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News November 5, 2020 Page 2
EU CONFIDENTIAL
The dead-tree version of the No. 1 EU news and politics podcast. Your guide to the good, the bad and the absurd in European politics.
BY CRISTINA GONZALEZ AND ANDREW GRAY
LISTEN TO THE PODCAST New episode online every Thursday
EU Confi dential is on Soundcloud, Apple, Google, Stitcher and Spotif y (scan the code at right).
With the result of the U.S. presiden-
tial election hanging in the balance, we
asked POLITICO journalists to weigh in
on the implications of what we know
so far — for America, Europe and the
world.
* * *
“Whoever wins in the end, the result
shows that neither candidate or party
has a clear, convincing mandate. For
Europe, that means it has to hedge its
bets in the coming years because which-
ever party ends up controlling the White
House could be out again in four years.
That makes the prospect of a new trans-
atlantic trade deal or a plan to redefi ne
and renew the transatlantic alliance
much more complicated.” — Matthew
Karnitschnig, chief Europe correspondent
* * *
“For Central Europe, the relationship
with Washington is of key importance —
regardless of who is in the White House. A Biden presidency would likely make Wash-
ington much more vocal about the need
to respect democratic norms in countries
such as Poland and Hungary. But even if
the rhetoric gets frosty, the U.S. would re-
main Central Europe’s key security guar-
antor — and in capitals such as Warsaw,
there would still be a focus on maintaining
strong security ties with the Washington.”
— Lili Bayer, EU politics reporter
* * *
“Regardless of the fi nal outcome,
Trump’s repeat defi ance of widespread
polls showing he would be easily defeat-
ed only confi rmed a widespread view
among European politicians, diplomats
and foreign policy experts: the bully-
ing, blustering, polarizing, pugilistic, un-
predictable and unapologetic president
is the symptom of a political trend in
the United States – not the cause of it,
or even, necessarily, its driving force.”
— David M. Herszenhorn, chief Brussels
correspondent* * *
“This hung result is causing major
heartburn in Geneva, where the mul-
tilateral bureaucracy was hoping all
the Trumpian disruption could just be
wiped away. The president is quitting
the World Health Organization and
paralyzing the World Trade Organiza-
tion. EU leaders say they want to take
charge and lead reform. Trump may
get to call their bluff .” — Sarah Whea-
ton, senior health reporter
* * *
“Democracies are facing challenges
around the world. Without context,
it would often be hard to know if
you were reading about the state or
the country of Georgia in this U.S.
election cycle. Trust and institutions
take longer to build or rebuild than
it takes to destabilize them, and that
is America’s challenge come January
2021.” — Ryan Heath, senior editor, PO-
LITICO U.S.
POLITICO reporters on the U.S. elections
CATCHING UP WITH ...
America divided:
Whoever fi nally
wins the election,
it’s already clear
from the results
that the United
States remains
deeply polarized on
a host of political
issues. What does
that mean for
Europe?
Europe divided:
While one EU
leader endorsed
Tr u m p ’s c l a i m
of victory, other
senior European
politicians
worried openly
that democracy
itself was being
undermined. Will
America’s divisions
exacerbate
Europe’s?
A house divided:
Which members
of Congress will
play a leading role
in transatlantic
relations in the
years ahead?
What we’re
talking about
this week
DECLASSIFIED BY PAUL DALLISON
Sleepy Joe, F**kface
Von Clownstick and
the art of political
nicknames
At the time of writing,
Sleepy Joe (© Donald J
Trump) was still battling
F**kface Von Clownstick
(© Jon Stewart) for the
presidency of the United
States.
Say what you like about
Trump, but he’s great at
inventing nicknames for
his opponents: Sleepy
Joe, Crazy Bernie and
Crooked Hillary are all
short, sharp and easy for
a crowd to chant even if
their MAGA hats are on a
bit too tight.
The importance of a good
nickname was made clear
this week with the bizarre
case of the murder of
Vladimir Marugov, better
known as Sausage King.
Marugov — a prominent
businessman who owned
some of Russia’s largest
meat-processing plants,
including one called Meat
Empire — was killed with
a crossbow after being
attacked while in a sauna
on his lavish estate near
Moscow.
The case took a twist when police searched
a suspect’s home for
clues and they found a
pensioner, described as
being under the infl uence
of “a psychotropic
substance,” handcuff ed
to a bedpost. The pensioner was later
identifi ed by Russian
state media as Alexei
Zavgorodniy, a lawyer
best known for
representing notorious
mafi a hitman Alexander
Solonik, also known as Sasha the Macedonian.
Asked for comment
on the grisly murder
of Sausage King,
Burger King refused to
comment.Lots of politicians have
nicknames, of course,
with some more inventive
than others. Simon
Burns, for example, was
a fairly unremarkable,
if longstanding, British
Conservative MP. But
he had a good nickname
— Third Degree Burns
(because he obtained a
third-class degree, the
lowest grade to pass, in
history at Oxford).
Former French President
(and womanizer) Jacques
Chirac was known as
the Five Minute Man,
according to a muckraking
memoir published by his
former driver who claimed
female staff at the Left
Bank headquarters
of the president’s
Rassemblement pour la
République party used
to joke with each other:
“Chirac? Five minutes,
with the shower après
included.”
Yet not everyone needs
a nickname as their
birth name sums them
up perfectly. There’s
Britain’s Mark Reckless,
who jumped from party
to party in search of
greater Euroskepticism
and once got so drunk
that he forgot to vote on
the country’s budget.
And then there’s Richard
White, a Republican
lawmaker from Kentucky.
Yes, he’s a Rich White
Republican.
Paul Dallison is POLITICO’s
slot news editor. Caption competition
“Who am I voting for? Trudeau.” CAN YOU DO BETTER? EMAIL PDALLISON@POLITICO.EU | BEST ENTRIES APPEAR IN FRIDAY’S ONLINE VERSION OF THIS COLUMN

BRUSSELS
BEAT
News
Agenda
Thursday, November 5: Videoconfer-
ence of EU chiefs of defense (European
Union Military Committee).
Monday, November 9: Videoconfer-
ence of foreign affairs ministers (focus-
ing on trade).
Tuesday, November 10: Videoconfer-
ence of European affairs ministers.
Wednesday, November 11 — Friday,
November 13: European Parliament
plenary session.
Career track
Recovery task force: Céline Gauer will
be the new director general in charge of
the Recovery and Resilience Task Force
(RECOVER) within the Secretariat-Gen-
eral of the European Commission. The
Commission also appointed Johannes
Luebking as principal adviser and Euro-
pean Semester coordinator in the Re-
covery and Resilience Task Force. Anna
Colucci, head of the energy directorate, will be acting head of unit for energy
antitrust until DG COMP appoints a
successor for Luebking.
EESC heads: Austria’s Christa
Schweng has been elected the new
president of the European Economic
and Social Committee. The two new
vice presidents elected to join her are
Italy’s Giulia Barbucci and Ireland’s Cil-
lian Lohan.
VDL team addition: Former Der Spie-
gel journalist Peter Mueller will join the
team of European Commission Presi-
dent Ursula von der Leyen as speech-
writer and communication adviser.
Wood lobbyist: Former British MEP
Paul Brannen has been appointed di-
rector of public affairs for the European
woodworking and sawmill industries.
Corrections
POLITICO is committed to correct-
ing errors. To contact the newsroom
regarding a correction request, please
email editorial@politico.eu.
The bloc should also
penalize ‘people and
companies supporting
Lukashenko,’ the
opposition leader said
TIKHANOVSKAYA URGES EU TO
ENACT MORE SANCTIONS ON BELARUS
The EU should act fast and impose
more sanctions on the regime of
strongman Alexander Lukashenko
and its supporters, Belarus opposi-
tion leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya
has said.
In an interview with the Finan-
cial Times published on Sunday,
Tikhanovskaya welcomed the EU’s
decision to penalize 40 Belarusian
officials last month, but urged Brus-
sels to step up sanctions to include
“people and companies supporting
Lukashenko,” as well as the Belaru-
sian Olympic Committee, which is
headed by Lukashenko.
She also noted that the bloc had
at times been slow to act. The sanc-
tions issued in October had been
delayed because Cyprus had de-
manded simultaneous action against
Turkey.
“This help is needed now. And
if European countries, and all the
countries supporting our movement,
could move faster in their decisions,
that would be wonderful,” she said.
Her comments came as Belaru-
BY ZOSIA WANAT
sians protest for the 12th consecu-
tive week against Lukashenko, who
claimed to have won a presidential
election in August with 80 percent
of the vote. Tikhanovskaya, the main
opposition candidate, fled to Lithu-
ania after the vote. The EU has called
the election “neither free nor fair.”
On Sunday, tens of thousands of
Belarusians gathered once more in
Minsk — despite riot police firing warning shots into the air and using
stun grenades to deter them, accord-
ing to Reuters.
Tikhanovskaya also told the FT
that visa-free travel for Belarusians
to the EU could be of help. “We will
be discussing this item with Europe,”
she said. “[If ] people can leave the
country without problems, the re-
gime will not have so much power
over them. Belarusians will feel freer.” Svetlana
Tikhanovskaya,
the Belarus
opposition
leader.
ARTURAS
MOROZOVAS/
GETTY IMAGES
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POLITICO SRL
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Managing Editor, Policy Marion Solletty
Editor, UK Kate Day
Creative Director Tim Ball
Enterprise Editor Stephan Faris
CONTACT USEditorial editorial@politco.eu (+32) 02 540 9068 Twitter: @politicoeurope Comments: letters@politico.eu
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BUSINESSChief Financial Officer Guillaume Blandet
Vice President of Product & Technolog y Stephen Bradley
BRUSSELS BUBBLE
PARLIAMENT DE FACTO CLOSES
UNTIL THE END OF NOVEMBER
If MEPs needed another reminder
of the fact they aren’t currently
welcome in the European Parlia-
ment, here it is: The institution’s
bureau has decided “the central
register of attendance will remain
temporarily closed from 2 to 30
November 2020,” it wrote in a
note to MEPs seen by POLITICO.
That means lawmakers won’t be
able to claim their daily allow-
ances, bar a very few exceptions:
No register means no signature,
which means no money.
This is perhaps the most effec-
tive means of preventing MEPs
from traveling to Brussels. Only
those physically chairing meet-
ings or participating in trilogues
can “attest their attendance
directly in the Chamber or meet-
ing room,” the note says — for
everybody else, there is no good
reason to be present, and no way
to prove that they are. The daily
allowance is a flat-rate €323 per
day spent in Brussels or Stras-
bourg to cover accommodation
and related costs.
Not all MEPs are happy. Markus
Ferber, a veteran MEP, emailed
everyone in Parliament to say
that “after serving for more than
26 years as a member of this dis-
tinguished house I never thought
that I will witness this self-de-
struction.” (Florian Eder)

News Page 5 November 5, 2020
SEE EUROPE ON PAGE 19SEE UNCERTAINTY ON PAGE 19
EU FRETS OVER FALLOUT FROM US ELECTION UNCERTAINTY
Alarmed
by Trump’s
reaction
and the
strength
of his
support,
Europeans
see trouble
ahead BY DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
Donald Trump may or may not be out
of the White House — but his tens of
millions of supporters aren’t going
anywhere. And Europe on Wednes-
day took somber note, bracing for
hours, or days — if not years — of fur-
ther uncertainty about its troubled
transatlantic ally.
Across the Continent, many pub-
lic figures reacted with dismay to
Trump’s premature declaration of
victory, his unfounded allegations
of electoral malfeasance, and his
simultaneous vow to fight the elec-
tion result in the U.S. Supreme Court — saying they feared a crisis for de-
mocracy with potentially worldwide
implications.
“What we are seeing now is that
the election campaign, which was
as hard-fought as could be and was
fought with all means, is not over, but
that it continues — that now the battle
has begun for the legitimacy of the
result,” the German defense minister,
Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, said.
“This is a very explosive situation,
a situation that the experts rightly say
could lead to a constitutional crisis in
the United States. And that is some-
thing that must certainly be of great
concern to us overall,” Kramp-Kar-
renbauer, a close ally of Chancellor
Angela Merkel, told Germany’s ZDF
television.
The former U.K. foreign secre-
tary, Jeremey Hunt, said: “We need
to make sure protracted legal argu-
ments don’t turn into a catastrophe
for the worldwide reputation of de-
mocracy.”
European financial markets also
showed their instinctive displeasure
at the uncertainty of the U.S. politi-
cal situation, opening lower across
the board before getting back into
positive territory in the afternoon.
However, not all European lead-
ers were upset at Trump’s election-
night outburst.
Slovenian Prime Minister Janez Janša, an anti-migration populist and
the leader of Melania Trump’s native
land, declared Trump the obvious
winner. He accused the media of de-
nying the facts and congratulated the
Republican Party for “strong results
across the US” — though it was clear
Democrats would hold the House of
Representatives and still had a slim
chance to win the Senate.
Regardless of the final outcome of
the presidential election, Trump’s re-
peated defiance of polls suggesting he
would be easily defeated only con-
firmed a widespread view among
European politicians, diplomats and
TRUMP OR BIDEN,
EUROPE IS THE LOSER
BY MATTHEW KARNITSCHNIGIN BERLIN
Whoever wins the U.S. election, Eu-
rope has already lost.
It’s no secret that most Europeans
have been praying Joe Biden would win the presidency; as of Wednesday
it seemed he may yet, but not with
anything like a landslide.
If Donald Trump, the president
Europe loves to hate, had prevailed
by a wide margin, Europe would at
least have had clarity on its options
and could plan accordingly.
Instead, America remains as di-
vided as ever. That’s not just bad for
the United States, it will also temper
hopes in Europe for a clear path for-ward in the transatlantic relationship.
Yes, transatlantic relations would
inevitably improve under a Biden
presidency after the bitternerness
of the Trump years (how could they
not?). Nonetheless, the ambitious
agenda many European leaders
were hoping to pursue on every-
thing from environmental policy
to trade to defense, already seems
A narrow result and
looming gridlock spell
trouble for transatlantic
ties
PHOTO BY
CHANDAN
KHANNA/AFP VIA
GETTY IMAGES

News November 5, 2020 Page 6
SEE FRANCE ON PAGE 12
BY MATTHEW KARNITSCHNIG
Austria’s capital was on high alert
on Tuesday as police searched for
suspects in the wake of a shooting
spree by an Islamic State militant in
AFTER ATTACKS IN
FRANCE, POLITICIANS
PUSH FOR DEPLOYMENT OF
SURVEILLANCE TECHNOLOGY
Transport minister ‘largely
in favor’ of using AI to
fight terrorism on public
transport networks
BY NICHOLAS VINOCUR
France has so far resisted a broad
rollout of surveillance technology in
public spaces. That could be about
to change.
After a series of bloody attacks,
right-wing politicians and a minister
in President Emmanuel Macron’s gov-
ernment have called for increased use
of surveillance technology, breaking
with privacy advocates in the name
of tracking would-be assailants and
preventing further violence.Jean-Baptiste Djebbari, the trans-
port minister, said in the wake of a
schoolteacher’s beheading on Octo-
ber 16 that he was “largely in favor”
of using artificial intelligence to fight
terrorism on public transport net-
works if individuals’ privacy rights
were respected.
“The idea is to use artificial intel-
ligence to track suspicious behavior,
and it’s already being done in several
countries,” Djebbari told a national
radio station on Sunday.
The comment seemed to go against
recommendations from France’s pri-vacy regulator, the CNIL, which has
blocked attempts to deploy facial rec-
ognition cameras in public spaces as
being “neither necessary, nor pro-
portionate” to their aims of boost-
ing security.
But Djebbari’s comment was in
tune with growing calls from right-
wing politicians, who have long
pressed for increased use of tech-
nology to combat crime and terror-
ism as is increasingly being done in
other European countries, despite
AUSTRIA IN SHOCK AFTER DEADLY
ATTACK BY ISLAMIC STATE MILITANT
Police search for suspects
as country struggles to
come to terms with worst
terror assault in decades
central Vienna on Monday evening
that left five dead, including the gun-
man, and 22 injured.
Police made 14 arrests in connec-
tion with the case but authorities
said they had yet to find evidence
that any of the suspects, all of whom
were friends and acquaintances of the
dead shooter, were directly involved.
Authorities urged Austrians to re-
main vigilant amid confusion over
whether other assailants may still
be on the loose. Immediately after
the attack, officials spoke of multiple
attackers. But on Tuesday they said they had no concrete evidence that
more than one person had mounted
the assault.
The attack, the worst terrorist inci-
dent Austria has seen in decades, left
the nation of 9 million in a collective
state of shock. The Vienna killings,
which followed the recent attacks in
France that left several dead, stoked
fears across Europe that after a pe-
riod of relative calm, Islamic terror
is again on the rise on the Continent.
The incidents have reignited discus-
sions — especially in France — over
why national strategies for combat-ing Islamic terrorism have not been
more effective.
In Austria, the initial shock quickly
turned to anger on Tuesday after it
emerged that the assailant, who was
shot and killed by police, had been
in prison on a terror-related convic-
tion until he was released last year
after serving only seven months of a
22-month sentence. The 20-year-old,
a dual citizen of Austria and North
Macedonia, had been arrested after
trying to join the so-called Islamic
State in Syria.
Austrian Chancellor Sebastian
Kurz avoided questions surround-
ing the killer on Tuesday, focusing
instead on honoring the dead with a
somber address to the nation and or-
dering three days of national mourn-
ing.
“In Austria, we sometimes believe
that we live on an island of the fortu-
SEE AUSTRIA ON PAGE 12
Austrian police
surround the
plaza where
wreaths are
laid to honor
the victims
of Monday’s
terror attack in
Vienna.
JOE KLAMAR/AFP
VIA GETTY IMAGES

Leading green
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Sustainable building materials provide
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www.lafargeholcim.com/climate-energy

News November 5, 2020 Page 8
SEE SEX WORKERS ON PAGE 23
BY ASHLEIGH FURLONG
It’s going to be a bleak winter for Eu-
rope. But for sex workers, a group
that feels it’s been forgotten during
the pandemic, the return of lock-
downs doesn’t just mean being out
of work; it could also mean being
once again cut off from vital health
services.
As the first wave of coronavirus
hit the Continent, many countries
implemented complete bans on sex
work. At the same time, essential
services for sex workers — condom
distribution, mobile vans providing
specialized support, and counseling
and advice services — shuttered their
doors and moved online.
In a recent survey by the Global
Network of Sex Work Projects, Euro-
pean respondents reported several
cases of reduced access to condoms
and lubricants, harm-reduction ser-
vices, and testing and treatment of
sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).
In Norway, Pro Sentret, the Oslo
Municipality’s health and social ser-
OUT IN THE COLD: SEX WORKERS BRACE
FOR A SECOND CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN
Sex workers in Europe,
already in a uniquely
vulnerable position, battle
to access health services
vice provider for sex workers, found
that the pandemic “in effect, halted
or severely restricted” sex workers’
access to health and social services.
The organization’s report on the ef-
fect paints a devastating picture.
“Nearly all service providers were
forced to shut down drop-in servic-
es,” it stated.
In Hungary, a spokesperson for
the Association of Hungarian Sex
Workers (SZEXE) said that due to
the pressure on the health system,
it’s currently “nearly impossible” to
get STD screenings. These screenings
form part of the mandatory health
certificates that sex workers are re-
quired to have.
Over in Germany, a member of the
sex worker trade association BesD,
who goes by the name Maia Ceres,
said that many services available for
sex workers without health insurance
are closed or limited.
For transgender and homeless sex
workers in Berlin, the difficulties are
compounded. A volunteer from the
peer-to-peer project Trans*Sexworks,
who goes by the name Caspar Tate,
said he heard reports of trans sex
workers being barred from homeless
shelters and rejected by women’s or-
ganizations.
For the sex workers whom Tate
works with — many of whom are mi-
grants, homeless or both — financial
hardship is a permanent fixture. But the pandemic has crushed them. Tate
described receiving calls from sex
workers saying that they have noth-
ing to drink or eat.
“Shops closing also means that
there’s no access to bathrooms for
washing your hands, no access to wa-
ter,” he said. “A lot of people don’t
even understand that.”
While many of these services got
back up and running again in the
summer, at least in some form, there
are fears about what will happen now
that a second wave is hitting Europe.
In Germany, for example, the latest
lockdown once again officially bans
the operation of places where sex
work is carried out, such as brothels.Tate said this has left a “big ques-
tion mark” for sex workers. BesD’s
Ceres said that sex workers are pan-
icking. “There are absolutely no sav-
ings left over for most of them,” she
said.
LOCKED OUT OF INSURANCE
As POLITICO has reported, across the
bloc, sex work often sits in a strange
limbo — not completely criminalized
but also not able to access state sup-
port. In some countries, that also ap-
plies to health insurance.
“You don’t have medical insur-
ance, you don’t have retirement
benefits, you don’t have any normal
benefits like every other person who
works,” said Emilka Zawierucha, an
activist with Sex Work Polska. In Po-
land, sex work itself is legal but is
not seen as legitimate work, with sex
workers unable to claim any social
benefits.
In Germany, health insurance is
mandatory, but there are around
61,000 people without any coverage
at all — typically the self-employed and
unemployed. That category also in-
cludes some sex workers who have
slipped through the cracks, said Ceres.
Broader changes to health care
during the pandemic have also
slammed sex workers. Walk-in ser-
vices at doctors’ offices are a thing of
Sex workers
in Amsterdam
(top) and
Hamburg are
struggling
to make a
living under
lockdown
measures.
KENZO
TRIBOUILLARD/
AFP VIA GETTY
IMAGES (TOP)
AND MORRIS
MACMATZEN/
GETTY IMAGES

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friendly energy; modern energy
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achieve climate neutrality — zero
net CO2 emissions —and provide
100 percent green energy to its
customers. “Our long-term strate-
gic goal is for 100 percent of the
energy sold by PGE to come from
renewable sources in 2050. Our
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ambitious program of building
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PGE Group is stepping on a path of decarbonization and will become climate neutral by 2050
via PGE Group Poland

News November 5, 2020 Page 10
BY HANNE COKELAERE The coronavirus is exposing just how
much the rights of deaf and hearing-
impaired people are lagging, as health
restrictions infuse their day-to-day life
with new barriers.
On the one hand, the pandemic
has come with increased awareness
about hearing impairments, with sign
language interpreters now a common
sight in major government announce-
ments. On the other, it has put short-
comings in sharp relief, warned Mark
Wheatley, executive director of the
European Union of the Deaf (EUD),
making systemic failings “increasingly
obvious.”
Associations for the deaf and hear-
ing-impaired point to major gaps in
their access to information, from
announcements of new coronavi-
rus measures to day-to-day commu-
nication — and, crucially, getting in
touch with health services.
One immediate example is the
prevalence of face masks: While mask
rules are critical for health reasons,
they make lip-reading impossible,
leaving this group lost in “a sea of
CORONAVIRUS LEAVES
HEARING-IMPAIRED
ALONE IN A ‘SEA OF BLUE’
An especially acute
dilemma is what to do
about face masks
blue,” in the words of Wheatley.
Some policymakers are now tak-
ing steps to fill communication gaps
for hearing-impaired people.
Within the past month, the Dutch
upper house of parliament lent its
support to a bill recognizing sign
language as one of the Netherlands’
official languages, alongside Dutch
and Frisian. The government now
has three months to ratify the text.
More broadly, sign language recog-
nition has made progress across the
EU. Romania recognized Romanian
sign language as the mother tongue of
the deaf community earlier this year.
In some countries, recognition stems
from topic-specific laws, while oth-
ers, including Finland and Hungary,
have added it into their constitutions.
The Netherlands already has mea-
sures in place to support sign lan-
guage. But once ratified, its official
recognition should make it more
widely accepted to rely on sign lan-
guage and charge the government
with promoting its use. The new law
is an important anchor for the right
to use sign language — a right deaf
people didn’t have until 1980, noted
Jessica van Eijs, one of the MPs who
championed the bill.
Sign languages have their own
grammar, but for a long time they
were “seen as just a kind of fluttering
of hands” that distracts from spoken
language, not as a full-fledged lan-guage in its own right, Van Eijs said.
“If you force someone not to use
sign language, you’re preventing
them from participating fully [in so-
ciety],” added Van Eijs, who has a
hearing impairment.
With the outbreak of the corona-
virus, that disconnect has taken on
a more immediate and urgent sig-
nificance.
As the pandemic first took hold,
it forced health services to reorga-
nize that “deaf people were difficult
to reach, as all contact was done by
phone,” said former MEP Helga Ste-
vens, director of Doof Vlaanderen, a
Flemish association for deaf people.
The Italian association ENS warned
in the spring that emergency services
weren’t attuned to the needs of the
deaf, due to a lack of access to emer-
gency numbers and the absence of
interpretation in hospital units. In
Spain, protesters gathered outside
hospitals in September to decry the
lack of sign language interpreters in
health centers.
People with hearing impairment
often rely on a remote video inter-
preting service (VRI). But the avail-
ability of these services is uneven
across the Continent: Scandinavian
countries have one interpreter for
about 10 deaf people, while in South-
ern and Eastern Europe, “it’s over
1,000 to one,” Wheatley said.
Stevens noted she recently had
spent an hour in the VRI queue before
giving up. Deaf people’s dependency
on others in an emergency situation
is “a major problem with or without
corona, but especially now,” she said.
Furthermore, deaf and hard-of-
hearing people displaying symptoms
of the virus often struggle to get in
touch with a doctor and are less likely
to be alerted to potential infection
risks, since many contact-tracing
systems rely on telephone contact.
Society tends to overlook people
with hearing impairments as they are
an “invisible disability,” said Océane,
a hearing-impaired nurse working
with other hearing-impaired people,
who declined to give her last name.
While her mother tongue is French,
Océane also relies on lip-reading and
uses sign language.
Despite some improvements,
emergency services ranging from
the police to towing services to sui-
cide helplines are falling well short of
ensuring access for hearing-impaired
people, she said.
“That clearly shows that we’re not
equal,” she added.
A MUDDLE OVER MASKS
The wearing of face masks only
makes things harder.
Océane said she “absolutely” sup-
ports masks as a protective mea-
sure, but admits that adjusting to a
life where everyone is covered has
been a “nightmare.”
“For a person who is used to lip
reading, when we are deprived of it,
we experience it a bit as if they’re
taking away the right for us to com-
municate orally with someone,” she
explained.
Masks not only hide speech. They
also obscure facial expressions, which
are an integral part of communication
in lip reading as well as sign language.
“Deaf people are able to tell how a
person is by their expression; wheth-
er they’re angry, fed up, sad, happy,”
said Wheatley, adding that this ad-
ditional burden also strains mental
health, as many deaf people are ner-
vous about going out.
It’s down to the deaf or hard-of-
hearing person to find a Plan B to
communicate to the best of their abil-
ity, noted Océane.
“In everyday life, that’s not only
tiring, but also sometimes discourag-
ing,” she said.
CRISIS-TIME TRANSPARENCY
One solution that’s being touted is
transparent face masks that leave
the mouth visible. But they remain
uncommon.
In Spain, Health Minister Salva-
dor Illa promised in September that
it would be only a “matter of days”
for the government to certify trans-
parent masks. That has yet to hap-
pen — a delay that has drawn the ire
of the deaf community.
“We’ve been waiting months and
months for this certification,” Marcos
Lechet, who started a petition that
gathered over 100,000 signatures,
told Illa and Consumer Affairs Min-
ister Alberto Garzón in a video mes-
sage Friday. “The days go by and we
remain isolated.”
Meanwhile, the U.K. government
in September said it would distribute
250,000 clear masks to health and so-
cial care workers, and in Belgium, the
Walloon government has promised
to distribute 10,000 masks among
hearing-impaired people.
But it’s not enough, Stevens said,
as “you can’t read your own lips.” The
government should issue advice on
how and when to use them in pub-
lic, she added.
In daily life — for example, on pub-
lic transport, in shops, or in town
halls, “that’s where they should be
wearing a transparent face mask,”
she said.
The new barriers highlight how
important it is for policymakers to
consult people with a disability in the
event of a crisis, to avoid a dispropor-
tionate impact, Wheatley said.
Van Eijs said the Dutch law — the
result of a decades-long push for the
rights of deaf and hard-of-hearing
people — highlights that people with
a disability “are increasingly ready
to say ‘This isn’t working for us — if
this is how it is, then you’re shutting
us out.’”
Aitor Hernández-Morales contributed
reporting.
Francesco
Tortorelli
poses with
a fabric and
plastic see-
through mask
he created for
the hearing
and speech
impaired in
Grugliasco,
Italy.
MARCO
BERTORELLO/AFP
VIA GETTY IMAGES

News Date Page X News November 5, 2020 Page 12
Austria
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6
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PRESENTED BY
nate, where we are spared the violence and ter-
ror we see in news reports from abroad,” Kurz
said. “Even though we live in a safe country, the
sad truth is we still don’t live in a safe world.”
The reports of multiple attackers were based
on eyewitness accounts of shots being fi red with-
in a span of minutes at multiple spots in the his-
toric heart of Vienna’s central district.
As of Tuesday evening, however, Austrian au-
thorities said they had no “concrete evidence”
that more than one shooter was involved. Even
so, police redoubled patrols in the city center
as a precaution and urged local residents to re-
main home. Shops are expected to reopen on
Wednesday.
Gerhard Pürstl, Vienna’s police chief, said
offi cers “neutralized” the main suspect at 8:09
p.m. in front of St. Rupert’s, a 13th-century Ro-
manesque church that counts as the city’s old-
est. The man’s body lay unattended for hours
because he appeared to be wearing a belt of
explosives, which turned out to be fake. Police
have not released the dead man’s name.
Authorities raided the man’s apartment on
Tuesday. Austrian Interior Minister Karl Neham-
mer told a press conference that there were
“clear indications” of the man’s continued al-
legiance to ISIS. He said the man had posted a
picture of himself on Instagram, posing with
some of the weapons he used on Monday.
The head of the Jewish Community of Vienna,
Oskar Deutsch, said it was unclear if the city’s
main synagogue, where the spree began, was a
target, as the temple and its offi ces were closed
at the time. Nevertheless, he said all community
members were advised to remain indoors until
getting the all-clear from authorities.
Monday was the last night before Austria’s
nationwide coronavirus lockdown began, and
some people had taken their fi nal opportunity
to go out to restaurants, bars and other venues,
with the area where the shootings were carried
out known for its nightlife. Many people were concerns from regulators that live
monitoring of citizens violates Eu-
rope’s privacy rules, the General
Data Protection Regulation.
Valérie Pécresse, a conservative
politician and president of the Île-
de-France region that encompasses
Paris, argued early on Friday for lift-
ing restrictions on facial recognition.
“In our region, we have placed
cameras in all transport networks.
We cannot use them today to fi ght
the risk of terrorism,” she told France
Info radio. “We do not have the right
to use artifi cial intelligence technol-
ogy, which would allow us to spot
suspicious movements — someone
who is prowling, who is checking
out locations, someone who we see
is wearing an explosive belt.”
Pécresse was backed up by other
members of her Les Républicains
party.
In the Mediterranean city of Nice,
where three people were killed last
week in a knife attack described as
“Islamist terrorism” by Macron, the
conservative mayor is also an out-
spoken supporter of technological
surveillance. It was an experiment
with facial recognition in his city —
cameras deployed at the entrance of
two high schools — that prompted the
CNIL to rule against the initiative in
October of last year.
“Because of an old-fashioned in-
stitution called the CNIL, successive
governments will not stop telling me
that we don’t have the right to use
facial recognition, that I am not al-
lowed to use a database [of suspected
terrorist sympathizers],” said Chris-
tian Estrosi.
France
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6
He added: “We can’t win the war
against this enemy with the laws of
peace.”
Facial recognition tools depend
on matching faces to records held in
databases, and it’s unclear whether
they would have been of any use to
prevent either the attack in Confl ans-
Sainte-Honorine or the one in Nice.
In the fi rst example, the attacker,
an 18-year-old Chechen refugee with
settled status in France, did not show
up in any database of suspected ter-
rorist sympathizers, according to lo-
cal media. In the second, police said
they had no record of the Tunisian
man who entered France three weeks
before he carried out his knife attack.
Yet as France enters a period of
heightened alert for terrorism — with
a fresh attack thwarted on Friday —
such considerations could fall to the
wayside amid calls for a crackdown.
Under the GDPR, countries enjoy lati-
tude to circumvent rules if they see a
national security imperative.
So far, the CNIL has resisted such
arguments. Asked for comment, a
spokesperson pointed to a statement
from late 2019 in which the agency
called for a national debate on the use
of facial recognition and other bio-
metric technologies — a call that Ma-
cron’s government has yet to answer. trapped inside venues in the city center.
World leaders quickly responded to the Vi-
enna shootings in a strong show of solidarity
with Austria.
“In these terrible hours when Vienna has
become the target of terrorist violence, my
thoughts are with the people there and the se-
curity forces facing the danger,” German Chan-
cellor Angela Merkel said. “We Germans stand
by our Austrian friends in sympathy and soli-
darity. The fi ght against Islamist terror is our
common fi ght.”
French President Emmanuel Macron, whose
country is still reeling after recent deadly attacks
at a church and against a teacher, tweeted in
German that “We, French people, share in the
shock and sorrow of Austrians after an attack
in Vienna. After France, another friendly coun-
try has been attacked. This is our Europe. Our
enemies must know who they are dealing with.
We will not give up.”
European Council President Charles Michel
tweeted support for Kurz and said, “Europe
strongly condemns this cowardly act that vio-
lates life and our human values. My thoughts
are with the victims and the people of #Vienna
in the wake of tonight’s horrifi c attack.”
European Commission President Ursula von
der Leyen also voiced support for Austria, tweet-
ing: “I am shocked and saddened by the brutal
attack that took place in Vienna. My thoughts
are with the families of the victims and the Aus-
trian people. Europe stands in full solidarity with
Austria. We are stronger than hatred and terror.”
In the U.S., both incumbent President Don-
ald Trump and his Democratic rival Joe Biden
commented on the attacks.
“Our prayers are with the people of Vienna
after yet another vile act of terrorism in Eu-
rope. These evil attacks against innocent peo-
ple must stop. The U.S. stands with Austria,
France, and all of Europe in the fi ght against
terrorists, including radical Islamic terrorists,”
Trump tweeted.
“After tonight’s horrifi c terrorist attack in Vi-
enna, Austria, Jill and I are keeping the victims
and their families in our prayers,” Biden said,
referring to his wife. “We must all stand united
against hate and violence.”
“We do not have the right to
use [AI], which would allow us
to spot suspicious movements
— someone who is prowling,
who is checking out locations,
someone who we see is wearing
an explosive belt.”
VALÉRIE PÉCRESSE,
A CONSERVATIVE POLITICIAN

BY MARCO MENSINK,
DIRECTOR GENERAL, CEFIC
Imagine a future where our Euro-
pean economy has gone circular,
recycling all sor ts of molecules into
new raw materials. A future where
elec tric vehicles rule our roads and
are powered by sustainable bat ter-
ies. A future where we have smar t
homes, connected to our phones
as part of an internet of things,
and also to a European renewable
energy grid supplied by endless
amounts of wind and solar energy.
A future where climate-neutrality is
achieved by 2050. That future will
be created by chemistry. Already
today, Europe’s chemical industr y is
ever y bit as indispensable to mod-
ern life necessities, from medicines,
food and clean water to producing
the hi-tech materials with which
our increasingly digital societies
are built. Tomorrow’s world will be-
come even more so a world created
by chemistr y.
This is why the choices that will be
made about how to implement the
new European Chemicals Strategy
for Sustainability represent oppor-
tunities to accelerate that Green
Deal vision and the role of Euro-
pean, homegrown chemistr y. It is
an oppor tunity for European and
member countr y authorities deal-
ing with climate, circular economy,
innovation, trade, enforcement and
digital policies to work more closely
with the chemic al indus tr y to deliver
on European Green Deal objec-
tives, accelerate the post COVID-19
Green Recover y and strengthen the
EU’s strategic value chains.
A historic moment for the future
of chemicals managementKey elements of this strategy have
been at least 10 years in the mak-
ing and the new strategy now joins
together over 60 dif ferent mea-
sures. The chemical industr y has
welcomed the much-needed new
compliance, enforcement and in-
novation proposals to ensure the
safety of European citizens and en-
vironment. However, it is impor tant
to remind ourselves that the new
Chemicals Strategy for Sustainabil-
ity was set up as a key pillar of the
European Green Deal — a deal that
was presented as Europe’s growth
strategy — in which environmental,
economic and social sustainability
would go hand-in-hand with ad-
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por ting the European Green Deal
and Europe’s ambition to become
climate neutral by 2050. It was the
right thing to do and we recognize
the huge market opportunities this
transition holds for our industry,
which produces the building blocks
of all the solutions the Green Deal
needs. It is therefore deeply con-
cerning that the Chemicals Strategy
for Sustainability has so far missed
major oppor tunities to speak more
clearly to the EU Green Deal goals.
Conventional regulation has only a
limited role in being able to drive
huge-scale innovation investments.
Yet the new strategy so far is mainly
focused on formulating a ver y long
new set of classic regulator y mea-
sures, ranging from what could be
major changes to REACH regula-
tion and bans on cer tain types of
chemistry for hundreds of consum-
er produc ts, to other wide-ranging
changes to sector legislation. Espe-cially when the rest of the world is
still catching up with REACH 1 and
is unlikely to follow an upgrade into
REACH 2.
However, we are encouraged by the
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mission, including recently in a joint
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there would be no regulator y over-
haul and only a ver y targeted revi-
sion, as the strategy itself says.
Europe needs home-grown ‘Green
Deal chemicals’ and a game plan
for its chemical industry
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for a ‘Future Chemicals Deal’, and
he is absolutely right. With China
and Japan now pledging carbon
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for making the technology solu-
tions enabling the EU Green Deal.
It is crucial to ensure Europe doesn’t
outsource its Green Deal to other
regions. To build on the new chemi-
c als s trategy, what both Europe and
its chemical industr y now need is an
EU Green Deal game plan for our
chemical industr y. From large com-
SDQLHVWR60( VDQGWKHODUJHKRXVH 
hold brands that are our down-
stream customers, all those par ts of
our industry should be involved that
can deliver the investments needed
at scale to meet the new chemical
strategy’s goals and at the same
time invest in new innovations like
elec tric crackers, hydrogen, chemi-
cal recycling and Carbon Capture,
Utilization and Storage.
The Chemicals Strategy for Sustain-
SPONSORED CONTENT from CEFIC
ability will impac t ever y industrial
sec tor in Europe. It is therefore es-
sential that the true magnitude of
this new strategy is captured by the
regulator y bodies and the role for
multi-stakeholder dialogue is well-
recognized.
The encouraging signs are that the
Commission is listening and is pre-
pared to bring our sec tor in, along
with other impor tant stakeholders,
to co-design how the strategy is im-
plemented. From the new safe and
VXVWDLQDEOHEGHVLJQFRQFHSW&HF
called for, to the proposal for more
dialogue between industry and
stakeholders that the new strategy
promises. It is essential our indus-
tr y is at the table with the regulators
and policymakers helping to deter-
mine how this plan can work in prac-
tice. Only by working together, we
can make this new strategy work for
WKH EHQHW RI (XURSH IRU DOO RI XV
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European industr y and its people. “Con-
ventional
regulation
has only a
limited role
in being
able to drive
huge-scale
innovation
invest-
ments.”
Can the Chemicals Strategy for Sustainability
make the Green Deal a reality?
‘With China and Japan now pledging carbon neutrality, the race has intensified for making the
technology solutions. Let’s ensure Europe doesn’t outsource its Green Deal to other regions.’
via Shutterstock
Marco Mensink via Cefic

Wonk’s Survival Guide to the European Green Deal Page 15 November 5, 2020
BY AITOR HERNÁNDEZ-MORALES
AND KARL MATHIESEN
To see the limitations of the Euro-
pean Green Deal first-hand, hop on
a bike and cycle from Brussels to
the historic city of Leuven, some
30 kilometers to the east.
To meet its 2050 climate-neu-
trality goal, the EU will have to,
among other things, free city
streets of emissions-spewing vehi-
cles to make way for cleaner types
of transportation. Some munici-
palities, like Brussels, will find that
a steep challenge. For others, like
Leuven, the road will be smoother
— but not without obstacles.
In Brussels, a city of 1.2 million,
the confusion manifests on the
streets. In the EU capital, cohesive
planning has proved difficult. Deci-
sions about mobility must be nego-
tiated between the region and 19
communes with overlapping politi-
cal priorities. We crossed five local
government jurisdictions just try-
ing to get out of the capital. Each
had differing cycle infrastructure
A TALE OF TWO CITIES
IN BELGIUM GOING GREEN
Booting cars out of city
centers unleashes big
political fights
and few real checks on congestion.
Once free from Brussels, it takes
about an hour to get to Leuven
along a bicycle highway that winds
along a railroad track, by single-
family homes and past fragrant
fields of horses and cows. Whizzing
downhill into the city center, the
silence is striking as traffic noise
drops away.
In recent years, Leuven has
been the scene of a two-wheeled
revolution. The city is divided into
six sectors; cars aren’t allowed to
cross between them, and instead
are pushed out to a ring road. It
makes running local errands in a
private car time-consuming and
inconvenient.
The scheme is the brainchild of
mobility expert Tim Asperges, who
was hired six years ago to address
a worsening congestion problem.
Wearing sensible shoes, he joined
us to show off his work, peddling
past bike schools, pedestrianized
streets and spiraling multistory
bike ramps. “I am convinced it re-
ally can work everywhere,” he said.
The thing is, it almost didn’t
work in Leuven. Wealthy, mid-
sized cities such as Leuven — popu-
lation 100,000 — are ideally suited
for the green transition. But As-
perges’ transformation almost col-
lapsed before it even began.When his proposals were intro-
duced, they drew considerable op-
position — mainly from merchants
who feared kicking cars out of the
center would affect their bottom
line. When council members’ sup-
port started wavering, Asperges
was convinced a year’s work was
doomed.
In stepped Leuven’s Mayor Louis
Tobback, a former Belgian interior
minister who governed the Flem-
ish city between 1995 and 2018.
According to Asperges, Tobback
pulled wavering council members
into a room, banged the table and
told them the scheme must be ap-
proved. “He was one of these really
powerful figures who could use
their political capital to get things
done,” he said.
Change then came quickly. With-
in a year of implementing Asperg-
es’ plan, cycling increased by 32
percent, and since then car traffic
has dropped by nearly one-fifth in
the urban center. The train station
is surrounded by garages for 5,200
bicycles. Those are full. A major
building site next door will create
space for 4,000 more.
As the EU tries to cut transport
emissions around the bloc, much
will depend on whether cities like
Brussels will follow Leuven’s ex-
ample, or even be able to.In 2018, local elections in Brus-
sels put Green politicians into the
majority of the 19 communes’ mo-
bility positions. Bart Dhondt, the
city’s alderman of mobility and
public works, explained that while
some COVID-related measures to
slow down traffic and remove cars
from the city center have been
adopted, the Belgian capital’s car-
centric citizenry and shopkeep-
ers remain skeptical of larger-scale
changes.
“Mobility is a very touchy sub-
ject right now,” said Dhondt. The
alderman added that he appreciat-
ed that the EU’s Green Deal “gives
voice to the dream of a greener
urban future,” but said, “it would
be nice if there were also funds set
aside for these investments, for
greening cities.”
A Commission proposal to create
100 climate-neutral cities across Eu-
rope by 2030 estimates it would cost
around €10,000 per citizen to rid
cities of most emissions — around
€1 billion for Leuven and €25 billion
for Brussels. The “overwhelming
part” of this will not come from the
EU, the report said, but from the pri-
vate sector and local, regional and
national governments.
Asperges acknowledged Leu-
ven’s wealth, stable industries and
climate-conscious university of
65,000 students were crucial to
making his plans work. The city
demands public works from de-
velopers in exchange for planning
permission — and they readily pay.
“Money has never been a prob-
lem,” he said.
Other cities won’t be so lucky,
and Asperges warned that getting
funding from the EU takes “a lot of
energy.”
“Europe is there, but it’s also far
away,” said Asperges, wheeling his
bike back to the municipal office
block where he works. In Leuven,
Belgium,
above, cars are
being pushed
out of the city
center onto a
ring road.
ISTOCKPHOTO

Wonk’s Guide to the European Green DealWonk’s Survival Guide to the European Green Deal
BY ELINE SCHAART Recycle your trash. Turn off the
lights when you leave home. Don’t
eat meat. Think before fl ying. Don’t
drive an SUV. Bike to work.
It’s a common refrain from
many climate campaigners: We
carry the fate of the planet in our
hands.
But while it’s true that the
wheels of the economy are dic-
tated by consumer choices,
some activists argue that the real
decision-makers when it comes to
addressing global warming are cor-
porations and governments.
In his book “Een beter milieu
begint niet bij jezelf” or “A better en-
vironment doesn’t start with your-
self,” the Dutch journalist Jaap Tiel-
beke writes that real change starts
Individual action won’t
be enough to stop
climate change, but it
can
sometimes motivate others
YOU CAN’T SAVE THE PL A
The planet’s top polluters
How does someone’s personal crusade to reduce their emissions compare to those
generated by the planet’s most-polluting energy companies? It would take the whole
planet living car-free for 3.7 years to compensate for Saudi Aramco’s emissions of
the last 50 years.
Below are total carbon and methane emissions by top oil, gas and coal companies
between 1965 and 2017, in million tons of CO2:
with politics: “Not with buying a
Tesla, but when investing in public
transport. Not with becoming a
vegan, but with the elimination of
intensive livestock farming.”
There are numbers to back up
the idea that it’s the big players
that really matter. A 2017 study by
the Climate Accountability Insti-
tute found that 71 percent of the
world’s greenhouse gas emissions
since 1988 could be traced to just
100 fossil fuel companies, many of
them state-owned.
Richard Heede, the author of the
study, said fossil fuel companies
are “at the nexus of deciding how
much carbon fuels are delivered to
consumers worldwide.”
That doesn’t mean, however,
that individuals are off the hook,
according to Heede. The study
found that roughly 90 percent of
the greenhouse gases produced by
those 100 companies are the result
of burning fuel for energy — and
that does mean that cutting back
on things like driving or fl ying mat-
ters.
“It’s the consumers that actually burn and demand the fossil fuels
that these companies provide,”
said Heede. He said that where companies bear most responsi-
bility is for actions like lobbying
against emissions cuts or in favor of Having fewer
children is
the best way
to reduce
a person’s
contribution
to climate
change,
according to
a study by
Sweden’s Lund
University
Center for
Sustainability
Studies.
ISTOCKPHOTO

November 5, 2020 Page 17
How much diff erence we make
Almost every EU country has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions per capita
in recent years — but some Europeans still pollute way more than others. While
citizens of Luxembourg generated 20.3 tons* of C02-equivalent per capita in 2018,
while Swedes emitted 5.4 per capita, almost four times less.
But which part of a country’s emissions is actually attributable to a citizen’s
personal actions — and what can each of them do to reduce the pollution they
generate?
Below is a breakdown of the number of tons of CO2-equivalent that a person would
reduce every year,** if they ...
*Some values are provisional or estimates. Not including emissions and removals related to
land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF).
**Mean values. Diff erent regions used to calculate means values for each scenario. In some
scenarios, estimations are based on developing countries’ data only.
Source: EEA, IOP, Climate Accountability InstitutePOLITICO
A NET (ALONE)
subsidies for polluting industries.
In order to hit the European
Commission’s target of cutting
emissions by 55 percent by 2030,
both companies and people have
to step up, said Kimberly Nicho-
las, associate professor of sustain-
ability science at Sweden’s Lund
University Center for Sustainability
Studies.
Nicholas co-authored a study
that ranked 148 individual actions
on climate change according to
their impact. It found that having
fewer children is the best way to
reduce a person’s contribution to
climate change, followed by giv-
ing up cars and avoiding long-haul
fl ights. Those do much more to
cut greenhouse gas emissions than
eating a plant-based diet, recycling
or switching from plastic to canvas
bags.
“We need a drastic system
change,” said Nicholas, and most
of that has to happen among the
world’s wealthiest people. “The
top 1 percent of households emit
22 times the per capita climate
targets, while only 5 percent of households live within the targets
at the moment,” she said.
Another way that individual ac-
tions can have an eff ect is that in
many cases, they turn out to be
contagious. The behavior of a sin-
gle person may not bend the curve
on climate change, but setting an
example of cleaner living can have
a bigger impact if others follow.
Google’s Project Sunroof web-
site allows people to see who has
solar panels in a given neighbor-
hood (it only works in the U.S. for
now). It shows that panels are not
randomly distributed but appear in
clusters.
“There’s enough evidence that
shows that good behavior spreads,”
said Nicholas.
Even more eff ective is using
voting and direct pressure to get
governments and companies to
change policies, Heede and Nicho-
las said.
“Relying on individual capacity
to reduce will not suffi ce, you need
to vote appropriately and help run
the companies we work for,” said
Heede.
“Relying on
individual
capacity to
reduce will
not suffi ce,
you need
to vote
appropriately
and help
run the
companies
we work for.”
RICHARD
HEEDE, AUTHOR
OF A STUDY BY
THE CLIMATE
ACCOUNTABILITY
INSTITUTE

News November 5, 2020 Page 18
PRO
BRIEFING
Who still loves cash
In Germany, respondents in a recent survey stated a clear change in behavior when it comes to payment methods due to the coronavirus pandemic: The use of cash has dropped significantly,
according to the results.
Source: Allensbach survey for Initiative Deutsche ZahlungssystemePOLITICO Pro DataPoint
Kenya reached a trade deal with
Britain on November 3, despite
opposition from its regional
trade partners. The deal will
ensure that the East African
nation’s businesses don’t see
any new tariffs at the end of the
Brexit transition period in just a
couple of months. Kenya’s main
exports to the U.K. include cof-
fee, tea and spices, vegetables,
and cut flowers. British firms
sold £815 million worth of goods
and services to Kenya in 2019.
The deal will also allow British
businesses operating in Kenya
to continue getting duty-free ac-
cess to the U.K.
TRADE UK
UK AND KENYA REACH TRADE
DEAL
The Commission on October 30
referred France to the Court of
Justice of the European Union
over failure to protect its citizens
against poor air quality. The
Commission says that France
has not respected the daily limit
values for particulate matter —
microscopic particles that are
mainly present in emissions from
industry, traffic and heating — in
the zones of Paris and Martinique
in most years since 2005, when
the rules became legally bind-
ing. It’s the second time France
has been referred to the EU’s top
court for failing to comply with
the bloc’s air quality standards.
SUSTAINABILITY
EU TAKES FRANCE TO COURT OVER
POLLUTION
The Commission on October 30 sent
a reasoned opinion to Bulgaria over a
law obliging retailers to favor Bulgarian
produce, which discriminates against
imports and is in breach of EU single
market rules. This is the next step in
the infringement procedure, which
could culminate in a referral to the
Court of Justice of the European Union
if Bulgaria doesn’t back down within
two months. Brussels also sent a first
warning to Slovakia against similar
moves in July. Poland and Roma-
nia considered similar measures but
dropped them.
AGRICULTURE & FOOD
EU PRESSES BULGARIA OVER
FOOD LAW
Austria and Portugal announced plans
for limited lockdowns in an attempt to
slow the spread of the coronavirus. In
Austria, Chancellor Sebastian Kurz an-
nounced a nighttime curfew from 8 p.m.
to 6 a.m., with some exceptions. Cafés
and restaurants will be able to sell take-
away only; venues such as gyms, muse-
ums and theaters will have to shut. The
new measures will apply until the end of
November. In Portugal, Prime Minister
António Costa announced new restric-
tions under which people will only be
allowed to leave their homes to go to
work, school or shopping.
HEALTH CARE
AUSTRIA, PORTUGAL IMPOSE PARTIAL
CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWNS
Governments may be willing to hold off
an EU tax on technology companies to
give more time for global talks, accord-
ing to a draft statement. Germany put
forward the text as it leads the talks
during its turn at the helm of the EU
presidency. National tax officials are
negotiating on the document, intended
to set a policy line for the Commis-
sion to follow. The statement would
serve as notice that the EU should not
go ahead on its own legislation before
global negotiations continue, despite
the OECD falling short of hopes for a
deal this year.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
EU MAY DELAY TECH TAX TO ALLOW FOR
GLOBAL TALKS
The Commission on October 30
singled out Belgium, Hungary and Ro-
mania for failing to implement cyber-
security legislation protecting critical
infrastructure. The countries failed to
send the EU a comprehensive list of
sectors and services they consider to
be “operators of essential services”
under the NIS Directive. The Commis-
sion said Belgium’s list is missing “the
number of operators in several critical
sectors.”
CYBERSECURITY
EU: 3 COUNTRIES BREACH
CYBERSECURITY LAW
The European Securities and Markets
Authority slammed German financial
regulators’ supervision of collapsed
financial technology company Wire-
card. ESMA’s investigation, released
November 3, found “deficiencies” in
the supervision of Wirecard’s financial
reporting at Germany’s BaFIN and the
Financial Reporting Enforcement Pan-
el. ESMA said its fast-track peer review
identified “a number of deficiencies,
inefficiencies and legal and procedural
impediments” to oversight of Wire-
card, which collapsed in June with €1.9
billion missing from its books.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
ESMA SLAMS GERMANY’S WIRECARD
SUPERVISION
The Commission on October 30 accused
the Czech Republic’s state-owned rail
operator České dráhy of charging prices
below cost in order to hinder competi-
tors. České dráhy has been competing
with RegioJet and Leo Express on the
Prague-Ostrava route. According to the
Commission, the competition benefited
consumers with the number of passen-
gers doubling in a few years, but when
the rivals started to take hold, the state-
owned incumbent “reacted by starting
to offer its services at prices that did not
cover its costs, with the aim of hindering
competition in the market.”
COMPETITION
EU TARGETS CZECH RAIL OPERATOR’S
PRICING
The German government will spend
€2 billion of its national coronavirus
stimulus plan on grants for automo-
MOBILITY
GERMANY GIVES CARMAKER GRANT
CONDITIONS tive companies and their suppliers to
support clean mobility and automation,
the economics ministry said in a new
proposal November 2. The money was
set aside as part of the government’s
sprawling coronavirus support package announced earlier this year. Under the
proposal, grants would be available for
research and development programs,
programs to boost sustainability and
for firms to retrain their employees. The
fund would run from 2021 until 2024.
Left: Bulgaria
is under
pressure from
the European
Commission.
Right: Austrian
Chancellor
Sebastian
Kurz.
KENZO
TRIBOUILLARD/
AFP VIA GETTY
IMAGES
POOL PHOTO BY
LUKAS BARTH/
GETTY IMAGES
ARE YOU A
POLICY PRO?
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exclusive access
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0% 25% 50%75%
2018 2019 2020
Payment method used for shopping lately, by age group
In percentage of survey respondents in Germany
10 8 1 1
4861 54 35
38 294265
0% 25% 50% 75% 16-29 30 -44 45-59 Ag e 6 0+
Cash Card Vi a s m art p ho ne35%48%
card 63%
47%
cash
1%4% via
smartphone
Use of payment methods for shopping
In percentage of survey respondents in Germany
0 0 039%60%
2%
The survey was conducted in July 2020 with a sample size of 1,237 German citizens aged 16 or over.
Payment method used for shopping, over time Payment method used for shopping, by age group

News Page 19 November 5, 2020
Uncertainty
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5
foreign policy experts: The bullying,
blustering, polarizing, pugilistic, un-
predictable and unapologetic pres-
ident is the symptom of a political
trend in the United States — not the
cause of it, or even, necessarily, its
driving force.
French Finance Minister Bruno Le
Maire noted Wednesday morning that
the U.S. “has not been a friendly part-
ner for the EU.”
“Whether Joe Biden or Trump is
chosen by the Americans does not
change this strategic fact,” Le Maire
told Radio Classique. “The American
continent has detached itself from the
European continent and it is time for
Europeans to assume their respon-
sibilities.”
Many Europeans have concluded
that MAGA country, the fervent, na-
tionalist swath of the U.S. electorate
— untroubled by Trump’s lies, his al-
leged tax cheating, his efforts to use
his office to enrich his family, his
mismanagement of the coronavirus
pandemic, or his embrace of dicta-
tors and disdain for traditional allies
— will continue to be a major political
force, testing U.S. democratic insti-
tutions and shunning international
cooperation.
It also stands to constrain Biden,
a far more centrist politician, even if
he ends up winning the presidency.
Guy Verhofstadt, a member of the
European Parliament and former
prime minister of Belgium, said Eu-
rope should recognize that it cannot rely on Washington.
“Looking at the chaos across the
Atlantic, I’m more certain than ever
that Europeans are stronger together
in an uncertain world,” Verhofstadt
tweeted. “Whatever the outcome, the
EU needs to take its destiny into its
own hands.”
While Biden gave a brief speech
saying he believed he was “on track”
to win the election, Trump not only prematurely declared that he had
won — something many analysts had
predicted he would do — but also un-
leashed a barrage of attacks on the
U.S. electoral system that appeared
intended to discredit the results.
Trump called for a halt to count-
ing in states where he was leading
in the polls, and demanded the cer-
tification of incomplete tallies, while
also accusing Democrats of trying to
“disenfranchise” his own supporters.
Trump amplified his allegations of
malfeasance on Wednesday, as updat-
ed results showed him trailing in the
key states of Wisconsin and Michigan.
Trump’s remarks drew rebukes
from some European voices, includ-
ing Iratxe García Pérez, the leader of
the social democratic group in the
European Parliament.
“Time to wait for the final results
of #USAElections2020, in full respect
of the electoral process. Trump’s be-
haviour undermines US democracy,”
Garcia tweeted “Hoping that @Joe
Biden will bring new hope both to
US citizens and to the whole world.”
Wolfgang Ischinger, the chairman
of the Munich Security Conference
and former German ambassador to
the U.S., expressed gratitude to Re-
publican U.S. Senator Marco Rubio
for insisting that all ballots would be
counted — an exchange that would
have been unthinkable in the pre-
Trump era.
The EU’s top officials, Commission
President Ursula von der Leyen and
Council President Charles Michel, did
not issue any statement, while the
bloc’s EU’s foreign policy chief, Jo-
sep Borrell, expressed a willingness
to work with the U.S. no matter the
outcome.
“The American people have spo-
ken,” Borrell tweeted. “While we wait
for the election result, the EU remains
ready to continue building a strong
transatlantic partnership, based on
our shared values and history.”
Maïa de La Baume, Lili Bayer, Elisa
Braun, Hans von der Burchard, Charlie
Cooper, and Cristina Gonzalez contrib-
uted reporting.
Republican
candidate
Donald Trump
speaks during
his premature
victory speech.
CHIP
SOMODEVILLA/
GETTY IMAGES
out of reach.
The reason is twofold. Not only
will Biden lack a strong mandate if
he wins by the skin of his teeth, but
Congress looks likely to remain di-
vided, with the Democrats control-
ling the House of Representatives
and the Republicans in charge in
the Senate.
The technical term for that con-
stellation is “gridlock.” It will force
Biden into the same corner that
Trump faced for the past two years
and that bedeviled much of Barack
Obama’s time in office.
Without a majority in both hous-
es of Congress, neither president
was able to pursue much of his leg-
islative agenda, relying instead on
executive fiat, orders that can be
reversed with the stroke of a pen
by a successor.
For Europe, that makes the U.S.
a flighty partner when it comes to
pursuing an ambitious global agenda.
One needn’t look further than
the Iran nuclear deal of 2015 to un-
derstand what’s at stake. Without a
Democratic majority in the Senate,
Obama faced a choice of no deal or
one that lacked the full legitimacy of
a treaty under U.S. law. He chose the
latter course, only to see the accord,
which Europe and the U.S. negotiat-
ed with Iran and other world powers
over a period of more than a decade,
collapse after Trump came into office
and abandoned it.
The same dynamic was at play with
the Paris climate accord. Without a
congressional stamp, it was much
easier for Trump to withdraw.
That’s why European leaders were
hoping Biden would win by a land-
slide with the Democrats riding his
coattails in Congress.
Indeed, many of the polls in the
run-up to election day pointed in that direction, feeding expectations
in some corners of the Continent of
a “revolution” on the scale of Ronald
Reagan’s 1980 win, a victory that trig-
gered a dramatic change of direction
in American politics. A strong Biden win could have al-
lowed Washington and its European
allies to pursue the kind of sweeping
transatlantic agenda many think is
essential in order to renew and re-
define the alliance, especially in the face of the growing challenge posed
by China.
It wasn’t meant to be. Though
some in Europe, especially in Germa-
ny, have signaled interest in trying to
resuscitate the effort to craft a trans-
atlantic free trade deal, it may not be
worth the effort if the next president
can’t get it through Congress.
At the back of Europe’s mind will
also be the question of what happens
four years from now, even if Biden
wins this time. Given his age, Biden
could well choose to be a one-term
president. If he were to be succeed-
ed by a Republican in the mold of
Donald Trump — a distinct possibil-
ity given the current American politi-
cal climate — why bother negotiating
deals that could evaporate as soon
as he exits?
The answer might be that Europe
doesn’t have any better options, es-
pecially when it comes to security.
Confronted with an increasingly
belligerent Russia, Europe needs
America’s security umbrella more
than at any time since the end of
the Cold War. Germany and other
countries will do whatever they can
to keep the U.S. engaged in Europe’s
defense.
Yet that issue could remain a
source of tension with a Biden ad-
ministration, which, like Trump, is
keen to focus more on China in the
coming years. A Biden administration
would likely follow Trump’s policy of
pushing Europe to take on more re-
sponsibility for its own security, albeit
with a less aggressive tone.
With Europe’s economy ham-
mered by the pandemic and the
public’s appetite for more spending
on defense tepid at best, the security
question seems bound to remain a
source of transatlantic tension.
In other words, even if most Eu-
ropeans can’t wait to see the back
of Trump, they may soon find them-
selves stuck in the same situation
they’ve been in for the past four
years: hoping for the best but fear-
ing the worst.
Europe
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5
Democratic
candidate Joe
Biden.
WIN MCNAMEE/
GETTY IMAGES

Forum
BY GRETA PRIVITERAIN MILAN
In the capital of Italy’s northern
Lombardy region, those who live
EYE OF THE STORM: LOMBARDY
FACES SECOND COVID-19 NIGHTMARE
LETTER FROM LOMBARDY
As infections rise
across Italy, the wealthy
northern region is once
again the hardest hit
near hospitals have started count-
ing ambulance sirens again.
Until a few weeks ago, it seemed
Italy might be spared the second
wave of coronavirus infections
engulfing the Continent. It had
successfully rebounded from a
devastating spring, earning inter-
national praise for its handling of
the emergency and successfully
reopening its economy in time for
the summer tourist season. But the
steadily rising numbers, and the
government’s decision this week to
impose a new set of restrictions to
curb the virus, dispersed any illu-
sions Italy might be in the clear.
In Lombardy, the wealthy region that was hit hardest by the first
wave of the virus in March, morale
is especially low. Of Italy’s current
tally of close to 420,000 cases,
the largest share — some 98,000 —
have been registered in the region,
making it by far the most affect-
ed. On Tuesday, the government
labeled Lombardy a “red zone,”
meaning movement in and out of
the region is prohibited, except for
emergencies, and all shops, bars
and restaurants are shuttered for at
least two weeks, among other strict
measures.
For residents, the spike in cases
and the return to lockdown is an
uncomfortable flashback to the day in late February when they
first started to worry about an
unknown virus that would soon
overwhelm hospitals and funeral
homes.
This time, the region’s capital,
Milan — largely spared during the
first wave, which devastated the
cities of Bergamo, Lodi and Brescia
— has emerged as a major infec-
tion hub, with some 4,000 new
cases registered per day (in a city
of around 1.4 million people) and
one of the highest reproduction
rates in the country.
Exasperated and worried about
the tough months ahead, many
residents are asking: Why does it
Exasperated
and worried
about the
tough months
ahead, many
residents are
asking: Why
does it still
feel like we are
groping in the
dark?

November 5, 2020 Page 21
that is burned in the mind of many
Italians.
Hospital beds are scarce and
ambulances carrying new coro-
navirus patients routinely have to
queue outside the entrance to the
emergency room. A shortage of flu
vaccines — the result of govern-
ment failure to start tenders on
time — also risks exacerbating the
situation in coming weeks.
“Gloves, mask, cap, visor, water-
repellent coat, boots, second pair
of gloves. I am ready to enter the
red zone,” Andrea Artoni, a doc-
tor who works in one of the largest
hospitals in Milan, wrote in a long
Facebook post about the anxieties
of health workers returning to the
trenches. “I didn’t miss this ritual
and it took me a long time to real-
ize that I was back in.”
Beyond those on the front lines
and those who fall ill, patients re-
ceiving or waiting for treatment
for other illnesses are also paying
a high price for mistakes made by
authorities charged with planning
for a return of the virus in the fall
and winter.
When Filippo Maraffi, a retired
veterinarian who was diagnosed
with cancer two years ago, went to
Bergamo for a CT scan, “only 1 of 4
rooms was working because there
was no staff,” he said. “It was al-
ready bad before — with the health
emergency, everything got worse.”
According to Maraffi, patients
like him are increasingly skipping
check-ups and treatment sessions
for fear of becoming infected with
the coronavirus, which is more
likely to cause severe complica-
tions in cancer patients and people
with compromised immune sys-
tems.
“The bureaucracy in recent
months has worsened, it is under-
standable. But if measures such
as home nurses were implement-
ed, they would meet the needs of
other patients who still exist,” he
said.
No one has been left unscathed
by the crisis. People are tired, dis-
appointed, angry. Over the past
weeks, protests — some of which
are led by far-right groups — have
erupted in the biggest Italian cities,
including Milan. Businesses, and
restaurants and bars in particular,
are fearful of another total lock-
down that they say would decimate
their livelihood.
In the hospitals, there is little
time to consider the political con-
troversy and heated debates about
the economic cost of another lock-
down as the number of patients
requiring intensive care treatment
and the number of deaths start to
climb.
“We knew that with the arrival
of winter and the cold we could
find ourselves facing a situation
similar to that of March, but almost
no one could imagine that already
in October we would have found
ourselves with these numbers,”
said Francesco Tursi, a pulmonolo-
gist and head of the COVID-19 unit
at the main hospital in Codogno,
the city where the outbreak started
in February.
Tursi fell ill himself in March,
and still recalls the toll it took on
his body — and the fear he, like so
many others, felt.
“Seeing those desperate eyes
again makes my heart ache,” he
said. “We have to hold on and
make it through this time too. To-
day we are better prepared, but
until the vaccine and a specific
cure arrive, we have to live with
COVID.” still feel like we are groping in the
dark? Are Lombardy’s high num-
bers simply coincidence or the
result of mismanagement at the
political level?
The answer likely lies some-
where in the middle.
Opposition parties blame the
regional government led by Attilio
Fontana, a member of the far-right
League, for failing to learn the les-
sons of the first wave.
“The biggest [mistake] was not
strengthening the tracking activ-
ity,” said Emilia De Biasi, the re-
gional secretary of the Democratic
Party (PD) and head of health and
welfare. “In the city, the situation
is out of control, we have no idea
where the new contagion clusters
are.”
She added that the government
had failed to provide more resourc-
es to general practitioners, who
should be patients’ first point of
contact in order not to overwhelm
hospitals.
The region has been struggling
to make up for a shortage of doc-
tors. Efforts to create teams of white coats to visit people with
symptoms in their homes, to al-
leviate pressure on hospitals and
avoid people spreading the disease
further, have fallen flat, not just in
Lombardy but across the country.
The regional government’s plan to
recruit doctors among new medi-
cal graduates was met with the crit-
icism that it is too little, too late.
Other preventative measures
have also stalled. At the start of
the pandemic, there was an abun-
dance of so-called COVID-hotels,
places where patients with man-
ageable symptoms could conva-
lesce to prevent them infecting
other members of their household.
Over the summer, management
passed from the Civil Protection
Agency to the regions, which are
only now launching tenders for
agreements with the structures, de-
laying the use of the spaces.
Testing capacity is also an issue.
“Everything is still based on the
swab, left to the goodwill of the
people,” Massimo De Rosa, group
leader of the 5Star Movement in
Lombardy, told the outlet Fan-page, citing a lack of rapid tests in
schools and for the population at
large.
“This is not enough, especially
in the region that had the peak of
Italian COVID cases. Today we are
paying the consequences.”
According to Giulio Gallera, the
region’s health chief, Lombardy is
making a “titanic effort” to manage
the situation, which is complicated
by years of cuts to health care.
Speaking on “Che Tempo Fa,” a
popular television program, Galle-
ra said the region has “enormous
capacity to do test swabs” and will
open “20 or 30” new testing cen-
ters in the coming 10 days.
Gallera acknowledged that Lom-
bardy has to “manage to lower the
curve or in 15 days we will be in
pain.” He did not respond to mul-
tiple requests for comment from
POLITICO.
On the ground, doctors and
nurses have started to warn of a re-
turn to the nightmare of the spring,
when military trucks were called
in to help transport the dead out
of hospitals in Bergamo — an image
A deserted
Corso
Sempione
in Milan
last week.
Authorities
in Lombardy,
Italy’s
hardest hit
region during
the novel
Coronavirus
first wave, have
imposed a
night curfew.
EMANUELE
CREMASCHI/
GETTY IMAGES

Opinion November 5, 2020 Page 22
BY ELISABETH BRAW
Since the coronavirus pandemic,
China has shifted into high gear
when it comes to PR. But its ef-
forts — including, most recently,
President Xi Jinping’s announce-
ment that China would go carbon-
neutral by 2060 — aren’t having the
intended effect.
As a devastating recent survey
shows, the global public isn’t sold
on China as a benign benefactor
and global player. And while Bei-
jing may not care what Western
citizens think, Chinese businesses
should — or they will soon feel the
power of the public’s unhappiness.
Xi’s announcement — during
the U.N. General Assembly in Sep-
tember — fits into China’s broader
aim of setting itself apart from
the United States, the archrival
it hopes to replace as the world’s
superpower.
There are serious cracks in the
shiny façade of these efforts.
Much of the emergency medical
supplies Beijing sent to coronavi-
rus-stricken countries with great
fanfare in the early months of the
pandemic turned out to be defec-
tive or insufficient, causing the
stunt to backfire and undermining
public trust.
Beijing’s embrace of “wolf war-
rior” diplomacy — in which it alter-
natively tried to convince the West
on issues such as the repression
of its Uighur minority in Xinjiang
province and the democracy pro-
tests in Hong Kong — also raised
red flags among its intended recipi-
ents.
Last month, China’s ambassa-
dor to Belgium tweeted a photo of
a group dancing, writing “ethnic
minorities dancing in Xinjiang.
Only happy and carefree people
can dance so beautifully.” His
ambassador colleague in Canada,
meanwhile, ominously warned his
host government that there could
be consequences for the “health
and security” of Canadians living in
Hong Kong if Canada granted asy-
lum to Hong Kongers.
The Western public wasn’t
fooled, neither by stingy coronavi-
rus aid nor by obfuscation about
Uighurs and Hong Kong.
As a Pew Research Center poll
shows, disapproval of China is ris-
ing sharply in Western countries.
In the U.K., some 79 percent hold
a negative view of China, up 19
percentage points since last year,
while in Sweden the rate is 85 per-
cent and in the United States 73
percent. Even in Italy, a target for
Chinese charm offensives long be-
fore the pandemic, the disapproval
rate is rising: 62 percent, up from
57 percent last year.
Western public opinion may not
matter to Beijing, especially consid-
ering that it doesn’t exactly nurture
democracy at home. But it matters
to Western governments. If better
PR alone won’t fix relations with
European countries, bad PR is ac-
tively exacerbating the problem.
In Sweden, the shift in public
perception has already had po-
litical consequences, Pål Jonson,
the chairman of the parliament’s
defense committee, told me. He
pointed out that Sweden “has ad-
HOT
TAKES
“Millions and millions
of people voted for
us. A very sad group
of people is trying to
disenfranchise that
group of people ... This is
a fraud on the American
public. This is an
embarrassment to our
country. Frankly, we did
win this election.”
U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD
TRUMP, SPEAKING TO HIS
SUPPORTERS FROM THE WHITE
HOUSE IN THE WEE HOURS OF
WEDNESDAY MORNING. TRUMP
WAS ROUNDLY CRITICIZED
— BY LAWMAKERS FROM
BOTH PARTIES — FOR THESE
BASELESS CLAIMS OF FRAUD AS
MILLIONS VOTES CONTINUED
TO BE COUNTED
The West isn’t buying
Beijing’s propaganda —
and that will hit Chinese
companies’ bottom line
China’s unpopularity problem
opted a new strategy on China that
includes stark warnings regarding
the country’s actions in Sweden.”
Last month, Sweden also
banned Huawei from its 5G net-
work. The Chinese foreign ministry
quickly retorted with warnings that
the step would have a “negative im-
pact” on Swedish businesses.
That may be true, but while
European businesses will be af-
fected by deteriorating relations, in
the long run, it’s China Corp. that
stands to feel the most pain.
Consider the case of Huawei
in the U.K., a country heretofore
rather well-disposed toward China.
This summer, the U.K. govern-
ment decided to ban Huawei in its
5G networks, just months after it
had decided to include it. Pres-
sure from U.S. President Donald
Trump’s administration played a
role, but anger among Britons and
their MPs over Huawei’s links add-
ed plenty of fuel to the fire.
The recent sale of Italy’s strate-
gic Port of Trieste is another key
example of a government shifting
position in response to anti-Chi-
nese backlash. Last year, soon after
Italy joined China’s Belt and Road
initiative, the Port of Trieste ex-
plored cooperation with the China
Communications Construction
Company, a Chinese state-owned
behemoth. Instead, at the end of
September, the Hamburg port op-
erator HHLA acquired a majority
stake in the port.
Germany’s Economy Minister
Peter Altmaier, meanwhile, recent-
ly encouraged German businesses
to diversify their supply chains
beyond China, to other Asian coun-
tries.
Moves like this might cause com-
panies to think twice about accept-
ing large investments by Chinese
outfits, all too aware that customer
anger can harm their brand and
thus the share price. For example,
Oatly, a trendy Swedish oat milk firm, has taken a hit to its brand
and customer base since a state-
owned Chinese investment com-
pany bought a 30 percent stake.
Activist investors could even
start following the example of Rus-
sian opposition leader Alexei Na-
valny, who bought a small number
of shares in various Russian com-
panies and then started turning up
at shareholder meetings to decry
the firms’ corruption.
At the very least, Western busi-
nesses will be facing ever-more
intense scrutiny over any dealings
with China.
In a recent interview, Mark Cu-
ban, the owner of the American
basketball team Dallas Mavericks,
was asked why the National Bas-
ketball Association takes “$500
million dollars-plus from a country
that is engaging in ethnic cleans-
ing.” His answer — simply that
“they are a customer of ours” —
may not hold up for very long un-
der growing scrutiny of the ethics
of taking Chinese money.
Such a development would
be disastrous for Beijing, which
over the past several decades has
strengthened its global position by
investing in Western companies:
French telecom equipment maker
Alcatel-Lucent, Standard Bank in
the U.K., German industrial-ma-
chinery maker Krauss Maffei and
the football club Inter Milan to
name just a few.
The Chinese Communist Party
may consider its PR techniques
successful at home, but its globe-
spanning businesses stands to reap
the sorry fruit of Beijing’s bullying
and obfuscation.
For a country investing enor-
mous effort into its Made in China
2025 plan for economic superpow-
er status, that should set off alarm
bells.
Elisabeth Braw is a visiting fellow at
the American Enterprise Institute.
A coal fired
power plant on
the outskirts
of Beijing.
President
Xi Jinping
announced
recently that
China would go
carbon-neutral
by 2060, but
his country is
still struggling
to gain traction
with the
Western public.
KEVIN FRAYER/
GETTY IMAGES
“If we were watching
this in another country,
it would be setting off
alarm bells. It would
be a sign, anywhere
else in the world, of a
democracy in peril. I
think our democracy is
in peril.”
CNN’S ABBY D. PHILLIP,
REACTING TO TRUMP’S
P R E M AT U R E D E C L A R AT I O N O F
VICTORY
“Him: What are
you watching?
Me: American
Horror Story.
Him: Is it on Netflix?
Me: No. On the news.”
PIM TECHAMUANVIVIT IN A
TWEET TUESDAY NIGHT AS
ELECTION RESULTS ROLLED IN
“You see a lot of red, and
you see a lot of blue.”
INSIGHTFUL ANALYSIS FROM
CNN’S WOLF BLITZER
“I just want my
Instagram to be about
me again, and how good
I look.”
ALEX GARCIA, 28, TO THE MIAMI
HERALD, ON WHY HE CHANGED
HIS MIND AT THE LAST MINUTE
AND VOTED FOR JOE BIDEN
INSTEAD OF TRUMP

News Page 23 November 5, 2020
Sex workers
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8
Getting out of the crisis
Building the post- Covid world
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Join us Nov. 12 at 2 pm CET
the past, as appointments need to be
made online or over the phone, and
many services no longer take place
in person.
Despite the ubiquity of digital tech-
nology, for some sex workers, this
isn’t part of their reality.
“A lot of women don’t have access
to the internet, don’t have smart-
phones, and don’t have the resources
that many people take for granted,”
said Laura Watson, spokesperson
for the English Collective of Prosti-
tutes (ECP). “So anything like an on-
line consultation and it’s just out the
window. You can do a phone call, but
it’s very limited.”
For the trans sex workers Tate
works with, booking and getting to
appointments at clinics that provide
services for people without health in-
surance isn’t possible on their own
without access to the internet. “We
make the appointments for people,
we pick them up and take them
there,” he said.
There’s another benefit to walk-in
services: anonymity.
“A lot of sex workers are con-
cerned about their data security and
they don’t want to hand out their
numbers or email addresses so they
wouldn’t they wouldn’t use those
[online] services,” explained Ceres.
OLD STIGMAS, NEW PROBLEMS
Difficulties in accessing health care
for sex workers aren’t new.
One can’t just announce to a doc-
tor that one is a sex worker, said Za-
wierucha.
The ECP’s Watson agrees. “Being
able to speak freely, and being able to say what you’re doing, truthfully,
to health professionals, is massively
stopped by the criminalization [of sex
work],” she said.
The job itself is incredibly risky
during the pandemic. Social dis-
tancing isn’t usually possible. And
while groups such as Zawierucha’s
Sex Work Polska work to educate sex
workers about hand hygiene and dis-
infectants, there is little that can be
done to significantly reduce the risk
faced by sex workers.
A feeling shared by many is that
sex workers have been left behind
by their governments during the
pandemic.
Andrès Lekanger, outreach worker
with Norway’s PION, a sex worker
interest group, points to the continu-
ation of efforts to support drug us-
ers but not sex workers as evidence
of this discrepancy. While some sex
workers who are also drug users
can access the services provided,
Lekanger said sex work just doesn’t
carry “the same priority.”
“Drug users were prioritized but
sex workers were forgotten during
the [first] lockdown,” he said. “We
would like to see attention given [to
sex workers] before the situation gets
out of control.”
INCREASED CRIMINALIZATION
To their advocates, an overriding
concern is that the criminalization
of sex work has only increased dur-
ing the pandemic. In many countries
in Europe, sex work itself is legal
but the activities surrounding it —
such as operating a brothel — are
criminalized.
But under lockdown, sex work be-
came de facto criminalized. It’s clas-
sified in the same category as beauty
salons and hairdressers, which were
closed due to the close contact neces-
sitated by the work and their “non-essential” nature. Those defying the
laws by continuing to work are sub-
ject to police enforcement and fines.
“Raids and arrests and prosecu-
tions of sex workers have really con-
tinued and in many areas have ac-
tually been increased,” said Watson.
The result: When crackdowns occur,
sex workers often move elsewhere,
making it harder for health services
to reach them.
Pro Sentret’s report includes in-
stances of police contacting sex work-
ers on an escort site via SMS, telling
them that selling sex is banned in Nor-
way and that they must take down
their adverts and leave the country
immediately or face deportation.
In Poland, Zawierucha cites re-
ports of police standing next to sex
workers to discourage customers. In
Hungary, where mandatory medical
reports are needed to practice sex
work, the SZEXE union said these are
impossible to get due to the pressure
on the health system, resulting in the
police fining sex workers.
Over in Berlin’s red-light district,
Ceres described reports of police
stopping people to check for con-
doms in their bags when sex work
was banned during the lockdown.
Research shows that this kind of en-
forcement, which is commonly re-
ported in countries where sex work is
illegal, can lead to sex workers decid-
ing that the risk of arrest outweighs
the need to protect themselves from
sexually transmitted diseases and
pregnancy.
It’s not just enforcement of lock-
down that sex workers are contend-
ing with. Aware that sex work is in
effect banned, activists report clients
using this to their advantage — know-
ing that a sex worker cannot report
any abuse to the police without re-
vealing that they have been breaking
lockdown rules.Pro Sentret’s report found an up-
tick in violence, with sex workers tell-
ing them of “an increase in intoxicat-
ed clients, clients who refuse to pay,
or motivate not paying by the fact
that selling sex is prohibited; clients
who refuse to use a condom, bargain
over price or demand services that
the seller does not offer.”
Lekanger said that he had heard of
several instances of sex workers being
the victim of violence or other crimes
during the pandemic. They can’t “go
to the police or health service provid-
ers, because they then feared that
this temporary ban against selling
sex would be used against them,” he
noted, referring to bans on sex work
during the first lockdown.
In the community of trans sex
workers in Berlin, Tate said that vi-
olence has escalated in the last two
months. “[It’s] getting worse and
worse, attacks are happening every
week,” he said.
Without support from their gov-
ernments, sex workers have turned
to one another.
Sex workers have been contacted
Lekanger’s PION to ask about what
their legal standing is, how they can
protect themselves against coronavi-
rus and how they can help fight the
pandemic.
Many sex work advocacy groups
have raised funds for those strug-
gling during the pandemic. But these
fundraisers are just a “drop in the
ocean,” said Lekanger. Even relatively
large funds such as the €100,000 re-
ceived by BesD are quickly exhausted.
BesD’s Ceres also fears that there may
not be that many more donations on
the horizon.
“The first wave put a lot of sex
workers in an existential crisis,” said
Ceres. “Now we are facing the sec-
ond wave and I have no idea how sex
workers are going to face it.”
“Drug
users were
prioritized
but sex
workers were
forgotten
during
the [first]
lockdown. We
would like to
see attention
given [to sex
workers]
before the
situation
gets out of
control.”
ANDRÈS
LEKANGER,
OUTREACH
WORKER WITH
NORWAY’S
PION, A SEX
WORKER
INTEREST
GROUP

Optics
Amid a rising surge of coronavirus infections, Americans set out en masse Tuesday to vote
for their next president. Though record numbers of votes were cast early this year, millions
still physically headed to the polls to fill out their ballots. Here’s a look at where they did it:
AMERICA VOTES, AND
BEGINS THE WAITING GAME
The White
House,
just before
sunrise on
Election Day.
Donald Trump
visits his campaign
headquarters in
Virginia, at right; his
wife Melania votes in
person in Palm Beach.
The first lady refused
to wear a mask, and
was allowed to vote
anyway despite health
restrictions.
Voters fill in their
ballots in Concord,
New Hampshire.People gather at Black
Lives Matter Plaza
in Washington, D.C.,
Tuesday afternoon.

November 5, 2020 Page 25
And sun rises a day
later on the Capitol
building, right, as the
nation awaited results.Scenes from
Tuesday in
(c lo c k w is e f ro m
left) Maine,
Colorado,
Florida,
Colorado and
Delaware.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES

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MAROŠ ŠEFČOVIČvice president for interinstitutional relations and foresight, European
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