Janie_Crow_-_Fruit_Garden_CAL_-_Getting_Ready_UK_V3

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Getting Ready by Jane Crowfoot
The Fruit Garden CAL

YARN USAGE – COLOUR RECIPE 1
Life DK:
100g – 298m (326yds),
75% Premium Acrylic,
25% Wool.
Parchment (2445) 4
Caramel (2446) 3
Blue Haze (2346) 1
Cranberry (2319) 1
Denim (2322) 1
Fern (2311) 1
Rose (2301) 1
Batik :
50g – 138m (151yds),
80% Premium Acrylic,
20% Wool.

Coral (1903) 1
Graphite (1915) 1
Heather (1906) 1
Mint (1918) 1
Rose (1916) 1

Total = 17 balls
Weight of blanket 1450g
Equipment
3.5mm (US E/4), 4mm (US G/6) and 4.5mm (US 7) crochet hooks
Stitch Markers
Yarn Needle
YARN USAGE – COLOUR RECIPE 2
Naturals
Bamboo + Cotton :
100g - 250m (273yds),
60% Bamboo, 40% Cotton.
Night (7160) 4
Dusk (7159) 3
Canyon (7157) 1
Celery (7155) 1
Peach (7131) 1
Pumice (7154) 1
Raisin (7158) 1
Rose (7165) 1
Seafoam (7143) 1
Thyme (7156) 1
Umber (7161) 1
Total = 16 balls
Weight of blanket 1100g
Equipment
3mm (US D), 3.5mm (US E/4), 4mm (US G/6) crochet hooks
Yarn Needle
Stitch Markers
APPROXIMATE BLOCKED BLANKET MEASUREMENT:
Life & Batik DK 128cm (50½in) square.
Naturals – Bamboo + Cotton 112cm (44in) square.
I am really excited to be able to present you with another Crochet Along collaboration with Stylecraft. You can
find out about my inspiration for this project, which includes information about my design process, by reading
through my Introduction document. I have put this ‘Getting Ready’ document together to help you with some of
the basic information I think you need to be aware of before you embark
on the project. Please take some time
to read through my notes, even if you are a crochet pro as there may be something in here that may help you.
The Fruit Garden CAL is the culmination of months of work for myself and the Stylecraft te
am and so we
hope you will enjoy it. I think it is possibly the most challenging CAL yet, but the project starts easy and gets
progressively harder with step by step images throughout, so I hope it will be a really good learning tool and
that you will cherish your crochet stitches and be proud of the outcome of your hard work.
The CAL will be released in 8 parts between April and August 2020 via the Stylecraft website –
https://www.stylecraft-yarns.co.uk/Crochet+Along+with+Stylecraft/0_CAFA122.htm – on the following dates:
28th April, 12th May, 26th May, 9th June, 23rd June, 7th July, 21st July, 4th August
The patterns will be published in UK & US terms and Dutch Language.
I will be doing videos to accompany each motif to help you along the way
.
These will be published via my website https://www.janiecrow.com/
© Jane Crowfoot 2020 All rights reserved. This pattern and items created from it are for personal use only. Commercial use of either the patterns or the items made from them is strictly prohibited. Please respect the copyright and do not pass either digitally or otherwise to another person.

© Jane Crowfoot 2020 All rights reserved. This pattern and items created from it are for personal use only. Commercial use of either the patterns or the items made from them is strictly prohibited. Please respect the copyright and do not pass either digitally or otherwise to another person.
ABBREVIATIONS AND TERMINOLOGY:
This project is not aimed at complete beginners or those
relatively new to crochet and there is an assumption that you
know your basic stitches and terminology.
TENSION
Crochet is by nature an organic and creative process – it is
wonderful to pick up some yarn and a hook and create motifs
and decorative pieces that eventually make up a larger
project. Many crocheters are used to doing just this without
thinking too much about how big their pieces come up and
whether things are being worked to the correct tension.
I have added images and notes on tension throughout the
patterns. Please check that your tension matches mine as
you work through the project.
Why is tension so important for this project?
Before you start work on your project I urge you to check
that you are working to the correct tension.
This project requires you to work in the round on some of
the motifs and in rows on other pieces. If you achieve a
tension tighter or looser than the suggested tension you will
find that your project will differ in size to mine, that you will
use a different amount of yarn and possibly that your pieces
will fit together properly in the making up stages. The look
of the crochet stitches can also differ – a looser tension is not
as neat as the standard tension, whilst a tight tension can
make your work stiff or cardboard like.
I tend to use small locking stitch markers – these look like little
nappy pins and are really safe as the stitches cannot escape.
Locking markers are especially good for holding crochet
pieces together while you sew up seams. I tend to use a stitch
marker to mark every corner stitch on the motifs. If you
mark every motif you will need a lot of markers, so you could
mark your stitches with spare pieces of yarn or small pins.
How to achieve the correct tension:
Many crocheters simply assume that they will achieve the
correct tension. This is a totally logical conclusion to make;
after all, the information on the ball band or within the
pattern is based on what the ‘standard’ tension is. In practice,
however, many crocheters do not naturally attain the correct
tension and therefore do not achieve a tension that sits
within the ‘standard’.
Pre-blocked and Blocked Tension:
When designing the project I worked to a square motif
template that measured 14/15cm (6in) across the widest
point. In reality not all of the square motifs have exactly the
same measurement once they are complete, but because the
crochet pieces will stretch a little when you put everything
together this will not be noticeable at any point.
The measurements given in the pattern are for pre-blocked
sizes throughout. Measuring to a pre-blocked size rather
than a blocked size is more accurate as crocheters could over
stretch their work to achieve the blocked tension.
Factors that can affect your tension:
Many things can make a difference to the tension you
achieve; I have listed 4 of the most common below:
1. Your level of expertise: If you are a newcomer to the craft
of crochet you may well find that your crochet tension will
change as your ability improves. When launching into a
project like this it is worth making sure you have put in
enough ground work to ensure that you are working in
the right way and that you have the ability to work
consistently. Whilst the project is aimed at those looking
to improve their skills, it is not aimed at beginners.
2. Your mood or situation: If you are a bit stressed or have
had a bit of a tough day you may find your crochet tension
is affected. Equally, having a few glasses of wine or
watching a funny or enthralling movie whilst crocheting
can also cause your tension to differ. As a general rule try
to crochet in the same kind of situation whenever
possible to ensure that everything stays as it should.
3. Hook Sizes: Make sure you are using the correct size hook.
For the most part of the project you will be asked to use a
4mm (US G/6) hook. Please check that you have not
mistakenly used a UK 4 (imperial size) or a US 4 or 4/E.
4. Number of stitches: It is quite common to achieve the
correct tension on a swatch only to find that it is not correct
over a larger piece. This is because tension can change as
we relax into the rhythm of a repetitive crochet action.
Measure your tension at all the places I ask you to within
UK US
Right Side RS Right Side RS
Wrong Side WS Wrong Side WS
chain ch chain ch
slip stitch ss slip stitch ss
stitch space st-sp stitch space st-sp
stitch(es) st(s) stitch(es) st(s)
double crochet dc single crochet sc
half treble crochet htr half double crochet hdc
treble crochet tr double crochet dc
double treble crochet dtr treble crochet tr
double crochet 2
together
dc2tog single crochet 2
together
sc2tog
double crochet 3
together
dc3tog single crochet 3
together
sc3tog
treble crochet 2
together
tr2tog double crochet 2
together
dc2tog
treble crochet 3
together
tr3tog double crochet 3
together
dc3tog
double treble crochet
3 together
dtr3tog treble crochet 3
together
tr3tog
Make Bobble MB Make Bobble MB
Spike double crochet SPdc Spike single crochet SPsc
Make Popcorn MP Make Popcorn MP

the pattern just to be sure you are continuing to work at
the correct tension.
What to do when you have achieved a different tension to
the tension in the pattern:
If you find that your crochet motifs are coming up smaller
than mine this means you are working too tight. Rather than
trying to change your crochet method (by consciously
crocheting looser) simply change up to a size larger hook. If
you are still too tight then try another size larger. Make a
note of how many sizes you have had to change by so that
you are sure to make the swap for each of the three sizes.
If you find that your crochet pieces are coming up larger
than mine this means you are working too loose. Rather than
trying to change your crochet method (by consciously
crocheting tighter) simply change down to a size smaller
hook. If you are still too loose then try another size smaller.
As above, make a note of how many sizes you have had to
change by so that you are sure to make the swap for each of
the three sizes.
Having trouble with your tension over treble crochet
(US double crochet)?
Look at the way you work the stitch
Because of the nature of a treble crochet (US double crochet)
it is common to find variances in stitch length and width
even if the correct hook has been used in relation to the one
used to achieve the correct tension over double crochet
(US single crochet)
When we make a treble crochet (US double crochet) we wrap
our yarn around the hook first and then work 3 movements
drawing yarn loops through others to create the stitch. The
tension achieved over each of these movements and the
angle at which we hold our hook can have an impact on the
tension of each step of the stitch.
Why you need to change hook size when you are told to?
The reason you will need to change hook size is to do with
the tension achieved over different stitches. When you make
a fabric using a dense stitch like double crochet (US single)
you have very little room between the posts of your stitches,
whereas when you work with stitches that have a longer post,
such as treble crochet (US double) the space between the
posts of the stitches gets bigger.
I recommend the use of a 4mm (US G/6) hook for Recipe
1 (3.5mm (US E/4) hook for Recipe 2) for the majority of
the crochet within this project, but there are places where
you will need to swap down to a 3.5mm (US E/4) or up to a
4.5mm (US 7). As a general rule, look out for hook changes
when working treble crochet (US double crochet) and slip
stitches. Hook sizes are marked in bold within the written
patterns.
Changing hook sizes can be a bit of a pain, but it is made
easier if you have colour coded hooks – even a dab of
different shades of nail polish on your crochet hook handles
can make the process of identifying hooks easier.
YARN USAGE:
It is my advice that you keep hold of all your yarn until the
end of the project – by this I mean all the pieces you might
undo and any pieces that look a bit frayed. Don’t be tempted
to use any of the yarn for any other project until you have
completed this one and make sure you keep everything in
a safe place.
In both Colour Recipes some shades have 10g of leftover yarn
once the project is complete. It was a conscious decision not
to add an extra ball of these colours into the recommended
quantities, so that you do not have excess yarn that you do
not require. It is still possible, that some crocheters (with
loose tension or who leave long ends to sew in) may need
an extra ball of a colour.
The shades in question are:
Colour Recipe 1: Life DK - Blue Haze and Batik – Graphite
Colour Recipe 2 : Naturals – Bamboo + Cotton – Night
Look out for the first pattern on Tuesday 28th April .
Photography with thanks to National Trust, Standen House, Sussex https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/standen-house-and-garden The colour reproduction in this pattern is matched as closely as possible to the yarn but due to photography and printing restrictions some slight variations may occur. © Jane Crowfoot 2020 All rights reserved. This pattern and items created from it are for personal use only. Commercial use of either the patterns or the items made from them is strictly prohibited. Please respect the copyright and do not pass either digitally or otherwise to another person.
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