National_Geographic_Little_Kids_-_July_2018

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animalcards!
t2018
natgeolittlekids.com
THE MAGAZINE FOR
YOUNG EXPLORERS July
/
Augus t
l l k
Dolphins!

Why do
think fro
have suc
big eyesAfrogslargeeyesletitseeup,down,
andallaroundwithoutmovingits
headoreyes.Thishelpsthefroglook
forfoodwithoutbeingnoticed. Why?
MONICA MARTINEZ DO-ALLO / SHUTTERSTOCK
EYE
ANIMALS
2 JUly / August 2018

Look at each picture in the top row.
Find the dierences between it and the one below.
What Is Different?
SEASONING_17 / SHUTTERSTOCK (TURTLES); FOOTTOO / SHUTTERSTOCK (BOAT); VILAX / SHUTTERSTOCK (PENCILS)
SORTING
national geographic 3
Find one
difference. Find two
differences. Find three
differences.

They get
their name from the hornlike
shape on their beaks.
This bird
is as long as
a four-year- old kid. Hornbills
live in forests.
They eat fruit, insects, eggs, and lizards.
STEVE WILSON / GETTY IMAGES
Thats Cool!
Meet the rhinoceros hornbill.
NATURE
4

—CE CREAM
—IGLET
What in the World Are These?
—LOWER
— ALLOONS
— ONGUE
—UBBLE GUM
— LAMINGO
— OTH
— UTTONS
TOP ROW (LEFT TO RIGHT): ERIC ISSELEE / SHUTTERSTOCK; © FSTOP / SUPERSTOCK; VSTOCK / GETTY IMAGES. MIDDLE
ROW (LEFT TO RIGHT): KEVINRUSS / ISTOCK; TALSEN / SHUTTERSTOCK; © IAN HOOTON / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY / CORBIS.
BOTTOM ROW (LEFT TO RIGHT): © PHOTOSINDIA / SUPERSTOCK; MATT JEPPSON / SHUTTERSTOCK; JAK WONDERLY.
NAMING
WHAT OTHER PINK THINGS CAN YOU NAME?
national geographic 5

ANIMALS
Bottlenose dolphins leap and swim in the ocean.
They whistle, squeak, trill, and click to talk.
A baby dolphin makes up a special whistle when
it is about a year old.
That whistle is its name.
D O L P H I N
T A L K
Bottlenose
dolphins eat fish, shrimp, and squid.
DANITA DELIMONT / GETTY IMAGES (BIG PICTURE);
SHIN OKAMOTO / SHUTTERSTOCK (SMALL PICTURE)
6 JUly / August 2018

NOW
SHOWING!
natgeolittlekids .com/july
DOLPHIN
VIDEO
They live in
groups with
their friends and family.
national geographic
7

Baby dolphins
babble to practice grown-up sounds, just like human babies.
A baby
dolphin is called a calf.
A dolphin uses
its name to tell
others who it
is and where it
is swimming.
It might say something
like, “Hi, my name is
Splash. I am over here.”
CALF
8 JUly / August 2018

Bottlenose
dolphins can
leap high out of the water.
Sometimes they jump and belly f lop to make a loud splash.
Dolphins also use
their bodies to talk.
They slap their tails or f lippers on the
water.
STEPHEN FRINK / GETTY IMAGES (OPEN MOUTH); FOUR OAKS / SHUTTERSTOCK (LEAPING);
DMITRI MA / SHUTTERSTOCK (TAIL); BARRY BROWN / WILD HORIZON / GETTY IMAGES (CALF) national geographic
9

ROBIN EGGS
ANIMAL
E
Many animals hatch from eggs. Draw a line
with your finger from each egg picture to
the animal that hatches from that egg.
Which picture has
the most eggs?
EMPEROR PENGUIN EGG
MILK SNAKE EGGS LADYBUG E
MAtching
10
JUly / August 2018

SCLOWNFISH EGGS
GGS
How many of the eggs will
hatch into birds?
GGS
DAVID TIPLING / GETTY IMAGES (PENGUIN EGG); KEITH HOMAN / SHUTTERSTOCK (ROBIN EGGS); © CHRIS MATTISON / FLPA / MINDEN PICTURES (SNAKE EGGS); VISUALS
UNLIMITED, INC. / ROBERT PICKETT / GETTY IMAGES (BUG EGGS); OPTIONM / SHUTTERSTOCK (FISH EGGS); CHRISTIAN MUSAT / SHUTTERSTOCK (BUG); LEVENT KONUK /
SHUTTERSTOCK (FISH); MATT JEPPSON / SHUTTERSTOCK (SNAKE); © VLADIMIR SELIVERSTOV / DREAMSTIME (PENGUIN); BRIAN GUEST / SHUTTERSTOCK (ROBIN)
EMPEROR
PENGUIN MILK
SNAKE
ROBIN
CLOWNFISH
LADYBUG
national geographic
11

A serval hides quietly in
the tall grass. It is waiting
for food to come close
enough to catch.
SER S

JUMPING
ANIMALS
12 JUly / August 2018

The wild cats giant
ears twist and turn
to listen. When the
serval hears a
bird flying by,
it jumps
straight up. Servals also
hunt squirrels,
hares, mole rats, and insects. It snatches the food
from the air with its
sharp claws.
JOE MCDONALD / GETTY IMAGES (IN GRASS); MARTIN HARVEY / GETTY
IMAGES (JUMPING); YSBRANDCOSIJN / GETTY IMAGES (CLAWS) CLAWS
national geographic
13

A servals long legs
help it jump very
high. A serval could
even jump to the top
of your refrigerator! Servals
use their claws like hooks to catch frogs and fish.
They
can leap the length of a car.
14 JUly / August 2018

Meet some morespotted cats.
WITH SPOTS
BLACK-FOOTED CAT
JAGUAR
GEOFFROYS CATLEOPARD CAT
CATS
OTHER
MARTIN HARVEY / GETTY IMAGES (FISHING); GERALD & BUFF CORSI / GETTY IMAGES (LEAPING);
MINT IMAGES - FRANS LANTING / GETTY IMAGES (JAGUAR, BLACK-FOOTED CAT); © EDWIN GIESBERS /
NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY (GEOFFROYS CAT); NICK GARBUTT / GETTY IMAGES (LEOPARD CAT) 15

16 JUly / August 2018
BEFORE AND
Draw a line with your finger from a
before picture to the photo that
shows what happens after.
TIME

AFTER
Which of these foods is your favorite?
SERGII SOBOLEVSKYI / SHUTTERSTOCK (SLIDING, BOTH); VLADIMIR BOROZENETS / SHUTTERSTOCK (APPLE, BOTH); ELI_ASENOVA / GETTY IMAGES (BUBBLES, BOTH);
SIDEKICK / GETTY IMAGES (EATING CUPCAKES); MICHAEL C. GRAY / SHUTTERSTOCK (ICE CREAM, BOTH) HERO IMAGES / GETTY IMAGES (ICING C UPCAKES)
national geographic 17

18 JUly / August 2018
BEES MAKE
Nature
The bee flies
back to its home,
called a hive.
There it shares the nectar with other bees.
A honeybee
looks for a
flower. It drinks
sugar juice,
called nectar,
from inside the
flower. HIVE

The bees put the nectar
into special parts of the
hive. It thickens and
becomes honey. Yummy!
ARTO HAKOLA / SHUTTERSTOCK (1); TOMARK / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES (2); LEHRER / SHUTTERSTOCK
(3); JOHNER IMAGES / GETTY IMAGES (HONEY); PETER WATERS / SHUTTERSTOCK (TOP) national geographic
19

RACCOON!
Raccoons live in
forests, grasslands,
neighborhoods, and
even big cities. Here
are a few things that
help raccoons f ind
food wherever
they live.Sharp
claws help a
raccoon climb
trees to look for tasty bird eggs in nests. Raccoons use
their front paws and long fingers
to pick berries, lift things, or dig up worms.
A raccoons
eyes help it see at night, when it looks for food.
Its nose
sniffs out foods
like snails and fruit. It can even smell seeds in the ground.
Anatomy
20
JUly / August 2018

Its ears
can hear very quiet noises,
such as a mouse
scurrying across the ground. The color
of its fur makes
a raccoon hard to see in the dark. That helps it
surprise animals it wants to eat.
Raccoons eat fruit, nuts, seeds, mice, bugs, frogs, and fish.
MOOSEHENDERSON / SHUTTERSTOCK (BIG PICTURE); © BLICKWINKEL / ALAMY (CLAWS) national geographic
21

22 JUly / August 2018
These pictures show animal parents with their babies.
Count the number of babies in each picture. Match
the number of babies to the number in the circle.
HOW MANY BABIES?
Counting ELEPHANTSMEERKATS
DUCKS
1
23
4
5
How many
children are in your family?

MORAG CORDINER / GETTY IMAGES (DUCKS); © WILL BURRARD-LUCAS / MINDEN PICTURES (MEERKATS); PIM LEIJEN / SHUTTERSTOCK (FOXES);
© DUNCAN NOAKES / DREAMSTIME (ELEPHANTS); OUTDOORSMAN / SHUTTERSTOCK (POLAR BEARS); STEPHEN FRINK / GETTY IMAGES (COVER)
POLAR BEARS
FOXES
How many
animal parents are on these pages?
Parents:
Follow us on Twitter @
NGKids
and like us on Facebook. PRINTED ON 100% PEFC-CERTIFIED PAPER—
PEFC/29-31-58—Please recycle. Editor in Chief and Vice President,
Kids Magazines & Digital
Rachel Buchholz
Executive Editor
Marfé Ferguson Delano
Vice President, Visual Identity
Eva Absher-Schantz
Design Director, Magazines Eileen OTousa-Crowson
Editorial Ruth A. Musgrave, Contributing Writer
Photo Shannon Hibberd, Senior Photo Editor;
Kelley Miller, Contributing Photo Editor
Art Dawn McFadin, Contributing Designer
Production Sean Philpotts, Director
Digital Laura Goertzel, Director;
Tirzah Weiskotten, Video Manager
Administration Michelle Tyler, Editorial Assistant
International Magazine Publishing
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Jennifer Jones, Business Manager;
Rossana Stella, Editorial Manager
Finance Jeannette Swain, Senior Budget Manager;
Tammi Colleary-Loach, Senior Manager, Rights Clearance;
Pinar Taskin, Contracts Manager
Consumer Marketing
John MacKethan, Vice President and General Manager,
North American Consumer Marketing;
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Market Services
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Publicity
Caitlin Holbrook, Publicist (202) 857-5882
PUBLISHED BY
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PARTNERS, LLC
Chief Executive Officer Gary E. Knell
Chairman of the Board of Directors Peter Rice
Executive Vice President and General Manager, Nat Geo WILD / Nat Geo Kids Media
Geoff Daniels
Senior Vice President, Kids Media, Content Jennifer Emmett
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS,
Issue 69, July / August 2018
(ISSN 1934-8363), is published bimonthly by
National Geographic Partners, LLC, 1145 17th Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036-4688.
POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS, P.O. Box 62136, Tampa, FL 33662-2136. If the Postal Service alerts NGP that your magazine is undeliverable, NGP has no further obligation unless it receives a corrected address within two years.
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national geographic
23

wild
cards
wild
cards
HARVEST MOUSE COPYRIGHT © 2018 NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PARTNERS, LLC

DANIEL TRIM PHOTOGRAPHY / GETTY IMAGES
FUN FACTs
The tiny harvest mouse weighs only about as much as a nickel. It is so light that it can climb up blades of grass.harvest
mouse

wild cards wild cards
SQUID

© CHRIS NEWBERT / MINDEN PICTURES
FUN FACTs
Squids live in the ocean. A squid has two long tentacles it uses to
catch food. Then it uses its eight arms to hold the food as it eats. squid

wild
cards
wild
cards
BLUE PEAFOWL

SM RAFIQ PHOTOGRAPHY / GETTY IMAGES
FUN FACTs
Male peafowl are called peacocks. Females are called peahens. A
peacock has a big, beautiful tail he shows to attract peahens. blue
peafowl

wild cards wild cards
CHEETAH

BILDAGENTUR ZOONAR GMBH / SHUTTERSTOCK
FUN FACTs
Cheetahs run faster than any
other animal on land. They can run 65 miles an hour. That is as
fast as a car drives on a highway. cheetah

wild cards wild cards
EASTERN BOX TURTLE

© LYNN M. STONE / NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY
FUN FACTs
A box turtle can pull its head,
legs, and tail inside its hard shell. That protects it from enemies such as skunks and raccoons. Eastern
box turtle

wild cards wild cards
AUSTRALIAN SEA LION

ANDREA IZZOTTI / SHUTTERSTOCK
FUN FACTs
This sea lion makes deep
dives in the ocean. That is
where it hunts for food such as sh and squid.
Australian
sea lion

OBSERVATION
Copyright © 2018 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction of the whole or any part of the contents of NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS
without written permission is prohibited. N ATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS and Yellow Border: Registered Trademarks
® Marcas Registradas. Printed in the U.S.A.
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PRZEMYSLAW SKIBINSKI / SHUTTERSTOCK
Hide-and-Seek
Can you find the giraffe in this picture?