Aguilar Peninsula, Big Wave
    Bay and genteel Shek O. At a
    gentle pace the walk should
    take about three hours,
    enough time to build
    up a good appetite
    when you arrive in
    Shek O. Take plenty of
    water. d Map F5

    * Stanley
    A former fishing village,

    Lei
    ( Ap
    Chau

    Supposedly the most densely
    populated island in the world,
    Ap Lei Chau (or Duck Island),
    opposite the Aberdeen
    waterfront, is crowded with new
    high-rise developments. Bargain
    hunters may find a visit to the
    discount outlets at the southern
    end of the island worthwhile
    (see p76). Close to the ferry pier
    are some small family businesses, boatyards and temples that
    have survived the modern
    developments. d Map E5

    Morning
    This circular tour of Hong
    Kong Island is perfectly
    feasible to complete in a
    day, so long as you don’t
    start too late.
    From Central, jump on an
    Aberdeen-bound bus,
    alighting close to Aberdeen harbour (see p73).
    Haggle for a sampan
    harbour tour offered by
    one of the pushy touts on
    the waterfront. Don’t
    expect an informative
    commentary. Keep a look
    out for Aberdeen’s few
    remaining houseboats.
    Avoid the production-line
    floating restaurants and
    opt instead for lunch at
    Repulse Bay, which is just
    a 15-minute bus ride away.
    Enjoy the beach and a swim,
    then take lunch either at
    one of the beachfront cafés
    or the upmarket Verandah
    (see p77). Alternatively,
    head to the supermarket
    behind the Verandah and
    create your own picnic.

    Around Hong Kong Island – South

    Stanley was one of the largest
    towns on the island before the
    British arrived and placed a fort
    on its strategic peninsula. Relics
    from both eras remain, but
    Stanley’s many excellent
    seafront restaurants and its
    extensive market are justifiably
    the main draws for visitors
    (see pp16–17).

    A Circular Tour

    Afternoon

    Chinese Cemetery

    ) Chinese
    Cemetery

    Stretching away on the hill above
    Aberdeen, the Chinese
    Cemetery is a great place for
    photographs, both of the
    cemetery itself and of the
    harbour beneath. Negotiating the
    steep, seemingly endless steps
    is quite an undertaking, though,
    especially on a hot day. d Map E5

    Just a short hop further
    south along the coast, the
    lovely town of Stanley is
    certainly worth a visit. If
    you haven’t yet eaten, the
    restaurants here are excellent, some with lovely sea
    views. Lose a couple of
    hours browsing for clothes
    and souvenirs in Stanley
    market, though admittedly
    it is not Hong Kong’s best
    market (see p39).
    If you want to get some
    walking in, take a short bus
    or taxi ride to Tai Tam
    country park. A path leads
    through to Wong Nai
    Chung Gap, from where
    buses and taxis head back
    into the city.

    75

    Around Hong Kong Island – South

    Left The Birdcage Centre The Verandah Right El Cid

    Designer Outlets in Ap Lei Chau
    Plaza
    ! Horizon
    This shabby, high-rise

    building on the edge of the
    island of Ap Lei Chau (see p75)
    is home to a number of outlets
    for discount clothing, warehouse
    furniture, antiques and home
    furnishings. A taxi from
    Aberdeen is probably the
    simplest way to reach it. d 2 Lee
    Wing St, Ap Lei Chau • Map E5

    Joyce Warehouse

    @ The extensive selection of

    clearance designer wear from
    the stores of Hong Kong chain
    Joyce are perhaps the main
    reward for struggling out to
    Horizon Plaza (above). You get
    discounts of 60 per cent on the
    likes of Armani. d 21/F Horizon Plaza

    # Replay
    A samples and warehouse
    shop with limited stocks of
    casual clothes, but great
    discounts, often around 80 per
    cent. d 7/F Horizon Plaza

    $ Inside
    A modest warehouse outlet

    of a smart interior furnishings
    chain. There’s a small range of
    clearance items at discounts that
    can be as high as 90 per cent.
    d 16/F Horizon Plaza

    Birdcage
    % The
    This one offers mostly

    original Chinese antiques and
    curios sourced by the owners of
    the Birdcage shop on the
    mainland. Items range from

    76

    portable antiques and curios to
    furniture. d 22/F Horizon Plaza

    Club
    ^ Toys
    A small shop offering an

    award-winning selection of
    educational toys at warehouse
    prices. d 9/F Horizon Plaza

    Crawford Outlet
    & Lane
    Slow-moving items and old

    stock from Hong Kong’s trendy
    department store are on sale
    here at much lower than orginal
    prices. d 25/F Horizon Plaza

    * Matahari
    Chinese antiques and

    reproductions, soft furnishings,
    silk Shanghai-style lamps and
    hand-painted children’s furniture
    are crammed into Matahari’s
    extensive store and wholesale
    warehouse. d 11/F Horizon Plaza

    ( Space
    Take your pick of last

    season’s bags, accessories,
    shoes and clothes by the
    inimitable Italian designer
    Miuccia Prada. Minimalist décor
    and layout ensure a true Prada
    experience. d 2/F East Commercial
    Block, Marina Square, South Horizons

    Flamingo
    ) Golden
    Lots of smaller knick-knacks

    alongside the bigger-ticket
    furniture at Golden Flamingo
    include a wide selection of
    attractive Chinese vases, picture
    frames and lacquer jewel boxes.
    d 27/F Horizon Plaza

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat and Drink
    Verandah
    ! The
    Indisputably Southside’s

    at Stanley
    ^ Saigon
    End a satisfying day in

    d 109 Repulse Bay Rd, Repulse Bay

    d 1st floor, 90 Stanley Main St • Map F6

    • Map F5 • 2315 3166 • $$$$

    • 2899 0999 • $$$

    Black Sheep
    @ The
    Stroll the quiet lanes of the

    Fat Hau
    & Tai
    With most Repulse Bay

    premier venue, the Verandah,
    with its candlelight, sea views
    and old colonial grandeur, is the
    place for big-budget romancing.

    bohemian enclave of Shek O on
    the southeast coast, and this
    veggie-friendly, organic café
    beckons. d 452 Shek O Rd, Shek O
    Village • Map F5 • 2809 2021 • $$

    Welcome Garden

    Stanley at this atmospheric
    Vietnamese restaurant.
    Romantics will gravitate towards
    the balcony tables at sunset.

    restaurants catering to the local
    millionaire residents, Tai Fat Hau
    is a budgetary godsend. Late
    opening (last orders 2:30am) is
    another plus. d 16 Beach Rd, Repulse
    Bay • Map F5 • 2812 2113 • $

    # Home-style Cantonese cook- * Balcony Café
    ing of unimpeachable authenti­
    OK, it’s part of a supermar­
    city, served up by the beach. d

    770 Shek O Rd, Shek O Village • Map F5
    • 2809 2836 • No credit cards • $$

    Fung Terrace
    $ Hei
    Despite the mall location,

    this is your safe bet for high-end
    Chinese dining in Repulse Bay.
    Come for sublime dim sum, then
    walk it off on the sparkling beach
    below. d Level 1, Repulse Bay Shopping Arcade • Map F5 • 2812 2622 • $$$$

    % ElAfterCidsangria and tapas on

    the wide colonial balcony of this
    upscale Spanish restaurant,
    Stanley takes on a faintly Iberian
    edge. El Cid also offers possibly
    the prettiest views available
    from the waterfront. d 102 Murray
    House, Stanley Plaza • Map F6 • 2899
    0858 • $$$$

    Around Hong Kong Island – South

    Saigon at Stanley

    ket, but breakfast on this sunny
    terrace with sea views is one of
    the Southside’s undiscovered
    bargains. d Park ‘N’ Shop, Stanley
    Plaza • Map F6 • 2813 5672 • $

    Inn
    ( Smuggler’s
    Stanley’s gentrification has

    thankfully bypassed the Smuggler’s Inn, which is a relic of the
    days when British soldiers from
    Stanley Fort blew half their
    wages here. d 90A Stanley Main St
    • Map F6 • 2813 8852 • $

    ) Lucy’s
    Perennially popular venue for
    bistro-style nosh, with Mediter­
    ranean influences. Vibes are
    relaxed, standards consistently
    above-par. Stanley’s answer to a
    light, well-bred lunch. d 64 Stanley
    Main St • Map F6 • 2813 9055 • $$

    Following pages Plover Cove, the New Territories

    77

    Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    O

    n one level, Tsim Sha Tsui (universally truncated to "TST" in a merciful
    gesture to non-Cantonese speakers) is still a parody of a tourist quarter
    in an Asian port: its tailors and camera salesmen do not suffer fools, its
    hostess bars are the scene of many a ruinous round of drinks. But there is
    also much more to TST than that. There is a profusion of world-class cultural
    venues, galleries and museums. There are hotels – the Peninsula, the InterContinental, the Langham – of jaw-dropping luxury. And in the monolith that
    is Harbour City is every product and service the
    human mind can conceive of.
    Sights in TST
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    52

    Museum of History

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    & + $7 + $0

    The Golden Mile

     

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5

    

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    Left Cultural Centre Centre Oysters, Sheraton Hotel Right Gargoyle, Boom Bar

    1RUWK
    3RLQW

    
    
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    Kowloon • Map N4 • See also p147

    of History
    # Museum
    Brand new and built at a
    The Golden Mile

    Golden Mile
    ! The
    This strip that stretches up

    Nathan Road from the waterfront
    could be more accurately dubbed
    the “neon mile”. It’s less glitzy
    than Central and comprises
    mainly bars, restaurants, tailors,
    camera and electronic shops and
    the odd desultory topless bar.
    The crowds are so great that
    walking the Golden Mile
    becomes a major challenge.
    d Map N1–4

    The Peninsula Hotel

    @ The last word in luxury

    accommodation and service. This
    venerable hotel sits like a proud
    old dowager, gazing sedately
    across at the vertiginous Hong
    Kong Island skyline. The cheapest
    rooms start where many other

    cost of almost HK$400 million.
    Half of that was spent on its
    pièce de résistance, the Hong
    Kong Story, which attempts to
    chronicle the 400 million-odd
    years since Hong Kong coalesced
    from the primordial ooze.
    Controversy lurks, however, in its
    cursory treatment of the colonial
    era. The panel of governors’
    portraits ends at Sir Mark Young,
    who left in 1941. d 100 Chatham Rd

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    luxury hotels stop, although
    special offers sometimes apply.
    A night in the opulent Peninsula
    suite will set you back the price
    of a new car. It boasts eight bars
    and restaurants, including the
    Philippe Starck-designed Felix
    and cognoscenti-favoured Gaddi’s
    (see p87). If you desire, you can
    swoop onto the roof by helicopter. Otherwise you’ll be collected
    by Rolls-Royce. d Salisbury Rd,

    South • Map M3 • 2724 9042 • 10am–6pm
    Mon & Wed–Sat, 10am–7pm Sun • Adm

    Museum
    $ Space
    When you’ve had enough of

    history, come and peek into the
    future. This odd-looking dome in
    the heart of Tsim Sha Tsui includes
    an omnimax theatre and interactive
    exhibits such as the jetpack ride.
    d Cultural Centre Complex, 10 Salisbury
    Rd • Map N4 • 2721 0226 • 10am–9pm
    Sat, Sun, 1pm–9pm Mon, Wed–Fri.
    Closed Tue • Adm (free Wed)

    Left Museum of History Right Space Museum

    81

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    Left Science Museum Right Cultural Centre

    Museum
    % Science
    Some fascinating interactive

    displays here if you don’t mind
    fighting your way through the
    giggling, pushing throngs of
    schoolchildren. There are enough
    buttons to push, gadgets to
    grapple with and levers to tweak
    to satisfy even the most hard-toplease kids. Basic principles of
    chemistry, physics, biology and
    other sciences are explained but
    in a much more entertaining and
    less dry manner than in the
    classroom. d 2 Science Museum Rd
    • Map P3 • 2732 3232 • 10am–9pm Sat,
    Sun, 1pm–9pm Tue–Fri • Adm

    Chungking Mansions
    This grim and squalid collection of
    guesthouses, flops and fleapits
    amid the glitter of Nathan Road
    has become the stuff of legend
    over the years, resisting attempts
    to knock it down. The bottom
    three floors are full of fabric
    shops, fast-food joints and lurid
    video shops. You may trip over a
    collapsed drug addict in amongst
    the rats and firetrap wiring.
    Hong Kong auteur Wong Karwai made this the setting of his
    1994 hit film, Chungking Express.
    The best way to experience the
    Mansions is in one of the cheap
    Indian restaurants (see p87).

    of Art
    ^ Museum
    You may well be fed up with
    Mosque
    & Kowloon
    museums by this point. If not,
    When the muezzin calls the
    here you’ll find oil paintings,
    etchings, lithographs and
    calligraphy. One display features
    pottery shards and suchlike from
    southern China dating back to
    Neolithic times, and there is also
    a fine collection of elegant
    porcelain from various Chinese
    dynasties. d 10 Salisbury Rd • Map N4

    faithful to prayer, the Jamia
    Masjid Islamic Centre is where
    you’ll find most of Hong Kong’s
    Muslims. You can stop by for a
    look, but take your shoes off and
    be respectful. Entry to the inner
    part is not permitted unless you
    are a Muslim come for prayer.

    • 2721 0116 • 10am–6pm Mon–Wed,
    Fri–Sun. Closed Thu • Adm (free on Wed)

    • 5am–10pm daily • Jumah (Friday) prayers
    at 1:15pm

    d 105 Nathan Rd • Map N3 • 2724 0095

    Centre
    * Cultural
    With a peerless view beckon-

    Museum of Art

    82

    ing across the water, the geniuses
    in charge decided to build the
    world’s first windowless
    building, and covered it for good
    measure in pink public toiletstyle tiles. Wander around and
    marvel at one of the great archi-

    d 10 Salisbury Rd

    Clocktower

    • Map M–N4 • Box
    office 10am–9.30pm
    daily • 2734 9009

    ( Clocktower
    The Kowloon-Canton Rail-

    way, which now ends at Hung
    Hom, used to finish at this clocktower, as did the rather more
    famous Orient Express (see also
    p14). A newly-opened extension
    now once again brings trains to
    the tip of Kowloon. From here,
    you can walk for more than a
    kilometre around the TST
    waterfront and marvel at the odd
    optimistic fisherman dangling a
    line in the harbour. d Map M4

    Park
    ) Kowloon
    While in TST, if you feel one
    more whisper of “Copy watch?
    Tailor?” may provoke you to
    irrational violence, then venture
    through the park gates, find a
    well-shaded bench and watch
    the world go by. There’s a big
    swimming pool (reputed to be
    something of a gay cruising
    zone), an aviary and a pond
    featuring flamingos and other
    aquatic birdlife. d Haiphong Rd
    • Map M–N3 • 6am–midnight daily

    A Morning Out
    Early Morning
    Catch the Star Ferry (see
    pp14-15) to TST. As you
    come in, check out the
    vast West Kowloon
    Reclamation to the left. If
    the Mass Transit Railway
    Corporation has its way, a
    vast tower that will vie for
    world’s tallest building
    honours will stand here
    within four or five years.
    If you’re still standing after
    the stampede to disembark
    (be wary of pyjama-clad
    old ladies), saunter past
    the old clocktower, pause
    to take in one of the world’s
    most breathtaking views,
    then cross Salisbury Road
    and stop for tea at the
    Peninsula Hotel (see p81).
    From here, brave the crush
    and bustle of the Golden
    Mile (see p81). Unless you
    want a new suit or dress,
    do not make eye contact
    with the legion of touts
    who have never heard the
    word “no”. Walk straight
    by. They are merciless if
    they sense weakness.

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    tectural debacles
    of the 20th century.
    That said, it hosts
    some good dance
    and theatre.

    Brunch
    When you’ve had enough
    of the smog-shrouded
    streets, hawkers and
    being jostled, cross
    Haiphong Road into
    Kowloon Park. There is
    plenty of space here to
    pause and do some
    serious people-watching.
    You’ll probably be getting
    peckish by now. Head
    back down Nathan Road
    to Joyce Café, for reasonably-priced vegetarian fare
    and an earful of tai-tais
    (wealthy housewives)
    comparing the morning’s
    purchases. The espressos
    and capuccinos are firstrate; the vegetable
    lasagna delicious.

    Kowloon Park

    83

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    Left Chungking Mansions Centre Kowloon Park Right Spoon

    Spots to People-Watch
    Avenue
    ! The
    Ask for a table near the street,

    preferably under the glass-roofed
    section of the restaurant. Floor-toceiling plate glass windows
    provide the perfect vantage point
    to look down on Nathan Road’s
    passing parade. (Imaginative
    fusion food, too.) d 50 Nathan Rd
    • Map N4 • 2315 1118 • $$$

    Chungking Mansions

    & Spoon
    Since Alain Ducasse opened

    it, Spoon has been the venue of
    choice for Hong Kong’s most
    beautiful people. Look at them or
    at the 550 spoons on the ceiling.
    d Hotel Intercontinental, 18 Salisbury Rd
    • Map N4 • 2721 1211 • $$$$$

    @ Hours of harmless fun to be * The Langham Hotel
    had watching the endless stream
    Understated and elegant,
    of freaks, geeks and desperados
    being accosted by a legion of
    touts (see also pp82, 87 & 152).

    Mansions
    # Mirador
    Not as famous as its above-

    mentioned neighbour, but entertaining nonetheless. More weirdos.
    More confused backpackers.
    d 54-64 Nathan Rd • Map N4

    Park
    $ Kowloon
    Best spot is on the benches

    near the fountain in the centre of
    the park. In summer, there is a
    constant and colourful proces­
    sion along the path (see p83).

    Felix

    % If the wallet won’t stand up
    to a meal, just drink in the bar
    and watch everyone watching
    everyone else (see p87).

    City
    ^ Harbour
    A people-watcher’s paradise.

    Massive labyrinth of interconnec­
    ted malls with plenty of cafés
    and benches to park upon and

    84

    soak up the orgy of conspicuous
    consumption (see opposite).

    For price categories See p87

    the Langham attracts clientele of
    the same ilk, such as screen star
    Michelle Yeoh, perhaps on her
    way to T’ang Court. d 8 Peking Rd
    • Map M4

    ( Hèagen-Dazs
    A frosty oasis when the

    mercury soars, with a glass bar
    and stools to perch upon while
    you gaze out at the hot and
    harried shoppers elbowing each
    other along the Golden Mile.
    d Cnr Nathan Rd and Peking Rd • Map N4

    Pub
    ) Chaser’s
    Primo people-watching along
    groovy Knutsford Terrace, one of
    Hong Kong’s best-kept secrets.
    d 2-3 Knutsford Terrace • Map N3
    +PSEBO

    5TJN4IB
    5TVJ

    Places to Shop
    City
    ! Harbour
    There are at least 700 shops

    in this vast agglomeration of malls
    stretching the length of Canton
    Road. It comprises the Ocean
    Terminal, Ocean Centre and
    Golden Gateway complexes. For
    serious shoppers only. d Canton
    Rd • Map M3–4

    Granville Road

    @ Great for souvenir T-shirts, all
    manner of big label knock-offs
    and factory seconds. Also top
    value at chain stores like Bossini
    and Giordano. d Map N3

    # Joyce
    Founder Joyce Ma is a Hong
    Kong icon. Her flagship store is
    in Central, but the Nathan Road
    outlet is also impressive, particularly if you have a penchant for
    Prada. d Glo Gateway Centre, Canton
    Rd • Map N4

    Rise Commercial Building

    $ It doesn’t look much from

    outside, but within you’ll
    discover a trendsetter’s utopia.
    d Cnr Chatham Rd South and Granville
    Rd • Map N3

    Centre
    % Beverley
    This was the original beacon
    of cool in TST. Floor after floor of
    mini-boutiques from young local
    designers. d 87-105 Chatham Rd
    South • Map N3

    stogies here. d Shop EL3, The
    Peninsula arcade • Map N4

    House
    & Star
    Top place for computers,

    software and all things geeky.
    Don’t be afraid to bargain. d 3
    Salisbury Rd • Map M4

    ’R’ Us
    * Toys
    Probably their biggest branch
    in Hong Kong. Kids will love it,
    your bank manager may not.

    d Shop 032, Ocean Centre • Map M4

    ( Fortress
    If you’re after electronic

    goods and baffled by the sheer
    number of shops around TST,
    chain store Fortress is a good
    bet. Other shops may advertise
    cheaper prices, but not all
    dealers are honest. d Shop 3281,

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    Left Harbour City shopping mall Right Joyce

    Ocean Centre • Map M4

    Wan
    ) Pacino
    One of Hong Kong’s best-

    known fashion tyros; the Chinese
    Vivienne Westwood. Nothing is
    sacred – not even Her Brittanic
    Majesty, whose visage can be
    seen looking most unamused on
    Wan’s lurid creations. d Shop 2045,
    Miramar Centre • Map N3
    +PSEBO

    5TJN4IB
    5TVJ

    ^ Davidoff
    If cigars are your thing,

    there’s an impressive array of

    85

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    Left Schnurrbart Centre Oyster Bar, Sheraton Hotel Right Morton’s of Chicago

    Places to Drink
    Spirit
    ! Aqua
    Sit in a cubbyhole facing the

    ales on offer take a while to
    pour. Perhaps a schnapps while
    you wait… d 9 Prat Ave • Map N3

    d 29/F, 1 Peking Rd • Map M4

    & Balalaika
    Chilled vodka shots in a

    window and sip a glass of bubbly
    as you watch the harbour light up.

    Lobby Lounge
    @ The
    The best harbour views in
    Hong Kong are to be found in
    the lobby of the superb Hotel
    Intercontinental. They are well
    worth the price of the drinks.
    d 18 Salisbury Rd • Map N4

    # Phonograph
    The music ranges from indie
    rock to metal to reggae, much to
    the delight of regulars who used
    to haunt Chemical Suzy at the
    same address. d G/F, 2 Austin Ave
    • Map N2

    Bar
    $ The
    An upscale watering hole

    that serves as a delightful refuge
    from the madding crowds – but
    prepare to pay through the nose
    for beverages. d 1/F The Peninsula •
    Map N4

    % Biergarten
    This is Hong Kong where

    land is at a premium, so despite
    the name don’t expect a garden.
    Do expect an authentically
    German hearty friendliness,
    plenty of German beers on tap,
    and a German menu. Stays open
    until 2am. d 5 Hanoi Rd • Map N3

    ^ Schnurrbart
    German brewing at its

    finest, although the delicious

    86

    room at freezer temperatures. A
    fur coat is provided (see p87).

    Mama’s
    * Bahama
    A little worn around the

    edges, but still the best watering
    hole on trendy Knutsford Terrace.
    DJs play a range of sounds, there’s
    table football (“foosball”), surfboards and alcoholic slurpees.
    d 4–5 Knutsford Tce • Map N3

    Up
    ( Bottom’s
    Horribly, horribly sad and

    tacky – it featured in James
    Bond’s The Man With the Golden
    Gun. Worth a look, just for historical purposes, of course. d 14
    Hankow Rd • Map N3

    Kelly’s Last Stand
    ) Ned
    This place has been here

    forever, as has the jazz band. An
    opportunity to get your feet
    tapping to tunes by the crustiest,
    most grizzled bunch of musicians
    this side of New Orleans. d 11A
    Ashley Rd • Map N3
    +PSEBO

    

    5TJN4IB
    5TVJ

    

    Price Categories
    For a three-course

    $
    meal for one with half
    $$
    a bottle of wine (or
    $$$
    equivalent meal) and $$$$
    extra charges.
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat
    and Wine Bar
    ! Oyster
    Sublime view and oysters so

    fresh they flinch when you
    squeeze a lemon on them. d 18/F
    Sheraton Hotel, 20 Nathan Rd • Map N4
    • 2369 1111 • $$$

    @ Felix
    The food is fantastic, the

    view better and the bar crammed
    with the rich and famous. The
    highlight, for men at least, are
    the cheeky Philippe Starckdesigned urinals, where you
    relieve yourself against a glass
    wall and feel like you’re showering Hong Kong. d 28/F, The Peninsula
    • Map N4 • 2315 3188 • $$$$$

    Morton’s of Chicago

    # Carnivore’s paradise. Huge

    slabs of cow, aged and cooked
    to perfection. d 4/F Sheraton Hotel
    • Map N4 • 2732 2343 • $$$

    $ Dynasty
    Cantonese cuisine at its

    best. d 4/F New World Renaissance
    Hotel, 22 Salisbury Rd • Map N4 • 2369
    4111 ext. 6361 • $$

    % Balalaika
    The décor is more rustic

    than Russian. Try piroshkies,
    borscht or a cold shot of Stoli.
    d 2/F, 10 Knutsford Tce • Map N3 • 2312

    Asia’s finest restaurants. d 1/F The
    Peninsula • Map N4 • 2315 3171 • $$$$$

    & Delaney’s
    Reasonably authentic Irish

    menu and great range of draught
    ales and whiskeys. Also lots of
    dim lighting and cosy nooks. d
    Basement, 71–77 Peking Rd • Map N4 •
    2312 7062 • $$

    * Gaylord
    This place has been going

    for almost 30 years. Live Indian
    music complements delicious
    curries. d 1/F Ashley Centre, 223–225
    Ashley Rd • Map N3 • 2376 1001 • $$

    Around Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui

    Gaylord

    Mansions
    ( Chungking
    No hygiene awards here, but

    it has to be done at least once.
    Follow the touts into the heart of
    darkness for one of the best and
    cheapest Indian meals you’ve
    ever had. Safe bets are the Delhi
    Club, Taj Mahal Club and the
    Khyber Pass Mess. (See also
    pp82, 84 & 152.) d Map N4 • $

    ) Hutong
    Updated Northern Chinese

    classics in theatrically lit towertop restaurant. d 28/F, I Peking Rd •
    Map M4 • 3428 8342 • $$$
    +PSEBO

    6222 • $$

    ^ Gaddi’s
    Impeccable French cuisine,

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    irreproachable service and
    famous patrons. Gaddi’s has
    earned its reputation as one of

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    87

    Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok
    and Prince Edward

    G

    ritty, proletarian and utterly engrossing, Yau Ma Tei and Mong

    Kok provide a heady mix of karaoke bars, dodgy doorways and street
    markets before terminating in the more upscale apartments of Prince Edward.
    If Hong Kong has an emotional heartland, then it is these hectic streets,
    every paving slab the scene of some delicious hustle. Within living memory
    there were open fields here, but now all is uncompromising Cantonese
    ghetto. Come for some of Hong Kong’s best shopping, restaurants of rowdy
    authenticity and a sensuous barrage that will linger in your mind.
    Sights
    Flower Market
    Tin Hau Temple
    Temple Street

    Façade detail, Tin Hau temple

    Jade Market

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    Around Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward

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    d Flower Market Rd

    Hau
    # Tin
    Temple

    Bird Garden

    Garden
    ! Bird
    The small but pretty Bird

    Garden is where local folk,
    mostly elderly, take their birds to
    sing and get some fresh air.
    There’s also a small bird market
    here selling sparrows, finches
    and songbirds in elegant little
    cages. Fresh bird food, in the
    form of live grasshoppers, is fed
    to the birds through the cage
    bars with chopsticks. d Yum Po St

    Flower Market

    @ Near the Bird Garden is a

    vibrant flower market, at its best
    and brightest in the morning. The
    stalls and shops lining the entire

    The Tin Hau temple in Yau Ma Tei
    is divided into three sections.
    Only one of these is actually
    devoted to Tin Hau, the sea
    goddess who is Hong Kong’s
    favourite deity and essentially its
    patron. Admittedly, it is neither
    the oldest nor the grandest
    temple in the territory, but it is
    pretty nonetheless. The other
    two sections are dedicated to
    Shing Wong, the god of the city,
    and To Tei, the god of the earth.
    Officially no photography is
    allowed anywhere inside the
    temple. English-speaking visitors
    should head for a couple of stalls
    at the far end of the temple,
    where they can have their
    fortunes told in English. d Map M1
    • 8am–5pm daily

    Street
    $ Temple
    Night Market

    Visit the chaotic, crowded night
    market on Temple Street as
    much for the spectacle as for the
    shopping (see pp18–19).

    Around Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward

    length of Flower Market Road
    sell a wide variety of exotic
    flowers – a wonderfully colourful
    sight and a good place to take
    photographs. The busy market is
    especially exciting to visit during
    the Chinese New Year (see p36).

    Left Flower market Right Tin Hau temple

    For more about Hong Kong’s markets See pp38–9

    89

    Around Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward

    Left Quiet lane near Yau Ma Tei’s Tin Hau Temple Centre Jade for sale Right Shanghai Street

    Market
    % Jade
    The small, covered Jade

    Market is worth a quick forage
    even if you’re not intending to
    buy any jade. Dozens of stalls
    sell jewellery, small animals
    (many representing characters
    from the Chinese zodiac) and
    beads in jade. There will be few
    bargains on sale, particularly to
    those without a knowledge of
    good jade, but there’s plenty of
    cheap jade here if you just want
    to own some trinkets. d Kansu St
    • Map M1

    Market
    ^ Ladies
    The term “ladies” is

    somewhat out of date, as there’s
    plenty more than women’s
    clothing here. The shopping area
    consists of three parallel streets:
    Fa Yuen Street, crammed mostly
    with sports goods and trainer
    shops; Tung Choi Street (the
    former ladies market); and Sa
    Yeung Choi Street, specializing in
    consumer electronics. Market
    stall prices are cheap, and shop
    prices are better than those on
    Hong Kong Island. The crowds
    can be tiring, though, especially
    on hot days. d Map E4

    Kowloon
    & West
    Reclamation

    Currently a pedestrian no-go
    area, the reclaimed land of West

    90

    The Triads
    Overcrowded Mong Kok is the
    heartland of the Hong Kong triad
    gangs. The triads originated in
    17th-century China as secret
    societies who tried to reinstall the
    Ming dynasty after the Manchus
    took over. Though they have been
    given a romantic image in
    literature and the cinema, the
    modern-day reality is of sleaze
    and slayings. Tourists are unlikely
    to be a target, however, so don’t
    be put off visiting this exciting
    district of Hong Kong.

    Kowloon is a jumble of road
    intersections and messy building
    sites. It will also be the site of
    what is projected to be the world’s
    tallest building, assuming it goes
    ahead (see pp42–3). The 480-m
    (1,575-ft) high Kowloon Station
    Tower is due for completion in
    2006 or 2007 and will cost an
    estimated HK$20 billion
    (US$2.56 billion). d Map L1–3

    Street
    * Boundary
    History is visible in the rulerstraight line of Boundary Street,
    which marked the border
    between British Hong Kong and
    China between 1860 and 1898.
    The lower part of the Kowloon
    Peninsula was ceded (supposedly in perpetuity) by China to
    the British, who wanted extra

    d Map E4

    Street
    ( Shanghai
    The whole area around

    Shanghai and Reclamation
    streets is a traditional Chinese
    neighbourhood, if somewhat less
    vibrant and seedier than it was a
    few years ago. Interesting nooks
    and shops include funeral
    parlours, herbalists, health tea
    shops, paper kite shops and, at
    21 Ning Po Street, a shop selling
    pickled snakes. d Map E4

    Street
    ) Reclamation
    Market

    If you haven’t seen a Hong Kong
    produce market in full swing,
    you could do worse than wander
    down Reclamation Street. This
    predominantly fruit and
    vegetable market will provide
    some good photo opportunities.
    The squeamish, however, may
    want to avoid wandering inside
    the municipal wet market
    building where livestock is
    freshly slaughtered and expertly
    eviscerated on the spot. d Map E4

    Down the Peninsula
    Early Morning
    Take the MTR to Prince
    Edward to start at the top
    of the Kowloon Peninsula,
    near the old Chinese
    border at Boundary
    Street. Take Exit B2 and
    head to the Bird Garden
    via the flower shops and
    stalls on Flower Market
    Road (see p89). Testament
    to the Chinese love of exotic goldfish, the stalls at
    the top of Tung Choi Street
    sell a surprising variety of
    shapes and colours.
    Cheap shops and market
    stalls abound a short walk
    away to the south on the
    streets below Argyle
    Street and east of Nathan
    Road. Pedestrians also
    abound - some 150,000
    souls live in every square
    kilometre of this part of
    the Peninsula.
    Crossing Nathan Road,
    head to the Jade Market
    for jewellery and figurines.
    If you want the best
    choice of jade, arrive
    before lunchtime because
    some of the stallholders
    pack up after this.

    Early Afternoon
    Take a breather in the
    small, pleasant square
    across the way and watch
    the world go by with the
    elderly locals, or peep
    inside the busy Tin Hau
    Temple (see p89). Then
    break for a rough and
    ready cheap Chinese lunch
    in the covered canteens
    on the corner of Pak Hoi
    and Temple streets.

    Around Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward

    land for army training and commerce. The British then became
    worried over water shortages
    and wanted yet more land to
    protect Hong Kong Island from
    the threat of bombardment from
    newly invented long-range
    artillery. In 1898 the border was
    moved again to include the
    entire New Territories, this time
    on a 99-year lease (see p30).

    After lunch explore the
    produce stalls along
    Reclamation Street and
    the old Chinese district
    around Shanghai Street.
    Kitchen utensils shop, Shanghai Street

    91

    Around Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward

    Left Chan Chi Kee Cutlery Right The Lobby Lounge

    Funky Shops
    Wah
    ! King
    Building

    Uncrowded mall with funky
    street clothing, accessories,
    handbags and watches. There’s
    genuine vintage denim and other
    70s and 80s rarities, and kitsch
    Japanese cartoon ephemera
    aplenty. d 628 Nathan Rd

    @ ITSmart, minimalist outlet for
    sleek Japanese and American
    street clothes and accessories.

    d 2/F IN’s Square, 26 Sai Yeung Choi St

    # Izzue
    Another good place for

    hepcats and urban warriors to
    find the right tops and dancing
    trousers for a night out.
    d 1/F, IN’s Square, 26 Sai Yeung Choi St

    Pro
    $ Sony
    Shops

    Com% Mongkok
    puter Centre

    Not such good deals
    on computer hardware
    and software as in
    Sham Shui Po but
    convenient for a huge
    selection of games
    and accessories.
    d 8A Nelson St

    92

    Conveniently located outlet of an
    extensive Hong Kong chain
    selling cosmetics of every shade
    and type at very low prices.
    d 34 Argyle St

    Fan
    & Ban
    Floriculture

    The porcelain and ceramic vases
    and wicker-work flower baskets
    are not likely to win awards for
    chic or design, but the choice is
    impressive and the prices are
    reasonable. d 28 Flower Market Rd

    Chi Kee
    * Chan
    Cutlery

    Cheap, sturdy woks, steamers,
    choppers and pretty much
    everything else you might desire
    for the well-equipped kitchen.
    d 316–318 Shanghai St

    Head to the Sony Vaio, Walkman
    and Playstation Pro Shops for the
    latest audio and video gems
    among Sim City’s computer
    shops. d Sim City, Chung
    Kiu Commercial Building,
    47–51 Shan Tung St

    ^ Sasa
    Cosmetics

    1SJODF&EXBSE

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    ( Sandy
    Your one-stop shop in the

    jade market for pearls, beads
    and jewellery of all sorts. Go
    between 11am and
    4pm. d Jade Market stall
    .POH,PL

    413–414, Kansu St

    Yuen
    ) FaCommercial

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    Audio and videophiles
    will be in their
    element here, among
    the very latest in
    sleek gadgets at
    competitive prices.
    d 75–77 Fa Yuen St

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Cheap and Chinese Eats
    Fook Heen
    ! Tak
    Decent Cantonese food

    including good, cheap dim sum.
    d B/F, Stanford Hotel, 118 Soy St • 2710
    4213 • $$

    Ping Koon
    @ Tai
    Hong Kong’s version of

    Pub & Café
    ^ KK
    You can’t miss this lively,

    place with a cigar-smoking gorilla
    looming over the entrance. Basic
    Chinese and Western food, and
    beer. d F/F, 44-58 Soy Street, Mong
    Kok • 2388 7115 • $$

    western food at a branch of a
    century-old chain. Try the
    “Swiss” (sweet) sauce chicken.
    d 19–21 Mau Lam St • 2384 3385 • $

    Long Pakistan
    & Ah
    Halal Food

    Chai Kee
    # Mui
    A great stop for a pot of tea

    Woosung St • Map N2 • 2782 1635 • No
    credit cards • $

    and some fruit jellies and lotus
    paste buns. The adventurous
    might try the bird’s nest and egg
    tarts or double boiled frog’s
    oviduct with coconut milk. d G/F,
    120 Parkes St • Map N2 • 2388 8468 • No
    credit cards • $

    A good bet if you fancy a spicy
    curry, although the surroundings
    aren’t pretty. d G/F, Tak Lee Bldg, 95

    * Fairwood
    Part of a large Chinese fast

    food chain, this branch has CD
    listening posts and some
    Internet terminals. d B/F, King Wah
    Centre, 620-628 Nathan Rd • 2302 1003
    • No credit cards • $$

    Restaurant
    $ Peking
    Peking duck is the speciality,
    Lobby Lounge
    ( The
    or try Yangzhou fried rice with
    Deserves a mention for its
    ham and peas at this gently
    ageing, charming restaurant.

    glass atrium, quiet outdoor
    seating, terrific coffee and
    afternoon tea menus. d 4/F, The

    d F/F 227 Nathan Rd • Map N2 •
    2735 1316 • No credit cards


    $$

    Eaton Hotel, 380 Nathan Rd
    • Map N1 • 2710 1863 • $$

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    % Saint’s
    Teahouse

    Quirky snacks and an
    intriguing menu of teas
    in a contemporary
    Taiwan-style Chinese
    teahouse, which is
    one of an extensive
    chain. d 61a Shantung St
    • 2782 1438 • No credit
    cards • $

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    Vegetarian

    Familiar mock-meat
    dishes on the à la
    carte menu, but the
    real steal is the ample
    lunchtime buffet, which
    includes desserts and
    a pot of tea. d 13 Jordan

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    Around Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok and Prince Edward

    Left Saint’s Alp Teahouse Right KK Pub & Café

    Rd • Map N2 • 2384 2833 •
    No credit cards • $

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    93

    Around Kowloon – New Kowloon

    Left Temple prayer sticks and incense Right Lion Rock

    New Kowloon

    T

    he site of the old airport, Kai Tak has not been allowed to lie

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    driving range. In the neighbouring streets are excellent budget dining and
    seconds outlets, for this is where locals go bargain-hunting. Culture is
    found to the north, in the Tang Dynasty-style
    architecture of the Chi Lin Nunnery or the joyful
    chaos of Wong Tai Sin Temple.
    Sights in New Kowloon
    1
    2
    3

    Wong Tai Sin Temple

    4
    5

    Oriental Golf City

    6
    7
    8
    9
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    Kowloon Walled City
    Park
    Chi Lin Nunnery

    Lei Yue Mun
    Fat Jong Temple
    Lei Chung Uk Tomb
    Hau Wong Temple
    Apliu Street

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    Tai Sin Temple
    ! Wong
    A noisy, colourful affair,

    Wong Tai Sin is always crowded
    and aswirl with incense smoke.
    Legend holds that Wong Tai Sin
    (originally known as Huang Chuping), who was born in Zhejiang
    Province around AD 328, could
    see the future and make wishes
    come true. The temple opened in
    1921, after a Taoist priest brought
    a sacred portrait of Huang to Hong
    Kong. Its vivid, stylised architecture contrasts sharply with the
    surrounding concrete boxes.
    Worshippers from the three main
    Chinese religions – Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism – flock
    here, not to mention 100-odd
    soothsayers hawking their services. Find out for yourself if they
    are as accurate as Huang. Behind
    the temple is an ancient and
    mysterious tomb that still baffles
    historians. d Map F4 • 7am–5:30pm

    Walled City Park
    # Kowloon
    One of Hong Kong’s most

    picturesque parks began life in
    1847 as a Chinese fort. A legal
    oversight by the British left the
    fort under Chinese control after
    the New Territories were leased
    to Britain. It was levelled during
    World War II, and a labyrinthine
    ghetto called the Walled City
    sprang up in its place. This bizarre
    place quickly became a magnet
    for triads, drug dealers, heroin
    addicts, pornographers and rats
    the size of small dogs (see p96).
    It was pulled down in 1992 and
    replaced by the park. A display of
    photographs in the almshouse
    near the entrance tells the story.

    Around Kowloon – New Kowloon

    Left Smoky offerings Right Wong Tai Sin Temple

    d Map E4

    Rock
    @ Lion
    One of the best places to

    view this fascinating natural
    landmark is, conveniently, from
    outside Wong Tai Sin temple.
    Find the open area near the
    fortune tellers’ stalls where you
    can look straight up at what from
    this angle resembles the grizzled
    head of a male lion. Those
    feeling energetic may be
    tempted to scale its heights.
    Take lots of water, and be
    warned – the top section is not
    for the faint-hearted. d Map E4

    Maze, Kowloon Walled City Park

    Golf City
    $ Oriental
    This is, reputedly, the world’s
    biggest driving range, with more
    than 200 bays. Whack away to
    your heart’s content – unless
    you’re well-connected or seriously
    rich, this is as close as you’ll get
    to a golf course in Hong Kong.
    d Kai Tak Runway, Kai Fuk Rd • Map F4
    • 2522 2111 • 7am–midnight • Adm

    95

    Around Kowloon – New Kowloon

    Chi Lin Nunnery

    Lin Nunnery
    % Chi
    It is said that not a single

    nail was used in the construction
    of this lavish replica of a Tang
    Dynasty (AD 618–907) place of
    worship. The nunnery opened in
    2000, funded by donations from
    wealthy families, whose names
    are inscribed under the roof tiles.
    On the mainland, few original
    structures survived the Cultural
    Revolution of the 1960s, so this
    is a rare chance to see the
    ingenuity of ancient Middle Kingdom architecture. There are also
    impressive statues of the Sakyamuni Buddha, ornate gardens
    and gently whispering waterfalls,
    and the underlying hum of the
    chanting, shaven-headed nuns.

    The Grimmest Conditions
    on the Planet
    More than 50,000 poor souls
    once inhabited the Kowloon
    Walled City (see p95), a place of
    few laws and no taxes, but plenty
    of diseases and desperate
    criminals. In the 1950s the triads
    moved in, and the narrow lanes
    often ran red with blood. Before
    1992 it was also one of the few
    places left in Hong Kong to find
    grizzled opium addicts puffing
    away in divans.

    • Thu–Tue 9am–4:30pm daily • Free

    rants lining the waterfront. This
    is the closest point between
    Hong Kong Island and Kowloon
    but don’t be tempted to swim
    across – if the pollution doesn’t
    kill you, you’ll be whisked away
    by the strong currents. d Map F5

    Yue Mun
    ^ Lei
    Once a fishing village, Lei

    Jong Temple
    & Fat
    Although it is one of the most

    d Chi Lin Drive, Diamond Hill • Map F4

    Yue Mun translates as “carp
    gate”, although the only fish
    you’re likely to see now are in
    the excellent seafood restau-

    famous Buddhist sites in Hong
    Kong, the Fat Jong Temple is little
    visited by foreigners. Making it well
    worth the journey to see is the

    Left Chi Lin Nunnery complex Right Lei Yue Mun fish market

    96

    Rd, Won Tai Sin • Map E4 • 10am–
    6:30pm. Closed Mon

    Chung Uk Tomb
    * Lei
    The Han burial tomb (AD 24–
    220) can barely be seen through
    a scratched sheet of perspex. Still,
    it’s one of Hong Kong’s earliest
    surviving historical monuments,
    so act impressed. d 41 Tonkin St,
    Sham Shui Po • Map E4 • 10am–1pm,
    2pm–6pm. Closed Mon • Free

    Wong Temple
    ( Hau
    Quaint and tiny, Hau Wong is
    hardly worth a special trip, but
    take a look if you’re in the area.
    It was built in 1737 as a
    monument to the exiled boyemperor Ping’s most loyal
    advisor. Usually fairly quiet
    unless a festival is in full swing.

    d Junction Rd • Map E4 • 8am–5pm daily

    Apliu Street

    ) This huge street market is

    full of all sorts of strange junk
    and pirated goods. You’ll feel
    you’re on another planet here –
    this is as “local” as Hong Kong
    gets. It includes perhaps the
    world’s biggest collection of
    secondhand electrical stuff.
    Occasionally you can spot the
    odd retro turntable or radio, but
    most of it is rubbish. d Map E4

    An Afternoon Out
    After Lunch
    Catch the MTR to Wong
    Tai Sin (see p95) and brave
    the crowds of earnest
    worshippers at the temple.
    Some of the fortune tellers
    in the nearby stalls speak
    English. Try to bargain
    them down to a third or
    quarter of the price given.
    Some use numbered
    sticks, others prefer
    curved bits of wood
    known as Buddha’s lips.
    If you’re feeling fit, tackle
    Lion Rock (see p95). It’s a
    demanding climb, but the
    views are superb. The
    steep inclines towards the
    top are for the stout of
    heart only. Take plenty of
    water on a warm day.
    A ten-minute taxi ride will
    take you to the Kowloon
    Walled City Park, Hong
    Kong’s loveliest urban
    park. The tranquil green
    space contains eight
    different gardens.

    Around Kowloon – New Kowloon

    striking colour scheme – with red
    pillars standing out from the white
    walls – ornate decorations and
    magnificent Buddha sculptures.
    The temple somehow manages
    to be be both busy and serene at
    the same time. d 175 Shatin Pass

    Late Afternoon
    By late afternoon you
    should have worked up an
    appetite, so take a cab to
    the seafood restaurants
    on the waterfront at Lei
    Yue Mun. Watch the sun
    paint the skyscrapers pink
    and orange as it sinks into
    the harbour, while you crack
    open crabs and munch on
    giant shrimps, all washed
    down with wine or an icy
    Tsing Tao beer.
    For a really exceptional
    view, try the Tai Fat Hau
    restaurant (see p99) in Lei
    Yue Mun. Its dining room
    is set on stilts over the
    water, with floor-to-ceiling
    windows. It is particularly
    famous for shellfish
    cooked in spicy wine,
    deep roasted crab and
    spicy, fried king prawns.

    Apliu Street

    97

    Around Kowloon – New Kowloon

    Left Dragon Centre Centre Page One Right Festival Walk shopping mall

    Places to Shop
    Shopping Centre
    ! Golden
    Cheap computer equipment

    here, and nearby shops have a
    massive range of VCDs and DVDs.
    Take care – many are poor-quality
    pirate recordings. d 94A Yen Chow
    St, Sham Shui Po • Map E4

    Dragon Centre

    @ Soaring glassy mall in the

    midst of Sham Shui Po’s grime
    and dust. Good food hall, computer stuff and a terrifying rollercoaster. d 37K Yen Chou St cnr Cheung
    Sha Wan Rd, Sham Shui Po • Map E4

    # Log-On
    The household goods division
    of the stylish City-Super supermarket chain. Best part of this store
    is called The Gadget – row upon
    row of well-designed gizmos for
    the discerning homemaker.
    d Shop UG01, Festival Walk, 80 Tat Chee
    Ave, Kowloon Tong • Map E4

    Chung China Works
    $ Yuet
    The place to come for all

    kinds of china objects – tableware,
    decorative, personalized or
    monogrammed. Orders may take
    four weeks but shipping is
    arranged. d 3/F Kowloon Bay Industrial
    Centre, 15 Wang Hoi Rd, Kowloon Bay
    • Map F4

    Lancôme

    % Take your pick from the skin

    check-up, the 45-minute VIP
    consultation, or go straight for a
    one-hour facial in a private cabin.

    98

    One
    ^ Page
    Massive branch of Hong

    Kong’s great bookshop chain. Top
    marks for stacking books with
    the covers facing outward,
    saving readers badly kinked
    necks. Good coffee shop, too.
    d Shop LG1-30, Festival Walk, Kowloon
    Tong • Map E4

    Chau Street and Nam
    & YuCheong
    Street

    The small shops that line these
    two streets sell an enormous
    range of laces, zippers, ribbons,
    beads and buttons – a wider
    choice than you might have
    imagined could exist. d Map E4

    and
    * Crabtree
    Evelyn

    More sweet-smelling goodies to
    pamper yourself with here. The
    smell of lavender pot-pourri
    nearly knocks you over as you
    step over the threshold. d Shop
    UG17, Festival Walk, Kowloon Tong
    • Map E4

    &
    ( Bang
    Olufsen

    Audophiles will drool over the
    sleek designs and crystal clarity
    from one of the most
    distinguished names in sound.
    d Shop LG1-10, Festival Walk, Kowloon
    Tong • Map E4

    ) Artemis
    Great range of shoes,

    d G18 Festival Walk, Kowloon Tong • Map

    particularly their eponymous
    label. d 229 Level 2, Plaza Hollywood,

    E4 • 2265 8665

    Diamond Hill • Map E4

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat and Drink
    Thai
    ! Combo
    Kowloon City is famous for

    its cheap and tasty Thai food. Be
    warned that you may need a
    couple of beers to put out the
    fire from the beef salad. d 14 Nga
    Tsin Long Rd, Kowloon City • Map E4 •
    2716 7318 • $$

    Sham Tseng Yue Kee
    Roast Goose Restaurant

    @

    Locals can’t get enough of the
    stewed goose intestines, though
    the less exotic roast goose with
    salt and pepper is a better bet.
    d 6 Nam Kok Rd, Kowloon City • Map E4
    • 2383 1998 • $

    Little Italy
    ^ Amaroni’s
    Hong Kongers love Italian,

    and they have taken this place to
    heart. Share plates and make
    yourself at home. d Shop LG1-32,
    Festival Walk, Kowloon Tong • Map E4
    • 2265 8818 • $$

    Choi
    & Tso
    Literally “rough food”, this is

    one for those prepared to take
    some culinary risks to experience
    the real Hong Kong. Are you up
    to sauteed pig’s intestines and
    fried pig’s brains? d 17-19A Nga Tsin
    Wai Rd, Kowloon City • Map E4 • 2383
    7170 • No credit cards • $

    Around Kowloon – New Kowloon

    Amaroni’s Little Italy

    China
    # Exp
    * Festive
    The health-conscious will be
    In fact, the festivities are
    pleased to find unexpected
    combinations of tried and tested
    noodles with offbeat additions
    such as grapefruit. d UG23 Festival

    fairly muted here, but the food is
    good. Northern-style Chinese
    cooking and glossy interiors.

    Walk, Kowloon Tong • Map E4 • 2265
    8298 • $$

    Tong • Map E4 • 2180 8908 • $$

    Shing Hin Chinese
    Restaurant

    $

    Students get a 15 per cent
    discount on staples such as dim
    sum and congee in a no-frills but
    clean setting. d 8/F Recreation Bldg,
    City University, Kowloon Tong • Map E4 •
    2788 8163 • $

    Wing Lai Yuen

    % Traditional Sichuan food in a

    plain setting. The dan dan
    noodles are so delicious that
    customers are limited to just one
    serving. d 1/F Site 8 Whampoa Garden
    • Map E4 • 2320 6430 • $$

    d Shop LG-1, Festival Walk, Kowloon

    Fat Hau
    ( Tai
    This place juts out over the

    water at Lei Yue Mun, offering
    delicious Chinese seafood dishes
    like shellfish cooked in spicy
    wine, and grilled king prawn.
    d 58A Hoi Pong Rd Central, Lei Yue Mun
    • Map F4 • 2727 4628 • $$$

    Lung Seafood
    ) Kong
    You can’t miss this place –

    two huge stone lions guard the
    front door. Deep-roasted crab
    and steamed abalone with
    orange crust rate highly. d 62 Hoi
    Pong Rd West, Lei Yue Mun • Map F4
    • 2775 1552 • $$$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    99

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left Stairs to Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery Centre Railway Museum Right Lek Yuen Bridge

    The New Territories

    A

    s a name, the New Territories is suggestive of frontier country; in
    colonial times this was indeed the place where pith-helmeted sahibs
    went on tiger shoots, threw tennis parties and wrote memoirs. Today, much of
    it is suburban rather than rural: more than a third of Hong Kong’s population
    lives here, in dormitory towns dotted across “the NT”, as locals abbreviate it.
    But to the north are Hong Kong’s largest expanses of open country, including
    the important Mai Po marshes, and there are centuries-old temples and settlements. At the NT’s northern extremity is the border with “mainland” China.
    NT Sights
    1 Ten Thousand Buddhas
    Monastery
    2
    3
    4

    Sha Tin Racecourse

    5

    Ching Chung Koon

    6
    7
    8
    9
    0

    Amah Rock
    Hong Kong Railway
    Museum

    Kadoorie Farm
    Heritage Museum
    Yuen Yuen Institute
    Tin Hau Temple
    Castle Peak Monastery

    Left Amah Rock Centre Racegoer, Sha Tin Right Pagoda, Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery

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    Tin MTR • Come Horseracing
    Tour 2366 3995 or 2368 7111
    • No children • Adm

    Images, Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery

    Thousand
    ! Ten
    Buddhas Monastery

    The Buddhas in question are
    stacked on shelves in the main
    hall of this hillside sanctuary at
    Pai Tau Tsuen, Sha Tin. In fact,
    there are more like 13,000
    Buddha images now. The
    monastery comprises five
    temples, two pavilions and an
    elegant nine-storey pagoda. Take
    a deep breath before you enter
    the grounds – there are 400-odd
    steps to negotiate. d Map E3 • KCR

    Rock
    # Amah
    An odd tower of rocks near

    East to Tai Wai, take north exit and follow
    signs • 9am–5pm • Free

    Lion Rock Tunnel that when
    viewed from a certain angle,
    looks eerily like a woman with a
    baby on her back, hence the
    name. Legend holds that the
    amah’s husband sailed overseas
    to find work, while she waited
    patiently for his return. When a
    storm sunk his boat, she was so
    grief-stricken she turned to
    stone. An alternative inter­
    pretation is that the rock was
    created as an ancient phallic
    symbol. d Map E4 • KCR East to Tai Wai

    Tin
    @ Sha
    Racecourse

    Kong
    $ Hong
    Railway Museum

    Hong Kong’s most famous
    horseracing track is at Hong
    Kong Island’s Happy Valley (see
    pp12–13), but the people who
    live in this part of the world are
    so mad about horseracing they
    built a second racetrack in the
    NT. More than 85,000 punters
    have been known to pack Sha
    Tin’s $500-million world-class
    track, where record-breaking

    Tai Po’s museum is not really one of
    Hong Kong’s best, but train­
    spotters will like it. A variety of
    old coaches sit on tracks outside
    what used to be the Tai Po
    Market Station, built in 1913.
    Inside is a tolerably interesting
    account of the city. d 13 Shung Tak

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    sums are wagered on
    Saturday and Sunday
    afternoons between
    September and June.
    Form guides are
    published in the South
    China Morning Post on
    race days. d Map F3 • Sha

    St, Tai Po Market, Tai Po • Map E2 • KCR
    to Tai Po Market, then minibus 25K • 2653
    3455 • 9am–5pm. Closed Tue • Free

    Left Sha Tin Racecourse Right Hong Kong Railway Museum

    101

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left Ritual, Yuen Yuen Institute�� Left Mai Po marshes

    Chung Koon
    % Ching
    The temple’s name means

    “evergreen pine tree”, a symbol
    of longevity and perseverance.
    The Koon, a Taoist sect, built the
    first structure, the Palace of Pure
    Brightness, in 1961 and has
    since added myriad pagodas,
    pavilions and peaceful Chinese
    gardens. There’s also vegetarian
    food and a bonsai collection. d
    Tsing Chung Path, Tuen Mun • Map C3 •
    LRT 615 or 615P from Tsing Wan to
    Chung Tsing • 7am–6pm daily • Free

    Farm
    ^ Kadoorie
    Set up by local moguls Lord

    Lawrence and Sir Horace
    Kadoorie in 1951 to provide work
    for some 300,000 penniless
    refugees, Kadoorie Farm and
    Botanic Garden is now a centre
    for conservation and environmental awareness. It includes a
    deer haven and butterfly house.
    Prior booking is essential. d Lam
    Kam Rd, Tai Po • Map E2 • Bus 64K or 65K
    or minibus 25K from Tai Po Market KCR •
    2488 0166 • 9:30am–5pm Mon–Sat • Free

    Saving the Sanctuary
    The NT’s Mai Po marshes (see
    p44) are a world-class site of
    ecological significance, with more
    than 60,000 birds stopping here
    on migratory routes each winter.
    Kingfishers, herons and
    cormorants abound, and the
    marshes are one of the last
    habitats for the near-extinct blackfaced spoonbill and Saunders’ gull.
    Hong Kong’s premier
    birdwatchers’ paradise has been
    the subject of fierce debate and
    hard-fought battles between
    staunch environmentalists and
    developers desperate for scarce
    new land. The environmentalists,
    fortunately, have the upper hand.
    The biggest danger is pollution
    and industrial waste seeping into
    the marshes from factories at
    nearby Deep Water Bay.

    Museum
    & Heritage
    Sha Tin’s museum vies with
    the revamped Museum of
    History in Kowloon for Hong
    Kong’s best museum honours
    (see pp20–21).

    Yuen Institute
    * Yuen
    This temple complex is

    Heritage Museum

    102

    popular with Buddhists,
    Confucianists and Taoists alike.
    It’s usually full of worshippers,
    so be respectful. The main
    building is a replica of Beijing’s
    Temple of Heaven. The notices
    outside carry the latest
    soothsayers’ wisdom on which

    A Day in the NT
    Morning

    Yuen Yuen Institute

    signs in the Chinese horoscope
    are set for an auspicious year. Try
    the cheap and tasty vegetarian
    food in the Institute’s restaurant.
    d Map E3 • MTR to Tsuen Wan, then
    minibus 81 • 9am–6pm daily • Free

    Hau Temple
    ( Tin
    Hidden away at the far end

    of Clearwater Bay sits the oldest
    of Hong Kong’s many temples
    dedicated to the sea goddess Tin
    Hau. It’s eerily quiet as you make
    your way down the steps, through
    a verdant patch of forest. Inside
    the temple, spirals of incense
    drop ash onto models of fishing
    boats. d Sai Kung • Map G3 • Free

    Peak
    ) Castle
    Monastery

    The 1-mile (1.5-km) walk from
    the nearby light railway station is
    hard, but this is a nice little
    outing to relieve stress if the
    bustle of Hong Kong is getting to
    you. Suck in some (relatively)
    fresh sea air and let the chanting
    of the monks soothe your soul.

    Head back to the KCR, and
    proceed to Fanling station.
    Take the 54K bus to Lung
    Yeuk Tau, start of the Lung
    Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail
    (see p104). This takes you
    through the five famous
    walled villages of the New
    Territories, built by ancient
    clans as safe havens from
    marauding bandits. The
    walk takes a couple of
    hours, and provides a
    fascinating insight into
    what life once was like in
    these parts.

    Afternoon
    Take a bus or taxi back to
    the KCR, and travel on to
    Sha Tin KCR station. A
    short cab ride away is the
    Lung Wah Hotel (see
    p109), which isn’t a hotel
    anymore, but a restaurant.
    This eating house has
    been going strong for
    more than 50 years, so
    they must be doing
    something right.

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Take the MTR to Kowloon
    Tong then switch to the
    KCR train. Get off at Tai Po
    Market station, and take
    the 64K bus or a taxi to
    Fong Ma Po. This is the
    home of the Wishing Tree.
    Buy a red paper plate from
    a stall, scribble down your
    wish, then hurl it into the
    tree. If it sticks, your wish
    is granted. A gorgeous
    picture opportunity.

    If you are in Sha Tin on a
    weekend between September and June, head off
    to the racecourse (see
    p101) for an afternoon of
    thundering hooves.
    On weekdays or out of the
    racing season, check out
    Sha Tin’s excellent places
    to shop at New Town
    Plaza (see p106).

    d Map B3 • 9am–5pm daily • Free

    103

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left Tsang Tai Uk Centre Fish restaurant, Sai Kung village Right Ruin, Fanling heritage trail

    Historic Villages and New Towns
    Tai Uk
    ! Tsang
    This stronghold of the

    looms through the pall.
    Another ancestral hall.

    Tsang clan dates back to
    1848 and is built in typical
    Hakka style, with thick
    walls and a defensive
    tower in each corner.
    Dozens of families still live
    here. d Map L3

    d Map E1

    Kung
    ^ Sai
    Quaint fishing village

    turned expatriate haunt.
    Pubs with names like
    Steamers and the Duke of
    York, offset by old Chinese
    men click-clacking mahjong
    tiles in tiny cafés. d Map G3

    Wan
    @ Tsuen
    This is the terminus

    of the MTR line and a
    Warrior image,
    perfect example of new
    Kam Tin
    Fanling
    town overcrowding. Worth
    The name means
    a look just to glimpse
    “brocade field”, although
    Hong Kong life at its bleakest.
    these days any crops are more
    d Map D3
    likely to be decorated with rusty
    cars. Traditional walled villages at
    Sha Tin
    Kat Hing Wai and Shui Tau.
    Less grim version of Tsuen
    d Map C3
    Wan, with a massive shopping
    centre. Home to Hong Kong’s
    Ping Kong
    second racetrack. d Map E3
    Off the beaten track, and
    therefore its walled village is
    Fanling
    less busy than others. d Map E1
    Fanling’s Tang Chung Ling
    ancestral hall belongs to the
    Tap Mun Chau
    foremost clan in the New TerritoOne of the New Territories’
    ries. The Lung Yeuk Tauheritage
    best-kept secrets. Picturesque
    trail is nearby.
    little island where
    d Map E2
    villagers watch the
    world go by from
    Sheung Shui
    quaint homes. d Map H2
    Home to another
    • Ferry 8:30am–6:30pm
    of the main local
    clans the Liu. From
    Tai Po
    here, it’s a quick cab
    Its market and
    ride to Lok Ma Chau,
    Railway Museum are
    one of the border
    worth a quick look,
    crossings, where the
    before making your
    architects-on-acid
    way to scenic Plover
    skyline of Shenzhen
    Cove. d Map E2
    Kam Tin river

    &

    #

    *

    $

    (

    %

    )

    104

    Areas of Natural Beauty
    Cove
    ! Plover
    This isn’t actually a cove, at

    least, not any more. In fact it’s a
    massive reservoir which was
    created by building a dam across
    the mouth of the bay, then
    pumping all the seawater out
    and pumping in fresh water from
    China. Hike or bike the trails.
    Maps from HKTB. d Map F1

    Pool
    @ Bride’s
    Stunning waterfalls amid

    lush forest. Take the camera and
    wear sensible shoes. d Map F2

    Tai Po Kau

    # Forest reserve near the

    Chinese University, popular with
    serious birdwatchers. d Map F2

    Mun Tsai
    $ San
    Charming village perched

    between verdant hills and a
    sparkling bay. Check out the local
    fisherfolks’ floating homes with
    their dodgy wiring. d Map F2

    Bay
    & Clearwater
    Various walks and beaches

    on offer here. From Tai Au Mun,
    you can walk to the less than
    inspiringly named Clearwater
    Bay Beach One and Beach Two
    or Lung Ha Wan (Lobster Bay).
    Shark sightings send the locals
    into a lather each summer, and
    recently holes have been found
    in some nets. You’ve been
    warned. d Map G5

    Ke Wan
    * Long
    Relatively inaccessible little

    gem of a beach. Don’t get too
    carried away with the view as
    you descend the vertiginous goat
    track, or you may find yourself at
    the bottom sooner than you
    intended. d Map H3

    Long Wan
    ( Tai
    Hong Kong’s finest beach,

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left Plover Cove Right San Mun Tsai floating village

    on the beautiful Sai Kung
    Peninsula. Take a good map and
    lots of fluids before setting off
    (see pp22–3). d Map H3

    Mo Shan
    % Tai
    “Big fog-shrouded mountain”
    On Shan
    ) Ma
    is the translation, although on
    The mountain’s name means
    many days the peak of Hong
    Kong’s tallest mountain is visible.
    It reaches 957 m (3,139 ft).
    Quite a hike to the top, but
    superb views await the
    intrepid. d Map D3

    “saddle”, a reference to its shape
    (see p45). d Map F3

    Po Marsh
    ^ Mai
    The marsh on the

    western edge of the New
    Territories is a bird sanctuary (see p44). d Map D2

    Tai Long Wan

    105

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left The Melting Pot Right Universal Models

    Places to Shop

    ! IKEA
    Even those who are not

    normally fans of the Swedish
    chain will find the wide array of
    made-in-China products
    attractive. d L3 & L5 Grand Central
    Plaza, 138 Sha Tin Rura Committee Rd,
    Sha Tin • Map F3

    Jewellery
    @ My
    Innovative designs and

    prices that won’t break the bank.
    Check out their diamond-studded
    chokers. d Shop 15, Citylink Plaza •
    Map E3

    # Universal
    Models

    Plenty here for the model
    enthusiast, whether you’re after
    incredibly detailed military
    figurines or the latest Mobile Set
    Gundam. An added attraction for
    some is a scary range of pelletfiring replica guns. d Wah Wai
    Industrial Centre, Sha Tin • Map E3

    Melting Pot Home
    $ The
    Furnishings

    Home décor items from Asia and
    beyond. Only open Tue–Sat. Call
    in advance. d DD111, Lot

    ^ Suzuya
    Cute, girly Japanese fashion
    label. Just the ticket if you want
    to look like Sailormoon.

    d Shop 462, 4/F New Town Plaza, Sha Tin
    • Map E3

    & Bossini
    Big branch of the cut-price

    chain store. Stock up on comfy
    cotton T-shirts, socks and khakis.
    d Shop 318A, 3/F, New Town Plaza, Sha
    Tin • Map E3

    &
    * Marks
    Spencer

    Sensible shoes, comfortable
    underwear and comfort food for
    homesick Britons. One of their
    biggest Hong Kong branches.
    d Shop 329–39, 3/F, New Town Plaza, Sha
    Tin • Map E3

    Heung
    ( Hang
    Bakery

    Hong Kong’s most popular baker
    of “wife cakes”, a flaky pastry
    filled with red bean paste. These
    traditional confections are de
    rigueur at Chinese weddings.
    d 64–6 Yuen Long Main St • Map C2

    2153 Pat Heung, Yuen Long •
    Map C2 • 2488 0280

    Overjoy Porcelain
    Factory

    %

    Dinner service designs
    run into the hundreds
    and are made to order.
    d 1/F Block B, Kwai Hing

    Industrial Building, Kwai Chung
    • Map E3 • 2487 0615

    106

    Children outside
    Bossini

    Wah Bakery
    ) Wing
    Hong Kong’s

    premier purveyor of
    moon cakes (see p50).
    These rich glazed pastry
    treats are eaten during
    the Mid-Autumn festival.
    The egg yolks in the
    centre represent the full
    moon. d 86 Yuen Long Main
    St • Map C2

    Places to Drink

    ! Steamers
    Make merry at Sai Kung’s

    most stylish pub, a big
    improvement on the dingy,
    windowless Newcastle Pub of its
    former life. Great for peoplewatching. d A2-3 Kam Wah Building,
    18–32 Chan Man St, Sai Kung • Map G3

    Pub
    @ Beach
    Overlooking the bay and a

    10-minute stroll around the
    waterfront from Sai Kung Town.
    The Beach Pub has bands on the
    weekends and a regular crowd of
    local Chinese and expatriates.
    d Beach Resort Hotel, 1780 Tai Mong Tsai
    Rd, Sai Kung • Map G3

    Tavern
    # Railway
    A welcome little watering

    hole near the Railway Museum
    in Tai Po. Just the ticket after a
    hard day’s rural meandering. d
    Chik Luk Lant, Tai Wai • Map E2

    Poets

    $ Don’t let the name fool you.
    Loud discussions about the
    previous night’s Premier League
    soccer matches are more likely
    than pompous declamations in
    iambic pentameter. d G/F 55 Yi
    Chun St, Sai Kung • Map G3

    Duke of York

    % A Sai Kung institution. A

    faithful crowd of regulars can be
    found every night and weekend
    propping up the bar of this
    renovated boozer. Very good pub
    grub, too. d 42–56 Fuk Man Rd, Sai
    Kung • Map G3

    Sports Bar and
    ^ Cheers
    Restaurant

    Another of the new-ish spots
    that have sprung up in vibrant
    Sai Kung Town. It’s more
    sophisticated than some of its
    competitors, but rather boisterous if the soccer or rugby are
    on the television. d 28 Yi Chun St,
    Sai Kung • Map G3

    Riverside Hotel Bar
    & Regal
    Up-scale watering hole

    overlooking Sha Tin’s Shing Mun
    River. It’s a good place to retreat
    to after a shopping marathon in
    New Town Plaza. d 1/F Regal
    Riverside Hotel, Tai Chung Kiu Rd, Sha Tin
    • Map E3

    * Forget-Me-Not
    Lounge Barr

    One of Sha Tin’s many hotel
    bars. Reasonably priced beers
    but not much atmosphere. d G/F

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left Shoppers, New Town Plaza Centre Pousada Right Regal Riverside Bar

    Royal Park Hotel, 8 Pak Hok Ting St, Sha
    Tin • Map E3

    ( Xtreme
    This new happening place

    has pool tables, flat-screen TVs,
    and live bands at the weekends.
    Warning: the Xtreme cocktail can
    easily serve four. d 72 Po Tung Rd,
    Sai Kung • Map G3

    ) Pousada
    This bar-cum-restaurant set

    in a Portuguese-style inn brings a
    slice of Macau to the New
    Territories, with sea views and al
    fresco drinking. d 112 Pak Sha Wan,
    Sai Kung • Map G3

    107

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Left Cosmopolitan Curry House Centre and Right Chianti Ristorante Italiano

    Cheap Eats

    ! Pepperoni’s
    One of the first decent

    Ley
    ^ Yau
    Fabulous seafood set menus

    • Map G3 • 2792 2083 • $$

    Beach, Sha Kiu Village, Sai Kung • Map G3
    • No credit cards • 2791 1822 •
    www.yauleyseafood.com.hk • $$$

    @ Cosmopolitan
    Curry House

    Ristorante Italiano
    & Chianti
    Stuff yourself with cut-price

    Western-style restaurants in Sai
    Kung and still going strong. Huge
    servings, relaxed ambience.
    Excellent pizza, pasta, nachos,
    calamari and a good wine
    selection. d 1592 Po Tung St, Sai Kung

    This place has been thriving for
    years. Cheap, cold beer and
    spicy Malay and Indonesian
    curries. Queues to get in are a
    common sight. d 80 Kwong Fuk Rd,
    Tai Po • Map E2 • 2650 7056 • $$

    Steak House
    # Lardos
    Steaks are cooked to

    perfection by an owner who
    supplies Hong Kong’s best hotels
    with their raw material. d G/F 4B
    Hang Hau Village, Tseung Kwan O, Sai
    Kung • Map G3 • 2719 8168 • $$

    Restaurant
    $ IKEA
    Swedish menu with lunch

    specials that include meatballs,
    smoked salmon and a wide
    selection of cheesecake. d L5
    Grand Central Plaza, 138 Sha Tin Rural
    Committee Rd • Map F3 • 2634 1688 • $

    Ming Yuen
    % Sun
    Seafood

    Excellent-value dim sum and
    other unpretentious Chinese
    food served up in a historic
    village setting. d Shop 268 I/F
    Fanling Centre, 33 San Wan Rd • Map D2
    • 2676 1368 • $

    108

    in a little restaurant nestling in
    Sha Kiu Village, reachable by
    road, hiking, ferry, or boat to
    their private pier. d Millionaire’s

    pasta at the buffet and marvel at
    the mediocre service. d 3/F

    Kowloon Panda Hotel, 3 Tsuen Wah St,
    Tsuen Wan • Map D3 • 2409 3226 • $-$$

    * Shalimar
    Cheapest curries outside

    Chungking Mansions. d 127 Kwong
    Fuk Rd, Tai Po • Map E2 • No credit cards
    • 2653 7790 • $

    Deserts
    ( Honeymoon
    (Moon Key)

    Good-sized portions of various
    traditional deserts, with durian
    eaters segregated so as not to
    offend others wiith the strong
    smell of the fruit. Open until
    2am. d 10A–C Po Tung Road, Sai Kung •
    Map G3 • No credit cards • 2792 4991 • $

    Indian
    ) Shaffi’s
    The owner is famous in

    these parts as the former chef
    for many years for British and
    Gurhka troops at Shek Kong
    barracks. After the Handover, he
    set up his shop in Yuen Long –
    where his faithful fans still seek
    out his top curries. d 14 Fau Tsoi St,
    Yuen Long • Map C2 • 2476 7885 • $

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Restaurants

    ! Jaspa’s
    Good fusion food, friendly

    staff and lots of antipodean
    wines at reasonable prices. d 13
    Sha Tsui Path, Sai Kung • Map G3 • 2792
    6388 • $$$

    Kee Seafood
    @ Tung
    Restaurant

    Point at what you want from the
    huge range of sea creatures
    swimming in waterfront tanks
    and haggle a bit. They bag it; you
    take it to the kitchen; they cook
    it; you enjoy one of the best
    seafood meals in Hong Kong.
    d Shop 11–15, Siu Yat Building, Hoi Pong
    Sq, Sai Kung • Map G3 • 2791 9886 • $$$

    Lung Wah Hotel

    # The hotel is long gone, but

    Shing Restaurant
    ^ Kar
    There are few reasons to go

    to Yuen Long, but should you do
    so, try Kar Shing’s traditional
    New Territories Great Bowl
    Feast. Four people will struggle
    to finish this steaming pile of
    meat, seafood and vegetables. d
    3/F Yuen Long Plaza, 249 Castle Peak Rd •
    Map C2 • 2476 3228 • $$$

    & Thai-Malaysian
    Restaurant

    Far-flung curry emporium in
    Sheung Shui. Famed locally for
    spicy concoctions involving
    crabs, fish, king prawns and
    other fruits of the sea. d 28-30 Sun
    Fat St, Sheung Shui • Map E1 • 2673
    2230 • $$

    the pigeon restaurant has been
    going strong for 50 years. Don’t
    worry about eating pigeon – it is
    lean and delicious. Occasional
    celebrity sightings. d 22 Ha Wo Che

    Thirty-One
    * One
    Accessible by road or private

    St, Sha Tin • Map E3 • 2691 1594 • $$

    Tseng Tsau Village, Shap Sze Heung, Sai
    Kung • Map G3 • 2791 2684 • $$$$$

    Around the Region – The New Territories

    Royal Park Chinese

    boat, this restaurant serves food
    from its own organic farm. Seats
    only 20, so book ahead. d 131

    Park Chinese
    $ Royal
    Classy Cantonese cooking –
    ( Kaga
    not an easy thing to find in Sha
    Good sushi in Sha Tin.
    Tin. Specialities include shark’s
    fin soup and crispy chicken. d 2/F
    Royal Park Hotel, 8 Pak Hok Ting St, Sha
    Tin • Map E3 • 2694 3939 • $$$

    Firenze
    % Ristorante
    Generally packed, and when

    you try their pastas washed
    down with well-priced red wines
    you’ll know why. Good pizza too.
    d 60 Po Tung Rd, Sai Kung • Map G3
    • 2792 0898 • $$-$$$

    d Shop
    A191-193, 1/F New Town Plaza Phase 3,
    Sha Tin • Map E3 • 2603 0545 • $$$

    ) Baanthai
    The restaurant may be in an

    uninspiring setting in Sha Tin’s
    sprawling New Town Plaza, but
    the spicy Thai delicacies on offer
    are just the thing to revive
    footweary shoppers. d Shop A172,
    3/F Hilton Plaza, Sha Tin • Map E3 • 2609
    3686 • $$-$$$

    Following pages Spiral sticks of incense

    109

    Around the Region – Outlying Islands

    Left Tai O Centre Lamma Island Right Lobster

    Outlying Islands

    H

    ong Kong is thought of as a city not an archipelago, but there are

    260 islands in the group and, assuming you can haul yourself out of
    the downtown bars and boutiques, some of Hong Kong’s most sublime
    experiences await you there. Now that it is connected to the city by bridge,
    the largest of the islands, Lantau, is losing the quirky languor it once had;
    but the smaller islands offer plenty of compensations. From the narrow lanes
    of Cheung Chau to the outdoor raves of Lamma’s Power Station Beach, Hong
    Kong’s islands give you many opportunities to lose yourself.
    Sights in the Outlying Islands
    1
    2
    3
    4

    Lantau – Mui Wo

    5

    Lamma – Sok Kwu Wan

    6
    7
    8
    9
    0

    Lantau – Tai O
    Lantau – Sunset Park
    Lantau – Trappist
    Monastery

    Lamma – Yung Shue Wan
    Po Toi
    Tap Mun
    Peng Chau
    Cheung Chau

    Stilt houses, Tai O

    Left China Bear Pub, Lantau Right Sunset Peak, Lantau

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    Mui Wo
    ! Lantau:
    The main ferry from Hong

    Kong Island to Lantau docks at
    Mui Wo, or Silvermine Bay as the
    British named it. It’s a good
    starting point from which to
    explore the island, though not
    the most beautiful spot on
    Lantau. Most of the restaurants
    and bars and a supermarket are
    just around the corner from the
    ferry pier. There is also a beach
    five minutes’ walk to the
    northeast. Enjoy a beer and a
    game of snooker or stock up for
    a picnic before walking or
    beachcombing. d Map C5

    Tai O
    @ Lantau:
    Lying on the far western

    coast of Lantau, the pretty village
    of Tai O is a trek from Mui Wo
    but it’s worth the effort. Sitting in
    a tidal estuary, this is one of the
    last places in Hong Kong where
    you can see the traditional stilt
    housing of southern Chinese
    fishing villages. Some are as
    small as dolls’ houses. For an
    authentic Hong Kong consumable, buy a jar of shrimp paste, a

    Tai O fishing village

    powerful type of fish sauce
    created by fermenting shrimp
    and spices in a barrel in the sun.
    It’s actually much better than it
    sounds. d Map A5

    Sunset Peak
    # Lantau:
    For the reasonably fit,

    Sunset Peak offers the finest
    views on Lantau. The 934-m
    (3,063-ft) high mountain, Hong
    Kong’s second highest,
    commands great views across
    Hong Kong, down onto the
    international airport, Po Lin
    Monastery and the lovely
    wooded valleys of this sparsely
    inhabited terrain. Hardy souls
    stay at the nearby Youth Hostel
    and head up the peak for Hong
    Kong’s most spectacular sunrise.
    Obviously all this only applies in
    clear conditions. d Map B5

    Around the Region – Outlying Islands

    Mui Wo beach, Lantau Island

    Trappist
    $ Lantau:
    Monastery

    The chapel, next to a dilapidated
    old dairy farm, is open to visitors
    willing to observe the silence of
    the monastery. Apart from that,
    there’s not much to see at the
    monastery itself, but it’s a
    good excuse for a gentle
    woodland walk to or from
    Discovery Bay. The monastery is also served by a
    ferry pier with infrequent
    Kaido services to Discovery
    Bay and the island of Peng
    Chau (see p115), which has
    many seafood restaurants.
    d Map C5 • Free

    For Lantau’s Big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery See pp28–9

    113

    Around the Region – Outlying Islands

    Peng Chau harbour

    Sok Kwu Wan
    % Lamma:
    Don’t expect many sights in

    Lamma’s main area of
    development on the east coast.
    Sok Kwu Wan is known mainly
    for its quarry and wall-to-wall
    seafood restaurants along the
    harbour front. The seafood tanks
    are a sight in themselves,
    however, with some monstersized fish and crustaceans.
    There’s not much to differentiate
    most restaurants, although the
    standard is generally very good.
    Have a look at the pretty Tin Hau
    Temple at the end of the main
    street. The lovely 3-mile (5-km)
    circular walk to the sleepy,
    remote village and beach at Yung
    Shue Ha is recommended for the
    reasonably fit. d Map E6 • Regular
    ferries from Hong Kong Island

    Yung Shue Wan
    ^ Lamma:
    Lamma’s western coast also

    has a harbour, with lots of bars
    and eating choices along the
    village’s endearingly ramshackle
    main street. Watch villagers,
    resident expats and fellow
    visitors wander by, before hitting
    the well-kept beach at Hung

    Lantau’s Pink Dolphins
    The rare and endangered dolphins
    of the Pearl River Delta can
    usually be found at play near the
    coast of Lantau. A guided boat
    trip to see them is certainly
    worthwhile. Learn about the lives
    of these creatures and the threats
    they face, including pollution,
    overfishing and lethal boat
    propellers and hydrofoils. Tours
    leave at least four times a week
    (see pp54 &145).

    Shing Ye, a 20-minute walk to
    the southwest. d Map D5 • Regular
    ferries from Hong Kong Island

    Toi
    & PoGetting
    to this craggy, barely

    inhabited outcrop of rock south
    of Hong Kong Island is a logistical challenge (without a hired
    junk only feasible on Sundays).
    It’s worth the effort, however, for
    secluded walks and spectacular
    cliff views over the South China
    Sea, rounded off with a meal at
    the island’s only restaurant, the
    Ming Kee (see p117). d Map F6
    • Ferry to and from St Stephen’s Beach,
    Stanley, on Sundays

    Left Drying fish Right Beach at Hung Shing Ye, Lamma

    114

    For Hong Kong Island’s outlying islands ferry piers See Map L4

    Mun
    * Tap
    To the north

    from Wong Shek and Ma Liu Shui

    Chau
    ( Peng
    This tiny island nestling off

    the coast of Lantau, opposite
    Discovery Bay, remains in many
    ways a traditional Hong Kong
    coastal community. You wander
    among its narrow alleys, tiny
    shops and temples to the gentle
    soundtrack of a distant game of
    mahjong or the sound of
    Cantonese opera leaking from an
    old radio set. But there’s no
    beach, and few eating choices,
    although the seafood is cheap.
    d Map C5 • Ferries from Hong Kong
    Island and Lantau’s Discovery Bay

    Chau Island
    ) Cheung
    This former pirate haven

    retains much of its traditional
    character, from the small-scale
    shipyards at the harbour’s edge
    to the old temples and shrines
    that dot its narrow alleys. With
    many of its inhabitants still being
    fishermen, it’s a good destination for cheap seafood. There are
    also a couple of excellent
    beaches (see pp24–5).

    Morning
    Make a reasonably early
    start for Lantau from the
    outlying islands ferry
    terminal on Hong Kong
    Island. After disembarking
    at Mui Wo (see p113), take
    the No.1 bus from outside
    the ferry pier all the way
    to its terminus at the old
    fishing village of Tai O
    (see p113) on the far
    northwestern coast.
    Take in the sights and
    smells of this ancient
    settlement before heading
    back along the road to
    Ngong Ping for the Big
    Buddha and Po Lin
    Monastery (see pp28–9).
    Have a vegetarian lunch at
    the monastery, or take a
    picnic. The area around
    Ngong Ping is great for
    gentle rambles with a
    view and some serious hill
    climbing (Lantau Peak).

    Afternoon

    Around the Region – Outlying Islands

    of the Sai Kung
    Peninsula, tiny
    Tap Mun, which
    means “grass
    island”, is another remote
    destination with
    Fishermen
    only a couple of
    daily connections with the mainland. The rewards are striking
    rock formations, pounding seas,
    a herd of cattle and relative
    seclusion. The island’s Tin Hau
    Temple is surprisingly large and
    beautiful. Take a picnic, as there
    are few eating opportunities. Nor
    is there any accommodation on
    the island, so be sure to catch
    that last ferry. d Map H2 • Ferries

    A Day on Lantau

    If time still permits, take
    the bus back towards Mui
    Wo, but jump out at the
    fantastic, clean and usually
    deserted beach at Cheung
    Sha (ask the driver to let
    you know when). Spend a
    relaxed afternoon paddling,
    swimming and sunbathing on this glorious
    stretch of golden sand.
    Slake your afternoon thirst
    and tea-time hunger at
    Stoep (see p117), which
    offers Mediterranean-style
    and South African food.
    From here it’s a short ride
    back into Mui Wo. Before
    catching the return ferry,
    squeeze in a drink at the
    Hippo or China Bear (see
    p117), two convivial bars
    near the ferry pier.

    115

    Around the Region – Outlying Islands

    Left Big Buddha Centre Boats, Lantau Right Hakka woman

    Photo Opportunities
    Buddha on Lantau
    ! Big
    The dramatic setting in itself
    is worth a picture, let alone the
    mighty Buddha (see pp28–9).

    Ferry Aft Deck
    @ Any
    Gain some perspective on

    the dramatic skyline of the
    islands. The Star Ferries offer the
    best chance to capture the dramatic skyscrapers (see pp14–15).

    Hakka Women
    # Hatted
    The large woven hats draped

    with a black cotton fringe come
    from the Hakka people, once a
    distinct ethnic group in the region.
    Many women wear these hats
    around Hong Kong, though not
    all wearers are ethnic Hakka.

    Chau Harbour
    $ Cheung
    Handsome high-prowed fishing boats, squat sampans and
    busy boatyards are just some of
    the sights (see pp24–5).

    O Village, Lantau
    % Tai
    The old fishing village on the

    remote northwest coast is the
    last settlement in the territory
    with a significant number of stilt
    houses, some almost as small as
    play houses (see p113).

    Fire Engine and
    ^ Miniature
    Ambulance, Cheung Chau

    Walk to the northern end of She
    Praya Road on Cheung Chau
    Island and peep inside the
    vehicle bay where you’ll see the
    island’s mini-ambulance and tiny
    fire tender. These toy-size vehicles

    116

    are designed to navigate the
    island’s narrow lanes.

    Restaurants’
    & Lamma
    Seafood Tanks

    The restaurants display the
    subject of their menus live and
    swimming in huge outdoor fish
    tanks. You’ll see some edible
    leviathans here from monster
    grouper to giant lobsters and an
    absorbing array of other fidgeting
    crustacea and teeming sealife.

    of Airport
    * View
    from Lantau Peak

    Take a powerful lens on a clear
    day to get decent shots of the
    airport from Lantau Peak. The
    summit also offers terrific views
    down onto the monastery and
    surrounding country. d Map B5

    Kong Airport
    ( Hong
    Planespotters Platform

    There’s no official viewing area at
    the airport, so take a taxi or walk
    to the small hill (the only natural
    part of this man-made island)
    just opposite Tung Chung town.
    There’s a footpath to the summit
    and its pagoda. d Map B5

    Ma Bridge
    ) Tsing
    Lookout Point

    If big construction projects move
    the earth for you, then head to
    the free Airport Core Programme
    Exhibition Centre in Ting Kau.
    The viewing platform on the roof
    offers a great opportunity to
    photograph the elegant Tsing Ma
    and Ting Kau bridges. d Map D3

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat and Drink
    Bear, Lantau
    ! China
    Missed the ferry? Never

    Lamma, Lamma
    ^ Deli
    A favourite haunt of local

    2984 9720 • No credit cards • $$

    Yung Shue Wan • Map D5 • 2982 1583 • $$

    Lantau
    @ Stoep,
    Good Mediterranean and

    Café, Lamma
    & Bookworm
    This place wears its ethical,

    Village • Map B6 • 2980 2699 • $$

    d 79 Main Street, Yung Shue Wan • Map

    mind. Nip round the corner for
    one of the cheap lunch specials
    and 30 kinds of bottled and draft
    beer. d G/F, Mui Wo Centre • Map C5 •

    South African fodder are served
    up on one of Lantau’s loveliest
    beaches. Try the tapas-style
    dishes or the cold Cape-style
    curried fish. d 32 Lower Cheung Sha

    The Gallery, Lantau

    # A cosy place with al fresco

    dining close to a decent beach.
    The cuisine is Mediterranean and
    Turkish but dedicated carnivores
    can choose ostrich and spicy
    boerewors, a long South African
    sausage. d Tong Fuk Village, South
    Lantau Road • Map B6 • 980 2582 •
    Closed Mon • No credit cards • $$

    Windsurfing Water Sports
    Centre Café, Cheung Chau

    $

    ex-pats and the place for all-night
    Typhoon parties, the friendly Deli
    also serves a decent Western
    and Indian menu. d 36 Main Street,

    veggy heart on its sleeve, with
    its twee slogans to peace, love
    and tofu on its walls. Don’t be
    put off. Service is friendly; the
    fresh food and juices exceptional.
    D5 • 2982 4838 • No credit cards • $$

    Lok Yuen, Lamma
    * Han
    Take a gentle 20-minute

    walk from Yung Shue Wan for
    legendary pigeon specialities.
    Former governor Chris Patten
    and comedian John Cleese are
    fans. d 16-17 Hung Shing Ye • Map D5 •
    2982 0680 • No credit cards • $$

    Kee, Cheung Chau
    ( Cheung
    Somewhat shabby premises,

    The “all-day” breakfast, snacks
    and mainly Western entrées are
    good enough to keep you from
    exercise altogether. Open 1–6pm.

    but the noodles are fresh and
    the dumplings and wontons just
    right. There’s no signage in
    English but it’s easy to find, just
    by the ferry pier. d 83 Praya St • Map

    d 1 Hai Pak Rd, Cheung Chau • Map C6 •

    C6 • 2981 8078 • No credit cards • $

    2981 8316 • $$

    Rainbow Seafood, Lamma

    % One of Lamma’s better places

    Around the Region – Outlying Islands

    China Bear

    Kee Seafood, Po Toi
    ) Ming
    Run by a restaurateur and

    for a full seafood splurge with a
    harbour view. The locals love it,
    and so will you. d 16-20 First Street,

    his seven daughters, this is Po
    Toi’s only restaurant. Reach it by
    junk or from Stanley on a Sunday
    (see p114). d Tai Wan • Map F6 • 2849

    Sok Kwu Wan • Map E6 • 2982 8100 • $$

    7038 • No credit cards • $$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    117

    Around the Region – Macau

    Left Guia Lighthouse Centre Relief, Maritime Museum Right São Domingos

    Macau

    G

    ambling is indisputably Macau’s main scene, catering mainly to

    overnight punters coming by boat or helicopter from Hong Kong.
    However, this former Portuguese colony is thankfully capable of more than
    shoddy imitations of Vegas. The Portuguese had 400 years of rich history
    here, and there are squares of impressively Iberian character if you know
    where to find them. The indigenous cuisine, fusing
    Chinese and Portuguese elements, is another draw.
    Sights in Macau
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5

    6
    7
    8
    9
    0

    Avenida da Praia Grande
    Guia Lighthouse
    Ruinas do São Paulo
    Largo de Senado
    Cultural Centre

    Protestant Cemetery
    Camões Grotto
    Forteleza do Monte
    Dom Pedro Theatre
    St Joseph’s Seminary

    Lou Lim Ieoc Garden
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    from Macau’s highest
    point and enjoy a
    leisurely stroll back
    down. d Free

    Ruinas de São Paulo

    da
    ! Avenida
    Praia Grande

    The graceful boughs of banyan
    trees stretch over this elegant
    avenue, shading the candycoloured pageant of colonial-era
    architecture. Unlike in Hong Kong,
    many of Macau’s historic piles
    survive in excellent condition. At
    the gorgeous fort-turned-hotel at
    Macau’s tip, the Pousada de São
    Tiago, the road becomes Avenida
    de Republica. Follow it around
    the point, where it turns into Rue
    da Barra and ends in the Porto
    Interior (Inner Harbour).

    Lighthouse
    @ Guia
    This most visible of Macau’s

    landmarks has kept its lonely
    vigil on Guia Hill since 1638, its
    flashing beacon beckoning to
    everyone from Portuguese
    traders to ferocious pirates and
    marauding Dutch navy boats.
    Catch the cable car up the hill,
    take in the 360-degree panorama

    The façade and
    intricate mosaic floor
    are all that remain of
    Macau’s grandest
    church, perched atop a
    steep flight of stone
    steps and propped up
    by a viewing platform at the rear.
    In its heyday, the Jesuit-designed
    Cathedral was hailed as the
    greatest monument to Christianity in the East. It caught fire
    during a massive typhoon in
    1835, and only extensive
    structural work in the early 1990s
    stopped the façade from
    crumbling to rubble. d Museum of

    Around the Region – Macau

    do São
    # Ruinas
    Paulo

    Sacred Art 9am–6pm • Free

    de Senado
    $ Largo
    Brightly painted colonial

    buildings and slightly psychedelic
    paving makes this square in the
    heart of Macau a favourite with
    photographers. At one end sits
    the Leal Senado, or Loyal
    Senate, now the seat of the
    municipal government but once
    the Portuguese headquarters.
    It was thus named because
    Macau refused to recognise the
    17th-century Spanish occupation
    of Portugal. d Leal Senado 9am–9pm
    • Closed Mon • Free

    Left Food stalls Right Largo de Senado

    For entry requirements to Macau See p136

    119

    Around the Region – Macau

    Left Camões Grotto Right Floating Casino

    Centre
    % Cultural
    This elegant building was

    designed and put up in time for
    the December 1999 Handover to
    China. In fact, the actual
    ceremony took place behind the
    centre in a temporary structure
    designed to look like a giant
    Chinese lantern. The centre is
    the focal point for the Macau
    Arts Festival each March. The
    only mystery is why there is
    what appears to be a ski-jump on
    the roof. d 11am–7pm daily • Free

    ^ Protestant
    Cemetery

    More interesting than
    it sounds – indeed,
    you might find yourself
    spending hours
    wandering this gravedotted grove, reading
    inscriptions to
    Headstone
    plague-doomed
    sailors and colonial adventurers.
    Those at rest include painter
    George Chinnery (the Mandarin
    Oriental’s bar in Hong Kong is
    named after him) and Robert
    Morrison, the first Protestant to
    venture to China in search of
    converts. d 9am–5:30pm daily • Free

    Macau’s History
    The peninsula of Macau was first
    settled by the Portuguese in 1557
    as a trading base and centre for
    Christianity. It was nearly taken
    by the Dutch in 1622, and struggled to survive through the next
    250 years. The Portuguese tried
    to re-establish power in the mid19th century, and managed to
    annexe the neighbouring islands
    of Taipa and Coloane. It could
    never compete with Hong Kong,
    however, and gambling, opium
    and prostitution continued to be
    the main draws. With the waning
    of colonial power, the Portuguese
    eventually gave the enclave back
    to China in December 1999.

    patriotic verse – a bust of him
    peers through the grotto’s
    gloom. The adjoining gardens are
    popular with old men and their
    caged birds first thing in the
    morning. d 6am–9pm • Free

    do Monte
    * Forteleza
    These walls bounded the

    original Portuguese settlement in

    Grotto
    & Camões
    The author of the 16th-

    century Portuguese epic The
    Lusiads may never actually have
    visited Macau, but don’t try telling
    the local Portuguese. Luis Vaz de
    Camões specialized in overblown,

    120

    Forteleza do Monte

    A Day in Macau
    Morning

    Macau, a well-stocked fort, which
    its inhabitants boasted could
    withstand years of siege. The
    sternest test came in 1622 when
    the Dutch, who had been coveting
    Macau for years, made their move,
    only to be decisively beaten. The
    Portuguese military were based
    here up until 1966, at which
    point Portugal decided it was
    more politic to be administrators
    of Macau rather than gun-toting
    colonialists. d 7am–7pm daily • Free

    Pedro Theatre
    ( Dom
    The first Western-style lyric

    theatre in the East, the Dom
    Pedro opened in 1858. Recent
    renovations have seen it again
    hosting plays and performances
    after years of neglect. The hike
    up the hill is worth it for a look at
    a piece of theatrical history.
    d 9am–6pm • Macau Tourism Office for
    performance details • 333 000

    Seminary
    ) StTheJoseph’s
    Jesuits constructed this
    ornate lemon-yellow chapel
    between 1746 and 1758,
    modelled on the Bon Gesu
    Basilica in Rome. Its original
    dedication plaque, recently
    unearthed, namechecks
    Portuguese King João V, Macau
    Bishop Hilario de St Rosa and
    Chinese Qing-dynasty Emperor
    Kien Lum. The 200-year-old bells
    still ring out each day, and all
    sorts of fascinating Catholic
    artifacts can be found within.

    When your feet start to
    protest, take a cab across
    the causeways to Coloane
    Island and a sangria-soaked
    lunch at Fernando’s (see
    p125). Get a large jug of
    piquant Sangria in, then go
    for the fried chicken, garlic
    prawns, clams and
    sardines. The bread is hot
    and moreish, and the
    Portuguese salad is
    simplistic bliss.

    Around the Region – Macau

    Colonial-style buildings

    Catch a taxi to the Ruinas
    de São Paulo (see p119)
    in the heart of Macau,
    pose for a picture on the
    steps in front, then lose
    yourself in the surrounding
    streets full of Chinese and
    antique furniture shops.
    The rich red lacquered
    trunks and cabinets, old
    teak tables and chairs are
    all cheaper than in Hong
    Kong’s antique stores.

    After Lunch
    Walk off lunch on Hac Sa
    Beach (see p122) or
    wobble your way to the
    minibus outside Fernando’s
    and travel to Taipa village,
    which has picturesque
    houses and shops.
    It’s easiest to hail a cab to
    get back to Macau. Stop
    off at the Hotel Lisboa
    (see p123) to ponder the
    flagship casino’s seedy
    ambience. If you fancy a
    flutter, go ahead, but bear
    in mind that most of its
    customers are confirmed
    gambling junkies.
    If you manage a win or can
    stop while you still have
    cash, head for Avenida Dr
    Sun Yat-sen and its myriad
    bars for a night on the tiles.
    Maybe start at Moonwalker, then pop upstairs
    to Signal (see p124).

    121

    Around the Region – Macau

    Left Lou Lim Ieoc Garden Centre Rua da Felicidade Right Maritime Museum

    Best of the Rest
    Tower
    ! Macau
    Locals have dubbed it “Dr

    Ho’s erection” in honour of casino
    mogul Dr Stanley Ho. At 338 m
    (1,107 ft), it pips Paris’s Eiffel
    Tower and is the centrepiece of
    a planned theme park and restaurant complex. The glass floor
    revolving restaurant is not for the
    faint of heart. d Nam Van Lakes area

    de Coloane
    @ Pousada
    Macau’s first beachfront

    hotel is a top spot for a few cold
    drinks when the sun is shining.
    d Cheoc Van Praia, Coloane • 882 143

    Yat-sen
    ^ Sun
    Memorial House

    The so-called “father of modern
    China” once resided in Macau,
    and his first wife continued to
    live here after he departed.
    d Avenida Sidonio Pais • 10am–5pm.
    Closed Tue • Free

    da
    & Rua
    Felicidade

    The “street of happiness” once
    teemed with brothels, hence its
    somewhat ironically bestowed
    name. It’s now a quaint, cobbled
    thoroughfare full of cheap
    eateries.

    Lim Ieoc Garden
    # Lou
    Shady trees, lots of benches;
    Museum
    * Maritime
    lotus ponds.
    The place to head if you are
    d Avenida do Conselheiro
    Ferreira De Almeida • 6am–6pm daily

    Museum
    $ Macau
    Good displays on history and
    architecture. d Citadel of São Paolo

    do Monte • 357 911 • 10am– 6pm. Closed
    Mon • Adm

    São Domingos

    % The pale yellow Spanish-style

    church towers over the Largo do
    Senado square. White ants forced
    extensive
    renovations in
    the mid-1990s.
    More than 300
    sacred works of
    art are in the
    adjoining
    museum. d Largo
    do Domingos
    • 10am–6pm daily
    • Free

    122

    interested in Macau’s colourful
    seagoing past. d Largo do Pagode da
    Barra • 595 481 • 10am–5:30pm. Closed
    Tue • Adm

    ( Pousada
    de São Tiago

    The beautiful hotel (see p154)
    overlooking the bay began life in
    the 17th century as a Portuguese
    fort hewn from the rock.
    d Avenida da República • 378 111

    Sa
    ) Hac
    Beach

    Black mineral
    sand beach.
    Enjoy a stroll
    around the
    headland to the
    Westin Resort
    (see p154) for a
    drink. d Coloane

    Places to Gamble
    Lisboa
    ! Hotel
    Casino mogul Dr Stanley

    Alai Casino
    ^ Jai
    Named after the world’s

    d Avenida de Lisboa 2–4 • 377 666

    Terminal • 726 086 • 24 hours

    Ho’s flagship looks like a UFO
    crossed with a wedding cake,
    and remains one of Macau’s
    most bizarre landmarks. Expect
    loan sharks and grim-faced
    gamblers in rumpled clothes.
    • Open 24 hours

    Macau Jockey Club

    @ A bit more down-at-heel

    fastest ball game, played in Cuba
    and Mexico. They used to play it
    in Macau, too, tossing the hard
    ball around at lethal speeds with
    curved wicker baskets, but it
    died out in the 1980s. d Opp Jetfoil

    Casino
    & Diamond
    Tucked away on the first

    than its high-tech, cashed-up
    Hong Kong counterpart.

    floor of the Holiday Inn, the
    smallish Diamond casino has a
    relatively classy crowd. d Rua De

    d Estrada Gov Albano da Oliveira, Taipa

    Pequim • 786 424 • 24 hours

    • 820 868 • Race meetings Wed or Thu
    & weekends • Adm

    # Canidrome
    Go the dishlickers! This is

    Around the Region – Macau

    Left Hotel Lisboa Centre Floating Casino Right Kam Pek Casino

    Hotel Casino
    * Kingsway
    One of Macau’s newest

    the only greyhound racing club in
    Asia. d Avenida General Castelo Branco

    casinos, it rates high on the glitz
    scale. Minimum bets are higher
    here than in other casinos, so it’s
    not for novices. d Rua de Luis

    • 333 399 • Tue, Thu & weekends • Adm

    Gonagaza Gomes • 702 398 • 24 hours

    Casino
    Pek Casino
    $ Floating
    ( Kam
    An old converted ferry lit up
    Has a loyal clientele of local
    like a Christmas tree. Crowded,
    ill-ventilated, smoky – everything
    a casino should be. d Avenida da
    Amizade, near the Hong Kong-Macau
    Jetfoil Terminal • 781 781 • 24 hours

    % Mandarin
    Oriental
    Casino

    The more genteel
    side of gambling.
    Well-dressed,
    urbane punters
    sip martinis. d
    Avenida da Amizade
    • 567 888 • 24 hours

    punters who can be downright
    rude to tourists and flashy Hong
    Kongers. Prolonged eye contact
    with habitués inadvisable. d Rua
    de Foshan • 24 hours

    ) Taipa
    Casino

    On Taipa Island,
    so rather less
    intense than its
    Macau counterparts. d 2 Estrada
    Almirante Marques
    Esperteiro • 831 536
    • 24 hours

    123

    Around the Region – Macau

    Left Sanshiro Centre DDs Right Casablanca Café

    Cafés, Bars and Clubs
    Café
    ! Signal
    Best of the pack on the new
    Dynasty Plaza waterfront
    reclamation area. Stark and
    stylish décor, fairyland harbour
    views and a mix of local and
    Hong Kong DJs playing
    commercial and underground
    sounds. d 1/F Vista Magnifica Court,
    Avenida Dr Sun Yat-sen • $

    Café
    @ Opiarium
    Cosy couches, great views,

    live bands. With licensing
    problems now resolved, the café
    consistently welcomes crowds of
    Macau’s cooler people. d Avenida
    Dr Sun Yat-sen • $

    # Sanshiro
    Kicks off late, after 10pm, as
    does most of Macau’s nightlife.
    Good mix of sounds, cool vibe.
    d Avenida Dr Sun Yat-sen

    Macau Jazz Club

    $ Bigger but not so atmospheric
    as the smoky, back-street holein-the-wall it replaced. Nearby,
    the tall gold Goddess of Mercy
    statue smiles sadly down at
    groovers with incipient hangovers.
    Live music after
    9pm. d Avenida Dr
    Sun Yat-sen

    Pub
    % Oskar’s
    Typical
    hotel-style pub
    with a mix of
    tourists, locals
    and the odd
    exponent of the

    124

    world’s oldest profession. d G/F
    Holiday Inn Hotel, Rua de Pequim

    Guia
    ^ Nova
    Interesting mix of colonial

    artifacts, not to mention the
    antique racing car. d G/F Mandarin
    Oriental Hotel, Avenida da Amidaze

    Pub
    & Talker
    Fiesty locals at play, so tread
    carefully. There’s always football
    on the television and cheap beer.
    d 104 Rua de Pedro Coutinho

    * DDs
    Huge new club abounding

    with all manner of nocturnal
    creatures, including the odd triad
    (see p90). d Underground complex
    opp Sintra Hotel, Avenida Dom João IV

    ( Moonwalker
    You won’t see “moonwalker”
    Michael Jackson, but the harbour
    view from this popular bar is
    magical. d Vista Magnifica Court,
    Avenida Marginal da Baia

    ) Casablanca
    Café

    There’s a pool table, lots of red
    velvet and
    posters recalling
    the famous film.
    Resist the
    temptation to
    say “play it
    again, Sam” to
    the surly bar
    staff. d Dynasty
    Plaza, Avenida Dr
    Carlos Assumpcao

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat

    ! Fernando’s
    ^ Mezzaluna
    Still unspoiled by its far-flung
    Flickering half-moon candles
    fame, Fernando’s is the perfect
    place for a long, lazy liquid lunch.
    Succulent roast chicken, grilled
    sardines, killer sangria and garlic
    prawns to die for. d Praia Hac Sa 9,
    Coloane • 882 531 (booking rec) • No
    credit cards • $$

    Lorcha
    @ AA fine
    proponent of Macan-

    ese cooking, which blends the
    cuisines of East and West. Try
    spicy grilled African chicken, bacalhau (baked codfish) and �caldo
    verde (potato purée soup). d Rua
    do Almirante Sergio 289 • 313 193 • $

    Flamingo

    # Poolside restaurant with

    Mediterranean décor serving topquality Macanese dishes. Try the
    curried crab and tamarind duck.
    d Hyatt Regency, Estrada Almirante 2,
    Taipa Island • 831 234 • $$$

    Solmar

    $ An old favourite among

    locals. Try the rich seafood soup
    with chunks of codfish that melt
    in your mouth. d Avenida da Praia
    Grande 512 • 574
    391 • $$

    Caffè
    Toscana

    %

    reflect this romantic Italian
    restaurant’s name. Best pasta in
    Macau and some fine wines. d
    Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Avenida de
    Amizade 956-1110 • 567 888 • $$$

    Militar de Macau
    & Clube
    Built to cater for army bigwigs,

    the Military Club is one of the finest examples of classical European architecture in Asia. Gourmet
    Portuguese cuisine. d Avenida da
    Praia Grande 975 • 714 009 • $$$

    Around the Region – Macau

    Left Grilled sardines, Fernando’s Right Clube Militar de Macau

    * Flamingo
    Ducks paddle in the pond as

    you soak up the atmosphere on
    the terrace. The food is European
    with a touch of Asia. d 6/F Hyatt
    Regency, Estrada Almirante Marques
    Esperteiro 2 • 831 234 • $$$

    Portuguesa O
    ( Cozinha
    Manel

    Chef Manel is a local legend for
    his bacalhau made with prime
    Norwegian cod salted in Portugal.
    d Rua Fernao Mendes Pinto 90, Taipa
    Village • 827 571 • $$

    ) Restaurante
    Pinocchio

    Small and
    friendly, serving
    Italian favourites.

    Try the Portuguese spicy
    prawns, roast
    pigeon and
    curried crab.

    d 11 Travesa de Sao

    d Rua do Sol 4,

    Domingos • 370 354
    • No credit cards • $$

    Taipa Village • 827
    128 • $$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    125

    Around the Region – Shenzhen

    Left Crabs, Dong Men food market Left Minsk World Right Splendid China theme park

    Shenzhen

    W

    ithin living memory, Shenzhen, just across the New Territories border,

    was a minor township in communist China, its communal fisheries set
    in extraordinary juxtaposition to capitalist Hong Kong. Yet Shenzhen (or
    “Shumchun”) has gone from gulag to Gotham City in the space of 20 years.
    The reason is its status as a free-trading Special Economic Zone, which has
    created wealth and allured schemers, tricksters and beggars from all over
    China. To them, Shenzhen is an ersatz Hong Kong; to the visitor, Shenzhen’s
    tawdry commercialism offers a glimpse of the brave new China. Enjoyable,
    assuming you maintain a stiff sense of irony.
    Sights
    1

    Luo Hu Commercial
    City

    2
    3
    4
    5
    6

    Dong Men District

    7
    8

    Happy Valley

    9

    Bargain Beauty
    Treatments

    0

    Honey Lake Resort

    Minsk World
    Window of the World
    Splendid China
    China Folk Culture
    Village
    Mission Hills Golf
    Club

    Luo Hu Commercial City

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    Hu
    ! Luo
    Commercial City

    Men District
    @ Dong
    If you have the energy to

    tackle it, a vast expanse of clothes
    shops awaits you in the sprawling
    Dong Men district. Remember
    that clothes such as men’s shirts
    will be cut for the Asian figure,
    so try before buying. At the
    eastern edge of Dong Men is a
    footbridge leading to another
    huge fabric market, located
    above a food market. There is no
    English signposting here,
    though, so be sure to have the
    destination written down in
    Chinese. d Dong Men district, a

    exploding in fireballs of increasing magnitude set against a spaghetti western soundtrack; behold
    stuffed Russian space dog Strelka;
    and applaud a baffling Russian
    cabaret act. d Yantian district • 2535
    5333 • 9:30am–4pm daily • Adm

    of the World
    $ Window
    Of all the oddities springing

    from Shenzhen’s fevered theme
    parks appetite, Window of the
    World is, to Western eyes, the
    most surreal: a reduction (literally
    and metaphorically) of the real
    world. Mount Fuji becomes a 6-m
    (20-ft) slagheap, tourists pose in
    Thai national dress in front of the
    Taj Mahal and, poignantly,
    Manhattan retains its World Trade
    Center. Live shows are put on at
    set times on most “continents”,
    including one from a suspiciously
    Asiatic-looking African tribe.
    There’s also a Grand Canyon
    flume ride and a real snow skislope. d Overseas Chinese Town • 86

    Around the Region – Shenzhen

    Right by the border
    station, this large mall
    is the most convenient
    place to shop in
    Shenzhen. Inside its
    teeming five stories
    are virtually all the
    consumer goods you
    Minsk World
    could ever desire, in
    exhaustive and exhausting
    quantities. The brands are either
    Chinese (often of solid build) or
    fake Western (take your
    chances). Countless stalls sell all
    manner of clothes, footwear,
    jewellery, watches, accessories
    and electronic goods. A huge
    textiles market is on the fifth
    floor. Expect to haggle over
    prices: offer no more than 10 per
    cent of the first asking price to
    start with. d By border stn

    8660 8000 • 9am–10:30pm weekdays,
    9am–10:30pm weekends • Adm

    couple of miles N of Luo Hu

    World
    # Minsk
    The ironies come thick and

    fast aboard this former Soviet
    aircraft carrier, selling American
    hot dogs from its flight deck. It’s
    a hugely popular destination for
    Chinese tourists, though few
    Westerners visit. Here you can
    thrill at footage of missiles

    Window of the World

    For mainland China visa information See p136

    127

    Around the Region – Shenzhen

    Left and Right Splendid China

    China
    % Splendid
    The architectural wonders of
    China, including recreations of
    Beijing’s Imperial Palace, the
    Terracotta Warriors of Xi’an and
    the Great Wall. d Overseas Chinese
    Town • 2660 0626 • 10am–10:30pm
    weekdays, 10am–8pm weekends • Adm

    China Folk Culture Village

    ^ Full-size recreations of tradi-

    tional villages are peopled by
    well groomed, eternally happy
    folk representing different ethnic
    Chinese groups. An anthropologist’s nightmare perhaps, but it
    will give you some idea of
    China’s diverse cultural and
    ethnic melting pot. d Overseas
    Chinese Town • 2660 0626 •
    10am–10:30pm weekdays, 10am–8pm
    weekends • Adm

    play at this five-star, 90-hole golf
    club. Alternatively, you can play
    tennis on one of the resort’s 51
    courts. d Mission Hills Rd, Guanlan
    town • Reservations 2802 0888, or in HK
    2973 0303 • Shuttle bus from HK’s Lok
    Ma Chau every 20 mins

    Beauty
    ( Bargain
    Treatments

    When you reach breaking point
    with all the shopping malls and
    theme parks, rest and refresh
    yourself with an exceptionally
    cheap foot or back massage, or
    perhaps some nail painting. A
    vast range of treatments are
    available at Luo Hu (see p127).
    Hotel health centres offer the
    assurance of professional
    reflexology and traditional
    massage as well as the
    opportunity to be pampered.

    Valley
    & Happy
    This theme park gives Hong
    Lake Resort
    ) Honey
    Kong’s Ocean Park a run for its
    Almost every kind of leisure
    money, with the bonus of a tidal
    pool, adrenalin-inducing rides
    such as the Space Shot, an assault
    course and martial arts demonstrations. Use the Happy Line
    monorail to travel between this
    and other nearby theme
    parks d Overseas Chinese

    facility is on the city’s doorstep
    at Honey Lake, including a large
    amusement park, shopping mall,
    golf courses and indoor and
    outdoor pools. d Shennan Rd, Futian
    district • 8370 8988 • Adm

    Town • 2644 9168
    • 9:30am–9pm daily • Adm

    Hills
    * Mission
    Golf Club

    Many Hong Kong
    executives come
    across the border to

    128

    Mission Hills Golf Club

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat and Drink
    Restaurant
    ! Laurel
    Terrific classic Cantonese

    restaurant that is packed all day
    but worth a wait. d Shop 5010, 5/F,
    Lou Hu Commercial City • 8232 3668 • $$

    @ Nishimura
    Low-key eatery, one of only
    a few Japanese food places in
    Shenzhen. Reasonably priced
    sushi, sashimi, teppanyaki and
    robotayaki. d 2/F, Shangri-La Hotel,
    Jianshe Rd • 8396 1386 • No credit
    cards • $$

    Elephant Thai
    # Golden
    Restaurant

    A central location that’s easy to
    find, a clear English menu and
    polite staff all make this one of
    the best Southeast Asian
    restaurants in town. d Block B, 1/F
    Lido Hotel, Dong Men Nan Lu, Luohu •
    No credit cards • 8223 3888 • $$

    $ 360°
    With great night views of

    Shenzhen, the revolving
    restaurant atop the luxury
    Shangri-La Hotel (see p148) has
    an international buffet, hotpots
    and grills. d Shangri-La Hotel, Jianshe
    Rd • 8396 1380 • $$$$

    J. Bean’s
    ^ Henry
    When you simply have to

    have that burger, head to Henry
    J Beans. It also has one of
    Shenzhen’s few decent bars
    without Vegas-style glitter or
    deafening Karaoke. d 2/F, Shangri-La
    Hotel, Jianshe Lu • 8396 1387 • $$

    Restaurant
    & Chaozhou
    A delightful place to learn

    more about Chaozhou cuisine,
    which deserves just as much
    exposure as its Cantonese
    cousin. The staff are helpful, and
    there is even a shark’s skin soup
    to sample. d The Landmark Hotel,
    Nan Hu Lu 2 • 8217 2288 • $$$$

    * Casablanca
    French- and Italian-

    influenced international food in
    Shekou district, which is
    Shenzhen’s expat, harbourside
    bolthole. d G/F, Yingbin Building, Taizi
    Lu, Shekou • 2667 6968 • $$

    Colors Dong Men
    ( True
    A quiet Western restaurant
    with live jazz, great food and
    English-speaking waiters. d 4/F

    Dong Men Friendship City, Jie Fang Lu •
    8230 1833 • $$

    Grey Wolf
    % The
    Highly unusual

    Restaurant
    ) Soho
    and Nightclub

    décor based on the
    architecture of Gansu,
    and some tasty
    Gansu-style lamb and
    potato dishes. d Huafu
    lu 1022, Futian • 8324 1818
    • No credit cards • $$

    Around the Region – Shenzhen

    Laurel Restaurant

    The staff have worked
    hard on everything
    from the food to the
    design in this flashy
    establishment. d Bitao
    Nishimura Restaurant

    Club, Tai Zi Lu, Shekou •
    2669 0148 • $$

    Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    129

    Guangzhou

    C

    hina’s two great revolutions, republican and communist, were born
    in Guangzhou (or what the West used to call “Canton”), which indicates
    the temperament of this sprawling southern Chinese capital. Far distant from
    Beijing, the city has gone its own wilful way, and there is still the insouciance
    and restlessness of a people who answer to no-one. The modern city is at
    the mercy of miasmic smog and yammering traffic, but it also has enormous
    personality, from Han dynasty tombs to a rich choice
    of temples, traditional architecture and the charm
    of Shamian Island’s faded 19th-century terraces.
    Sights in Guangzhou
    1
    2

    Shamian Island

    3

    Hua Lin Temple and Jade
    Market

    4
    5

    Chen Clan Temple

    Wandering Among the
    Gei

    Temples of Filial Piety
    and Six Banyan Trees

    6
    7
    8
    9

    Nanyue Tomb

    0

    River Trips

    Yuexiu Park
    White Cloud Mountain
    Guangdong Museum
    of Art

    Pagoda at Six Banyan Trees

    

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    Around the Region – Guangzhou

    Left Street scene Centre Martial arts in the park Right White Swan Hotel, Shamian Island

    

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    Island
    ! Shamian
    The small islet in southwest
    Guangzhou long served as the
    main gateway to China, the only
    place where merchants and
    diplomats were allowed to do
    business with the Empire. Today
    it’s a lovely leafy haven, recently
    restored and beautified with
    some good accommodation,
    dining and drinking options and
    quiet riverside walks.

    Among
    @ Wandering
    the Gei

    Perhaps the simplest yet most
    worthwhile thing to do in Guangzhou is to wander aimlessly
    along its gei, the narrow alleys
    between the ancient ramshackle
    houses in the older parts of
    town. The streets above Shamian
    Island up as far as Liwanhu
    district are especially good.
    Strolling down these byways
    gives a sense of the everyday
    life that has carried on here for
    hundreds of years. Absorb
    yourself in the minutiae of
    domestic life and small-scale

    Jade market

    industries, such as beauty
    treatments, maybe in the form of
    eyebrow plucking with a simple
    piece of cotton.

    Lin Temple
    # Hua
    and Jade Market

    An extensive jade market
    surrounds the small Buddhist
    temple of Hua Lin, which is also
    worth a quick visit. The jade on
    sale is cheaper than in Hong
    Kong, although you’ll need to be
    an expert to separate the rare
    real jade from the fake. Several
    antique stores and jade and
    amber sellers can be found west
    of Kangwang Zhong Lu, and north
    of Changshang Xi Lu. d North of

    Around the Region – Guangzhou

    Left Wandering among the gei Left Chen Clan Temple

    Xiajiu Lu, east of Wen Nan Wen Lu

    Clan Temple
    $ Chen
    With Chen being the most

    common family name in the
    area, it’s no surprise that the
    many groupings of local Chens
    constructed a suitably vast
    temple complex in the 1890s.
    It’s particularly worth a look if
    you haven’t visited any of the
    ancestral halls in the New
    Territories of Hong Kong. The
    most impressive feature is the
    ornate ceramic friezes adorning
    the roof, which depict legendary
    beasts. There are also displays
    (some of admittedly patchy
    quality) of jade, bone and other
    local crafts, some for sale. Head
    to the leafy courtyards for peace
    and shade. d Zhongshan Qi Lu, metro
    Chen Jia Ci • 8:30am–5pm daily • Adm

    For mainland China visa information See p136

    131

    Around the Region – Guangzhou

    Left Temple of the Six Banyan Trees Right Yuexiu Park

    of Filial Piety
    % Temples
    and Six Banyan Trees

    The Temple of Filial Piety (Guangxiao Si) was a royal temple as far
    back as the 2nd century BC, and
    is thought to have served as a
    Buddhist shrine since the 4th
    century AD. However, the
    buildings that stand today were
    built in the 17th century. It’s a
    lovely place to come and sit
    beneath venerable, ancient fig
    trees in quiet courtyards. The
    nearby Temple of the Six Banyan
    Trees (Liurong Si) has the oldest
    and largest pagoda in Guangzhou,
    standing at 55 m (180 ft), though
    the banyan trees have sadly died.
    d Guangxiao Lu

    Tomb
    ^ Nanyue
    A well-presented

    museum preserves the
    burial tomb and artifacts of
    one of the kings of the
    Southern Yue, who ruled the
    area in the 2nd and 3rd
    centuries AD. Well signposted
    in Chinese and English, the
    tomb offers a glimpse of a
    culturally sophisticated
    society. Fine ceramic
    pillows and exquisite packaging
    materials from
    later dynasties
    are among the
    displays. d Jeifang
    Bei Lu • 9am–
    5pm daily • Adm

    132

    Park
    & Yuexiu
    The lovely expanse of park

    contains a sculpture of the Five
    Rams, the symbol of Guangzhou,
    and a monument to Sun Yat-sen,
    the revered former Hong Kong
    resident and “father of modern
    China” The Munici-pal Museum is
    housed in the Zhen Hai Tower,
    the last remnant of the city’s
    14-century walls. d Metro Yuexiu
    Gongyuan Park • 7am­‑7pm • Adm •
    Museum 10:15am–4pm daily • Adm

    Cloud Mountain
    * White
    Overlooking the city haze is
    a huge wooded area dominated
    by a series of ridges and peaks,
    offering open space, fresh air
    and cooling breezes.

    ( Guangdong
    Museum of Art

    Probably still China’s largest
    art museum, with ancient
    and contemporary Chinese
    art. d Luhu Lu 13, Ersha Island

    • 9am–5pm Tue–Sun • Adm

    Trips
    ) River
    Escape the fumes and

    Five Rams sculpture, Yeuxiu Park

    look back on the
    city from the
    river. A number
    of operators offer
    cruises. Try an
    evening trip on the
    White Swan, a
    lovely old
    masted yacht.

    Unless otherwise stated, all restaurants accept credit cards

    Price Categories
    For a three-course
    meal for one with half
    a bottle of wine (or
    equivalent meal) and
    extra charges.


    $

    $$
    $$$
    $$$$
    $$$$$

    under HK$100
    HK$100–250
    HK$250–450
    HK$450–600
    over HK$600

    Places to Eat and Drink
    M Chef (aka Chao Mei)
    ! JThose
    of a nervous disposi-

    tion may want to skip the “frog
    milk” and “stewed insect in pot”,
    but the sizzling “chicken with
    three cups wine” is terrific.
    d Opp White Swan Hotel, Shamian Island
    • 8191 3018 • No credit cards • $$

    @ Lucy’s
    The chilled-out

    Wa Ju
    ^ Qing
    By far the best of the city’s

    Korean restaurants, with three
    floors, and a roof top from where
    you can look out over Dong Feng
    Park. d Shuiyin Lu 117 • 8725 1929 • $$

    Fusion
    & Japan
    In a city famed for its

    football-field sized
    restaurants, this is
    one of the largest. A
    huge choice of
    Japanese/Cantonese
    fusion dishes. d 2/F

    atmosphere makes it
    a good place to wind
    down, though the
    Western and Chinese
    food isn’t prizewinning, and the
    drinks are relatively
    expensive. d 3 Shamian

    Metro Plaza, Tian He Bei Lu
    358–378 • 8384 5109 • $$

    Matteo
    * DiGuangzhou’s
    most

    Nan Jie, Shamian Island
    • 8121 5106 • No credit
    cards • $$

    Bei Yuan Jiujia

    # A great opportunity to try –

    Around the Region – Guangzhou

    Lucy’s Restaurant

    J M Chef

    among other Cantonese and
    Chaozhou specialities – sweet
    and sour pork (tang cu li ji) as it
    should be. d Xiao Bei Lu 202 • 8356
    3365 • No credit cards • $$

    Jiang Hai Xian Da
    $ Dong
    Jiu Lou

    Occupying a full five floors, a
    great place to go on a seafood
    adventure. d Yanjiang Lu 2, beside
    Haizhu Guangchang • 8318 4901 • $$

    reliable Italian cuisine
    plus a very popular
    Sunday brunch. d West

    Side First Floor, Tian He Bei
    Lu 175–181 • 8525 0789 • $$$

    Guo Yan Yi
    ( Chuan
    An excellent introduction to
    hot and spicy Sichuan cuisine.
    Hotpot comes with a yin/yangstyle divider for those
    unaccustomed to fiery foods.

    d 2–3/F, Hua Xin Dasha, Shui Yin Lu 2 •
    3760 1325 • $$

    ) Tang
    A relative newcomer to the

    with a strong German influence
    and evening jazz sessions. d

    scene, Tang offers a very
    Cantonese interpretation of
    imperial royal recipes. Located in
    the same building as its popular
    nightclub. d Jian Shi Liu Ma Lu 1 •

    Yangjiang Zhong Lu 183 • 8333 6156 • $$

    8284 3320 • $$$

    1920

    % Expats and locals enjoy food

    Following pages Gardeners in central Hong Kong

    133

    streetsmart
    Planning Your Trip
    136

    Getting Around
    Hong Kong
    138
    Sources of Information
    139
    Things to Avoid
    140
    Health and Security Tips
    141
    Banking and
    Communications
    142
    Hong Kong on a Budget
    143
    Shopping Tips
    144
    Tours
    145
    Accommodation Tips
    146
    Places to Stay
    147–154

    streetsmart

    Getting to Hong Kong
    137

    Streetsmart

    Left Hong Kong Airport Centre British brand shop Right Road signs in Chinese and English

    Planning Your Trip
    and Visa
    ! Passport
    Information

    Citizens from the UK, US,
    Canada, Australia and
    New Zealand need only a
    valid passport to enter
    Hong Kong. UK citizens
    may stay up to six months
    and US, Canadian, Austra­lian and New Zealand
    visitors for up to three
    months without a visa.
    (Ensure your passport is
    valid for at least a month
    after you plan to leave
    Hong Kong.) To visit
    mainland China (beyond
    the New Territories), you
    will need a visa. These
    are easy to obtain when
    you are in Hong Kong,
    from travel agents. China
    Travel Service issues
    China visas China a charges a
    lot more than others.
    You’ll need to leave your
    passport and one
    passport photo. Citizens
    of most countries may
    visit Macau for up to 20
    days without a visa –
    Portuguese citizens are
    allowed 90 days.

    to Go
    @ When
    The milder months

    from October to late
    January are a popular
    time to visit, although
    Hong Kong’s climate is at
    its best in March and
    April. Hotel rooms will be
    heavily booked and more
    expensive in October and
    April. Flights also tend to
    be heavily booked during
    these months.

    # Climate
    Just south of the

    Tropic of Cancer, Hong

    136

    Kong’s sub-tropical
    climate has a mild winter
    (December–February)
    when temperatures can
    drop as low as 10°C
    (50°F), while spring
    (March–April) and autumn
    (October–November) are
    short, warm and pleasant.
    In summer (May–
    September), temperatures
    average about 28°C (83°F),
    relative summer humidity
    regularly soars above 80
    or 90 per cent and
    typhoons and tropical
    storms often visit.

    to Take
    $ What
    Light clothing will

    suffice for most of the
    year. A long-sleeved top
    is advisable for some of
    the arctic air-conditioning;
    a light jacket for the
    winter months.

    & Currency
    Information

    The local currency is the
    Hong Kong dollar (HK$),
    divided into 100 cents.
    Bills are issued in 20-, 50-,
    100-, 500- and 1,000dollar denominations. Coins
    come in 1-, 2-, 5- and 10dollar and 10-, 20- and
    50-cent denominations.
    Pegged to the US dollar,
    the exchange rate always
    hovers close to HK$7.8 to
    the US$1. HK$ are
    accepted in Macau but
    change is given in MOP$.
    ¥RMB are needed for
    mainland China.

    * Money
    Take lots! Hong Kong

    can be expensive. There
    is no limit on the amount
    that can be changed (see
    also p142).

    Local Prices
    % Languages
    Cantonese, Mandarin ( Hong Kong is not the
    and English are the official languages of Hong
    Kong. English is widely
    understood and spoken,
    but expect communication difficulties with
    taxi drivers and residents
    in remoter rural areas.

    ^ Health
    Preparations

    No compulsory vaccinations are required for
    Hong Kong, but a yellow
    fever vaccination is necessary if you are visiting
    southern China from a
    yellow fever infected area.
    Common medicines are
    readily available. Ensure
    you have valid medical
    insurance.

    shopper’s paradise it once
    was. Many branded and
    designer goods are on a
    par with or even pricier
    than in the West. Bargains
    can be found, however,
    in the markets (see
    pp38–9) and warehouse
    outlets (see pp76 & 106).

    Licences
    ) Driving
    A valid international

    driving licence is required
    for driving and car hire.

    Directory
    China Travel Service
    78–83 Connaught Rd,
    Central • 2853 3888

    Getting to Hong Kong
    Flights
    ! Direct
    Being a major hub,

    Hong Kong is well served
    by direct connections to
    much of the globe. Major
    cities linked by direct
    flights to Hong Kong
    include: Auckland, Sydney,
    Melbourne, LA, London,
    San Francisco, Toronto
    and Vancouver.

    @ Stopovers
    There are plenty of

    stopover options for
    breaking your journey.
    Singapore, Kuala Lumpur
    and Bangkok can make
    interesting and cheap
    stopover breaks if flying
    in from the west, or
    Seoul and Taipei if flying
    in from the east. Some
    carriers do not charge for
    arranging inbound or
    outbound stopovers and
    may offer special deals.

    Booking Flights
    and Hotels Online

    #

    Flight and hotel deals are
    worth checking on the
    websites listed in the
    directory. However,
    Chinese domestic flights
    should always be bought
    in Hong Kong or mainland
    China, at prices up to 50
    per cent cheaper than online. Chinese-run hotel
    rates are best bargained
    for locally.

    the
    $ Finding
    Cheapest Flights

    The cheapest times to
    head to Hong Kong are
    just after Chinese New
    Year in early January, and
    from November to midDecember. Late deals

    can sometimes be found
    on websites such as
    lastminute.co.uk. Booking
    well in advance can also
    secure lower prices.
    Some websites, such as
    travelocity.com, offer email services alerting you
    when tickets fall below a
    certain price. Bargains
    are less likely if your
    return leg falls in August,
    or between Christmas
    and Chinese New Year,
    when many locals fly out.

    from
    % Flights
    Southeast Asia

    If you’ll be spending time
    in Southeast Asia first,
    very competitively priced
    air tickets to Hong Kong
    can be bought in
    Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur
    and Singapore.

    ^ Information
    at the Airport

    There are tourist information offices in transfer area
    E2 and the arrivals buffer
    halls A and B. There’s also
    a hotel information and
    reservations office in the
    arrivals halls.

    & Cross-Country
    Route by Rail

    For those with time and
    money, the most adventurous way to reach
    Hong Kong from Europe
    is by rail via the TransSiberia Railway, through
    Mongolia or Manchuria to
    Beijing, and then connecting to Hong Kong.

    Routes
    * Rail
    from China

    depart regularly each day
    from Guangzhou. Sleeper
    services between Beijing
    and Shanghai depart on
    alternate days. “Soft”
    sleeper compartments
    are plush and less
    crowded but can cost
    almost as much as flying.

    Streetsmart

    Left Airport train Centre Macau Airport Right Passenger ferry

    Sea
    ( By
    Fast, regular ferry

    services to Hong Kong
    run from Guangzhou and
    Macau. Services from
    Macau take anywhere
    between one and two
    hours and from
    Guangzhou two to three
    hours.

    Road
    ) By
    Several buses also

    run daily between Guan­gzhou and Hong Kong.

    Directory
    Websites
    www.expedia.com
    www.priceline.com
    www.priceline.co.uk
    www.travelocity.com
    www.cheaptickets.com
    www.bargainflights.
    com
    www.lastminute.
    co.uk
    www.trailblazerguides.com
    www.cathaypacific.com
    Airport Information
    General information
    booths 2807 6543,
    7am–11pm daily
    • www.hkairport.com
    • Hotel reservation
    desks 6am–1pm daily

    Hong Kong-bound trains

    137

    Streetsmart

    Left MTR logo Centre Taxi Right Tram

    Getting Around Hong Kong
    Transfer
    ! Airport
    Options

    The excellent, modern
    airport trains to Central
    take just 23 minutes and
    depart every 10 minutes
    from 6am to 1:30am
    daily. Taxis are also
    readily available at the
    airport. The E11 bus
    through Central, Wanchai
    and Causeway Bay takes
    about an hour and is the
    cheapest option.

    @ Octopus
    Cards

    If you’re going to travel
    widely in Hong Kong
    consider buying an
    Octopus card, which you
    charge with money and
    swipe over the readers
    on most local buses,
    trains, ferries and trams.
    Special tourist versions
    allow unlimited travel for
    24 hours or three days.

    MTR
    # The
    and KCR

    The excellent, efficient
    MTR (Mass Transit Rail­way) system runs from
    6am to 1.30am on five
    underground lines
    connecting Hong Kong
    Island, Kowloon, the New
    Territories and Lantau.
    It’s clean, cheap and airconditioned. The KCR
    (Kowloon-Canton Railway)
    lines, connecting Kowloon
    with the New Territories
    and mainland China, run
    from 5.30am to 1am.

    $ Buses
    Cheap, frequent buses
    connect almost every
    place in Hong Kong. Pick

    138

    up a bus route map at
    any of the HKTA’s offices.
    Major hotels offer free
    shuttle buses between
    the hotels and Kowloon
    and Central KCR stations.

    % Taxis
    Red taxis operate in

    and around central Hong
    Kong and are reasonably
    priced. Surcharges apply
    for tunnel tolls, luggage in
    the trunk and late-night
    journeys. Tipping is not
    expected. Green taxis run
    in the New Territories;
    blue ones on Lantau. Bear
    in mind, though, that few
    taxi drivers can speak
    much English.

    ^ Ferries
    Ferries link Hong

    Kong Island with
    Kowloon, the outlying
    islands, Macau and
    China. The frequent Star
    Ferries (see pp14–15)
    shuttle between Hong
    Kong and Tsim Sha Tsui
    on Kowloon from 6:30am
    to 11:30pm. Next to
    Central’s Star Ferry pier
    are the main piers for
    outlying islands.

    & Trams
    The ancient, wood-

    panelled, double-deck
    trams running west to
    east from Kennedy Town
    to Chai Wan are a slow,
    sometimes cramped but
    undeniably atmospheric
    way to get around Hong
    Kong. A very reasonable
    flat fee applies for all
    destinations. The legendary Peak Tram (see p9)
    leaves from Garden Road.

    Foot
    * On
    The best way to see

    many central Hong Kong
    districts is to walk. The
    distances are short,
    although the inclines can
    be steep. Walking is
    really the only way to see
    the sights in Western,
    the Mid-Levels, Wan
    Chai, much of Kowloon
    and Hong Kong’s country
    parks. Walking in parts of
    Central and Admiralty,
    can, however, be a
    disorientating trudge
    around a maze of walkways and underpasses.

    Bike
    ( By
    Forget cycling among

    the urban congestion and
    fumes, but think about
    hiring a bike to hit some
    of the rugged, steep
    country trails. Contact
    the Hong Kong Cycling
    Association for details.

    Hire and
    ) Car
    Driving

    Why hire a car in Hong
    Kong when it’s so easy
    to get around, parking is
    scarce and congestion is
    so intense? If you do,
    you’ll need an international driving licence.

    Directory
    Hong Kong Cycling
    Association
    2504 8176
    Car Hire
    Avis 2890 6988 • Hertz
    2525 1313 • Trinity
    2563 6117

    Sources of Information
    Services
    ! HKTB
    The Hong Kong Tour-

    ism Board (HKTB) has
    conveniently located
    branches offering brochures
    and advice. There is also
    a website and multi­lingual visitor hotline.

    Websites

    @ HKTB’s website (see

    directory) is a good starting point. Others include
    the South China Morning
    Post’s www.scmp.com
    and www.totallyhk.com.
    For directory services go
    to www.hkt.com.

    # Newspapers
    The broadsheet daily

    South China Morning
    Post provides extensive
    coverage of local, Chinese
    and world news. The
    tabloid Standard gives less
    comprehensive coverage
    and an irreverent spin.

    Magazines
    $ Local
    HK Magazine (free) is

    a weekly listings magazine with eating, drinking
    and going out tips. BC
    Magazine (also free) is a
    clubbing-heavy, twicemonthly guide with listings. Both are available
    from bars and restaurants.

    % English-Language
    Radio and TV

    ATV World and TVB Pearl
    are Hong Kong’s two
    terrestrial Englishlanguage channels. RTHK
    is Hong Kong’s publicly
    funded but editorially
    independent radio broadcaster. RTHK 3 (567 AM,
    1584AM) has mainly news,

    finance and current affairs;
    RTHK 4 (96.7–98.9FM)
    plays Western and Chinese classical music,
    RTHK 6 (675AM) broadcasts BBC World Service
    programming.

    Books
    ^ Practical
    and Maps

    The HKTB has free maps
    of central Hong Kong and
    free booklets including A
    Guide to Quality Merchants,Hong Kong Access
    Guide for Disabled Visi­tors and Exploring Hong
    Kong’s Countryside, available in several languages.
    Good maps (the Countryside Series) are available
    from Government
    Publications Centres.

    & Business
    Information

    The Hong Kong Trade
    Development Council
    (www.tdctrade.com)
    offers useful information.

    and Figures
    * Facts
    The government

    website, www.info.gov.
    hk, with links to all its
    departments, is a good
    starting point for facts
    and figures. The CIA’s
    online World Factbook
    offers raw statistics on
    Hong Kong and China at:
    www.cia.gov/cia/publica
    tions/factbook/index.html

    and Air
    ( Weather
    Quality Info

    Hong Kong Observatory’s
    phoneline and website
    offer daily and three-day
    forecasts. The Weather
    Underground site, www.

    underground.org.hk, and
    South China Morning
    Post at http://weather.
    scmp.com also have local
    weather and air pollution
    information.

    Streetsmart

    Left Octopus travel cards Centre Tourist information sign Right HKTB desk

    Books for
    ) Some
    Background

    Hong Kong: A Guide to
    Recent Architecture by
    Juanita Cheng and
    Andrew Yeoh is a useful
    pocket guide. A History
    of Hong Kong by Frank
    Welsh starts from the
    time of British rule. Travellers’ Tales Guides: Hong
    Kong includes some excellent writing from Jan
    Morris, Bruce Chatwin
    and Charles Jennings.

    Directory
    HKTB Website
    www.discoverhong
    kong.com
    HKTB Branches
    Airport buffer halls and
    Area E2 • Tsim Sha
    Tsui Star Ferry
    terminal, Kowloon
    8am–6pm daily •
    Causeway Bay MTR
    station • 8am–8pm
    daily
    HKTA Hotline
    2508 1234
    Government
    Publications Centres
    4/F Murray Building,
    Garden Rd, Central,
    2537 1910
    HK Observatory
    2926 8200
    • www.weather.gov.hk

    139

    Streetsmart

    Left Busy road in Central Right Topless bar signs Right Public bus

    Things to Avoid
    in Central
    ! Driving
    Hong Kong and
    Kowloon

    Traffic is often bumper to
    bumper, so walk or take
    another form of transport.

    in Central
    @ Hurrying
    on a Sunday

    Filipino and Indonesian
    domestic workers crowd
    Central’s sidewalks and
    squares on a Sunday, so
    don’t expect anything
    other than slow progress.
    Watching these low-paid
    workers enjoying their
    only day off makes for a
    contrast, or perhaps
    rebuke, to the bustle and
    conspicuous consumption usually on display.

    Peak on a
    # The
    Sunday

    Long queues form for the
    Peak Tram and the whole
    Peak area is much busier
    at weekends and particularly on Sundays. Turn
    round and come back
    another day if it’s cloudy,
    too, as you’ll miss those
    spectacular views.

    or Drinking
    $ Eating
    on the MTR
    Hong Kongers may
    blithely litter their streets,
    countryside and harbour,
    but no-one eats or drinks
    on the spotless subway.

    Bars of
    % Hostess
    Wanchai or Tsim
    Sha Tsui

    That is unless you want
    to pay steep surprise
    cover charges on top of
    your already expensive
    drinks. These may still be

    140

    popular destinations for
    US sailors on shore
    leave, but don’t expect to
    recapture the world of
    Suzy Wong.

    Drug Use
    ^ Illegal
    Expect to be arrested

    if you are found in possession of illegal drugs of
    any kind. Hong Kong law
    officially makes no distinction between the types
    of drug found. Spot checks
    and raids are sometimes
    carried out in areas such
    as Lan Kwai Fong.

    Areas
    & Unfamiliar
    Late at Night

    There’s no doubt Hong
    Kong is a relatively safe
    city, but don’t tempt fate
    by wandering through
    quiet streets and heavily
    built-up housing areas in
    the dead of night. Take a
    taxi instead.

    * Traffic-Choked
    Areas

    On smoggy days you can
    see, smell and taste the
    pollution in places such
    as Causeway Bay and
    Central. When the
    pollution index heads
    above 100, escape the
    smog by taking a trip out
    to the countryside or the
    outlying islands.

    a Bus
    ( Taking
    Without the
    Right Change

    No change is offered on
    buses, so take the right
    money, use an Octopus
    Card (see p138) or be
    prepared to lose the
    change owed to you.

    a
    ) Leaving
    Rucksack
    Unattended

    Backpackers staying in
    such places as the Chungking Mansions (see p152)
    should take particular care
    with rucksacks. Theft by
    unscrupulous fellow
    travellers is a possibility.

    Directory
    General Emergencies
    999
    Crime Hotline
    2527 7177
    Hospital Authority
    Enquiry Service
    2300 6555
    • www.ha.org.hk
    The Adventist
    Hospital
    40 Stubs Rd, Happy
    Valley, Hong Kong
    Island • 2574
    �������������
    6211
    Caritas Medical
    Centre
    111 Wing Hong St,
    Sham Shui Po • 2746
    7911
    Matilda Hospital
    41 Mount kellet Rd,
    The Peak, Hong Kong
    Island • 2849 0123
    Queen Mary
    Hospital
    102 Pok Fu Lam Rd,
    Hong Kong Island
    • 2855 3838
    Lost/Stolen
    Credit Cards
    Amex 2811 6122
    • Master Card 800 966
    677 toll free • VISA 800
    900 782

    Health and Security Tips
    ! Foreign-Language
    Hotlines

    Important information
    and emergency hotlines
    are efficient and provide
    foreign-language speakers
    – mainly English.

    Water
    @ Drinking
    and Food Safety

    Hong Kong’s tap water is
    safe to drink. Wash fresh
    fruit and vegetables.
    Avoid locally caught
    seafood if your health is
    fragile, as high pollution
    levels and some diseases
    can lurk in local fish.
    Many local restaurants
    source fish from abroad.

    Pollution
    # Air
    Advice

    Urban air quality is improving rapidly following the
    introduction of cleaner
    vehicle fuels. Even so,
    the air pollution index
    can still head above 100,
    at which point people
    with respiratory complaints are advised to
    stay indoors. Consult
    the SCMP’s website
    http://weather.scmp.com
    for regular updates.

    $ Seawater
    Pollution and

    Swimming Dangers

    Sadly, Hong Kong has
    made slow progress in
    treating the sewage it
    empties into its own
    waters, let alone in
    tackling the pollution
    washing from China’s
    rivers. There are good
    beaches (usually government managed) but
    seawater quality can vary

    markedly. Toxic algae
    blooms occasionally
    make swimming unsafe.
    It’s best to swim on a
    lifeguard-staffed beach
    with shark net. On
    unmanaged beaches
    never swim at dawn,
    dusk, in murky waters or
    with open wounds.

    umbrella into a sun
    parasol. If you’re worried
    about the heat, avoid too
    much activity during the
    hottest part of the day.
    Head up Victoria Peak for
    cooler climes or to the
    coast for sea breezes.

    Security
    % Avoiding
    Risks

    Don’t underestimate your
    ability to sweat and lose
    fluid in the heat. Take lots
    of water. Buy a good map,
    take a mobile phone if
    you have one and small
    change for local transport.
    Sensible clothing and
    footwear are a must for
    walking unpaved trails.
    Pocket tissues might
    come in handy for some
    of the public toilets in
    rustic areas. In winter,
    take a waterproof.

    Crime and theft directed
    at tourists are rare in
    Hong Kong. To be completely safe, take commonsense precautions such
    as keeping a close hold
    on personal possessions,
    using a hotel safe if provided and not leaving valuable items or documents
    in your backpack.

    Security
    ^ Other
    Precautions

    If you are planning to
    spend time in Hong
    Kong, registering your
    passport with your local
    consulate or embassy
    will make replacing a lost
    one easier. Extra travel
    insurance may be a good
    idea if you are travelling
    with expensive items.

    and Humid& Heat
    ity Precautions

    Hydration is important at
    all times, especially so in
    Hong Kong’s stifling
    summer heat and
    humidity. Ensure you
    drink plenty of fluid.
    Cool, light, loose cotton
    clothing will be most
    comfortable. Wear a hat
    if you are outdoors for
    long periods or turn your

    Streetsmart

    Left Crowded street scene Centre Hiking, the Wilson trail Right Traditional pharmacy

    to Take if
    * What
    Hiking

    with
    ( Hospitals
    A&E

    Caritas Medical Centre
    and Queen Mary Hospital
    are among those with
    24-hour accident and
    emergency departments.

    and
    ) Doctors
    Dentists

    The Adventist Hospital
    and the Matilda Hospital
    are both private hospitals
    with bilingual
    (Cantonese/English)
    staff. Their outpatient
    departments include
    those for women and
    travellers, and there are
    also maternity and dental
    clinics. See the Yellow
    Pages for more foreignlanguage doctors and
    dentists in Hong Kong.

    141

    Streetsmart

    Left Bank window Centre left ATM Centre Phone boxes Right Man on a mobile

    Banking and Communications
    ATMs and
    Hong
    ! Banks,
    % Calling
    Credit Cards
    Kong
    Banks and ATMs are
    numerous. Opening hours
    are 9am–4:30pm Mon–Fri
    and 9am–12:30pm Sat.
    Most ATMs operate 24
    hours. Credit/debit cards
    are widely accepted.

    Changing
    @ Money
    and Forwarding

    Using your bank card at
    an ATM may be cheaper
    than changing money or
    using travellers’ cheques.
    Money forwarding can be
    arranged through local
    banks or Western Union.

    # Post
    The Hong Kong

    postal service is rapid
    and efficient. Local mail
    takes one to two days.
    Zone 1 air mail (all of
    Asia except Japan) takes
    three to five days. Zone 2
    (the rest of the world)
    takes five to seven days.
    The General Post Office
    operates Hong Kong’s
    post restante service.

    $ Telephones
    Local calls in Hong

    Kong are free. Many
    hotel lobbies and shops
    will make phones available free for local calls.
    Coin-operated public
    phone boxes cost HK$1
    minimum. Some accept
    credit cards or have
    Internet services. Phone
    cards for calling abroad
    are available from convenience stores, some
    vending machines, the
    Star Ferry piers and
    HKTB offices (see p139).

    142

    The international code for
    Hong Kong is 852, for
    Macau 853, and for
    mainland China 86. Hong
    Kong and Macau have no
    area or city codes, but
    Guangzhou is 020 and
    Shenzhen 0755.

    ^ Mobile
    Phones

    Hong Kong’s mobile networks are GSM-based.
    Dual-band mobile phones
    will work in Hong Kong if
    you have set the service
    up with your home
    provider. Pacific Century
    CyberWorks (PCCW) has
    outlets offering phone
    rentals by the week.
    WAP services are available, but not advanced.

    Internet
    & Local
    Access

    Internet access is plentiful, convenient, cheap
    and often free (see p143).
    Much of Hong Kong uses
    speedy broadband
    connections, including
    the main hotels, most of
    which have installed dual
    telephone/modem
    connectors into rooms.

    Kong
    * Hong
    Central Library

    Hundreds of magazines
    and newspapers from
    around the world are
    available to read free at
    the shiny new main
    library in Causeway Bay.
    Internet access here is
    plentiful, fast and free
    (bookings taken for one
    hour at a time). There’s

    also a good café with
    outdoor seating.

    ( Faxing
    Faxing from business

    centres or photocopying
    shops is simple, although
    not cheap. Your hotel may
    offer a cheaper service
    and will accept faxes on
    your behalf.

    ) Business
    Facilities

    Hong Kong is well supplied with business centres and services. See
    Hong Kong’s Yellow Pages.
    Business cards can be
    printed on Man Wa Lane
    in Sheung Wan, off Des
    Voeux Road West. Have
    your details translated
    into Chinese on the back.

    Directory
    Collect Calls
    10010
    Directory Services
    1081
    General Post Office
    2 Connaught Place,
    Hong Kong Island
    • 2921 2222
    HKT Phone Rental
    2883 3938
    Main Library
    66 Causeway Bay Rd,
    Hong Kong Island
    • 2921 0208
    Western Union
    Star Ferry 2316 2608
    United Centre
    95 Queensway, Hong
    Kong Island • 2528
    5631

    Hong Kong on a Budget
    Cheap
    ! Eating
    Food kiosks and inex-

    pensive Chinese restaurants abound. Fast food
    chains are competitive in
    Hong Kong. Lunchtime,
    all-you-can-eat buffets are
    also fairly common, or
    head to the Indian
    restaurants upstairs in
    Chungking Mansions
    (see p87).

    Nights
    @ Cheap
    Out

    Most bars offer long
    happy hours or
    promotions before a
    certain time of evening.
    Drink is free for women
    on certain nights at
    numerous bars. On race
    nights, soak up the
    atmosphere and some
    cheap beer at Happy
    Valley horseracing track
    (see pp12–13).

    Days Out
    # Cheap
    There are plenty of

    options for cheap days
    out. Walk Hong Kong’s
    wilderness trails (see
    pp46–7), nose around the
    market at Stanley (see
    p16), or walk the Dragon’s
    Back path to Shek O (see
    p74). It need only cost
    the return bus fare and
    the price of a cheap
    lunch, which you can
    sleep off on the beach.

    Buildings,
    $ Free
    Museums and
    Galleries

    For dizzying views atop
    some of the world’s
    tallest buildings head to
    the free viewing galleries
    on the 47th floor of the

    Bank of China Building in
    Central (see p42) and the
    46th floor of Wanchai’s
    Central Plaza (see p43).
    Hong Kong’s museums
    and galleries are incredibly cheap to visit, but all
    have a free day each
    week and some are free
    all week.

    Parks and
    % Free
    Gardens

    Hong Kong Park (see
    p59), which includes the
    excellent walk-through
    Edward Youde Aviary, and
    the Zoological and
    Botanical Gardens (see
    p54) nearby are well
    worth a visit and are
    completely free.

    Tai Chi
    ^ Free
    Lessons

    Learn the slow, graceful,
    health-promoting moves
    of the traditional Chinese
    martial art Tai Chi for free
    under the Tsim Sha Tsui
    clocktower early on
    Tuesday and Wednesday
    mornings (see also p33).

    & Temples
    Hong Kong’s many

    temples are free (although
    change for the collection
    box is appreciated). Try
    the Man Mo Temple on
    Hollywood Road (see
    p61), the Tin Hau Temple
    off Nathan Road in Yau
    Ma Tei (see p89) or the
    Wong Tai Sin Temple in
    eastern Kowloon (see p95).

    Calls and
    * Free
    Internet Access

    Local telephone calls are
    usually free, except from

    payphones and many
    hotel rooms. Some hotel
    lobbies have telephones
    for free local calls. Internet access is plentiful and
    free at the Convention
    Centre’s Business Centre
    and at the Causeway Bay
    Main Library.

    Streetsmart

    Left Temple Centre Cheap food stall Right Tai Chi

    Cultural
    ( Free
    Events

    For free music go to the
    foyer of the Hong Kong
    Cultural Centre (see p82)
    on Thursday lunchtimes
    and some Saturdays. The
    Fringe Club (see p64)
    hosts free live music
    from local and visiting
    bands on certain weekends.
    Free exhibitions of local
    artists’ and photographers’
    work are always on at
    the Hong Kong Arts
    Centre in Tsim Sha Tsui.

    Basement
    ) Bargain
    Accommodation
    For central and cheap, if
    admittedly sometimes
    nasty, accommodation,
    try the labyrinthine
    Chungking Mansions or
    its grubby little sister
    Mirador Mansions, both
    on Nathan Road in Tsim
    Sha Tsui. Also consider
    the YMCA and Youth
    Hostel Association (see
    also pp146, 151 & 152).

    Directory
    YMCA
    2268 7888
    Youth Hostel
    Association
    2788 1638

    143

    Streetsmart

    Left Cobbler Centre Landmark Centre Right Souvenir opera mask

    Shopping Tips
    Hours
    ! Opening
    Most shops open daily
    but not usually before
    about 10:30am and will
    not generally close
    before 6:30pm. Many,
    especially in the busy
    shopping districts, close
    later at 9pm or beyond.

    Sales Tax

    @ The government is

    considering a 3 per cent
    sales tax, but at present
    there is no sales tax apart
    from on cars, cosmetics,
    alcohol and tobacco.

    to Haggle
    # When
    Small businesses,

    such as the many independent computer and electrical goods stores, are often
    worth trying to bargain
    with. Consider asking for
    a cash discount for items
    such as computers or
    antiques. Haggling is
    almost obligatory in the
    markets, particularly for
    gifts, antiques and
    souvenirs.

    and designer fakes. If
    you’re prepared to haggle
    for each and every
    purchase and do a lot of
    shopping, the trip will
    pay for itself.

    Finding a Tailor

    clothes and watches are
    cheap, common and easy
    to find in any of Hong
    Kong’s markets and
    especially in Shenzhen.
    Quality can range from
    the good to the dreadful,
    so buyer beware.

    ^ Dozens of tailors can

    hand-make suits in as
    little as 48 hours. The
    prices can be good,
    although a cheap deal
    sometimes means cheap
    cloth or corners cut. If in
    doubt use a better-known
    tailor. For men’s suits try
    the famous Sam the
    Tailor or the Mandarin
    Hotel’s bespoke A-Man
    Hing Cheong. For tailormade cheong sams, try
    funky Shanghai Tang.

    on a
    & Shopping
    Budget

    QTS symbol (a large gold
    Q with black brushstroke),
    it indicates the shop has
    passed a Hong Kong
    Productivity Council Audit
    for fair trading, service
    levels, store environment
    and product knowledge.

    For dirt-cheap clothes,
    head to the markets at
    Lai Chi Kok and Sham
    Shui Po. The ubiquitous
    Giordano and Bossini
    chains offer decent, good
    value Gap-style wear. For
    deeply discounted
    clearance designer wear
    head to the shops on the
    4th, 5th and 6th floors of
    the Pedder Building (see
    p63) in Central or Joyce’s
    warehouse outlet on Ap
    Lei Chau (see p76).

    Larger
    % Finding
    Sizes

    for the
    * Break
    Border

    Symbol
    $ QTS
    Where you see the

    Some Westerners,
    women in particular, find
    shoes designed for the
    slighter Asian foot a tight
    fit. It’s worth asking

    144

    boutiques and shops if
    they have your size in
    their warehouse. Clothes
    are usually less of a
    problem. Hong Kong’s
    Marks & Spencer outlets
    provide a wide range of
    clothing sizes.

    Consider getting a visa
    for China (see p136) and
    cross over to the border
    town of Shenzhen (see
    p126–9) for cheap clothes

    ( Fakes
    Fake designer

    ) Avoiding
    Rip-Offs

    Take great care when
    buying complicated items
    such as cameras,
    computers and other
    electronics, particularly
    from the independent
    shops in Tsim Sha Tsui.
    Is there a warranty? If
    yes, can the item be
    serviced or repaired
    under it once you are
    back home? Are essential
    accessories included?

    Directory
    A-Man Hing Cheong
    Mandarin Oriental,
    5 Connaught Rd,
    Central, Hong Kong
    Island • 2522 3336
    Sam the Tailor
    94 Nathan Rd, Tsim
    Sha Tsui • 2367 9423
    Shanghai Tang
    12 Pedder St, Central,
    Hong Kong Island
    • 2525 7333

    Tours
    Tours
    ! Bus-Based
    If time is short or

    legs tire, the five-hour
    Heritage Tour offers a
    whistlestop glimpse of
    ancient temples,
    ancestral clan halls and
    walled villages. The daily
    Land Between Tour takes
    in Hong Kong’s highest
    mountain, and various
    rural markets and fishing
    villages. HKTB can provide
    booking numbers.

    @ Cultural
    Kaleidoscope

    This innovative and free
    series of walks and lectures by a group of
    experts on local culture,
    traditional Chinese
    medicine and feng shui,
    offers some excellent
    insights into traditional
    Hong Kong and Chinese
    culture. A daily talk is
    held at a set location
    covering a different topic
    each day. Get details
    from the HKTB.

    Walking Tours
    # DIY
    It may be a stone’s

    throw from Central’s
    skyscrapers, but the selfguided Western Walking
    Tour takes you into a
    different world past dried
    seafood shops, herbalists
    and temples. Pick up a
    brochure from HKTB
    offices. A more remote
    alternative is the Lung
    Yuek Tau Heritage Trail, a
    short but fascinating walk
    starting at Fung Ying Sin
    Koon Temple, which
    passes elegant ancestral
    halls, and tiny, stillinhabited walled villages.

    Kong
    $ Hong
    Dolphinwatch

    You’re almost guaranteed
    to see Hong Kong’s endangered pink dolphins
    off Lantau Island on this
    four-hour tour, and if you
    don’t you can go again
    free. Learn from the
    knowledgeable guides
    about the lives of these
    creatures and the threats
    they face.

    and
    % Museums
    Galleries

    See all of Hong Kong’s
    museums and galleries
    the easy way via the bus
    that shuttles between
    the art, science, space
    and history museums in
    Tsim Sha Tsui and the
    smart, impressive new
    Heritage Museum at Sha
    Tin. A one-week bus
    pass with unlimited entry
    ticket to all museums is
    available from HKTB
    offices. The special bus
    runs on Wednesday,
    Friday and Sunday from
    10am to 6pm.

    Tours
    ^ Harbour
    Take in the skyline of
    Central from the harbour
    by day or night,or sail
    beneath the Tsing Ma
    suspension bridge. A
    range of harbour cruises
    is on offer. Visit HKTB
    offices for details.

    Tour
    & Horseracing
    Feel the earth move

    and the hooves thunder
    as you cheer the finishers
    home in the ultimate
    Hong Kong night out.
    Splendid Tours runs the

    Come Horseracing Tour
    during race meetings
    (see pp12–13 & 101).

    Streetsmart

    Left Happy Valley Right Tsing Ma suspension bridge

    Rambles
    * Local
    Local historian Jason

    Wordie’s weekly Detours
    column and the outwardbound Explore column in
    the Sunday Morning Post
    Magazine may provide
    inspiration and useful
    information on Hong
    Kong’s hidden corners.

    Hire
    ( Junk
    If money is no object,
    hire a junk for the day
    and explore Hong Kong’s
    secluded beaches and
    craggy islands. See the
    Yellow Pages for listings.

    Rides
    ) Helicopter
    For the most drama-

    tic perspectives on Hong
    Kong, HKTB recommend
    Grayline Tours’ 12-minute
    helicopter ride, followed
    by lunch on Jumbo
    Restaurant and a cruise
    from Jumbo to Stanley.
    Scenic Hong Kong Panorama offers a cruise to
    the Sai Kung Peninsula,
    helicopter ride and lunch.

    Directory
    HKTB Tours
    Visitor hotline
    7am–9pm daily • 2508
    1234
    Hong Kong
    Dolphinwatch
    2984 1414
    Scenic Hong Kong
    Panorama
    2316 2151

    145

    Streetsmart

    Left YMCA Centre Waiter, Peninsula Hotel Right Pool, The Peninsula

    Accommodation Tips
    ! Making
    Reservations

    Booking through the
    HKTB or a travel agent
    will almost always be
    cheaper than just turning
    up at a hotel. Many websites offer hotel reservation services (see also
    p137). The Hong Kong
    Hotel Association runs
    information and reservations lines.

    Season
    @ High
    Rates climb during

    the busy conference
    months of October and
    April, and the best hotels
    (and many of the rest)
    will be booked solid. Avoid
    these months if you can,
    or book long in advance.

    Included
    # What’s
    in the Price

    Use of facilities such as
    gyms and pools are
    usually included in the
    room price. Breakfast is
    seldom included in the
    price except at top-ofthe-range places. Note
    that a 3 per cent government tax and a 10 per
    cent service charge will
    be added to your bill at
    all but the lowest-priced
    guesthouses. Local calls
    are free from public
    phones in Hong Kong,
    but strangely not usually
    from your hotel room.

    Cheap
    $ Good
    Accommodation

    Don’t be put off by the
    name, the YMCA (see
    p151) in Tsim Sha Tsui is
    well appointed and offers
    terrific views and value.

    146

    Or try the two-star Anne
    Black Guest House close
    to the Temple Street area
    in Kowloon. (See also
    other entries pp151–2.)

    Arrivals
    % Late
    If you’ve just got off

    the plane and need a
    place, try the hotel information and reservations
    offices in arrivals halls A
    and B, open from 6am to
    1pm or make for Chungking or Mirador Mansions
    on Nathan Road (see p152).

    Websites
    ^ Useful
    The websites listed

    in the directory are easy
    to use and book through,
    with plenty of substantial
    deals and discounts of up
    to 65 per cent.

    Travellers
    & Single
    The Anne Black

    Guest House has plenty
    of clean, cheap single
    rooms. Less appealing
    (but half the price)
    guesthouses such as in
    the Chungking Mansions
    (see p152) are other
    good budget options for
    single travellers.

    * Families
    Most of the better

    hotels offer babysitting
    services.The YMCA (see
    p151) has a few
    competitively priced
    family suites.

    ( Long-Stay
    Deals

    Many hotels and
    guesthouses will offer
    excellent discounts for
    stays of a month or

    more. For long stays it
    may be worth renting a
    serviced apartment
    (below). The Wesley in
    Wan Chai offers very
    competitive monthly
    packages. (See also p153.)

    ) Apartotels
    The Shama Group

    offers Central serviced
    apartments. If you want
    to get away from it all,
    some small, basic holiday
    apartments can be
    rented on leafy, low-rise
    Lamma Island close to
    the beaches, bars and
    restaurants.

    Directory
    Hong Kong Hotel
    Association
    Info 2383 8380 • Res����
    ervations 2769 8822 •
    www.hkha.com.hk
    Anne Black
    Guest House
    2713 9211
    Websites
    • www.asiahotels.com
    • www.accomline.com
    • www.asiatravel.com
    • www.lastminute.
    com.hk
    • www.rentaroomhk.
    com
    Shama Group
    2522 3082 •
    www.shama.com
    YMCA
    41 Salisbury Rd, Tsim
    Sha Tsui • 2268 7888
    The Wesley
    22 Hennessy Rd, Wan
    Chai • 2866 6688

    Price Categories

    $
    For a standard,
    $$
    double room per
    night (with breakfast $$$
    if included), taxes $$$$
    and extra charges. $$$$$

    under HK$500
    HK$500–$1,000
    HK$1,000–$2,000
    HK$2,000–$2,500
    over HK$2,500

    Super Luxury Hotels
    Peninsula
    Shangri-La
    ! The
    $ Island
    Opened in 1928 and
    The lovely airy lobby,
    still one of Hong Kong’s
    best-loved hotels, the NeoClassical Peninsula overlooking Victoria Harbour
    is famous for restrained
    luxury and excellent,
    friendly service (see
    p81). d Salisbury Rd,
    Kowloon • Map N4 • 2920
    2888 • www.peninsula.com
    • $$$$$

    Mandarin
    @ The
    Oriental HK

    A favourite among royalty,
    politicians, stars and business folk, the Mandarin
    benefits from a supreme
    Central location and a reputation for excellence and
    old-fashioned opulence.
    Beyond the imposing gold
    and black marble lobby
    and the frock-coated
    concierges and bellhops,
    the Mandarin’s elegant
    rooms have balconies
    overlooking the harbour
    and, less happily, busy
    Connaught Road. d 5
    Connaught Rd, Central
    • Map L5 • 2522 0111 •
    www.mandarinoriental.com
    • $$$$$

    Interconti# Hotel
    nental Hong Kong

    Popular with the rich and
    famous, the splendid,
    modern Intercontinental
    (formerly the Regent) is
    consistently voted among
    Asia’s best hotels. The
    huge, beautifully appointed rooms offer fantastic
    harbour views. d 18 Salisbury Rd, Kowloon • Map
    N4 • 2721 1211 • www.
    ichotelsgroup.com • $$$$$

    huge chandeliers and
    stunning silk landscape
    adorning the atrium are a
    prelude to the largest
    hotel rooms in Hong Kong,
    with terrific Peak or
    harbour views. d Pacific
    Place, Central • Map M6 •
    2877 3838 • www.shangrila.com • $$$$$

    Conrad
    % The
    Guests are dwarved

    by the giant flowers and
    insects on the high lobby
    murals in this impressive
    hotel. Rooms above the
    40th floor are large and
    sumptuous, with
    excellent harbour or Peak
    views. d Pacific Place,
    Central • Map M6 • 2521
    3838 • www.conradhotels.
    hilton.com • $$$$$

    Grand Hyatt
    ^ The
    Next to the Conven-

    tion Centre and the sole
    choice for unbridled luxury in Wanchai, the Grand
    Hyatt has looked after
    world- famous guests
    including former US
    President Clinton.
    Revamped rooms have a
    modern feel, including all
    high-tech mod-cons.
    d 1 Harbour Rd, Wan Chai
    • Map N5 • 2588 1234
    • www.hongkong.hyatt.com
    • $$$$$

    Ritz-Carlton
    & The
    Smaller and more

    intimate than many of its
    luxury heavyweight contenders, the plush, elegantly chintzy Ritz Carlton
    is celebrated for peerless,

    friendly service. d 3
    Connaught Rd, Central
    • Map L5 • 2877 6666
    • www.ritzcarlton.com
    • $$$$$

    Streetsmart

    Left Bar Shangri-La Right The Mandarin Oriental

    Mandarin
    * The
    Oriental Macau

    What this Mandarin lacks
    in its ferry terminal location it more than makes
    up for with service and
    facilities. It is, perhaps,
    the best hotel in Macau.
    Compared with Hong
    Kong’s rates, this is luxury
    on the cheap. d 956 1110
    Avenida da Amizade, Macau
    • 567 888 • www.mandarin
    oriental.com • $$$

    ( Kowloon
    Shangri-La

    Not quite up to the
    standards of its Hong
    Kong Island counterpart,
    perhaps, but the
    Kowloon Shangri-La
    offers luxury at a
    significant discount to its
    sister. The Horizon Club
    tariff includes butler
    service and club lounge.
    d 64 Mody Rd, Kowloon
    • Map P3 • 2721 2111
    • www.shangri-la.com
    • $$$$$

    Langham
    ) The
    Restrained opulence

    reigns throughout. There’s
    a good gym, pool and
    sauna and top-quality
    restaurants, including the
    impressive Cantonese
    T’ang Court, decked out
    like a Mongolian tent.
    d 8 Peking Road, Tsim Sha
    Tsui, Kowloon • Map M3
    • 2375 1133 • www.langham
    hotels.com • $$$$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all hotels accept credit
    cards, have en-suite bathrooms and air conditioning

    147

    Streetsmart

    Left Holiday Inn Golden Mile Centre The Sheraton Right Regal Airport Hotel

    Luxury Hotels
    Lisboa
    Garden
    ! The
    $ Royal
    Behind its audacious
    Hotel
    (some might say tasteless) exterior are more
    than 900 large rooms
    with beautifully embroidered bedspreads and
    great views. Dripping with
    marble and gilt, this temple to excess contains
    several casinos and topnotch fine dining. d
    Avenida de Lisboa 2-4,
    Macau • 377 666 • www.
    hotelisboa.com • $$$

    Inn
    @ Holiday
    Golden Mile

    Located in the heart of
    Kowloon’s shopping
    Golden Mile, the Holiday
    Inn has a wide range of
    eating and drinking
    options, many at reasonable prices. Rooms are
    comfortable, but won’t
    win any prizes. Facilities
    include pool, gym and
    babysitting service. d 50
    Nathan Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui
    • Map N2 • 2369 3111
    • www.goldenmilehk.holiday-inn.com • $$$$

    China Hotel
    Guangzhou

    #

    Possibly outdone by the
    equally huge Garden
    Hotel, China Hotel is still
    up in the top three hotels
    in Guangzhou and hogs
    the prime spot next to
    the city’s Trade Fair
    ground. There’s a large,
    well-equipped gym,
    health centre, outdoor
    pool and a vast range of
    decent restaurants and
    cafés. d Liu Hua Lu,
    Guangzhou • 8666 6888 •
    $$$

    148

    The 20-year-old Royal Garden is ageing beautifully,
    partly due to a recent
    facelift. Elegant rooms
    with cable TV sit round
    the bright atrium lobby.
    The rooftop gym, pool
    and tennis court impress,
    as does the world-class
    Italian restaurant. d 69
    Mody Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui
    • Map P3 • 2721 5215
    • www.theroyalgarden
    hotel.com.hk • $$$$

    Hotel
    % Garden
    Guangzhou

    The cavernous lobby
    gives some sense of the
    size of this imposing
    1,000-plus room hotel,
    boasting its own upmarket shopping mall and
    good eating and drinking
    options. d Huangshi Dong
    Lu 368, Guangzhou • 8333
    8989 • www.gardenhotelguangzhou.com • $$$

    Park Lane
    ^ The
    Room sizes are

    generous, most with
    views. Surf the net via
    your TV with wireless
    keyboard. Revamped
    deluxe rooms are very
    funky, especially the
    glass-walled bathrooms
    with glass sinks. d 310
    Gloucester Rd, Causeway
    Bay • Map Q5 • 2293 8888
    • www.parklane.com.hk •
    $$$$

    Excelsior
    & The
    The smart, modern

    and friendly Excelsior
    offers pretty much every
    in-room and hotel facility

    imaginable, as you’d
    expect from the Mandarin Oriental’s sister. d 281
    Gloucester Rd, Causeway
    Bay • Map Q5 • 2894 8888
    • www.excelsiorhongkong.
    com • $$$$

    Sheraton
    * The
    Rooms are comforta-

    ble but hardly special.
    However, the hotel’s central waterfront position,
    and full range of facilities
    including gym, pool, spa
    and 24-hour movie channels, put it in the luxury
    category. d 20 Nathan Rd,
    Kowloon • Map N4 • 2369
    1111 • www.starwoodhotels.
    com/ hongkong • $$$$$

    Hotel
    ( Shangri-La
    Shenzhen

    Close to the main shopping areas and railway
    station, the Shangri-la
    makes a great escape
    from Shenzhen’s seething retail madness. The
    rooftop pool (with gym,
    sauna and steam room
    nearby) makes a good
    place to relax. d Jianshe
    Lu, Shenzhen • Map D1 •
    8233 0888 • www.shangrila.com • $$$

    Plaza
    ) Harbour
    The Hung Hom

    location is the problem
    with this otherwise
    terrific hotel. Rooms have
    large beds and plush
    bathrooms, some with
    fine harbour views. There’s
    a splendid glass-sided
    rooftop pool. d 23 Tak
    Fung St, Hung Hom • Map
    Q3 • 2621 3188 • www.
    harbour-plaza.com • $$$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all hotels accept credit
    cards, have en-suite bathrooms and air conditioning

    Price Categories
    For a standard,

    $
    double room per

    $$
    night (with breakfast $$$
    if included), taxes $$$$
    and extra charges. $$$$$

    under HK$500
    HK$500–$1,000
    HK$1,000–$2,000
    HK$2,000–$2,500
    over HK$2,500

    Mid-Range Hotels in Hong Kong
    Renaissance
    Kimberley
    ! The
    $ The
    Harbour View
    Hotel
    The location above the
    Convention and Exhibition
    Centre on the waterfront
    ensures its popularity as
    a business hotel. Other
    visitors will like its landscaped grounds, leisure
    facilities and reasonable
    rates. d 1 Harbour Rd,
    Wanchai • Map N5 •
    2802 8888 • marriott.com
    • $$$

    Hotel
    @ Kowloon
    Less opulent than its

    sister hotel, the Peninsula
    across the way, the Kowloon is more suited to
    people seeking good
    location and connectivity.
    Its high-tech rooms boast
    computers with Internet
    access. Rooms are
    smallish though, and the
    supposedly digital/techlook is starting to look
    unintentionally retro 80s.
    d 19–21 Nathan Road, Tsim
    Sha Tsui, Kowloon • Map
    N4 • 2929 2888 • www.
    harbour-plaza.com • $$$

    Empire Hotel
    Kowloon

    #

    Opened in late 2001, this
    very smart hotel with
    modern gym and lovely
    atrium pool is a complete
    contrast to its threadbare
    sister in Wanchai. Rooms
    are equipped with the
    latest Internet and audiovisual gadgetry. Well
    located for Tsim Sha Tsui
    shopping and dining.
    d 62 Kimberley Road, Tsim
    Sha Tsui • Map N3 • 2685
    3000 • www.asiastandard.
    com • $$$

    The impressive, marbled
    lobby contains a business
    centre, pleasant bar and
    café lounge area around
    a soothing waterfall and
    lily pond. Rooms are well
    appointed, with marble
    bathrooms. Facilities include a golf driving range
    and spa. d 28 Kimberley
    Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui • Map N3
    • 2723 3888 • www.Kimber
    ley.com.hk • $$$

    Airport
    % Regal
    Hotel

    Hong Kong’s largest
    hotel links directly to the
    airport terminal and
    features large rooms
    with avant-garde interior
    designs. Ten restaurants
    and bars provide a choice
    of cuisine. d 9 Cheong Tat
    Rd, Chek Lap Kok • Map B5
    • 2286 8888 • www.regal
    hotel.com • $$$

    Miramar
    ^ Hotel
    A high-quality hotel

    in every respect. Despite
    the Nathan Road location,
    noise won’t be a problem
    as the rooms are well
    sound-proofed. The gym
    and pool are modern and
    impressive and there’s a
    good selection of restaurants. d 118-130 Nathan
    Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui • Map N3
    • 2368 1111 • www.
    miramarhk.com • $$$

    Hotel
    & Imperial
    Unbeatable for loca-

    tion in TST, the Imperial
    offers average-priced
    rooms, with discounts of
    up to 30 per cent when

    occupancy is low. Rooms
    are adequate but there
    are no other facilities
    except a small business
    centre. d 30–34 Nathan
    Rd, Tsim ShaTsui • Map N4
    • 2366 2201 • www.imperial
    hotel.com.hk • $$$

    Streetsmart

    Left Kowloon Hotel Right The Kimberley Hotel

    Eaton Hotel
    * The
    Easily the best option

    in the Yau Ma Tei/Jordan
    area. Rooms are smart,
    with broadband access,
    fax machine, bath and
    separate shower. The
    lobby offers a flood of
    natural light, outdoor
    seating and a lovely oasis
    of greenery. d 380
    Nathan Rd • Map N1 • 2782
    1818 • www.eaton-hotel.
    com • $$$

    World
    ( New
    Renaissance

    With adequate rooms
    and basic facilities, this
    competitively priced
    hotel is worth considering, although its interiors
    are in need of a facelift.
    Special deals and 50 per
    cent discounts are available. d 22 Salisbury Rd,
    Tsim Sha Tsui • Map N4
    • 2369 4111 • www.renais
    sancehotels.com • $$$

    Lei Inter­
    ) Bishop
    national House

    It’s quiet and close to the
    park. Rooms are small
    for the money – but you
    pay for proximity to the
    Escalator. Long stay
    packages are available.
    d 4 Robinson Rd, MidLevels • Map K6 • 2868
    0828 • www.bishop
    leihtl.com.hk • $$$

    149

    Streetsmart

    Left Holiday Inn Macau Centre The Metropole Right New Century Hotel

    Mid-Range Hotels, Macau & China
    Inn
    ! Holiday
    Close by Lisboa’s

    many casinos and convenient for the centre of Macau. Rooms (with cable)
    are blandly furnished but
    there’s a good range of
    facilities, including gym,
    pool, sauna and a decent
    restaurant for Cantonese
    and Sze chuan food.
    d 82–86 Rua de Pequim,
    Macau • 783 333 •
    www.ichltelsgroup.com
    • $$$

    Century
    $ New
    Hotel

    Heavy on the marble and
    chintz, this is unmistakably a gambling hotel. For
    non-gamblers it’s put in
    the shade somewhat by
    the lovely Hyatt opposite,
    but it does offer big
    rooms and comprehensive guest facilities.
    d Av. Padre Tomas Periera
    889, Taipa, Macau • 831 111
    • www.newcentury
    hotel-macau.com • $$$

    Metropole
    Guangdong
    @ The
    The sense that you’ve % Victory Hotel
    travelled back to the 1970s
    can be fun, but otherwise
    this ageing hotel, aimed
    more at Chinese mainlanders than foreigners, is
    nothing special. Happily,
    prices are low and it’s
    next to some of Macau’s
    best shopping and sightseeing areas. d 70
    Avenida do Dr Rodrigo
    Rodrigues, Macau • 388 166
    • www.mctshmi.com • $$

    Formerly the Victoria Hotel, this concern occupies
    two sites on Shamian
    Island – the main, new
    Neo-Classical block and
    the original colonial building. Facilities include
    business centre, swimming pool and sauna.
    d Shamian Bei Jie 53,
    Guangzhou • 8186 6802 •
    www.gd-victory- hotel.com
    • $$

    Royal
    # Hotel
    Macau

    Hotel,
    ^ Guangdong
    Shenzhen

    The Hotel Royal is one of
    Macau’s oldest hotels
    and shows it. That said, it
    is clean and well run,
    although the rooms offer
    little more than the
    basics. It has an indoor
    pool, gym (with some
    ageing equipment) and
    sauna. It’s also close to
    the heart of town and
    within sight of the pretty
    Guia Lighthouse. d
    Estrada da Vitoria 2-4,
    Macau • Map ref • 552 222
    • www.hotelroyal.com.mo
    • $$

    150

    A reasonably good value
    option with comfortable,
    if basic, rooms. Fairly
    thin on facilities, but with
    a modest restaurant and
    smart Japanese-style
    business centre. d 3033
    Shannandong Rd, Shenzhen
    (86 755) 2228339 • $$

    Plaza
    & Century
    Hotel

    A decent hotel in the
    heart of Shenzhen with
    spacious rooms, cable TV,
    pool, sauna, gym and
    high-rise karaoke club.

    d Kin Chit Rd Shenzhen

    • (86755) 232 0888
    • www.szcenturyplaza.com
    • $$$

    Hotel,
    * Landmark
    Shenzhen

    This recently renovated
    hotel offers luxury and
    extensive facilities,
    including health club,
    driving range, gym and
    Internet room. d Nanhu
    Lu 3018, Shenzhen • 8217
    2288 • $$$

    Panglin
    ( The
    Hotel

    Smart, modern and large, the
    Panglin is one of
    Shenzhen’s superior
    hotels, about two miles
    (4 km) from the railway
    station. Room sizes are
    decent and all come with
    cable TV. Extensive
    services include station
    shuttle bus, baby-sitting
    and 24-hour room service.
    The revolving Skylounge
    at the top is Shenzhen’s
    highest restaurant.
    d Jiabin Lu 2002, Luo Hu,
    Shenzhen • 2518 5888 •
    www.panglin-hotel.com
    • $$$

    ) Felicity
    Hotel

    This decent and goodvalue hotel is reasonably
    well located and even
    boasts its own art
    gallery. Standards are
    high (it’s run by the Best
    Western Group), there
    are four restaurants, a
    gym, pool and sauna.
    d Heping Lu 1085 • 2558
    6333 • www.bwsz.com •
    $$$

    For maps of Macau, Shenzhen and Guangzhou See pp118,
    126 & 130

    Price Categories
    For a standard,

    $
    double room per

    $$
    night (with breakfast $$$
    if included), taxes $$$$
    and extra charges. $$$$$

    under HK$500
    HK$500–$1,000
    HK$1,000–$2,000
    HK$2,000–$2,500
    over HK$2,500

    Value-for-Money Hotels
    Salisbury
    ! The
    YMCA

    Don’t be put off by the
    initials. For value, views
    and location, the alwayspopular YMCA, next door
    to the posh Peninsula,
    can’t be beaten. The wellfurnished rooms are
    spacious, equipped with
    fax/laptop ports, satellite
    and cable TV. A large
    swimming pool, sauna,
    gym and indoor climbing
    wall round off the facilities. Family suites are
    terrific. A few excellent
    up-market dorm beds,
    too. d 41 Salisbury Rd,
    Tsim Sha Tsui • Map M4
    • 2268 7000
    • www.ymcahk.org.hk • $$

    International
    @ BP
    House

    The boxy rooms with
    ugly 80s wallpaper have
    smallish beds, but the
    place is clean, efficient
    and can be cheap, and
    has lovely views over
    Kowloon Park. d 8 Austin
    Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui • Map M2
    • 2376 1111 • www.bpih.
    com.hk • $$

    Wharney
    # The
    Right in the

    increasingly smart centre
    of Wanchai, the Wharney
    offers decent surroundings, a revamped gym
    and pool, sauna,
    business centre and a
    couple of restaurants.
    Rooms are well
    appointed but on the
    small side. d 57-73
    Lockhart Road, Wanchai
    • Map N6 • 2861 1000 •
    www.gdhotels.com • $$$

    Wesley
    $ The
    The Wesley has a

    central location and low
    rates. That said, the
    fittings are tired and the
    rooms small. There’s no
    pool or gym and only a
    modest café. d 22
    Hennessey Rd, Wanchai •
    Map N6 • 2866 6688 •
    www.hanglung.com • $$

    View Inter­
    % Garden
    national House
    Given the location, the
    prices aren’t bad, and
    even better for long stays
    (two weeks plus). The
    décor is depressing 80s
    and the rooms smallish.
    Discounts of 30 to 50 per
    cent are often available in
    the low season. d 1
    Macdonnell Rd • Map K6
    • 2877 3737 • www.
    ywca.org.hk • $$$

    ^ Shamrock
    The rather severe

    lobby opens onto Nathan
    Road, and the dishevelled
    lifts lead up to some big
    rooms with satellite TV,
    a/c and telephone. d 23
    Nathan Rd • Map N4 • 2735
    2271 • www.shamrockhotel.
    com • $$

    View Inter­
    & Harbour
    national House
    This modest Chinese
    YMCA-run hotel charges
    a hefty premium for the
    location, although lowseason discounts are
    available. Bathtubs are
    only big enough for very
    supple adults. d 4 Harbour
    Rd, Wanchai • Map N5
    • 2802 0111 •
    www.ymca.org.uk • $$$

    Macdonnell
    * 2Road

    With pleasant rooms, a
    good Central location and
    excellent views across
    the Zoological and Botanical Gardens to the city
    and harbour, Macdonell
    Road offers good value.
    Rooms have all the
    basics plus kitchenette.
    Long-stay packages are
    available (see p153) d 2
    Macdonnell Rd, Central •
    Map K6 • 2132 2132 •
    www.twomr.comhk • $$$

    Streetsmart

    Nathan Road

    Empire
    ( The
    Hotel

    Marooned between the
    area’s two main roads, the
    Empire is right in the
    heart of Wanchai so
    you’re paying for location
    rather than luxury as the
    cheap, nasty fittings will
    constantly remind you.
    Still, prices are competitive, the service isn’t bad
    and there’s a small but
    adequate rooftop pool
    plus gym and broadband
    Internet access. d 33
    Hennessey Rd, Wan Chai
    • Map N6 • 2866 9111 •
    www.asiastandard.com • $$

    ) Rosedale
    on the Park

    One of Hong Kong’s
    newest hotels, this selfstyled “cyber boutique
    hotel” offers reasonable
    value. The look is sleek
    and modern, and small
    but well laid out rooms
    include broadband
    connection. d 8 Shelter St,
    Causeway Bay • Map Q6 •
    2127 8888 • www.
    rosedale.com.hk • $$$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all hotels accept credit
    cards, have en-suite bathrooms and air conditioning

    151

    Streetsmart

    Left Plover Cove Right The notorious Chungking House

    Cheap Sleeps
    Black
    ! Anne
    Guest House

    If location isn’t important
    then consider the YWCArun Anne Black Guest
    House stuck out in
    Mongkok. The rooms
    (either with private or
    communal bathrooms)
    are basic but clean with
    air-conditioning, TV, and
    telephone. d 5 Man Fuk
    Rd, Kowloon • Map E4
    • 2713 9211 • www.ywca.
    org.hk • $$

    Carpenter
    % Holy
    Guest House

    A pleasant alternative to
    the dingier guesthouse
    offerings in Chungking
    and Mirador, but stuck
    out in boring old Hung
    Hom. Facilities in double
    and triple rooms are
    basic but include TV,
    phone, bathroom, shower
    and air-conditioning.
    d 1 Dyer Ave, Hung Hom,
    Kowloon • Map R2 • 2362
    0301 • $$

    Lodge
    Bradbury Hall
    @ Booth
    Air-conditioned rooms ^ Hostel
    with shower, fridge, phone,
    bath and TV are merely
    adequate but the location
    and prices are great at
    this Salvation Army-run
    hotel. d 11 Wing Sing
    Lane, Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon
    • Map N1 • 2771 9266
    • www.boothlodge.
    salvation.org.hk • $$

    Bianchi
    # Caritas
    Lodge

    Like Booth Lodge next
    door, there’s only a
    chapel and restaurantcum-café to amuse
    yourself here. Still, the
    rooms are large by any
    standards. d 4 Cliff Road,
    Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon • Map
    N1 • 2388 1111•
    www.caritas-chs.org.uk • $$

    King’s Hotel
    $ New
    Well situated but in

    something of a chaotic,
    scrappy and noisy area.
    Rooms are neat but
    small, and the views
    unlovely. d 473 Nathan
    Rd, Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon
    • Map N1 • 2780 1281 • $$

    152

    As you might expect from
    such a remote hostel,
    basic, barrack-like dorms
    are the order of the day.
    Those with tents may
    want to walk on and
    pitch camp at Tai Long
    Wan’s lovely beaches
    nearby. d Chek Keng, Sai
    Kung, New Territories • Map
    F3 • 2792 3084 • $

    Lodge
    & Bradbury
    Youth Hostel

    This very pleasant hostel
    by the reservoir makes
    for a good base or stopoff for walkers exploring
    the beautiful Plover Cove
    area. Air-conditioned
    singles, doubles or dorms
    are available. d Tai Mei
    Tuk, New Territories • Map
    F2 • 2662 5123 •
    www.yha.org.hk • $

    Sha O Hostel
    * Pak
    Lying in the heart of

    the country park, this is a
    functional hikers’ overnight stop with dorm
    beds. The views are great
    and it’s also possible to

    camp. d Pak Sha O, Hoi
    Ha Rd, New Territories
    • Map F2 • 2328 2327 • $

    Lok Yuen
    ( Sze
    Hostel

    A very basic hikers’
    crash-pad, Sze Lok Yuen
    is close to the summit of
    Tai Mo Shan, Hong
    Kong’s tallest peak. The
    views are spectacular but
    its dorm rooms are pretty
    basic with no fans or airconditioning. The altitude
    cools things down
    though in all but the
    hottest months. Camping
    is permitted. d Tai Mo
    Shan, Tseun Wan, New
    Territories • Map D3 • 2488
    8188 • www.yha.org.hk • $

    ) Chungking
    House,

    Chungking Mansions

    Staying at the mansions
    is a badge of honour to
    some budget travellers,
    an unpleasant necessity
    to others (see p82). The
    dingy hallways and semisqualor contain dozens of
    guesthouses offering
    cheap, boxy and usually
    stuffy accommodation in
    an excellent location.
    Oppressive and fascinating at the same time,
    Chungking Mansions is a
    warren of small-scale
    commerce and Hong
    Kong’s cultural melting
    pot. Chungking House is
    probably the best option,
    with larger, more comfortable rooms than elsewhere in Chungking Mansions. d Block 4A/5F, 40
    Nathan Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui
    • Map N4 • 2366 5362 • $$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all hotels accept credit
    cards, have en-suite bathrooms and air conditioning

    Price Categories

    $
    For a standard,

    $$
    double room per
    night (with breakfast $$$
    if included), taxes $$$$
    and extra charges. $$$$$

    under HK$500
    HK$500–$1,000
    HK$1,000–$2,000
    HK$2,000–$2,500
    over HK$2,500

    Long-Stay Hotels
    Peel St
    ! 22
    Centrally located

    above a bustling produce
    market, this modern
    block offers cosy studios
    and spacious-looking
    apartments with smart
    furnishings, daily maid
    service and, for HK$250
    extra, monthly unlimited
    broadband Internet access.
    d 22 Peel St, Central • Map
    K5 • 2522 3082 • www.
    shama.com • HK$20,900–
    $56,000 per month

    Atrium
    $ The
    Beautifully furnished,

    executive apartments
    with five-star hotel-style
    service including health
    club, outdoor heated pool,
    24-hour room service. Well
    located above Pacific
    Place with amazing views
    over the city. d Pacific
    Place, 88 Queensway •
    Map M6 • 2844 8361
    • www.pacificplace.com.hk
    • HK$54,000–HK$76,300
    per month

    Wesley
    Repulse Bay
    @ The
    % The
    The fittings are tired
    For executives or
    and the rooms small, but
    The Wesley offers very
    competitive long-stay
    packages in a central
    location. Deals include
    free local calls, maid
    service, kitchenette, and
    use of swimming pool
    and gym at the sister
    hotel in Quarry Bay. d 22
    Hennessey Rd, Wanchai •
    Map N6 • 2866 6688 • www.
    hanglung.com • HK$7,800–
    HK$25,000 per month

    2 Macdonnell
    Road

    #

    Offering smarter and only
    slightly pricier long-stay
    accommodation than next
    door’s Garden View. The
    location is excellent; the
    views to the ������������
    harbour and
    ����
    city good.
    ��������������������
    Maid service,
    free local calls, use of
    gym, satellite and cable
    TV, kitchenette and
    Central shuttle bus are all
    included in the price. d
    2 Macdonnell Rd, Central
    • Map K6 • 2132 2132 • www.
    twomr.com • HK$16,500
    –HK$25,000 per month

    small families, these
    upmarket two-bedroom
    duplex apartments are a
    20-minute ride from Central in serene Repulse
    Bay. The hole in one of
    the tower blocks is said to
    promote good feng shui.
    d Repulse Bay • Map E5 •
    2292 2879 • www.the
    repulsebay.com • HK$65, 000
    –HK$82,000 per month

    Bay Bridge
    ^ The
    Given the Tsuen Wan

    location, these studio
    and suite apartments are
    not for those who must
    be at the centre of things.
    The apartments are
    smart, with shower and
    kitchenette. d 123 Castle
    Peak Rd, Yau Kom Tau,
    Tsuen Wan, Kowloon • Map
    D3 • 2945 1111 • HK$6,800–
    HK$12,500 per month

    Staunton
    & The
    Roll out of bed in

    these well decked out
    but small studio and oneor two-bed apartments
    and you’re beside the

    Escalator, bars and restaurants. Homely, with
    smart fittings and
    Chinese decorative
    touches. d Staunton
    Street, Central • Map K5 •
    2522 3082 • www.shama.
    com • HK$22,000–
    HK$37,000 per month

    Streetsmart

    The Repulse Bay

    View
    * Garden
    International
    House

    Very competitive longstay deals start at two
    weeks’ duration. But
    décor is tired 80s, and
    the rooms smallish. Long
    stayers benefit from
    maid service, free local
    calls and Central shuttle
    bus. d 1 Macdonnell Rd
    • Map K6 • 2877 3737
    www.ywca.org.uk •
    HK$1,000 • $$$

    Rosedale
    ( The
    on the Park

    The shiny new Rosedale
    has small but well laidout rooms with broadband connection and
    kitchenette. There’s also
    a small gym. d 8 Shelter
    St, Causeway Bay • Map
    Q6 • 2127 8639 • www.
    rosedale.com.hk • from
    HK$15,800 per month

    Salle Court
    ) La
    The studio and one-

    and two-bedroom apartments are furnished with
    TV, fridge, cooker and
    oven. There’s no gym or
    pool. but the park nearby
    has a public pool. d 30 La
    Salle Rd, Kowloon Tong
    • Map E4 • 2338 3899
    • HK$8,000–HK$28,000
    per month

    153

    Price Categories

    Streetsmart


    $
    For a standard,

    $$
    double room per
    night (with breakfast $$$
    if included), taxes $$$$
    and extra charges. $$$$$

    Left The Warwick Right Restaurant, Harbour Plaza

    Great Escapes
    Kong Gold
    ! Hong
    Coast Hotel

    This ten-acre resort offers
    sea views from its wellequipped rooms. The
    accommodation complex
    is unlovely from outside
    but recreation facilities
    include pool, pitch-andputt golf course, tennis
    courts and running track.
    d No.1 Castle Peak Rd,
    Kowloon • Map B3 • 2452
    8888 • www.goldcoasthotel.
    com.hk • $$$

    Warwick
    @ The
    A cheap alternative

    to city living, magical
    Cheung Chau’s only major
    hotel offers fine sea views
    next to good beaches
    with windsurf and kayak
    hire. Great coastal walks
    are around the headland.
    Furnishings are nothing
    special, and the exterior
    is 60s municipal. d East
    Bay, Cheung Chau • Map
    C6 • 2981 0081 • www.
    warwickhotel.com.hk • $$

    Plaza
    # Harbour
    Resort City

    Out in the New Territories,
    this extensive resort complex offers a vast array of
    sports and recreation
    facilities, including
    cinemas, shops, gyms,
    sports tracks and courts,
    Chinese and International
    restaurants, and nearby
    historical and beauty
    spots. All rooms include
    the basics with lounge
    and kitchenette. d 18 Yin
    Yan Rd, Tin Shui Wai, New
    Territories • Map C2 • 2180
    6688 • www.harbourplaza.com • $$

    154

    under HK$500
    HK$500–$1,000
    HK$1,000–$2000
    HK$2000–$2,500
    over HK$2,500

    Club
    $ Jockey
    Mount Davis
    Youth Hostel

    An excellent budget option
    for the adventurous, this
    lovely and friendly hostel
    sits atop Mount Butler at
    the western edge of
    Hong Kong Island. Take a
    taxi there. d Mount Davis
    Path, Kennedy Town • Map
    D5 • 2817 5715 •
    www.yha.org.uk • $

    Inn
    % Concerto
    Hardly a resort hotel

    but worth a night’s
    escape to leafy, low-rise
    Lamma Island. Modest
    but neat air-conditioned
    rooms with TV and
    minibar. Lamma’s famous
    Han Lok Yuen pigeon
    restaurant is nearby (see
    p117). d Hung Shing Ye,
    Lamma Island • Map D6
    • 2982 1668 • www.
    concertoinn.com.hk • $$

    Swan Hotel
    ^ White
    Overlooking the Pearl
    River on sleepy Shamian
    Island, this large but
    lovely hotel is the place
    to find peace in Guangzhou. d 1 Southern St,
    Shamian Island, Guangzhou
    • 8188 6968 • www.
    whiteswanhotel.com • $$$

    de
    & Pousada
    Sao Taigo

    Converted from an old
    Portuguese fort hewn
    from the rock in the 17th
    century, this tiny hotel
    looking across the bay to
    mainland China is a
    picturesque delight.
    Rooms are heavily but
    beautifully decorated in

    Portuguese style. d Avenida de Republica, Fortaleza
    de Sao Tiago de Barra, Macau
    • 378 111 • $$$

    * Westin
    Macau

    A lovely getaway. All
    rooms come with own
    terrace and sea views.
    There’s a small sandy
    beach and an 18-hole golf
    course, which hosts the
    Macau Open. Or practise
    your swing on the ocean
    driving range with balls
    that float. d Estrada de Hac
    Sa 1918, Ilha de Coloane,
    Macau • 871 111 • www.
    starwoodhotels.com • $$$

    Regency
    ( Hyatt
    Macau

    A great, family-friendly
    resort-style hotel. Lovely
    Portuguese-style rooms,
    all with sea views and
    featuring minimalist décor
    with Oriental touches.
    Fantastic pastries and
    desserts are baked on
    the premises. d Estrada
    Almirante 2, Taipa Island,
    Macau • 831 234 •
    www.hyatt.com • $$$

    de
    ) Pousada
    Coloane

    Tiny, remote, hotel at the
    far end of Coloane overlooking a small, pretty
    beach. It boasts a nice
    deck area, swimming
    pool, and attractive
    Portuguese-style
    restaurant and bar. Room
    fittings show their age,
    but they are well
    equipped. d Praia Chok
    Van, Coloane Island, Macau
    • 882 143 • $$

    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all hotels accept credit
    cards, have en-suite bathrooms and air conditioning

    General Index
    Page numbers in bold type
    refer to main entries.

    B
    Baanthai 109
    Bahama Mama’s 86
    Balalaika 86, 87
    Balcony Café 77
    Ban Fan Floriculture 92
    Bang and Olufsen 98
    banks 142
    Bank of China Tower 10, 42
    Bar, The 86
    bars, cafés and clubs
    budget travel 143
    Guangzhou 133
    Hong Kong Island,
    Northeast 71
    Hong Kong Island,
    Northwest 64
    Hong Kong Island, South 77
    Kowloon – New Kowloon 99
    Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui 84,
    86
    Macau 124
    New Territories, The 107
    Outlying Islands 117
    Shenzhen 129
    Top 10 nightclubs 52–3
    Barker Road 9
    Bay Bridge Hotel 153
    Beach Pub 107
    Bei Yuan Jiujia 133
    Beverley Centre 85
    Biergarten 86
    Big Buddha and Po Lin
    Monastery 7, 28–9, 115, 116
    Birdcage, The 76

    C
    Caffè Toscana 125
    Camões Grotto 120
    Canidrome 123
    Cantonese opera 32
    Cape D’Aguilar 44
    car hire 138
    Caritas Bianchi Lodge 152
    Carlsberg Cup 37
    Casablanca, Shenzhen 129
    Casablanca Café, Macau 124
    Castle Peak Monastery 103
    Cat Street Market 38
    Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter
    69
    Cenotaph, The 10
    Central district 58–61
    The Central Green Trail 47
    Central Library 142
    Central Market 41
    Central Plaza 43, 67
    Centre, The 43
    Century Plaza Hotel 150
    Chan Chi Kee Cutlery 92
    Chao Shao-an Gallery, Heritage
    Museum 21
    Chaozhou Restaurant 129
    Chaser’s Pub 84
    cha siu 50
    Chater Garden 11
    Chater Lounge, The 64
    Chee-Hwa, Tung 31
    Cheers Sports Bar and
    Restaurant 107
    Chen Clan Temple 131
    Cheung Chau Bun Festival 36
    Cheung Chau Island 7, 24–5,
    47, 115, 116
    Cheung Kee, Cheung Chau 117
    Cheung Kong Centre 43
    Cheung Yeung Festival 37
    Chianti Ristorante Italiano 108

    Chi Lin Nunnery 33, 96
    Children’s Discovery Gallery,
    Heritage Museum 20
    Children’s Hong Kong 54–5
    China Bear, Lantau 117
    China Folk Culture Village 128
    China Hotel, Guangzhou 148
    China Travel Service 136
    Chinese Cemetery 75
    Chinese medicine 33
    Chinese New Year 36
    Ching Chung Koon 102
    Ching Ming Festival 36
    Christmas Day 37
    Chuan Guo Yan Yi 133
    Chungking House, Chungking
    Mansions 152
    Chungking Mansions 82, 84, 87
    Clearwater Bay 105
    climate 136, 139, 141
    Clocktower 14, 33, 83
    Club 64 52, 64
    Club ‘97’ 64
    Clube Militar de Macau 125
    Combo Thai 99
    Come Horseracing Tour 12, 13,
    101, 145
    communications 142
    Concerto Inn 154
    The Conrad 147
    Convention and Exhibition
    Centre 43, 67
    Cosmopolitan Curry House
    108
    Cozinha Portuguesa O Manel
    125
    Crabtree and Evelyn 98
    cricket sixes 37
    currency 136
    Cultural Centre 82, 120
    cultures 34–5
    cycling 138

    Index

    A
    Aberdeen Harbour 73, 75
    accommodation 146 see also
    hotels and hostels
    acupuncture 33
    Ah Long Pakistan Halal Food
    93
    air pollution 139, 141
    airport information 137, 138
    Alibi 48, 65
    A Lorcha 125
    Alvares, Jorge 31
    Amah Rock 101
    Amaroni’s Little Italy 99
    American Peking Restaurant 71
    Anne Black Guest House 152
    Antidote 52, 64
    Ap Lei Chau 75
    Apliu Street 97
    Aqua Spirit 86
    Artemis 98
    Atrium, The 153
    Avenida da Praia Grande,
    Macau 119
    Avenue, The 84

    Bird Garden 39, 89, 91
    Bishop Lei International House
    149
    Black Sheep, The 77
    Blue 64
    Bookworm Café, Lamma 117
    books 139
    Booth Lodge 152
    Bossini 106
    Bottom’s Up 52, 86
    Boundary Street 90
    BP International House 151
    Bradbury Lodge Youth Hostel
    152
    Brecht’s Circle 71
    Bride’s Pool 44, 105
    Brown 71
    budget travel 143
    buses 41, 138, 140
    business information and
    facilities 139, 142

    D
    Dance parties 53
    Davidoff 85
    David’s Shirts 63
    DDs 124
    Deep Water Bay 73
    Delaney’s 87
    Deli Lamma, Lamma 117
    Diamond Casino 123
    Di Matteo 133
    dim sum 32, 51
    Di Vino 52, 64
    dolphin watching 54, 114, 145
    Dom Pedro Theatre 121
    Dong Jiang Hai Xian Da Jiu Lou
    133
    Dong Men District 127
    Dragon Boat Festival 36
    Dragon’s Back, The 45, 74
    Dragon Centre 98
    Dragon Culture 63

    155

    Index

    Dragon-i 52, 64
    driving 136, 138, 140
    drugs 140
    Duke of York 107
    Duddell Street 62
    Dynasty 87
    E
    Eaton Hotel 149
    El Cid 77
    Elliot, Captain Charles 31
    emergencies 140
    Empire Hotel 151
    Empire Hotel, Kowloon 149
    Escalator 40, 41, 59
    ethnicity 34–5
    Excelsior, The 148
    Exchange Square 59
    Exp 99
    F
    Fairwood 93
    Fanling 104
    Fashion Walk 70
    Fat Angelo’s 71
    Fat Jong Temple 96
    faxing 142
    Fa Yuen Building 92
    Feather Boa 53, 64
    Felicity Hotel 150
    Felix 52, 84, 87
    feng shui 33
    Fernando’s 121, 125
    ferries 40, 138 (see also Star
    Ferry)
    festivals and events 36–7
    Festive China 99
    Fetish Fashion 63
    Flagstaff House 62
    Flamingo 125
    Floating Casino 123
    flower market 89, 91
    food specialities 50–51
    football see Carlsberg Cup
    Forget-Me-Not Lounge Bar 107
    Foreign Correspondents Club 52
    Former Government House 59
    Former Military Hospital 62
    Forteleza do Monte 120
    Fortress 85
    Fringe Club 64
    G
    Gaddi’s 48, 87
    Gage Street Market 39
    Galleria, The Peak 8
    Gallery, The, Lantau 117
    gambling 123
    Garden Hotel, Guangzhou 148
    gardens see parks and gardens
    Garden View International
    House 151, 153
    Gaylord 87
    George VI Statue 62
    Golden Elephant Thai
    Restaurant 129

    156

    Golden Flamingo 76
    Golden Mile 81 see also
    Nathan Road
    Golden Shopping Centre 98
    Goldfish Market 39
    golf see Hong Kong Open
    government publications 139
    Grand Hyatt 147
    Grey Wolf 129
    Guangdong Hotel, Shenzhen 150
    Guangdong Museum of Art 132
    Guangdong Victory Hotel 150
    Guangzhou 130–133
    eating and drinking 133
    map 130
    Gucci 63
    Guia Lighthouse 119
    H
    Häagen Dazs 84
    Hac Sa Beach 121, 122
    Hainan chicken 50
    Ham Tin village 22–3
    Handover negotiations 11, 31
    Hang Heung Bakery 106
    Han Lok Yuen, Lamma 117
    Happy Valley, Shenzhen 128
    Happy Valley Races 6, 12–13, 68
    Harbour City 84, 85
    Harbour Plaza 148
    Harbour Plaza Resort City 154
    Harbour View International
    House 151
    Harlech Road 9
    Hau Wong Temple 97
    health and beauty treatments
    33, 128
    health preparations and tips
    136, 141
    Hei Fung Terrace 77
    helicopter rides 145
    Henry J. Bean’s 129
    Heritage Museum 7, 20–21, 102
    history 30–31
    HKTB (Hong Kong Tourist
    Board) 139
    Hoi Ha Wan 44
    Holiday Inn, Golden Mile 148
    Holiday Inn, Macau 150
    Hollywood Road 46, 61
    Hollywood Road Police Station
    62
    Holy Carpenter Guest House
    152
    Honey Lake Resort 128
    Honeymoon Deserts 108
    Hong Kong Convention and
    Exhibition Centre 43, 67
    Hong Kong Cycling Association
    138
    Hong Kong Disneyland 54
    Hong Kong Gold Coast Hotel 154
    Hong Kong Hotel Association
    146
    Hong Kong International Airport
    43

    Hong Kong Island, Northeast
    66–71
    eating and drinking 64
    map 66
    shopping 70
    Hong Kong Island, Northwest
    58–65
    bars and clubs 64
    colonial relics 62
    malls and boutiques 63
    map 58
    restaurants 65
    Hong Kong Island, South 72–77
    designer outlets in Ap Lei
    Chau 76
    eating and drinking 77
    map 72
    Hong Kong Land Loop 47
    Hong Kong Marathon 37
    Hong Kong Open 37
    Hong Kong Park 59, 69
    Hong Kong Railway Museum
    101
    Hopewell Centre 68
    Horizon Plaza 76
    horse racing 6, 12–13, 37, 68,
    101, 145
    hospitals and medical services
    140, 141
    hostels 143, 152
    Hotel Intercontinental, Hong
    Kong 147
    Hotel Lisboa 121, 123
    Hotel Miramar 149
    Hotel Royal, Macau 150
    hotels
    apartotels 146
    cheap sleeps 152
    great escapes 154
    long-stay hotels 153
    luxury hotels 148
    mid-range hotels, Hong
    Kong 149
    mid-range hotels, Macau and
    China 150
    super luxury hotels 147
    value-for-money hotels 151
    HSBC Bank Headquarters 11,
    42
    Hsu, Lin Tse 31
    Hua Lin Temple 131
    Hungry Ghost Festival 37
    Hutong 87
    Hyatt Regency Hotel Casino
    123
    Hyatt Regency, Macau 154
    I
    ice skating 55
    IKEA 106
    IKEA Restaurant 108
    Imperial Hotel 149
    IndoChine 1929 65
    Inside 76
    International Dragon Boat
    Races 37

    J
    J-01 70
    Jacob’s Ladder 45
    Jade Market 39, 90, 91
    Jade Market, Guangzhou 131
    Jah 64
    Jai Alai Casino 123
    Japan Fusion 133
    Jardine’s Bazaar 38
    Jaspa’s 109
    The Jazz Club 53
    Jimmy’s Kitchen 49, 65
    J M Chef 133
    Jockey Club 13
    Jockey Club Mount Davis Youth
    Hostel 154
    Joe Bananas 71
    Jo Jo, Lantau 117
    Joyce 65, 85
    Joyce Warehouse 76
    junks 32, 145
    Jusco 70
    K
    Kadoorie Farm 102
    Kaga 109
    Kam Pek Casino 123
    Kam Tin 104
    Kar Shing Restaurant 109
    karting mall 96
    Kau Kee 65
    KCR (Kowloon-Canton Railway)
    138
    Kee 52
    Kimberley Hotel 149
    Kingsway Hotel Casino 123
    King Wah Building 92
    KK Pub and Café 93
    Kong Lung Seafood 99
    Kowloon-Canton Railway
    (KCR) 138
    Kowloon Hotel 149
    Kowloon Mosque 82
    Kowloon – New Kowloon
    94–99
    eating and drinking 99
    map 94
    shopping 98
    Kowloon Park 55, 83, 84
    Kowloon Shangri-La 147
    Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui 80–87
    drinking 86
    eating 87
    map 80
    people watching 84
    shopping 85

    Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong
    Kok and Prince Edward 88–93
    funky shops 92
    cheap eats 93
    map 88
    Kowloon Walled City Park 95
    Kung Tak Lam 49
    L
    Ladies Market 38, 90
    Lamma see Outlying Islands
    Lancôme 98
    Landmark Centre 10, 63
    Landmark Hotel, Shenzhen 150
    Lane Crawford 63
    Lane Crawford Outlet 76
    Langham Hotel 84, 147
    languages 136, 141
    Lan Kwai Fong 60
    Lantau see Outlying Islands
    Lardos Steak House 108
    Largo do Senado 119
    La Salle Court 153
    Laurel Restaurant 129
    Lee Gardens 70
    Legco Building 62
    Legislative Council Building 11
    Lei Chung Uk Tomb 97
    Lei Yue Mun 96, 97
    library (Hong Kong Central
    Library) 142
    Light Vegetarian 93
    Lion Rock 95, 97
    Lion’s Nature Education Centre
    55
    Lippo Towers 43
    Lisboa, The 148
    Lobby Lounge, The (Eaton
    Hotel) 93
    Lobby Lounge, The (Hotel
    Intercontinental) 86
    Lockhart Road 67, 69
    Log-On 98
    Long Ke Wan 105
    Lou Lim Leoc Garden 122
    Lucy’s 77
    Lucy’s, Shamian Island 133
    Lugard Road, The Peak 9
    Lung Wah Hotel 109
    Luo Hu Commercial City 127
    M
    Macau 118–125
    cafés, bars and clubs 124
    eating 125
    gambling 123
    map 118
    Macau Grand Prix 37
    Macau Jazz Club 124
    Macau Jockey Club 123
    Macau Museum 122
    Macau Tower 122
    2 Macdonnell Road 151, 153
    MacLehose Trail 46
    magazines 139
    Mai Po Marsh 44, 105

    Mandarin Grill 49, 65
    Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong
    11, 147
    Mandarin Oriental, Macau 147
    Mandarin Oriental Casino 123
    Man Mo Temple 61
    Ma On Shan 45, 105
    maps 139
    Marathon Sports 70
    Maritime Museum 122
    markets 38–39
    Marks & Spencer 106
    Mason, Richard 67–68
    massage 33
    Matahari 76
    M at the Fringe 49, 65
    medical services 140
    Melting Pot, The 106
    Metropole, Macau 150
    Mezzaluna 125
    Mid-Autumn Festival 37
    Ming Kee Seafood, Po Toi 117
    Minsk World 127
    Mirador Mansion 84
    Mission Etrangères 62
    Mission Hills Golf Club 128
    Mitsukoshi 70
    monasteries see temples and
    monasteries
    money 136
    money changing and transfer
    142
    Mongkok computer Centre
    92
    moon cakes 50, 106
    Moon Koon Restaurant 12, 13
    Moonwalker 124
    Morton’s of Chicago 87
    MTR (Mass Transit Railway) 40,
    138, 140
    Mui Chai Kee 93
    Mui Wo, Lantau 113, 115
    Murray Building, Stanley 16
    Museum of Art 82
    Museum of History 81
    museums
    budget travel 143
    Guangdong Museum of Art
    132
    Heritage Museum 7, 20–21,
    102
    Hong Kong Railway Museum
    101
    Macau Museum 122
    Maritime Museum 122
    Museum of Art 82
    Museum of History 81
    Racing Museum 12
    Science Museum 54, 82
    Space Museum 81
    tours 145
    My Jewellery 106

    Index

    International Finance Centre
    15, 42–43, 59
    International Races 37
    Internet 142, 143
    Island Beverley 70
    Island Shangri-La 147
    Isogai, Rensuke 31
    IT 92
    Izzue 92

    N
    Nanyue Tomb 132
    Nathan Road 46–47, 81

    157

    Index

    natural beauty, areas of 44–45,
    105
    Ned Kelly’s Last Stand 86
    New Century Hotel, Macau 150
    New King’s Hotel 152
    newspapers 139
    New Territories, The 100–109
    areas of natural beauty 105
    cheap eats 108
    drinking 107
    historic villages and new
    towns 104
    map 100
    restaurants 109
    shopping 106
    New World Renaissance 149
    Nicholini’s 48
    nightclubs see bars, cafés and
    clubs
    Nishimura 129
    Noonday Gun 67
    Nova Guia 124
    O
    Ocean Park 54, 73
    Octopus cards 138
    Old Peak Road 9
    Old Police Station, Stanley 16
    One Harbour Road 49
    One Thirty-One 109
    Opiarium Café 124
    Opium Wars 30
    Orange Tree Bar and Grill 71
    Oriental Golf City 95
    Oskar’s Pub 124
    Outlying Islands 112–117
    eating and drinking 117
    map 112
    photo opportunities 116
    Overjoy Porcelain Factory 106
    Oyster and Wine Bar 87
    P
    Pacino Wan 85
    Page One 70, 98
    Pak Sha O Hostel 152
    Pak Tai Temple 24
    Panglin Hotel 150
    Park Lane 148
    parks and gardens see also
    natural beauty, areas of
    budget travel 143
    Chater Garden 11
    Pok Fu Lam Country Park 9
    Victoria Park 47, 68–9
    Victoria Peak Garden 9
    passports 136
    Pat Sin Range
    Patten, Chris 11, 31
    Peak, The 6, 8–9, 46, 140
    Peak Lookout, The 8
    Peak Tower 8
    Peak Tram 9, 40, 140
    Pedder Building 63
    22 Peel Street 153
    Peking Restaurant 93

    158

    Peng Chau 115
    Peninsula Hotel 81, 147
    Pepperoni’s 108
    Phi-b 64
    Phonograph 86
    Ping Kong 104
    Pirates Cave, Cheung Chau
    Island 25
    plague 60
    Plantation Road, The Peak 9
    Plover Cove 105
    Poets 107
    Pok Fu Lam Country Park 9
    Po Lin Monastery see Big
    Buddha and Po Lin Monastery
    postal services 142
    Post ‘97 see Club ‘97’
    Po Toi see Outlying Islands
    Po-Tsai, Cheung 31
    Pottinger, Sir Henry 31
    Pousada 107
    Pousada de Coloane 122, 154
    Pousada de Sao Tiago 122, 154
    Praya, The, Cheung Chau 47
    Prince’s Building 10, 63
    Protestant Cemetery 120
    Q
    Qing Wa Ju 133
    R
    Racing Museum 12
    radio 139
    Railway Tavern 107
    Rainbow Seafood, Lamma 117
    Reclamation Street 19
    Reclamation Street Market 91
    reflexology 32
    Regal Airport Hotel 149
    Regal Riverside Hotel Bar 107
    Renaissance Harbour View
    149
    Replay 76
    Repulse Bay 74
    Repulse Bay Hotel 153
    Restaurante Pinocchio 125
    restaurants
    budget travel 143
    Guangzhou 133
    Hong Kong Island, Northeast
    71
    Hong Kong Island,
    … Northwest 65
    Hong Kong Island, South 77
    Kowloon – New Kowloon 99
    Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui 84,
    87
    Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong

    Kok and Prince Edward 92
    Macau 125
    New Territories, The 108–109
    outlying islands 117
    Shenzhen 129
    Top 10 restaurants 48–49
    Rice Bar 64
    rickshaws 41

    Rise Commercial Building 85
    Ristorante Firenze 109
    Ritz-Carlton 147
    Rosedale on the Park 151, 153
    Royal Garden Hotel 148
    Royal Park Chinese 109
    Rua da Felicidade 122
    rugby 37
    Ruinas do São Paulo 119, 121
    S
    Saigon at Stanley 77
    Saint’s Alp Teahouse 93
    Sandy Chung 92
    St John’s Cathedral 62
    St Joseph’s Seminary 121
    St Stephen’s Beach, Stanley 17
    Sai Kung 104
    Sai Kung Peninsula see Tai
    Long Wan
    Sai Wan village 23
    Salisbury YMCA 151
    San Mun Tsai 105
    Sanshiro 124
    Sao Domingos 122
    Sasa Cosmetics 92
    Schnurrbart 86
    Science Museum 54, 82
    security tips 141
    Seibu 63
    Severn Road, The Peak 9
    Shaffi’s Indian 108
    Shalimar 108
    Sha Lo Tung 45
    Shamian Islands 131
    Shamrock 151
    Sham Tseng Yue Kee Roast
    Goose Restaurant 99
    Shanghai Street 91
    Shanghai Tang 63
    Shangri-La Hotel, Shenzhen148
    360° (restaurant) 129
    Sha Tin 104
    Sha Tin Racecourse 101
    Shek O 74
    Shenzhen 126–129
    eating and drinking 129
    map 126
    Sheraton, The 148
    Sheung Shui 104
    Sheung Wan 60
    She Wong Lam 33
    Shing Hin Chinese Restaurant
    99
    shopping
    Hong Kong Island, Northeast
    70
    Hong Kong Island,
    Northwest 63
    Hong Kong Island, South 76
    Kowloon – New Kowloon 98
    Kowloon – Tsim Sha Tsui 85
    Kowloon – Yau Ma Tei, Mong
    Kok and Prince Edward 92
    markets 38–39
    New Territories, The 106

    T
    Tai Chi 33, 143
    Tai Fat Hau 77, 99
    Tai Long Sai Wan 22–3
    Tai Long Wan 7, 22–3, 45,
    105
    Tai Mo Shan 105
    Tai O, Lantau 113, 115, 116
    Tai Ping Carpets 70
    Tai Ping Koon 93
    Tai Po 104
    Tai Po Kau 105
    Tai Wan 22–23
    Tak Foon Heen 93
    Talker Pub 124
    Tang 133
    T’ang Court 48
    Tango Martini 71
    Tap Mun 115
    Tap Mun Chau 104
    taxis 41, 138
    telephones 142
    television 139

    temples and monasteries
    Big Buddha and Po Lin
    Monastery 7, 28–9, 115, 116
    Castle Peak Monastery 103
    Chen Clan Temple 131
    Chi Lin Nunnery 33, 96
    Fat Jong Temple 96
    Hau Wong Temple 97
    Hua Lin Temple 131
    Man Mo Temple 61
    Pak Tai Temple 24
    Temple of Filial Piety 132
    Temple of the Six Banyan
    Trees 132
    Ten Thousand Buddhas
    Monastery 101
    Tin Hau Temple, Hong Kong
    Island 69
    Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon�������
    89��
    Tin Hau Temple, The New
    Territories 103
    Tin Hau Temple, Stanley 17
    Trappist Monastery, Lantau
    113
    Wong Tai Sin Temple 95, 97
    Temple of Filial Piety 132
    Temple of the Six Banyan
    Trees 132
    Temple Street Night Market
    7, 18–19, 38, 46, 89
    Ten Thousand Buddhas
    Monastery 101
    Thai-Malaysian Restaurant 109
    Thomas Jackson statue 11
    Time After Time 71
    Tin Hau Festival 36
    Tin Hau Temple, Hong Kong
    Island 69
    Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon 89
    Tin Hau Temple, The New
    Territories 103
    Tin Hau Temple, Stanley 17
    Totts Asian Grill and Bar 71
    Tourist Board (HKTB) 139
    tours 145
    Toys Club 76
    Toys ‘R’ Us 85
    Trailwalker 37
    trams 40, 138
    transport 40–41, 138
    Trappist Monastery, Lantau 113
    travel
    getting to Hong Kong 137
    getting around Hong Kong
    40–41, 138
    Treasure Inn Seafood
    Restaurant 32
    Treaty of Nanking 30
    Triads 90
    True Colors Dong Men 129
    Tsang Tai Uk 104
    Tsing Ma Bridge 42, 116
    Tso Choi 99
    Tsuen Wan 104
    Tuen Ng see Dragon Boat
    Festival

    Tung Kee Seafood Restaurant
    109
    Tung Wan Beach 25
    Two IFC Tower, 15, 42–3, 59
    U
    underground system 40
    Universal Models 106
    V
    V13 64
    Venerable Banyan Tree, Cheung
    Chau Island 24
    Verandah, The 48, 77
    Victoria Harbour 15
    Victoria Park 47, 68–9
    Victoria Peak see The Peak
    Victoria Peak Garden 9
    Visage Free 53
    visas 136

    Index

    shopping (cont)
    opening hours 144
    QTS fair trading symbol 144
    sales tax 144
    Signal Café 121, 124
    Silver Lining 13
    Smuggler’s Inn 77
    Snoopy’s World 55
    Sogo 70
    SoHo 60
    Soho Restaurant and Nightclub
    129
    Sok Kwu Wan, Lamma 114
    Solmar 125
    Sony Pro Shops 92
    Space 76
    Space Museum 81
    spas 33
    Splendid China 128
    Spoon 84
    sporting events 37
    Spring Lantern Festival 36
    Stanley 7, 16–17, 75
    Stanley Market 16, 39
    Star Ferry 6, 14–15, 40, 83,
    138
    Star House 85
    Statue Square 6, 10–11
    Staunton, The 153
    Steamers 107
    street food stalls (dai pai
    dongs) 18–19
    Stoep, Lantau 117
    Sunday Filipino Fiesta 11
    Sun Ming Yuen Seafood 108
    Sunset Peak, Lantau 113
    Sun Yat-sen Memorial House
    122
    Suzuya 106
    Suzy Wong 67–8
    swimming 141
    Sze Lok Yuen Hostel 152

    W
    walking 46–7, 138, 141, 145
    Wan Chai 68
    War Cemetery, Stanley 17
    Warwick, The 154
    websites 139
    Welcome Garden 77
    Wesley, The 151, 153
    Westin, Macau 154
    Whamey, The 151
    White Cloud Mountain 132
    White Swan Hotel 154
    Window of the World 127
    Wing Lai Yuen 99
    Wing Wah Bakery 106
    Wong Tai Sin Temple 95, 97
    Wonton 51
    The World of Suzie Wong,
    Richard Mason 61, 67–8
    X
    Xiaoping, Deng 31
    Xtreme 107
    Y
    Yat-sen, Dr Sun 31
    Yau Ley 108
    Yen Yen 129
    Ye Shanghai 65
    YMCA 143, 146, 151
    YS 71
    Yue Laan see Hungry Ghost
    Festival
    Yuen Siu see Spring Lantern
    Festival
    Yuen Yuen Institute 102
    Yuet Chung China Works
    98
    Yuexiu Park 132
    Yung Kee 65
    Yung Shue Wan, Lamma 114
    Z
    Zoological and Botanical
    Gardens 54

    159

    Acknowledgements

    Acknowledgements
    The Authors
    Jason Gagliardi is a freelance travel writer
    who divides his time between Hong
    Kong and Bangkok; Liam Fitzpatrick
    works for the Hong Kong Tourist Board
    and lives in London; Andrew Stone is a
    freelance travel writer based in Hong
    Kong.

    Courtesy of THE BIRDCAGE: 76tl;
    Courtesy of BOCA: 64tc;

    Produced by Blue Island Publishing,
    Highbury, London
    Editorial Director Rosalyn Thiro
    Art Director Stephen Bere
    Picture Research Ellen Root
    Research Assistance Amaia Allende
    Proofread and Index Michael Ellis
    Fact Checker Emily White

    Additional Photography

    Courtesy of THE HARBOUR PLAZA:
    154tc; NIGEL HICKS: 8–9, 44tc/br, 47tl,
    72tc, 78–9, 102tr, 110–1; Courtesy of the
    HONG KONG HERITAGE MUSEUM: 7ca,
    20tr, 21ca; Courtesy of the HONG KONG
    TOURISM BOARD: 8l, 14tl/b, 28c, 30tl,
    32tl/tc/tr/c/b, 33tl/tc/tr/bl, 34c, 35t,
    36tl/tc/tr/c/b, 37tl/tr/cra/cr/bra/br, 40tc/tr,
    44tl/tr/c/bl, 46tr, 50tc, 72tl, 80tl/c, 83tl,
    103tr/cr, 116tr, 137tl, 138tl, 139tl/tc/tr,
    141tl/tc/tr, 142tl, 143tr, 144tl, 145tl/tr,
    146tl/tc, 148tr;

    Artwork Lee Redmond

    Courtesy of the INTERCONTINENTAL
    HONG KONG: 92tr; Alain Ducasse 84tr;
    Courtesy of the ISLAND SHANGRI-LA:
    147tl;

    Main Photographers

    Nigel Hicks, Chris Stowers
    Dave King, Steven Lam,
    David McIntyre, David Murray, Jules
    Selmes, Paul Williams
    Cartography James Macdonald,
    Mapping Ideas Ltd
    AT DORLING KINDERSLEY:
    Senior Publishing Manager Louise Lang
    Publishing Manager Kate Poole
    Senior Art Editor Marisa Renzullo
    Director of Publishing Gillian Allan
    Publisher Douglas Amrine
    Cartography Co-ordinator
    Casper Morris
    DTP Jason Little, Conrad van Dyk
    Production Sarah Dodd

    Picture Credits

    Courtesy of FRINGE CLUB: 64tl;
    Courtesy of HONG KONG SCIENCE
    MUSEUM: 55tl;

    Courtesy of the KIMBERLEY HOTEL:
    149tc; Courtesy of the KOWLOON
    HOTEL: 149tl;
    Courtesy of LEONARDO MEDIA BV: 53tl;
    Courtesy of the MANDARIN ORIENTAL
    HOTEL: 147tc; Courtesy of THE MACAU
    GOVERNMENT TOURIST OFFICE:137tc,
    150tl/tc/tr; Courtesy of MELTING POT:
    106tl;
    NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM,
    London: 30c;

    The publishers would like to thank all the
    museums, hotels, restaurants, bars,
    clubs, casinos, shops, galleries and other
    sights for their assistance and kind
    permission to photograph at their
    establishments.

    PANOS PICTURES: Chris Stowers 3tr, 8b,
    14tr, 18–19, 19t, 30tr, 31t, 34tr, 38br, 63tl,
    66c/tr, 75tr, 88tl, 152tr; Courtesy of the
    PENINSULA HOTEL: 146tr; Courtesy of
    POUSAADA 107tc;

    Placement Key: t=top; tl=top left; tr=top
    right; tc=top centre; trc=top right centre;
    c=centre; ca=centre above; cra=centre
    right above; cb=centre below; cr=centre
    right; b=bottom; bra=bottom right above;
    bl=bottom left; br=bottom right; l=left
    CORBIS: Bettmann 30tc/bl; Horace
    Bristol 30br; Michael Freeman 94tl; Adam
    Woolfitt 119t;

    Courtesy of the SHERATON HONG
    KONG: 148tc;

    Courtesy of AMARONI’S LITTLE ITALY:
    99tl;

    160

    Courtesy of DIVINO: 52c;

    Courtesy of the WARWICK HOTEL: 154tl.
    All other images are © Dorling Kindersley.
    For further information see
    www.dkimages.com.

    Cartography Credits

    Cartography derived from Bartholomew
    Digital Database,
    www.bartholomewmaps.com.

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    Hong Kong Territory Index
    Aberdeen
    Causeway Bay
    Central
    Cheung Chau Island
    Cheung Sha
    Chiwei
    Chuen Lung
    Chung Hom Kok
    Deep Water Bay
    Discovery Bay
    Dong Men
    Fairview Park
    Fan Lau
    Fanling
    Fo Tan
    Ha Kwai Chung
    Ha Pak Nai
    Ha Tsuen
    Hang Hau
    Hang Tau Tai Po
    Ho Chung
    Hok Tsui Shan
    Hong Kong Island
    Hong Lok Yuen
    Huang Shul Klu
    Hung Hom
    Hung Shing Ye
    Kan Tau Wai
    Kat Hing Wai
    Kau Lung Hang
    Kei Lun Wai
    Keung Shan
    Kong Sin Wan
    Kwai Chung
    Kwan Tei
    Kwu Tung
    Kwun Yam Shan
    Lai Chi Kok
    Lam Tei
    Lam Tin
    Lantau Island
    Lau Fau Shan
    Lei Yue Mun
    Lin Tong Mei
    Lo Wai
    Luen Wo Hui
    Lung Kwu Shueng Tan
    Lung Kwu Tan
    Luohu
    Ma Liu Shui
    Ma On Kong
    Ma Tseuk Leng
    Mai Po
    Man Kam To
    Man Uk Pin
    Mong Tseng Wai
    Mui Wo
    Nanyuan
    Ngar Hom Sha
    Ngau Hom Sha
    Ngau Tau Kok
    North Point
    Pak Long
    Pak Mong
    Pak Ngau Shek
    Pak Sha Tsuen
    Pak Tin
    Pan Chung
    Pat Heung
    Peng Chau Island
    Pillar Point
    Ping Che
    Ping Kong
    Ping Shan
    Po Toi O
    Poi Toi Island
    Pok Fu Lam
    Pui O
    Quarry Bay
    Repulse Bay
    Sai Kung
    San Hui Village
    San Mun Tsai

    E5
    E5
    E5
    C6
    B5
    D1
    D3
    F6
    E5
    C4
    E1
    D2
    A6
    E2
    F3
    E4
    B3
    C2
    G4
    D2
    F4
    F6
    F5
    E2
    C2
    E4
    E6
    E1
    D2
    E2
    C3
    A5
    E5
    E3
    E1
    D1
    F3
    E4
    C3
    F4
    B5
    C2
    F5
    D2
    E3
    E2
    B3
    B3
    E1
    F3
    D3
    F1
    D2
    E1
    F1
    C2
    C5
    B1
    C2
    B2
    F4
    F5
    B3
    C4
    E2
    C3
    E3
    E2
    D2
    C5
    B3
    E1
    E1
    C2
    G5
    F6
    E5
    C5
    F5
    F5
    F3
    C3
    F2

    San Shek Wan
    Sha Ling
    Sha Tau Kok
    Sha Tin
    Sham Shek Tsuen
    Sham Shui Po
    Sham Tseng
    Shangbu
    Shanghu
    Shatou
    Shau Kei Wan
    Shek Hang
    Shek Kong
    Shek O
    Shek Pik
    Shek Tong Tsui
    Shek Wan
    Shek Wu Hui
    Shekou
    Shenzhen
    Sheung Kwai Chung
    Sheung Shui
    Shouson Hill
    Shuen Wan
    Shui Tau
    Shui Tsiu San Tsuen
    Siu Lam
    Siu Lang Shui
    Siu Lek Yuen
    So Kwun Tan
    So Kwun Wat
    Sok Kwu Wan
    Stanley
    Tai Au Mun
    Tai Kei Leng
    Tai Lam Chung
    Tai Mei Tuk
    Tai Mong Tsai
    Tai O
    Tai Po
    Tai Po Kau
    Tai Po Tau
    Tai Po Tsai
    Tai Shui Hang
    Tai Wan Tau
    Tai Wo
    Tan Kwai Tsuen
    Tap Mun Island
    Tei Tong Tsui
    Tin Fu Tsai
    Ting Kau
    Ting Kok
    Tong Fuk
    Tsang Tai Uk
    Tseng Lan Shue
    Tsim Sha Tsui
    Tsing Lung Tau
    Tsing Yi Island
    Tsuen Wan
    Tsung Kwan O
    Tuen Mun
    Tuen Tsz Wai
    Tung Ah Village
    Tung Chung
    Wan Chai
    Wang Chau
    Wo Mei
    Wo Yi Hop
    Wu Kai Sha
    Wu Lei Tau
    Xlasha
    Yau Ma Tei
    Yau Tong
    Yuen Kong
    Yuen Long
    Yueng Siu Hang
    Yung Shue Hua
    Yung Shue Wan
    Yunongcun
    Zucun



    Kowloon Index
    B5
    E1
    F1
    F3
    B5
    E4
    D3
    D1
    D1
    C1
    F5
    G3
    D3
    F5
    B5
    E5
    D4
    E1
    B2
    D1
    E3
    E1
    E5
    F2
    D2
    C3
    C3
    B3
    F3
    C3
    C3
    E6
    F6
    G4
    C2
    C3
    F2
    G3
    A5
    E2
    F2
    E2
    G4
    B3
    G5
    D3
    C3
    H2
    G5
    D3
    D3
    F2
    B5
    E3
    F4
    E4
    D3
    D4
    D3
    F4
    C3
    C3
    F5
    B5
    E5
    C2
    F4
    E3
    F3
    F3
    C1
    E4
    F4
    D3
    C2
    C3
    E6
    D5
    D1
    C1

    Ashley Road
    Austin Avenue
    Austin Road
    Baker Street
    Battery Street
    Bowring Street
    Bulkeley Street
    Cameron Road
    Canton Road
    Canton Street
    Carnarvon Road
    Chatham Road North
    Chatham Road South
    Cheong Wan Road
    Chi Wo Street
    Chung Hau Street
    Cook Street
    Cox's Road
    Dock Street
    Dyer Avenue
    Fat Kwong Street
    Ferry Street
    Gascoigne Road
    Gilles Avenue South
    Granville Road
    Haiphong Road
    Hankow Road
    Hanoi Road
    Hoi Wang Road
    Hok Yuen Street East
    Hong Chong Road
    Humphreys Avenue
    Hung Hom Road
    Hung Hom South Road
    Jordan Path
    Jordan Road
    Kansu Street
    Kimberley Road
    Kimberley Street
    Knutsford Terrace
    Kowloon Park Drive
    Lock Road
    Ma Tau Wai Road
    Man Cheong Street
    Man Wai Street
    Man Wue Street
    Man Ying Street
    Man Yue Street
    Man Yuen Street
    Middle Road
    Mody Road
    Nanking Street
    Nathan Road
    Nga Cheung Road
    Ning Po Street
    Observation Road
    Pak Hoi Street
    Parkes Street
    Peking Road
    Poi Loi Street
    Prat Avenue
    Princess Margaret Road
    Public Square Street
    Reclamation Street
    Saigon Street
    Salisbury Road
    Science Museum Road
    Shanghai Street
    Shung King Street
    Station Lane
    Tai Wan Road
    Tak Man Street
    Tak Shing Street
    Temple Street
    Tong Mi Road
    Wai Ching Street
    Waterloo Road
    Woosung Street
    Wuhu Street
    Wylie Road
    Yan Cheung Road
    Yuk Choi Road


    N3
    N2
    N2
    Q2
    M2
    M2
    Q1
    N3
    M3
    M2
    N3
    Q1
    P2
    P2
    N2
    P1
    Q1
    N2
    Q2
    R2
    Q1
    M2
    N2
    Q2
    N3
    N3
    N3
    N3
    M1
    Q1
    P2
    N3
    Q2
    Q2
    N2
    M2
    M1
    N3
    N3
    N3
    M3
    N3
    Q1
    M1
    M1
    M2
    M2
    Q1
    M2
    N4
    N3
    M2
    N2
    L2
    M2
    N3
    M1
    N2
    M4
    Q2
    N3
    P1
    M1
    M1
    M1
    N4
    P3
    M1
    R2
    Q1
    R1
    Q2
    N2
    M2
    M1
    M2
    M1
    M2
    Q2
    N1
    M1
    P2

    Hong Kong Index
    Aberdeen Street
    Albany Road
    Arbuthnot Road
    Arsenal Street
    Bonham Road
    Bonham Strand East
    Bonham Strand West
    Bowrington Road
    Bridges Street
    Caine Road
    Caroline Hill Road
    Castle Road
    Causeway Road
    Chater Road
    Cochrane Street
    Conduit Road
    Connaught Road Central
    Connaught Road West
    Cotton Tree Drive
    D'Aguilar Street
    Des Voeux Road Central
    Des Voeux Road West
    Drake Street
    Edinburgh Place
    Electric Road
    Elgin Street
    Exchange Square
    Fenwick Street
    Fleming Road
    Gage Street
    Garden Road
    Gloucester Road
    Graham Street
    Great George Street
    Gresson Street
    Harbour Road
    Harbour View Street

    K5
    K6
    K6
    M6
    J5
    K4
    J4
    P6
    J5
    K5
    Q6
    J5
    Q5
    L5
    K5
    J5
    K5
    J4
    L6
    K5
    K5
    J4
    M6
    L5
    R4
    K5
    L5
    N6
    N5
    K5
    L6
    P5
    K5
    Q5
    M6
    N5
    L5

    Harcourt Road
    Hennessy Road
    Hing Fat Street
    Hollywood Road
    Hornsey Road
    Hospital Road
    Hysan Avenue
    Ice House Street
    Jaffe Road
    Jervois Street
    Johnston Road
    Jubilee Street
    Kennedy Road
    Kings Road
    Ko Shing Street
    Lee Garden Road
    Lee Tung Street
    Leighton Road
    Link Road
    Lockhart Road
    Lok Ku Road
    Lower Albert Road
    Luard Road
    Lugard Road
    Lung Wui Road
    Lyndhurst Terrace
    Macdonnell Road
    Magazine Gap Road
    Marsh Road
    Morrison Street
    Morrisson Hill
    Northern Hospital Road
    Old Peak Road
    Park Road
    Paterson Street
    Pedder Street
    Peel Street

    M5
    N6
    R5
    K5
    K6
    J5
    Q6
    L5
    N6
    K5
    N6
    K5
    L6
    R4
    J4
    Q6
    N6
    P6
    Q6
    N6
    J5
    L6
    N6
    J6
    M5
    K5
    L6
    K6
    P5
    J4
    P6
    Q6
    K6
    J5
    Q5
    L5
    K5

    Percival Street
    Pier Road
    Pottinger Street
    Queen Victoria Street
    Queens Road Central
    Queens Road East
    Queensway
    Robinson Road
    Seymour Street
    Sharp Street
    Shelley Street
    Ship Street
    Spring Garden Lane
    Stanley Street
    Star Street
    Statue Square
    Staunton Street
    Stewart Road
    Swatow Road
    Tai Hang Road
    Tai Pang Shan Street
    Tamar Street
    Tia Yuen Street
    Tin Hau Temple Road
    Tonnochy Road
    Tsing Fung Street
    Tung Lo Wan Road
    Upper Albert Road
    Victoria Park Road
    Wan Chai Road
    Watson Road
    Wellington Street
    Wing Lock Street
    Wong Nai Chung Road
    Wyndham Street
    Yee Woo Street
    Yun Ping Road

    4AI0O-ARKET
    ,O7U
    3HENZHEN
    AND
    +#2TO-AILAND#HINA

    (ONG+ONG-42AND
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    P5
    K4
    K5
    K5
    K5
    P6
    M6
    K6
    J5
    P6
    K5
    N6
    N6
    K5
    M6
    L5
    K5
    P6
    N6
    Q6
    J5
    M6
    N6
    R5
    P5
    R5
    R6
    K6
    Q5
    P6
    R4
    K5
    K4
    P5
    K5
    Q5
    Q6

    7U+AI3HA

    )SLANDLINE
    4SUEN7ANLINE

    -A/N3HAN

    +WUN4ONGLINE

    5NIVERSITY

    4SEUNG+WAN/LINE

    (ENG/N

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    +OWLOON#ANTONRAILWAY

    3HEK-UN

    -A/N3HANRAIL

    3HA4IN

    )NTERCHANGESTATION
    4SUEN
    7AN

    4AI3HUI(ANG

    2ACECOURSE

    &O4AN

    !IRPORTEXPRESS

    #ITY/NE
    3HA4IN7AI

    4AI7O(AU
    4AI7AI

    $ISNEYLAND
    2ESORT
    +WAI&ONG
    AND
    4UNG#HUNG

    #HE+UNG4EMPLE

    +WAI(ING

    ,AI+ING
    !IRPORT

    -EI&OO
    ,AI#HI+OK

    7ONG4AI3IN

    +OWLOON
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    ,OK&U

    #HEUNG3HA7AN
    3HAM3HUI0O

    $IAMOND(ILL
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    3HEK+IP-EI

    0O,AM

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    #HUEN

    EYEWITNESS TRAVEL

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