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BARRON'S

BARRON'S

FIFTH EDITION
Murray Bromberg
Principal Emeritus

Andrew Jackson High School
Queens, New York
Melvin Gordon
Reading Specialist

New York City Schools

©Copyright 2008, 2000. 1993, 1987, 1971 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.
AU rights reserved.
No part of this book may be reproduced or distributed in any form or

by any means without the written permission of the copyright owner.
AU Inquiries should be addressed to:

Barron's Educational Series, Inc.
250 Wireless Boulevard
Hauppauge, NY 11788

www.barro...educ.com
Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 2007050610

ISBN-13: 978-0-7641-3864-5
ISBN-10: 0-7641-3864-2
Ubrary of

eo..-.

C.talo.....-bl-PubUcatlon Data

Bromberg. Murray.
1100 words you need to know I Murray Bromberg, Melvtn Gordon. - 5th ed.
p. em.
Cover title: Barron's 1100 words you need to know
Includes index.
ISBN-13: 978-0-7641-3864-5
ISBN-10: 0-7641-3864-2
l. Vocabulary. I. Gordon. Melvin. II. Title. III. Title: Eleven hundred words
you need to know. IV. Title: Barron's 1100 words you need to know.
PE1449.B643
428.1-dc22

2008

PRINTED IN 1HE UNITED SJ'ATES OF AMERICA

2007050610

CONTENTS
Fl,lll Pronunciation Key ............................................vi
WEEKS 1-46 ...............................................•.... 1

Burted Words .................................................. 290
Words in Context ............................................... 294
Arlswers ...................................................... 295
Final Review Test ............................................... 312

Panorama of Words ............................................. 319
Bonus Weeks .................................................. 367
VOC/QUarE ..................................................381

Index ........................................................ 391

INTRODUCTION
Recently, Amazon. com rated 1100 Words You Need to Know the Number 1 bestseller in its
category. We're proud of that distinction and of the vocabulary building help that we have
provided for the million people who have purchased copies of the book since its first edition
appeared.
Now, in this Anniversary Edition, we have added a Bonus section of new words in context,
idioms, and exercises that will assist you in mastering the challenging words as you find them
in your listening, reading, viewing, and conversing. The new material is consistent with our
successful blueprint of interest, variety, relevance, and repetition. By investing 15 minutes
daily with this new book, you will soon see a dramatic improvement in your vocabulary.

To the Teacher: 1100 Words was originally designed as a 36-week program to conform to
school schedules. The additional ten weeks were included as an extra credit section. Now,
for this Anniversary Edition, we have added bonus weeks and new words to enrich your
growing vocabulary.
Murray Bromberg
Melvin Gordon

FULL PRONUNCIATION KEY
a

a

a

bat, trap
rage, lace
jar, farther

j
k
1

m
b

ch
d

bag, sob
chill, such
done, said

n

ng
0

e

e

er

.met, rest
ease, see
fern, learri

0
6
oi

ou
f

g
h
-

1

feel. stiff
gone, big
him, hold
inch, pin
ivy, hive

p
r
s
sh
t
th
:r:H

vi

just, enjoy
kin, talk
lose, hurl
mice, cram
not, into
song, ring
rot, cot
tow, blow
cord, lord
toil. boil
mouse~ bout
pest, cap
red, art
see. best
crush, crash
time, act
this, math
they, booth

u
ii
v

w
y
z
zh
;}

bull, pull
dual. sue
vast, have
wish, wood
youth, yes
zoo, zest
pleasure, treasure
stands for:
a-in around
e in waken
i in cupid
o in demon
u in brush

NEw WoRDS

voracious
~ra.·sms

indiscriminate
in· dis krfm · ~ nit

READING WISELY
The youngster who reads voraciously, though indiscriminately, does not necessarily gain in wisdom over the teenager
who is more selective in his reading choices. A young man
who has read the life story of every eminent athlete of the
twentieth century, or a coed who has steeped herself in every
social-protest novel she can get her hands on, may very well
be learning all there is to know in a very limited area. But
books are replete with so many wonders that it is often
discouraging to see bright young people limit their own
experiences.

eminent
em' a mot
steeped

stept
replete
ri' plet·

Sample Sentences On the basis of the above paragraph, try to use your new words in the
following sentences. Occasionally it may be necessary to change the ending of a word; e.g.,
indiscriminately to indiscriminate.
1. The football game was _ _ _ _ _ _ with excitement and great plays.
2. The _ _ _ _ _ _ author received the Nobel Prize for literature.
3. My cousin is so

in schoolwork that his friends call him a bookworm.

4. After skiing, I find that I have a

appetite.

5. Modern warfare often results in the _ _ _ _ _ _ killing of combatants and
innocent civilians alike.

Definitions Now that you have seen and used the new words in sentences, and have
the definitions "on the tip of your tongue," try to pair the words with their meanings.
6. voracious

a. of high reputation, outstanding

7. indiscriminate

b. completely ftlled or supplied with

8. eminent

c. choosing at random without careful selection

9. steeped

d. desiring or consuming great quantities

10. replete

e. soaked, drenched, saturated

TODAY'S IDIOM

to eat humble pie-to admit your error and apologize
After his candidate had lost the election, the boastful
campaign manager had to eat hwnble pte.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 295

1

NEW WORDS

abound
~bound'

technology
nor~ je

tek

SOLVING THE SERVANT PROBLEM
The worlds of science-fiction abound with wonders. Yet
modem technology progresses so rapidly that what may be
today's wild dream may be next year's kitchen appliance. A
British scientist has prognosticated that within ten years
every suburban matron will have her own robot servant. One
task this domesticated automaton will not have to contend
with will be scouring the oven because even today the
newest ranges can be "programed" to reduce their own
baked-on grime to easily disposed of ashes.

prognosticate
t~ kat

prog nos'

automaton

o tom'~ ton
matron

rna: tr~n

Sample Sentences Now that you've seen the words used in context, and-hopefully-have
an il~ea of their meanings, try to use them in the following sentences. Remember that a
wor( -ending may have to be changed.
1. The mayor refused to

as to his margin of victory in the election.

2. The time is approaching when human workers may be replaced by _ _ _ _ __
3. A clever salesman will always ask a _ _ _ _ _ _ if her mother is at home.
4. The western plains used to
slaughtered by settlers.

with bison before those animals were

5. Man may be freed from backbreaking labor by the products of scientific

Definitions Test yourself now by matching the new words with the definitions. If you are
not sure of yourself, cover the top half of this page before you begin.
6. abound

a. an older married woman

7. technology

b. branch of knowledge dealing with engineering, applied
science, etc.

8. prognosticate

c. a robot; a mechanical "person"

9. automaton

d. to exist in great numbers

10. matron

e. to predict or foretell a future event

TODAY'S IDIOM

a pig in a poke-an item you purchase without having seen; a disappointment
The mail order bicycle that my nephew bought turned out to be a pig in
a poke, and he is now trying to get his money back.
2

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

NEw Woaos
paradox
par'; doks
realm
relm

IT'S A MAN'S WORLD
How paradoxical that the world's greatest chefs have all been
men! Cooking would clearly seem to be a field that lies
exclusively within women's realm. yet the wmals of cookecy
are replete• with masculine names: Brillat Savarin, Ritz, Diat,
Larousse. To compound the puzzle, there has rarely been a
tinge of rumor or scandal casting doubts on the masculinity
of these heroes of cuisine.

annals
an'n;lz
compound
kom pound'
tinge

(*replete-if you've forgotten the meaning, see page 1)

tlnj

Sample Sentences Try your hand now at using your new words by writing them in their
correct form (change endings if necessary) in these sentences:
1. His gloom was now
2. The

by the failing mark on his geometry test.
of sports are replete• with the names of great black athletes.

3. One of the great

of American life is that though minority groups have
suffered injustices, nowhere in the world have so many varied groups lived together
so harmoniously.
of garlic is all that's necessacy in most recipes.

4. A

5. The cruel king would not allow the prince to enter his
him to the forest, which abounded* with wild animals.

, restricting

(*abounded-studied previously, see page 2)
Definitions If you are having trouble in picking the right definitions, it may be best not to
do them in the order given, but to do the ones you are surest of first.
6. paradox

a. a trace, smattering, or slight degree

7. realm

b. a statement that at first seems to be absurd or
self-contradictocy but which may in fact tum out to be true
c. to increase or add to
d. historical records
e. special field of something or someone; kingdom

8. annals
9. compound (v.)
10. tinge (n.)

TODAY'S IDIOM

a flash in the pan-promising at the start but then disappointing
The rookie hit many home runs in spring training, but once
the season began he proved to be a }lash in the pan.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

3

NEW WORDS

WEEK

badger

1

•!• DAY

4

baj'O)r
implore

im plor'

HOW NOT TO GET YOUR WAY
It is difficult to change someone's opinion by badgering him.

drudgery

The child who begs his mother to "get off his back" when she
implores him for some assistance with the household
drudgery, may very well plead interminably for some special
privilege when he wants something for himself. How
paradoxical* that neither is able to perceive that no one likes
being nagged.

druj' O)r e
interminable

in ter· ffiO) nO) 1»1
perceive

par sev'

(*paradoxical-studied previously, see page 3)

Sample Sentences Getting the hang of it? Now go on to use the five new words in the

following sentences-remember, past tenses may be required.
1. She does her homework on Fridays to save herself from the _ _ _ _ _ _ of having
to do it durtng the weekend.

2. The teacher continually _ _ _ _ _ _ the pupil for the missing assignments.
3. The eminent scientist

difficulties in putting the invention into

practice.
4. The sick child's mother

the doctor to come immediately.

5. I listened to the boring lecture for what seemed an

fifty minutes.

Definitions Pick the letter of the definition that matches your new word and write it in the
answer space.

6. badger (v.)

a. unpleasant, dull, or hard work

7. implore

b. unending

8. drudgery

c. to plead urgently for aid or mercy
d. to understand, know, become aware of

9. interminable
10. perceive

e. to pester, nag, annoy persistently

TODAY'S IDIOM

to pour oil on troubled waters-to make peace, to calm someone down
When I tried to pour oU on troubled waters, both the angry husband
and his wife stopped their quarrel and began to attack me.
4

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

WEEK

1

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

You have accomplished something worthwhile this week. In learning twenty useful words
and four idioms, you have taken a step toward a greater mastery of our language. As a
result of today's lesson, you will become aware of those words that require greater study on
your part for complete success in these first lessons.
Take the following quiz by matching the best possible definition with the word you have
studied. Write the letter that stands for that definition in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. abound
2. annals
3. automaton
4. badger
5. compound
6. drudgery
7. eminent
8. implore
9. indiscriminate
10. interminable
11. matron
12. paradox
13. perceive
14. prognosticate
15. realm
16. replete
17. steeped
18. technology
19. tinge
20. voracious
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
to be completely soaked in something
b. to be able to tell what will happen in the future
c. someone's special field
d. to continually nag
e. carelessly chosen
f. related to science of engineering
g. to add to
h. beg for assistance
i. of outstanding reputation
j. a mature woman
k. small amount of
I. dull, difficult work
m. desiring huge amount
n. existing in great number
o. historical records
P· to come to have an understanding of
q. completely filled with
r. machine that behaves like a person
s. seemingly self-contradictory situation
t. unending
a.

to eat humble pie
a pig in a poke
a flash in the pan
to pour oil on troubled waters

Now check your answers on
page 295. Make a record of
those words you missed. You
can learn them successfully
by studying them and by
using them in your own
original sentences. If you
neglect them, then the effort
you have put into your
vocabulary building

campaign up to this point
will have been wasted.

u. a blind item; poor purchase
v. admit to defeat
w. a star today, a flop tomorrow
x. to try to make peace

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ------------------2. ------------------3. -------------------

4. ------------------5. ------------------5

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Week 1)
•:• Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.
1. The huge football player had a (voracious, replete) appetite.
2. Mter a seemingly (interminable, indiscriminate) wait, the surgeon came
to give us the news.
3. Without a (paradox, tinge) of evidence, the coroner could not solve the
murder.
4. In the (realm. annals) of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.
5. We invited the (eminent, steeped) engineer to address our club.
6. In the Catsldll Mountains, the woods (abotmd, implore) with deer.
7. I cannot (perceive, prognostfcate) why people voted for the corrupt
senator.
8. Night and day my kid brother (badgers, compotmds) me for money.
9. Science fiction movies usually feature (annals, crutomatons).
10. With his expertise in (drudgery, technology), my uncle is able to earn a
good salacy.

..

•.• Do these sentences make sense? Explain why.
11. The rookie was amazing during spring training but he turned out to be
ajlash in the pan.

12. I complained to the salesperson because he had sold me a pig in a
poke.

13. When I tried to pour oU on troubled waters, I only made matters worse.
14. Mter the election, when my candidate conceded his loss, I had to eat
hwnblepie.

6

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

WORDSEARCH 1

..

•.• Using the clues listed below, ftll in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Reggie the Con Man
In the of crime, there are few scoundrels who could match the
exploits of Reggie Hayes, who also used the names of Reginald Haven,
Ricardo Hermosa, Father Harris, and dozens of other aliases. Reggie's police
record, principally in Chicago and Baltimore, is®
with scams that
he perpetrated upon gullible people. Generally, his favorite target was a
®
who should have known better.
Dressed as a priest ("Father Harris"), he was most convincing, however. His
method of operation was to "find" a wallet stuffed with hundred dollar bills
outside a supermarket and then @
an unsuspecting woman to
share his good fortune, since there was no identification in the wallet. But
first, to establish her credibility, his victim had to put up a sum of money as
a testimonial to her good faith. Mrs. Emma Schultz, age 72, tearfully told the
police that she had withdrawn $14,000 fro~ her bank and placed it in a
shopping bag supplied by the helpful priest. He told her to hold onto the bag
while he went next door to a lawyer's office to make the sharing of their good
fortune legal.
wait, Mrs. Schultz discovered to her chagrin
After a seemingly
that the heartless thief had skipped out the back way, leaving her "holding
the bag"-a switched bag containing shredded newspaper-while he made
his getaway with her life savings.
@...::..5_ _ _

Clues

CD 3rd Day

®
®

1st Day
2nd Day

@ 4th Day

® 4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

7

NEW WORDS

WEEK

laconic
1~

2

•!• DAY

1

kon· lk

throng
throng

TO THE POINT

intrepid
in trep' td
accost
kost'

~

reticent
SClnt

ret'~

Calvin Coolidge, our thirtieth president, was named "Silent
Cal" by reporters because of his laconic speech. One
Sunday, after Mr. Coolidge had listened to an interminable*
sermon, a throng of newsmen gathered around him. An
intrepid reporter accosted the Chief Executive: "Mr.
President, we know that the sermon was on the topic of sin.
What did the minister say?" "He was against it," the reticent
Coolidge replied.
(*interminable-see page 4. Each review word will be
followed by an asterisk-you will .find the .first use of the
word by consulting the Index at the back of the book.)

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences:
1. His speech was usually rambling, but this time I found it brief and _ _ _ _ __
2. If a surly panhandler should _ _ _ _ _ _ you, keep on walking.
3. Even under repeated questioning, the witness remained _ _ _ _ __
4. A howling

of teenage girls surrounded the rap artists.

5. The corporal received the Silver Star for his _ _ _ _ _ _ deeds in combat.

Definitions Match the new words with their dictionary meanings.
6. laconic

a. expressing much in few words

7. throng

b. brave

8. intrepid

c. to approach and speak to

9. accost

d. crowd

10. reticent

e. silent

TODAY'S IDIOM
the sword of Damoc/es-any imminent danger
(a king seated one of his subjects underneath a sword that was
hanging by a hair, in order to teach him the dangers a king faces)
Although the president of the company seemed quite secure, he always
complained that there was a sword of Danwcles hanging over his head.

8

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

2 •:•

WEEK

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

furtive
fer' ttv
felon
fel' .,n

IF I HAD THE WINGS OF AN ANGEL
Casting a furtive glance over his shoulder, the felon slipped
out the main prison gate to be swallowed up in the British
fog. A pletlwra of escapes from supposedly secure prisons
embarrassed the hapless . wardens. To compound* their
problems, the officials were badgered• by irate citizens who
accused the guards of accepting bribes from convicts whose
motto was: "Stone walls do not a prison make, nor iron bars
a cage."

plethora

pleth'.,

~

hapless

hap' lis
irate

i' nit or i rat'

(*compound-see page 3; *badgered-see page 4)

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The _ _ _ _ _ _ contest winner was unable to locate the lucky ticket.
2. My uncle was

3. In a

wheP. the drunken driver swerved in front of us.
manner she removed her shoes and tiptoed up to her room.

4. When the teacher asked why the homework had not been done, he was greeted by

a

of incredible alibis.

5. Since the boss learned that Bob associated with a known _ _ _ _ _ _ , he

fired him.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. furtive

a. angry, incensed

7. felon

b. a person guilty of a major crime

8. plethora

c.

9. hapless

d. excess

unfort~nate

e. secret, stealthy

10. irate

TODAY'S IDIOM

Pyrrhic victory-a too costly victory
(King Pyrrhus defeated the Romans but his losses were extremely heavy)
In heavy fighting the troops managed to recapture the hill,
but it could only be considered a Pyrrhic victory.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 295

9

NEW WORDS

WEEK

pretext

2 •:•

DAY

3

pre· tekst
fabricate
fab~

DR. JEKYLL OR MR. HYDE?

rn kat

Under the pretext of being a surgeon he gained entry to the
hospital. When interviewed by the director, he had to
fabricate a tale of his medical experience, but he was so
adroit at lying that he got away with it. It was not until the
phony "doctor" began to gesticulate wildly with his scalpel,
that a vigilant nurse was able to detect the fraud. In the
annals* of medical history there have been a number of such
cases.

adroit

a droit·
gesticulate

je sttk· ya lat
vigilant

vif a lant

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The shootings at Columbine High School made educators much more
2. My nephew is quite

at making model airplanes.

3. Most fishermen can

a story about the size of the one that got away.

4. Her

of being tired did not fool us for an instant.

5. I often marvel as I watch the traffic officer _ _ _ _ _ _ at the onrushing cars.

Definitions Pick the letter of the definition that matches your new word and write it in
the answer space.
6. pretext

a. to lie: to construct

7. fabricate

b. skillful

8. adroit

c. an excuse

9. gesticulate

d. watchful

10. vigilant

e. move the arms energetically

TODAY'S IDIOM

a wet blanket-one who spoils the fun
Everyone wanted the party to go on, but Ronnie,
the wet blanket, decided to go home to bed.
10

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 295

NEW WORDS

avid
av· id
cajole
k~ Joi'

YOU'VE GOT TO BE A FOOTBALL EXPERT
As an avid football fan, I try to see every game the Jets play.
Whenever I can cajole my father into accompanying me, I try
to do so. He has only a rudimentary knowledge of the game,
and since I am steeped* in it, I enjoy explaining its intricate
details to him. It certainly does enhance your appreciation of
football when you are aware of every nuance of the sport.

rudimentary
n1' d~ men'~

re

enhance

tn hans·
nuance
nii ans'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences. You may have to
change the ending of a word.
1. Since my grasp of algebra is

, I cannot solve the problem.

2. The parakeet refused to be
3. It will
in advance.

into entering her cage.

your enjoyment of an opera if you know what the plot is about

4. In reading the satires of Jonathan Swift, one must be vigilant• in order to catch each
5. Bill Clinton is an _ _ _ _ _ _ reader of mystery stories.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. avid

a. eager

7. cajole

b. slight variation in meaning, tone, etc.

8. rudimentary

c. coax

9. enhance

d. intensify, heighten

10. nuance

e. elementary

TODAY'S IDIOM

to beard the lion in his den-to visit and
oppose a person on his own grounds
Having decided to beard the lion, I stormed into
the manager's office to ask for a raise.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

11

REVIEW

WEEK

2

•!• DAY

5

Keep adding to your vocabulary, as it is one of the most useful tools a student can possess.
Let's go over the twenty new words and four idioms you studied during this week.
In the following quiz, match the best possible definition with the word you have studied.
Write the letter that stands for that definition in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. acost
2. adroit
3. avid
4. cajole
5. enhance
6. fabricate
7. felon
8. furtive
9. gesticulate
10. hapless
11. intrepid
12. irate
13. laconic
14. nuance
15. plethora
16. pretext
17. reticent
18. rudimentary
19. throng
20. vigilant
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. uncommunicative
b. enthusiastic
c. alert
d. overabundance
e. courageous
f. to greet first
g. an excuse
h. unlucky
i. angry
j. criminal
k. basic, elementary
I. clever
m. to make up a lie
n. great number of people
o. concise, pithy
p. to use lively gestures
q. shade of difference
r. sly
s. coax, wheedle
t. to make greater

the sword of Damocles
Pyrrhic victory
a wet blanket
to beard the lion

u.
v.
w.
x.

an expensive conquest
spoilsport
defy an opponent in his home
any threatening danger

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 295. Make a record of
those words you missed. You
can learn them successfully
by studying them and using
them in your own original
sentences. If you neglect
them, then the effort you
have expended in building
up your vocabulary may be
wasted.

12

1. -----------------

2. ----------------3. ------~--------4. ----------------5. -----------------

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 2

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

The Best Laid Plans
Gloria Rogers overslept and then had to sprint to catch the same
Greyhound Bus that she boarded on the last Thursday of every month. J\Jter
a three-hour uneventful ride, she finally arrived at the bus terminal where a
courtesy van was ready to transport bus passengers to Visitors Day at the
State Penitentiary.
Although Gloria tried to act casual, she was more than a little nervous. Her
boyfriend, Art, a convicted CD
, had managed to gain admittance to
the prison's hospital on the ®
of having a gall bladder attack. Under
her own slacks and bulky sweater, Gloria was wearing a set of clothes that
she removed in the hospital bathroom and passed on to Art. He planned to
use them after making his escape in the back of the prison ambulance that
was parked outside his ward.
Art had spelled out his escape plan during Gloria's last visit, spending an

hour trying to®
her into being his accomplice. All that she had to
do was appear to have a seizure. Then she would@
a story about
her epilepsy while Art, with the smuggled clothes concealed under his prison
bathrobe, would slip out of the ward during the excitement. Unfortunately for
the schemers, a ®
hospital guard spotted Art climbing into the rear
of the ambulance and quickly foiled the escape attempt. The result was that
Art had three years added to his sentence and Gloria was imprisoned for her
role in the misadventure.
Clues

CD 2nd Day

® 3rd Day
@ 4th Day

@) 3rd Day

®

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

13

NEW WORDS

WEEK

loathe

3

•!• DAY

1

loth
reprimand

rep'

r.l

mand

lackluster

lak' Ius'

THE PEPTALK
"If there's one thing I loathe," the coach said, "it's a quitter."

t~r

caustic
k6' stik
wrest

He had good reason to reprimand us at half-time, because
the scoreboard revealed that we were losing, 45-20. Our
lackluster performance indicated to him that we had
forgotten the rudimentary• aspects of basketball. His caustic
remarks fired us up, however, and we dashed out,
determined to wrest control of the game from our rivals.

rest

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. With the help of his brothers he was able to _ _ _ _ _ _ the leadership of the
company from his partner.
2. Speaking in a monotone, the politician was booed for his
3. In a

address.

article, the drama critic slaughtered the hapless• actors.

4. I

spinach but I love other green vegetables.

5. When Ed arrived late, he knew that the grocer would _ _ _ _ _ _ him.
Definitions Match the new words with their dictionary definitions.
6. loathe

a. dull

7. reprimand (v.) _ _ b. to hate
8. lackluster

c. sarcastic, biting

9. caustic

d. take by force

10. wrest

e. to show sharp disapproval

TODAY'S IDIOM

crocodile tears-insincere tears
(crocodiles were said to cry while eating their prey)

When the football player broke his leg, his substitute wept crocodile tears.
14

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

NEW WORDS

infamous

in'

r~ m~s

jostle
jos· ~•

THE HANDCUFF IS QUICKER
THAN THE EYE
Slippery Eddie, the infamous pickpocket, was back at work,
'and every detective had to be especially vigilant.• Eddie's
technique was to jostle a victim toward a confederate who
would then slip the man's wallet out of his back pocket while
Eddie was stammering an apology to the confused dupe.
Within a week the incipient crtmewave came to an end when
Slippery Eddie inadvertently chose the chief of police for his
victim. Although Eddie loathes• Sing Sing, it's his permanent
address now.

dupe

dup
incipient
in sip'

in

e ~nt

inadvertent
~d v~rt· nt

Sample Sentences Can you put the new words in the right sentences?
1. By telling the truth, we stopped the

rumor from spreading.

2. The bombing of Pearl Harbor was referred to as an
3. The wealthy

deed.

consented to buy the often-sold Brooklyn Bridge.

4. When he attempted to
umbrella.

the old lady, she struck him with her

5. Through an _ _ _ _ _ _ error, the guided missile sped out of control.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. infamous

a. having a bad reputation

7. jostle

b. just beginning to exist

8. dupe (n.)

c. to shove hard

9. incipient

d. a person easily tricked
e. heedless, not attentive

10. inadvertent

TODAY'S IDIOM

to carry the day-to win the approval of the majority

The secretary's motion that we adjourn for lunch
carried the day, and we headed for the restaurant

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

15

NEW WORDS

WEEK

ominous

3

•!• DAY

3

om·~ n~s

tremulous
trem· y~ l~s
repudiate

rt py0·

de at

cessation

se sa·

sh~n

bristle
brts· ~1

COURTROOM DRAMA
There was an ominous silence when the jittery defendant
rose in court. !-Ie explained in a tremulous voice what had led
him to repudiate his confession made at the police station on
the night of the crime. The audience began to buzz excitedly
until the judge demanded a cessation of the noise. Although
the district attorney bristled with anger, the defendant kept
insisting that his lights had been violated because he had
not been told that he could see a lawyer before confessing.

Sample Sentences Fit the new words into the blanks.
1. Mter the weatherman had seen the

clouds, he prognosticated* rain.

2. The general attempted to
the testimony of the lieutenant, claiming
that the young officer was not an authority on low level bombing.
3. Upon seeing the snake, the cat began to

with fear.

4. The widow's _ _ _ _ _ _ hands revealed her nervousness.
5. The

of the bombing in Iraq was urged by the Pope.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. ominous

a a stopping

7. tremulous

b. to reject, decline

8. repudiate

c. stiffen with fear or anger

9. cessation

d. threatening

10. bristle (v.)

e. quivering

TODAY'S IDIOM

Skid Row-disreputable part of town, inhabited
by derelicts and people "on the skid"
The presence of so many bars has turned
our neighborhood into another Skid Row.
16

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

WEEK

3

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

4

euphemism
yii,

r~

miz

~m

mundane

mun'dan

CALL ME BY MY RIGHT NAME
My cousin refers to himself as a .. sanitary engineer"-a
euphemism for garbage collector. There are any number of
people who try to find more respectable or glamorous titles for
the mundane jobs they hold. It may seem incongruous to call
an undertaker a ..condolence counselor," or to refer to a taxi
driver as a .. transportation expediter," but some prefer those
titles. As a matter of fact, our butcher has stipulated that
from now on he wants to be known as a "meat coordinator."
He became irate* when I inadvertently* called him "Butch."

incongruous

in kong· gni

~s

condolence
bn do' I~ns
stipulate
stlp'

u lat

Sample Sentences In which blanks do the new words belong?

1. We repudiated* the contract because it did not _ _ _ _ _ _ a cost of living bonus.
2. The word "expired" is a

for "died."

3. When my neighbor's dog was run over, we sent a _ _ _ _ _ _ card.
4. The philosopher dealt with spiritual things, ignoming the _ _ _ _ _ _ ones.
5. The play was so _ _ _ _ _ _ that it seemed to be the work of several authors.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. euphemism

a. worldly

7. mundane

b. a less offensive term

8. incongruous

c. to specify a condition

9. condolence

d. inappropriate

10. stipulate

e. pity

TooAY's IDIOM
to go up in smoke--to come to no practical result
(kindling smokes but it will not light a fire)
The mayor's plans to get the gubernatorial nomination
went up in smoke when he couldn't end the costly strike.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

17

REVIEW

The word "review" means "to view again" and that is the purpose of our weekly review. You
will have noticed, of course, that many of the words that appear as new words are repeated
in subsequent lessons. Sometimes they are in the paragraph, sometimes in the sample
sentences, and occasionally in the idioms or directions. This continued emphasis on
"viewing again" will help you to become familiar with the vocabulary.
In the following quiz, match the best possible definition with the word you have studied.
Write the letter that stands for that definition in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. bristle
2. caustic
3. cessation
4. condolence
5. dupe
6. euphemism
7. inadvertent
8. incipient
9. incongruous
10. infamous
11. jostle
12. lackluster
13. loathe
14. mundane
15. ominous
16. reprimand
17. repudiate
18. stipulate
19. tremulous
20. wrest

DEFINITIONS
a. despise
b. menacing
c. evil
d. a pause
e. just starting
f. trembling
g. to have one's hair stand up
h. stinging
i. earthly
due to an oversight, negligent
make a specific demand
I. to push, to elbow
m. an easily fooled person
n. expression of sympathy
o. to scold severely
p. seize
q. having inconsistent elements
r. disown, refuse to accept
s. lacking brightness
t. saying something in a less direct way

t.

IDIOMS
21. crocodile tears
22. to cany the day
23. Skid Row

24. to go up in smoke

u.
v.
w.
x.

run down district
hypocritical sympathy
to win the honors
end fruitlessly

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 296. Make a record of
those words you missed. You
can learn them successfully
by studying them and using
them regularly in speech and
in your writing.

1. ----------------2. ----------------3. -----------------

4. ----------------5. -----------------

18

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 3



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Desert Storm Decision
In the 1991 Persian Gulf War, where the United Nations forces, led by
Americans, ousted the invading Iraqi army from Kuwait's soil, the ....:::; of combat took place in short order after the Allies were able to®...::._ _ __
control of the skies from the ®
Saddam Hussein's air force.
General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, the U.S. field commander, tended to
when asked by the media why he hadn't pursued the enemy all
the way to Baghdad, saying:

@

.. It would have been foolhardy for us to try to occupy that capital city and pile
up American casualties from sniper attacks by Iraq's guerillas. That may be
hard for you Monday morning quarterbacks to understand but I thoroughly
agreed with the president who was convinced that such an action would have
sent a bad message to the Arab world and would have splintered the Allied
partnership."

Schwarzkopf reiterated that it was his mission to hurl back the invaders with
tone, "to splatter
a minimum of bloodshed but not, he added in a ®
Saddam over the desert sands. That dictator's days are numbered," the
general concluded, ..but I expect his end is likely to come at the hands of his
own people." As it happens, the general was wrong about that.
Clues

®

3rd Day
1st Day

@ 2nd Day

@ 3rd Day

® 1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

19

NEW WORDS

alacrity
., lak· r;;,

WEEK

4

•!• DAY

1

te

disdain

MULLINS A K.O. VICTIM

disdan·

When the bell sounded, K.O. Mullins responded with
alacrity. He sprang from his stool and charged across the
ring, showing disdain for the champion's strength. Although
this belligerent attitude impressed the referee, it failed to
intimidate the champ. That intrepid* battler laid the
hapless• Mullins low with an adroit* feint and an uppercut.

belligerent
b;;, lif ;;,r ;;,n t
intimidate

urn·., dat

in

feint

rant

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. Y2K concerns of the January 1, 2000 problems with computers failed to
_ _ _ _ _ _ our company.
2. The Germans were duped* by the Allies'

toward the south, leaving

the way open for the Normandy invasion.
3. The waiter moved with

because he perceived* they were big tippers.

4. His _ _ _ _ _ _ manner caused him to lose one friend after another.
5. When the curtain carne down, the critic's face registered the _ _ _ _ _ _ she felt
for the lackluster• play.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

7. disdain (n.)

a. contempt
b. a false attack

8. belligerent

c. warlike

9. intimidate

d. to overawe

6. alacrity

10. feint

e. briskness, lively action

TODAY'S IDIOM

to throw down the gauntlet-to challenge someone
(when the gauntlet, or medieval glove, was thrown down,
the challenged one was required to pick it up)

The principal of our rival school threw down the gauntlet,
and we had no choice but to accept the challenge.
20

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

NEW WORDS

pugnacious

pug na' shas

promulgate

Jirom' al gat

MULLINS THROWS DOWN THE
GAUNTLET*

brash

The pugnacious K.O. Mullins demanded a rematch. He took a
full-page newspaper advertisement to promulgate his
challenge. When the champ's manager saw the brash
announcement, he accosted* Mullins, who was surrounded
by a throng• of newsmen. The manager openly scoffed at
Mullins and belittled his fighting ability. Mullins then lost his
temper and fearlessly punched the manager, knocking him
from his wheelchair.

brash
scoff

skof
belittle

bi lit' 1

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. We implored• the faculty advisor to _ _ _ _ _ _ the requirements for the

presidency of the club.
2. My mother liked the salesman's
people.

personality, but he irritated most

3. I don't understand modem art, but I neither loathe* nor

at it.

4. Since everyone can outpunch my cousin, he cannot afford to be _ _ _ _ __
5. Although Ralph can't play, he doesn't hesitate to
football team.

the efforts of our

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. pugnacious

a. quarrelsome

7. promulgate

b. to make seem less

8. brash

c. to sneer at

9. scoff

d. impudent

10. belittle

importan~

e. to make known officially

TooAv's IDIOM
feeling no pain-drunk

Although the party had just begun,
after his first drink he was feeling no pain.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

21

NEW WORDS

WEEK

tangible

4

•!• DAY

3

tan· j~ b~l
laceration

las

~

ni'

sh~n

MULLINS FORCED TO EAT HUMBLE PIE*
The irate* 80-year-old manager pressed charges against
K.O. Mullins, suing him for assault. As tangible evidence of
the attack, he pointed to a deep laceration over his eyebrow
that had required ten stitches. When the case was brought
before the court, the judge castigated Mullins for the sordid
incident. In addition to a costly financial settlement, Mullins
was required to make a public apology to the octogenarian.

castigate

kas·

t~

gat

sordid

sor· did
octogenarian

ok'

t~ j~

nar' 1 ~n

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The medic reached into his kit to find a bandage for the ugly _ _ _ _ __
2. Mr. Dixon belittled* our request for

proof of his loyalty.

3. The kindly foreman was too reticent• to openly _ _ _ _ _ _ the clumsy new
worker.
4. When the teenager announced her engagement to the
suspected it to be a publicity stunt.
5. Stories of their

, the public

youth poured forth from the unhappy felons. •

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. tangible

a. having actual form

7. laceration

b. to correct by punishing

8. castigate

c. jagged wound

9. sordid

d. dirty, base

10. octogenarian

e. person in his or her eighties

TODAY'S IDIOM

Hobson's choice--to have no choice at all (Mr. Hobson owned a livery
stable but he did not allow the customers to pick their own horses)

Despite all the talk about democracy in my family,
my father usually gives the rest of us Hobson's clwice.

22

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

NEW WORDS

solace
sol· is
aspirant
O)Spl" ~nt

THE DECLINE OF MULLINS
Mullins sought solace in whiskey. Once a highly respected
aspirant for the lightweight crown, he now found himself
associating with the dregs of Skid Row.* He would work
himself into an alcoholic frenzy in which he would trumpet
scurrilous attacks on the champ, the old manager, and the
judge. One avid* fight fan attributed Mullins' absence from
the ring to sickness, saying that he was "recovering from a
bad case of-SCOTCH."

dregs
dregz
frenzy
fren· ze
scurrilous
sker· 0) lO)S

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Vigilant* censors protect the public from listening to _ _ _ _ _ _ language on
television.
2. The publisher scoffed* at the reports that he was an _ _ _ _ _ _ for the job of
Secretary of State.
3. In a _ _ _ _ _ _ , the teenager overturned every drawer while searching for the
car keys.
4. At the bottom of the beautiful wine bottle, only the
5. In trying to offer
the situation worse.

remained.

to the pilot's wife, the reporter inadvertently* made

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

7. aspirant

a. most worthless part
b. coarse

8. dregs

c. easing of grief

9. frenzy

d. wild fit

6. solace

10. scurrilous

e. candidate for high position

TODAY'S IDIOM

to rule the roost-to be in charge, to be master
(a roost is a perch where domestic birds can sleep)
Although he is a lowly private in the army, at home he rules the roost.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

23

REVIEW
Let's see how many of the new words studied during the course of this week you remember.
Incidentally, try to keep a record of the many times you find your new words in magazines,
newspapers, and books. Before you knew the meanings of those words you probably skipped
right over them.
In the following quiz, match the best possible definition with the word you have studied.
Write the correct letter in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. alacrity
2. aspirant
3. belligerent
4. belittle
5. brash
6. castigate
7. disdain
8. dregs
9. feint
10. frenzy
11. intimidate
12. laceration
13. octogenarian
14. promulgate
15. pugnacious
16. scoff
17. scurrilous
18. solace
19. sordid
20. tangible
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. scorn
b. to make afraid
c. frantic outburst
d. person of eighty
e. to mock
f. make public, proclaim
g. pretense, sham
h. combative
i. candidate for better job
j. seeking war, hostile
k. speak of as unimportant
I. vulgar, using indecent language
m. insolent
n. punish, chastise
o. comfort
p. most worthless part
q. able to be touched
r. rough cut
s. filthy, ignoble
t. quick willingness

to throw down the gauntlet
feeling no pain
Hobson's choice
to rule the roost

u. be the boss, lay down the laws

v. under the influence of alcohol
w. to offer a challenge
x. to have no say in a matter

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on page
296. Make a record of those
words you missed. You can
master them with additional
review.

1. ---------------2. ----------------3. ----------------

4. ----------------5. -----------------

24

MEANINGS

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(from Week 4)

•!•

Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.

1. We were impressed with the new maid because she cleaned the house
with (alacrity, solace).
2. All (aspirants, lacerations) for the basketball team must come to
practice today.
3. Once he was a millionaire, but today he can be found among the
(dregs, octogenarians) of society.
4. The newspaper specialized in printing the (sordid, brash) details of
crime in the city.
5. After finding the (pugnacious, tangible) evidence in his drawer, Roger
took i~ to the police.
6. The normally (scurrUous, belligerent) police dog was unusually quiet
this morning.
7. Bobby, who was extremely modest, always (belittled, castigated) his own
achievements.
8. Treated with (frenzy, disdain) by his stepfather, Artie grew closer to his
natural father.
9. When the results of the bar exam were (intimidated, promulgated) Adele
saw that she had passed handsomely.
10. I used to (scoff, feint) at Hank's stories of the fish he had caught, but
he made a believer out of me.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 296

25

WORDSEARCH 4

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Want to Hun for Officer
In recent years, we have seen the phenomenon of incumbent politicians
retiring in record numbers. When interviewed, many of them admitted that
they had lost their taste for the job because of the abuse to which an
for office is subjected.
"My last campaign was a ®
affair in which my opponents did
my record and air@
charges about my
everything to®
private life," said one congressman. "I don't have to stand still for such
treatment," he added, "which was terribly embarrassing to me and my
entire family."
Citizen groups, appalled by the candidates' mudslinging, have sought to do
something about the situation. Committees have been formed in a number of
states to study ways to elevate the tone of the process, reduce the
of name calling that is generated
emotionalism, and eliminate the ®
as election day draws near.
"Unless we clean up this mess," said the chairman of an Illinois caucus, "we
will lose the best and the brightest from the political arena. After all, who but
a masochist wants to be a punching bag, the subject of daily vilification in
the media, and a target for every malcontent in town?"

Clues


4th Day

®
®

3rd Day
2nd Day

@ 4th Day

®

26

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

NEW WOR;:>S

rampant

ram·

~nt

inane

CHEATING

in

Duling my first weeks at the new school I obseiVed that
cheating was rampant. I had always considered it rather
inane to cheat on a test because of my code of ethics, and
because so much was at stake. Apparently the other students
didn't concur. In fact, even the presence of a proctor did not
intimidate• them. Far from being a clandestine activity, the
cheating was open and obvious.

an·

ethics

eth· lks
concur
keln ker·
clandestine
klan des· teln

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. When the plague was

on the island. Dr. Arrowsmith's wife died.

2. The spies thought their meetin~ was a
agents gathered outside the building.

one. but a throng• of F.B.I.

3. A special management committee was asked to investigate business _ _ _ _ __
4. Orville Wright was criticized for his
5. If I can get my parents to

desire to fly.
. I'll join the Peace Corps.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. rampant

a. secret, undercover

7. inane

b. code of principles

8. ethics

c. foolish

9. concur

d. agree

10. clandestine

e. going unchecked, widespread

TODAY'S IDIOM

stock in trade--the goods, tools, and other requisites of a profession
A quick wit and a warm smile were the salesman's stock in trade.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

27

NEW WORDS

flagrant

na· gr.mt
admonish
ad mon' ish
duress
du res'
culprit
kul' prit
inexorable
in ek' ~r a hal

CRACK~NG

DOWN

Mr. Dorsey, our new principal, determined to do something
about the flagrant cheating at our high school. He issued
bulletins and began to admonish those teachers who did not
proctor alertly. Under duress, the faculty reported the
names of the culprits. Several crib sheets were turned in as
tangible* evidence of the cheating. Mr. Dorsey's inexorable
campaign against the wrong-doers seemed to be paying off.

Sample Sentences Into which sentences do the new words fit best?

1. The _ _ _ _ _ _ was caught with his fingers in the cookie jar.
2. Television sleuths are _ _ _ _ _ _ in their pursuit of lawbreakers.
3. The confession was signed under
4. I suspect that my father will

, the attorney claimed.
me for coming home late.

5. Parking in front of a hydrant is a

violation of the city's law.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. flagrant

a. inflexible, unrelenting

7. admonish

b. compulsion, force

8. duress

c. outrageous, glaringly bad

9. culprit
10. inexorable

d. the guUty person

e. to warn, to reprove

TODAY'S IDIOM

to take down a peg-to take the conceit out of a braggart
(ship's colors used to be raised or lowered by pegsthe higher the colors, the greater the honor)
The alumni thought they had a great basketball team,
but our varsity took them down a peg.
28

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

NEW WORDS

egregious
i

gre· J~

distraught

STAR PLAYER IS CAUGHT

dis trot'

The cheating scandal came to a head when Art Krause, our
football captain, made the egregious mistake of getting
caught cheating on a midterm exam. If Art were suspended
(or his part in that sordid* affair, our chances for winning
the city championship would go up in smoke. • The distraught
coach asked the principal to overlook Art's duplicity. but Mr.
Dorsey replied in an acrimonious fashion that the players had
been given "a plethora" of athletic instruction but a paucity of
moral guidance."

duplicity
du pUs' .,

te

acrimonious
ak'

fOl

mo' ne OlS
paucity

pa' SO)

te

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The bank teller's _ _ _ _ _ _ error was difficult to correct.
2. We tried to ignore her
restraint.

comments, but that took considerable

3. _ _ _ _ _ _ is the stock in trade of all adroit* counterspies.
4. Although it was a creative writing class. the teacher complained about the
_ _ _ _ _ _ of talent there.
5. The soldiers were _ _ _ _ _ _ to learn that their furloughs had been canceled.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. egregious

a. scarcity

7. distraught

b. cunning, trickery

8. duplicity

c. mentally confused, crazed

9. acrimonious

d. remarkably bad

10. paucity

e. bitter

TODAY'S IDIOM

to pass the buck-to evade responsibility
(the "buck" may have been a piece of buckshot passed from one
poker player to another to keep track of whose turn it was to deal)
He always gives me a straight answer and never tries to pass the buck.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 296

29

NEW WORDS

WEEK

elicit
i lis' It

5

•!• DAY

4

pernicious

par ntsh' as

OUR PYRRHIC VICTORY*

tolerate

tol' ~rat
construe
k~n

stni'

impunity

tm pyii · n~

te

Mr. Dorsey summoned a representative group of teachers
and student leaders to his office in order to elicit their
reactions to the suspension of the football captain. He told
them that cheating was a pernicious disease that could not
be tolerated at our school. He loathed* having to discipline
Art Krause so severely, but unless strict measures were
taken, the student body would construe the incident as an
open invitation to cheat with impunity. "We may lose a
football game," the principal said, "but we can salvage our
self-respect."

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The border guards allowed the doctor to cross the frontier with _ _ _ _ __
2. It isn't easy to

answers from a sleepy class on Monday morning.

3. Dentists appreciate patients who can
4. She hoped that we would not
for power.
5. The dictator's
underground.

pain.
her decision to run for office as a thirst

rules failed to intimidate* the leaders of the

Definitions Place the letter of the correct defmition in the blank next to the new
vocabulary word.
6. elicit

a. freedom from punishment

7. pernicious

b. to make a deduction, to infer

8. tolerate

c. to put up with, to bear

9. construe

d. to draw forth

10. impunity

e. harmful, causing injury

TODAY'S IDIOM

to lionize a person-to make a big fuss over someone
(the lions at the Tower of London were considered its main attraction)

When the famous poet Dylan Thomas visited the United States,
he was lionized wherever he lectured.
30

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

WEEK

5

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

Congratulations! You have covered the first one hundred words in the book. With the same
diligence you should be able to tackle the remaining work and to master most of the
challenging words.
Take the following quiz by matching the best possible definition with the word you have
studied. Write the letter that stands for that definition in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. acrimonious
2. admonish
3. clandestine
4. concur
5. construe
6. culprit
7. distraught
8. duplicity
9. duress
10. egregious
11. elicit
12. ethics
13. flagrant
14. impunity
15. inane
16. inexorable
17. paucity
18. pernicious
19. rampant
20. tolerate
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. double-dealing

b. cannot be moved by persuasion, inflexible
c. silly
d. flourishing
e. to scold, warn
f. harassed
g. to permit, to put up with
h. extract
i. damaging, harmful
j. outstanding for undesirable quality
k. notorious
I. force, coercion
m. exemption
n. moral philosophy
o. agree
p. hidden, secret
q. to interpret
r. one who commits a crime
s. shortage
t. caustic, bitter

stock in trade
to take down a peg
pass the buck
to lionize a person

u. to idolize
v. to humiliate
w. the necessary equipment
x. to refuse to take responsibility

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 296. Make a record of
those words you missed. You
can learn them successfully
by studying them and by
using them in original
sentences. Use a word three
times and it is yours forever,
a wise man once said.

MEANINGS

1. -----------------

2. ----------------3. ----------------4. ----------------5. -----------------

31

WORDSEARCH 5
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Driving While Drunk
Throughout literature we find recurring tales of forthright people who are
outspoken in condemning illegal pl'a.ctices only to be brought low themselves
when they. or members of their families. commit such acts. Since literature
reflects life. we can expect to find similar instances in which a person's
are compromised, and he falls prey to the @
evil that he
had publicly denounced.
Take the story of Barry Vernon (not his real name). an aggressive Ohio district
attorney. Vernon could be counted upon to make®~---- remarks about
anyone who was driving while intoxicated. On numerous speaking
engagements. he railed against drunkenness and swore that any such
®
who was found behind the wheel of a car would be prosecuted to
the full extent of the law.
As fate would have it, Vernon's own son smashed into several cars. injuring

four people seriously, and then failed a sobriety test.
Following that....:..®____ violation of the law. Vernon resigned from office.
saying that as a private citizen he would continue his crusade against those
who drive under the influence of alcohol. Meanwhile. he wished to spend
more time with his son to try to understand the young man's behavior.

Clues

CD 1st Day
® 4th Day
® 3rd Day
@ 2nd Day

® 2nd Day

32

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 296

WEEK

6

•!• DAY

r~EW WORDS

1

affluent

ar 10 ;,nt
feasible

re· za ool

THE NEWSPAPER UMBRELLA
Our neighbor is an aJJiuent inventor whose latest brainstorm,
a feasible umbrella substitute, has been featured in many
magazines. As simply as the eye can discern, it is a hard
plastic strip, about the size of a ruler, which fits comfortably
into a woman's handbag or a man's suit jacket. If a person is
caught in a sudden rainstorm, he swings the plastic open in
the shape of a cross. Attached to each arm is a clip-like
device. Next, he takes the newspaper he is carrying and slides
it under each of the four clips. Now, equipped with a rigid
head covering he can sally forth to face the elements. To the
consternation of the umbrella manufacturers, it has been
enjoying a brisk sale, especially among commuters. If it
continues to do well, it could have a pernicious• effect upon
the umbrella industry.

d;,

zero'

discern

or d;,

sem.
sally

sar e
consternation

kon · st;,r mi · sh~n

Sample Sentences Fit the new words into the proper blanks.

1. Some prisoners planned a disturbance while others would - - - - - - toward
the gate.
2. Under duress• from the tax officer, the beggar admitted that he was truly
3. To the _ _ _ _ _ _ of the sergeant, there was a paucity* of volunteers for the
dangerous mission.
4. It's _ _ _ _ _ _ to build an electric auto, but wouldn't you need a terribly long
extension cord?
5. When we could _ _ _ _ _ _ the city lights, we knew we were safe at last.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. affluent

a. suddenly rush forth

7. feasible

b. possible

8. discern

c. dismay

9. sally (v.)

d. rich

10. consternation

e. perceive•

TooAY's IDIOM
I'm from Missouri-a skeptic, one who is not easily convinced

You might swallow his promises, but I'm from Missouri.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

33

NEW WORDS

precocious
prt ko· sh~s
perfunctory
fungk· t~r

~r

e

PATENT PENDING
My buddy Verne, a precocious automotive wizard, and I were
inspired to do some inventing on our own. We thought it
might be feasible* to park a car parallel to a space on the
street. Then, by pressing a button, we could raise the four
tires off the ground slightly, while dropping two special
wheels perpendicular to the curb. It would then be child's
play to roll into the narrowest of parking spaces. We took the
idea to Ed Greene who runs the Ford agency in order to
elicit* his reaction. Afte~ a perfunctory glance at our plans,
to our chagrin Ed snorted that our idea was inane,* but we
decided that he was just jealous of our brilliance. Tomorrow
we are going to start on a computer that will enable us to
measure the intelligence of perverse automobile dealers who
like to deride the efforts of junior geniuses.

chagrin
grin·

sh~

perverse
vers·

p~r

deride
di rid'

Sample Sentences Use the clues above to help find the proper words.
1. The children in Shakespeare's plays are so _ _ _ _ _ _ that they all sound like
grandparents.
2. Edith gave only _ _ _ _ _ _ attention to the new millennium, skipping our New
Year's Eve party.
3. The Wright brothers didn't become distraught* when a skeptic would _ _ _ _ __
their work.
4. When I correct my kid brother's math errors. he is _ _ _ _ _ _ enough to insist
that he is right.
5. To the
of many taxpayers, some citizens seem to cheat the
government with impunity.*

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. precocious

a. done without care, superficial

7. perfunctory

b. reaching maturity early

8. chagrin

c. feeling of disappointment, humiliation

9. perverse

d. contrary, persisting in error

10. deride

e. to ridicule, scoff* at
TODAY'S IDIOM

red-letter day-day of happiness, time for rejoicing
(holidays are red-letter days on our calendars)
My red-letter day came when I was chosen as senior class president.
34

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

WEEK

6 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

J

disparage
dis par' ij

laudable
Iod';) ool

HOLD THAT NOBEL PRIZE!
Speaking of inventions and discoveries, I just learned that an
eminent• scientist in Ohio has developed a pill that contains
all the nutritive value of three complete meals. In addition to
providing us with the vitamins and minerals we need daily,
this pill also gives a feeling of fullness. According to its
sponsors, the pill will nourish and satisfy. I hate to disparage
such a laudable achievement, but to me it seems like a most
objectionable discovery. Rather than a scientific triumph, I'd
be inclined to label it as an egregious• blunder, a scientific
disaster, a laboratory fiasco. Is there anyone in his right mind
who thinks that a pill can replace the pleasures of devouring
hot corn bread, masticating on a thick steak, biting into crisp
french fries, or attacking a chocolate sundae? I'm afraid that
this is one pill I'll have to eschew from chewing.

fiasco
leas'ko
masticate
mas, t;) kat
eschew
es chO.'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. The paradox• is that Javert's inexorable* pursuit of Jean Valjean was both
_ _ _ _ _ _ and despicable.
2. The affluent• storeowner
the efforts of his small competitor, saying
that he could always tolerate• that kind of rivalry.
3. To aid in digestion, you must _ _ _ _ _ _ each piece of meat one dozen times.
4. In an acrimonious• letter, her father described the project as a complete
5. Once he sought the limelight, but now he _ _ _ _ _ _ all interviews.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. disparage

a. to discredit, belittle*

7. laudable

b. avoid
c. to chew up
d. praiseworthy

8. fiasco
9. masticate

10. eschew

e. complete failure

TODAY'S IDIOM

to let sleeping dogs lie-to let well enough alone,
to avoid stirring up old hostilities
The lawyer wanted to open up the old case,
but his partner advised him to let sleeping dogs lie.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

35

NEW WORDS

WEEK

quell

6

•!• DAY

4

kwel
voluble

vol' ii

b~t

PERFECT PRODUCTS

confidant( e)
kon' r~ dant'
obsolescence

ob' sales' ns
dubious
du'
~s

be

I guess we'll never be able to quell those persistent rumors
about the invention of auto tires that will never wear out,
stockings that cannot tear, and pens that won't run dry. A
voluble economist informed me that such products will
never be marketed. "Can you imagine," he asked, "a
manufacturer cutting his own throat? Why would he sell you
an item that you will never have to replace? No," my
confidant whispered, "it's part of their scheme of planned
obsolescence to sell you merchandise with a limited life span
in order to keep you coming back for more." I am dubious
about the existence of those perfect products, but then I'm
from Missouri.*

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the proper blanks.

1. When the duplicity* was revealed, the jury became _ _ _ _ _ _ about Ed's
innocence.
2. In order to

the riot, the police sallied* forth with tear gas.

3. A teenage boy's father should be his true _ _ _ _ __
4. The
built into many products could be regarded as a flagrant* insult
toward the duped* consumer.
5. I could not doze in the chair because of the

barber.

Definitions Play the familiar matching game.

6. quell

a. one to whom you confide your secrets

7. voluble

b. talkative

8. confidant(e)

c. process of wearing out

9. obsolescence

d. put an end to

10. dubious

e. doubtful

TODAY'S IDIOM

thumb's down-signal of rejection (Roman emperors could condemn
a gladiator who fought poorly by turning their thumbs down)
My father turned thumbs down on our plan

to hitchhike to Florida during Easter.
36

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

REVIEW

After reading about these new ideas, you should be inventive enough to handle this review. If
there is a necessity for it, you may turn back to the original lesson to check on the meaning
of a word. As someone once remarked, "Necessity is the mother of invention."
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

affluent
chagrin
confidant(e)
consternation
dertde
discern
disparage
dubious
eschew
feasible
fiasco
laudable
masticate
obsolescence
perfunctory
perverse
precocious
quell
sally
voluble

DEFINITIONS
a. careless
b. dread, dismay
c. to chew
d. complete failure
e. reaching maturtty early
f. talkative
g. practicable
h. to make fun of
i. contrary
j. wealthy
k. keep away from
I. recognize
m. crush, stop
n. to discredit
o. person you tell your secrets to
p. disappointment
q. uncertain
r. commendable
s. sudden rushing forth
t. process of wearing out

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

I'm from Missourt
red-letter day
let sleeping dogs lie
thumbs down

Now check your answers on
page 297. Make a record of
those words you missed.
Study them, work on them,
use them in original
sentences. Amaze your
friends at parties!

u. occasion for rejoicing
v. I have to be convinced
w. don't rake up old grtevances
x. to signal rejection
WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ----------------

2. ---------------3. ----------------

4. ---------------5. ---------------37

WORDSEARCH 6

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Trouble at Truman High
It was a quiet morning at Harry S Truman High School. "Too quiet," Principal
Edna Suarez remarked to her secretary. "It's just when things are this serene
that I start to get an uneasy feeling."

Mrs. Suarez's sensitivity to life among 3,000 teenagers quickly proved to be
accurate. The first evidence of trouble came with a phone call from the
teacher in charge of the cafeteria who needed help to CD
a
disturbance. When Mrs. Suarez arrived on the scene, much to her
®
, students were pounding on their tables, throwing food on the
lunchroom floor, and making a complete ®
of school regulations. It
who the two ringleaders were
took the principal only a moment to @
and to summon them to her office.
Vincent, 16, and Elena, 15, admitted to having stirred up the protest. They
gave as their reasons the poor quality of food served and the dirty
environment. "It's like a pigsty down there," Elena declared, "and the food is
fit only for animals!"
What they had done, Mrs. Suarez told them, was inexcusable, and she ticked
off a list of reasons that made their conduct dangerous and subject to school
discipline. "What you were trying to do," Mrs. Suarez explained, "might be
considered ®
by some but you could have come to me, alone or with
a committee, to register your complaints. I would have investigated and, if
there was merit to your charges, would have taken the necessary action. Now
I'll have to ask you to bring your parents to see me on Monday and to stay
home until then."
Vincent and Elena seemed to be chastened by Mrs. Suarez's lecture.
However, on leaving her office, Elena told an assistant principal that in a
similar incident on a television show she learned that direct, dramatic action
usually gets quicker results than lengthy debate. He advised her to bring that
question up in her social studies class when she returned from suspension.

Clues


4th Day

@ 1st Day

®

3rd Day

@ 1st Day

®
38

3rd Day
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

WEEK

7

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

implacable
tm pia' ke ool
paroxysm
par' ~k siz ~m

MUCH ADO ABOUT A HAIRCUT
Perhaps you read about our school in the newspapers? We
were one of the first to have a showdown on the topic of long
hair for boys. Two honor students, Ron Harris and Len
Chester, were sent to the principal by their French teacher, an
implacable foe of nonconformists, who went into a paroxysm
of anger when she spied the boys in the hall. At first it seemed
like a simple case. The school would reprimand* the boys for
their reprehensible appearance and order them to cut their
hair or be suspended. But the boys' parents decided that the
school had overstepped its jurisdiction; they took their case to
the newspapers. What had started as a local skirmish now
began to take on the appearance of a full-scale war.

reprehensible
rep' ri hen'~ b~l
jurisdiction
JOr' is dik' sh~n
skirmish
sker'mish

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The detective was _ _ _ _ _ _ in his search for the murder weapon.
2. Saying that it was beyond his
the case.
3. In a

, Judge Klein refused to rule on

of rage, the tenant stormed out of the landlord's office.

4. The precocious• boy enjoyed an intellectual

with his elders.

5. The brash* student was forced to apologize for her _ _ _ _ _ _ conduct.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. implacable

a. a fit, sudden outburst

7. paroxysm

b. cannot be pacified, inexorable*

8. reprehensible

c. small fight, brief encounter

9. jurisdiction

d. worthy of blame

10. skirmish

e. power, range of authority

TODAY'S IDIOM

cause celi~bre--a famous law case or controversy
It was a minor dispute, but the ambitious lawyer
sought to turn it into a cause celebre.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

39

NEw WoRDS

harass
har· ;,s or h;,

WEEK

•!• DAY

2

~s·

monolithic
mon· lith' ik
arbitrary
ru-· \);) trer·

7

e

indigent
in· d;, j~nt
fray

fni

THE TEMPEST SPILLS OUT OF THE TEAPOT
Once the newspapers got the story, the case of the longhairs
became a cause celebre.* Ron and Len were interviewed, seen
on 'IV, and regarded by their fellow students as heroes. 'These
are not delinquents or hoods," one reporter wrote, "but cleancut American boys who are being harassed by a monolithic
school system." A caustic* editorial referred to the school's
decision as arbitrary and inane.* A false story even circulated
about the boys being rock-'n-roll performers whose indigent
families needed their salaries. Finally, the Civil Uberties
Union jumped into the .fray with a court order stipulating*
that the principal be required to show cause why the boys
should not be allowed to return to class.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. After the _ _ _ _ _ _ , the feuding families agreed to patch up their differences.
2. The
client was surprised when she was accosted* by her social
worker in the elegant restaurant.
3. To my mind the decision was unreasonable and _ _ _ _ __
4. George Orwell's 1984 depicts a frightening, _ _ _ _ _ _ government.
you, the phone company will give

5. If anonymous telephone callers
you an unlisted number.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. harass

a. based on whim, dictatorial

7. monolithic

b. poor, needy

8. indigent

c. massively solid

9. arbitrary

d. a fight

10. fray

e. to trouble, torment

TODAY'S IDIOM

one swallow does not make a summerdon't jump to conclusions based on incomplete evidence
"Sure, the Yankees won their opening game,
but one swallow does not make a summer."

40

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 297

NEW WORDS

stymie

su· me
effigy
ef aje

HAIRCUT DILEMMA
The school authorities were stymied. Public opinion had been
marshaled against them. No longer was it a simple case of
disciplining two wayward lads. Suddenly it had taken on the
appearance of a nightmare in which the principal was either
hanged In effigy or pictured in cartoons making a villainous
swipe at the two innocent Samsons. But the officials could not
allow Ron and Len to flout their authority with impunity. •
Members of the school board concurred* with the principal's
action but they were cognizant of the popular support for
the boys. Clearly a compromise was called for to resolve the
turbulent situation.

flout

flout
cognizant

kog· na zant
turbulent

ter· bya lant

Sample Sentences In which of the following newspaper headlines do the new words

belong?
1. "COACH OF LOSING TEAM HANGED I N - - - - 2. "CAUSE OF CANCER CONTINUES T O - - - - - DOCTORS"

3. "F.B.I.

OF CLANDESTINE* GANGLAND MEETING"

4. "MANY MOTORISTS

TRAFFIC LAWS, STUDY REVEALS"

5. "_ _ _ _ _ ATMOSPHERE IN ANGRY SENATE CHAMBER"
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. stymie

a. unruly, agitated

7. effigy

b. to hinder, impede

8. flout

c. show contempt, scoff*

9. cognizant

d. aware

10. turbulent

e. a likeness (usually of a hated person)

TooAY's IDIOM
a bitter pill to swallow-a humiliating defeat
It was a bitter pill to swallow for the famous b1lllard player
to be overwhelmed by the 12-year-old girl.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

41

NEW WORDS

WEEK

terminate
ter· md nat
forthwith
forth· with·
exacerbate
eg zas· dr bat
revert
ri vert'
oust
oust

7

•!• DAY

4

HAPPY ENDING?
Following an executive session, the school board ordered the
principal to terminate the suspension and to send the boys
back to class forthwith. Unless it could be shown that their
presence disrupted the learning process, there was no reason
to bar the boys. It was a bitter pill to swallow* for the
principal whose irritation was exacerbated by the ruling. But
some of the sting was taken out of the victory when the boys
appeared in school the next day with their hair clipped to a
respectable length. Everyone breathed a sigh of relief. Just as
things were about to revert to normalcy, however, the same
French teacher then demanded that a girl be ousted from
school for wearing a mini skirt.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. It seemed incongruous• to _ _ _ _ _ _ his employment just when he was so
successful.
2. Upon seeing the show, he called the 1V studio _ _ _ _ _ _ to protest.
3. The ushers moved with alacrity* to _ _ _ _ _ _ the disorderly patrons.
4. Mter taking the drug, she began to
5. The arrest of the spy did much to
countries.

to the days of her childhood.
relations between the two

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. terminate

a. to drive out, eject

7. forthwith

b. return

8. exacerbate

c. to end

9. revert

d. immediately
e. to irritate, make worse

10. oust

TODAY'S IDIOM
an ax to grind-having a selfish motive in the background

I am always dubious• about the motives of a man
who tells me that he has no ax to grind.
42

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

REVIEW

Pupils want to be individuals these days, and many of them refuse to conform to regulations
unless there are good reasons for such rules. In the area of vocabulary study, however, the
only rule that makes sense to all is that true mastery derives from continuous practice.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer spaces. (Which two review words are almost synonymous?)

REVIEW WORDS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

arbitrary
cognizant
effigy
exacerbate
flout
forthwith
fray
harass
implacable
indigent
jurisdiction
monolithic
oust
paroxysm
reprehensible
revert
skirmish
stymie
terminate
turbulent

DEFINITIONS
a. having a massive structure
b. to hinder
c. a conflict, fight
d. relentless, unappeasable
e. immediately
f. blameworthy
g. range of authority
h. to show contempt
i. poverty-stricken
j. to irritate
k. violent outburst
I. to end
m. a likeness
n. go back
o. to torment
p. riotous
q. eject
r. small battle
s. aware
t. based on whim

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

cause celebre
one swallow doesn't make a summer
bitter pill to swallow
an ax to grind

u. having a selfish motive
v. a humiliating defeat
w. don't jump to conclusions
x. famous law case

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 297. Make a record of
those words you missed.

2. - - - - - - - -

Note: fray and skirmish are
almost synonymous.

3. - - - - - - - -

MEANINGS

1. - - - - - - - -

4. - - - - - - - 5. ---------------

43

WORDSEARCH 7

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

The Heading of the Will
One full week after the funeral, the immediate family of millionaire Charles
Hudson was gathered in a law office to hear the reading of the deceased's will.
Mr. Hudson's wife, thirty years his junior, was prepared for a bitter
with his former wife and her son. The lawyer, Don Rollins,
session because he was the only one who was
anticipated a ®
®
of the contents of the revised will that Hudson had ordered drawn
up six months prior to his death.
The current Mrs. Hudson, attired in her smart widow's weeds, expected that
she would receive the lion's share of the estate. The former Mrs. Hudson felt
that she was entitled to most of the estate since she was practically
@
at the present time, despite her substantial alimony payments.
Lawyer Rollins cleared his throat and began to read:
"To my present spouse I leave my town house where she can continue to store
the jewels, shoes, dresses, and furs she accumulated in two years of
shopping and marriage.
"To my son, who has put off fmding a career until my estate would enrich
him, I leave the sum of ten dollars for cab fare to the unemployment office.
"To my former wife whose ®
behavior I tolerated for three decades,
I leave my beach house where she can continue to work on her tan,
something that she prized above our happiness.
"To the Society For the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals I leave the remainder
of my entire estate, knowing they will put it to better use than anyone in this
room."
The lawyer was wrong. No outcries. Silence, supreme silence, reigned among
the shocked audience.

Cl1.1.:s

CD
®

1st Day
3rd Day

® 3rd Day
@ 2nd Day

® 1st Day

44

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 297

WEEK

8 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

emaciated

i

rna· she a tid
surge
serj

ENTER DR. THOMAS A. DOOLEY
In 1956, Look Magazine named Thomas Dooley as one of the
year's ten most outstanding men. Just under thirty years of age
at the time, Dr. Dooley had already distinguished himself by
caring for a half-million sick and emaciated Vietnamese
refugees. When fighting broke out in the divided count.Iy of
Viet Nam, the northern Communist Viet Minh forces surged
southward, scattering thousands of refugees before them. At
the time, Dr. Dooley was a lieutenant, assigned to a tranquil
naval hospital in Yokosuka, Japan. Forthwith* he volunteered
for duty on a navy ship that had been chosen to transport the
refugees to sanctuary in Saigon. The curtain was beginning to
ascend on Dooley's real career.

tr~nquil

trang'

kw~l

sanctuary

sangk · chO er· i
ascend
~send'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The
residents of the Warsaw Ghetto managed to win several
skirmishes* from the Nazis.
2. A firecracker terminated* the _ _ _ _ _ _ climate of the neighborhood.
3. When Richard III violated the
of the church to seize the princes, he
exceeded his jurisdiction.*
4. Chicago put its heaviest players up front, but they were helpless as the Giants' line
___________ toward them.
5. Inexorably* the determined climber began to ___________ the Himalayan peak.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. emaciated
7. surge

8. tranquil
9. sanctuary

10. ascend

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

to rush suddenly
shelter
quiet
abnormally thin, wasted away
to rise

JODAY'S IDIOM

sour grapes-to disparage* something that you cannot have (from Aesop's fable about
the fox who called the grapes sour because he could not reach them)
Marcia said that she didn't want to be on the Principal's Honor Roll
anyway, but we knew that it was just sour grapes on her part.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 297

45

NEW WORDS

WEEK

malnutrition

8

•!• DAY

2

mal' nii trlsh' ~n
afflict
~

flikt'

DOOLEY'S MISSION
Aboard the refugee ship, Dooley's destiny took shape. He
became painfully cognizant* of the malnutrition, disease,
ignorance, and fear that afflicted the natives. In addition, he
discerned* how active the Communists had been in
spreading their anti-American propaganda. Tom Dooley
pitched in to build shelters in Haiphong, and to comfort the
poor Vietnamese there before that besieged city fell to the
powerful Viet Minh forces. He was seemingly unconcerned
by the many privations he had to endure. For his services,
Dooley received the U.S. Navy's Legion of Merit. He told the
story- of this exciting experience in Deliver Us from Evil a
best seller that alerted America to the plight of the
Vietnamese as well as to the sinister menace of communism.

besiege

bi sej'
privation

pri

va' sh~n

sinister
sin'~ st~r

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The stool pigeon, the detective's confidant,* told him about the
2. By running up a white flag, the
withdraw from the fray.*

plot.

troops indicated their desire to

3. Citizens of several Kentucky mountain communities are _ _ _ _ _ _ by the worst
poverty in the nation.
4. The emaciated* prisoners were obviously suffering from advanced _ _ _ _ __
5. Albert Schweitzer endured considerable

as a jungle doctor.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. malnutrition

a. lack of necessities

7. afflict

b. faulty or inadequate diet

8. besiege

c. evil, ominous

9. privation

d. to surround, hem in

10. sinister

e. to trouble greatly, to distress

TODA.Y'S IDIOM

to swap horses in midstream-to vote against a candidate
running for reelection, to change one's mind

The mayor asked for our support, pointing out how foolish
it would be to swap horses in midstream.

46

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

NEW WORDS

ubiquitous
yii bik' w~ las
remote

STYMIED* BY PERSONAL SICKNESS

ri mot'

Mter an extensive lecture tour in 1956, Dr. Dooley returned
to Laos to set up a mobile medical unit. Because the Geneva
Agreement barred the entrance of military personnel to the
country, he resigned from the Navy and went to work as a
civilian. That story is told in The Edge of Tomorrow. Next year.
despite a growing illness, the ubiquitous Dooley turned up in
the remote village of Muong Sing, attempting to thwart his
traditional enemies-disease. dirt, ignorance, starvation-and
hoping to quell* the spread of communism. But his trained
medical eye soon told him that the pain in his chest and back
was a harbinger of a malignant cancer.

thwart

thwart
harbinger

har' ban jar
malignant

rna lig' nant

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Sprinting all over the court, the _ _ _ _ _ _ referee called one foul after another.
2. Ben's reprehensible* table manners led his fraternity brothers to seat him in a
_ _ _ _ _ _ corner of the dining room.
3. The excellent soup was a
4. In an attempt to
a moat of burning oil.

of the delicious meal to follow.
the voracious* ants. he surrounded his house with

5. The surgeon finally located the

tumor that had afflicted* his patient

for many months.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. ubiquitous

a. distant. hidden away

7. remote

b. being everywhere at the same time

8. thwart

c. likely to cause death

9. harbinger

d. to hinder, defeat

10. malignant

e. a forerunner, advance notice

TODAY'S IDIOM

to cool one's heels-to be kept waiting
The shrewd mayor made the angry delegates cool their heels in his outer office.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

47

NEW WORDS

WEEK

excruciating

ek skrii' she

8

•!• DAY

4

a ting

respite

"PROMISES TO KEEP"

res' pit

From August, 1959 until his death in January, 1961, Dooley
suffered almost continuous, excruciating pain. His normal
weight of 180 was cut in half, and even the pain-killing drugs
could no longer bring relief. Knowing that he did not have long
to live, Dr. Dooley worked without respite on behalf of
MEDICO, the organization he had founded to bring medical
aid and hope to the world's sick and needy. The lines of Robert
Frost kept reverberating in Ws mind during those freiful days:
'The woods are lovely, dark and deep/ But I have promises to
keep I And miles to go before I sleep." When he finally
succumbed. millions throughout the world were stunned and
grief-stricken by the tragedy.

reverberating

ri ver'

b~

rcit' ing

fretful

fret'

f~l

succumb
~kum'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. With _ _ _ _ _ _ slowness, the minute hand inched its way around the clock.
2. The rescue team heard the miner's voice _ _ _ _ _ _ through the caves.
3. Around income tax time

faces are ubiquitous. •

4. The voluble* insurance salesman gave my father no _ _ _ _ __
5. Besieged* by debts, the corporation finally had to

to bankruptcy.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. excruciating

a. an interval of relief, delay

7. respite

b. worrisome, irritable

8. reverberating

c. reechoing, resounding

9. fretful

d. agonizing, torturing

10. succumb

e. to give way, yield

TODAY'S IDIOM

a red herring-something that diverts attention from the main issue
(a red herring drawn across a fox's path destroys the scent)

We felt that the introduction of his war record was
a red herring to keep us from inquiring into his graft.
48

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

REVIEW

Shortly before his death, Dr. Dooley was selected by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce as one
of America's ten most outstanding young men. There may be no connection between
success of that type and an expanded vocabulary-but one never knows.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. afflict
2. ascend
3. besiege
4. emaciated
5. excruciating
6. fretful
7. harbinger
8. malignant
9. malnutrition
10. privation
11. remote
12. respite
13. reverberating
14. sanctuary
15. sinister
16. succumb
17. surge
18. thwart
19. tranquil
20. ubiquitous
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. lack of necessities
b. inadequate diet
c. being everywhere at once
d. to trouble greatly
e. agonizing
f. wasted away
g. distant
h. evil
i. to rush suddenly
j. place of protection
k. forerunner
I. to rise
m. to hinder
n. yield
o. postponement
p. to surround
q. becoming progressively worse
r. reechoing
s. worrisome
t. peaceful

sour grapes
swap horses in midstream
to cool one's heels
a red herring

u. a diversion
v. to be kept waiting
w. to change one's mind
x. claiming to despise what you cannot have

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 297. Make a record of
those words you missed.

MEANINGS

1. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

2. - - - - - - - - 3.

4. - - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - - -

49

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Week 8)



••• Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.
1. Eric was (a.fflicted, besieged) with an inoperable ailment.
2. The octogenarian refused to (succumb. surge) to pneumonia.
3. The (remote, ubiquitous) mayor was photographed in four different parts
of the city yesterday.
4. We were worried lest the hostages be suffering from (sanctuary,
malnutrition).

5. The (tranquU, sinister) tone of the spring morning was suddenly broken
by the loud explosion.
6. I heard his voice (excruciating, reverberating) through the corridors.
7. The senator's bid for a second term was (thwarted, respited) by the
electorate.
8. After the king's death, his son (ascended, succumbed) to the throne in
the normal order of succession.
9. The (privations, harbingers) that the poor people endured in their ghetto
apartments were reprehensible.
10. The children were (emaciated, .fretjUl) when awakened from their nap.
11. We were asked to (swap horses in midstream, cool our heels) while
waiting for the bus.

50

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

PARTS OF SPEECH
(From Weeks 2-8)
•:• Choose the noun, verb, or adjective that answers each of the questions
and write the corresponding letter in the appropriate answer space.
a. affluent
b. arbitrary
c. avid
d. cajole
e. elicit
f. euphemism
g. fray
h. harbinger
i. indigent
j. precocious
k. pugnacious
I. reprimand
m. skirmish
n. sour grapes
o. wrest
1. Which noun tells you that something is on the way?
2. Which verb means to extract, to get something out oj?
3. Which adjective describes an action that is based on a whim?
4. Which adjective tells you about children who are very bright for
their age?
5. If a wealthy family moved into your neighborhood, which
adjective would be suitable for them?
6. Which adjective can be substituted for enthusiastic?
7. If you had to coax someone into doing something, which verb
would be appropriate?
8. When we call a garbage collector a sanitary engineer; which noun
comes to mind?
9. In seizing control, which verb is appropriate?
10. Which adjective describes a combative, quarrelsome person?
11. Which verb is a good synonym for scold?
12. What do you indulge in when you belittle that which you cannot
possess?
13. Which adjective describes a poverty-stricken person?
14. Which two nouns are almost synonymous?

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 297

51

WORDSEARCH 8

•!•

Using the clues listed below, ffil in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Aftermath of an Earthquake
The Egyptian earthquake in October 1992 killed 600 residents of
Cairo and hospitalized thousands of others, many of whom were expected to
CD
as a result of their injuries. Especially hard hit were the people
who inhabited the city's slums, who had to seek ®
in those
government buildings, schools, and factories that remained standing.
Muslim fundamentalists were active in providing relief to the survivors in the
form of food, water, blankets, and tents to house the more than 300 families
made homeless by the disaster. In the midst of a rubble-strewn street, a large
tent was set up, bearing the banner, "Islam is the Solution." Believers took
the opportunity to spread the message that the earthquake was a -=@'----of worse things to come, and that a wayward population must follow God's
laws if they expected to @
to heaven.
Throughout history, following volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, tidal waves,
and other calamities that periodically ®
mankind, religious leaders
have used such occurrences to bring the people back to their faith.
"Unless we return to Allah," said a priest, "we can expect more divine
punishment."
Since many Egyptians had expressed unhappiness about their government
prior to the earthquake, there was a good chance for Muslim fundamentalists
to seize the opportunity to win new converts by showing that the answer to
recovery was not through man's efforts but through God's.

Clues
Q) 4th Day

® 1st Day
@ 3rd Day
@ 1st Day

®

52

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 297

WEEK

9

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

impresario
tm· prn sAr· eo
extortion

ek star·

JUST SPELL THE NAME CORRECTLY
P. T. Barnum, the great circus impresario, was once accosted*
by a woman who showed him a scurrilous• manuscript about
himself, and said that unless he paid her, she would have the
book printed. Barnum rejected the extortion attempt. "Say
what you please," he replied, "but make sure that you
mention me in some way. Then come to me and I will estimate
the value of your services as a publicity agent." Barnum
obviously felt that adverse criticism was an asset for a public
figure. A man who seeks the limelight should not care what is
written about him but should be concerned only when they
stop writing about him. Barnum's philosophy suggests that
we might do well Lo review the plethora• of publicity given to
rabble-rousers and bigots.

sh~n

adverse
ad· vers
asset

as· et
bigot
big· ~t

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. When the business manager was accused of _ _ _ _ _ _ , his colleagues sought
to oust• him from the firm.
2. The eminent*

brought many cultural spectacles to our shores.

3. Attacked by the irate* crowd, the
4. Judge Davis hoped to be an

asked the police for sanctuary.•
in his wife's campaigns for political office.

5. It was excruciatingly* painful for the actors to read the _ _ _ _ _ _ reviews that
their performances had received.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. impresario

a. a narrow-minded, prejudiced person

7. extortion

b. unfavorable, harmful

8. adverse

c. one who presents cultural series, organizer

9. asset

d. a valuable thing to have

10. bigot

e. getting money by threats

TODAY'S IDIOM

to spill the beans-to give away a secret
Although he was naturally reticent,* when the felon* was intimidated*
by the members of the rival gang, he spilled the beans.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

53

NEW WORDS

WEEK

blatant

9

•!• DAY

2

blat' nt
entourage

an· tu razh

BIGOTS* GET PUBLICITY
Today, the blatant bigot, the leader of a lunatic fringe, and
the hate-monger, each with his tiny entourage, find it
relatively easy to attract publicity. Newspapers give space to
the virulent acuvitles of those agitators on the grounds that
they are newsworthy. 1V producers and radio executives,
seeking for sensationalism, often extend a welcome to such
controversial characters. "Yes," said the host of one such
program, "we invite bigots, but it is only for the purpose of
making them look r;idiculous by displaying their inane•
policies to the public." Some civic-minded organizations have
answered, however, that the hosts are not always equipped
to demolish those guests, and even if they were, the audience
would still be exposed to the venom they spew forth.

virulent

vir' ya lent
venom

ven·

~m

spew
spy\i

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The visiting dictator's ubiquitous• _ _ _ _ _ _ of bodyguards disturbed our
tranquil* city.
2. Europe's population was afflicted* by a _ _ _ _ _ _ plague known as the
Black Death.
3. From each candidate's headquarters acrimonious• charges would _ _ _ _ __
forth daily.
4. Clym Yeobright's mother succumbed* to the
5. With
family.

of a snake bite.

discourtesy the reporters continued to harass* the bereaved

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. blatant

a. group of attendants

7. entourage

b. disagreeably loud, very showy

8. virulent

c. poison, spite, malice

9. venom

d. throw up, vomit, eject

10. spew

e. full of hate, harmful
TODAY'S IDIOM

to keep a stiff upper lip-to be courageous in the face of trouble
It was admirable to see how the British managed to keep
a stiff upper lip in spite of the German bombing.
54

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

WEEK

9

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

loath
loth

COPING WITH BIGOTS*
Suppose a bigot wished to organize a meeting in your
neighborhood. Since we cherish freedom of speech, we are
loath to deny the request, even if he preaches hatred. As a
result, hate-mongers are given the opportunity to rent halls,
conduct meetings, publish abusive literature, and solicit
contributions. What can be done about them? One astute
observer, Prof. S. Andhil Fineberg, advocates the "quarantine
method." His plan is to give such groups no publicity and to
ignore them completely. Without the warmth of the spotlight,
he feels that the bigot will freeze and become ineffectual.
Debating with such warped minds is not feasible* and only
tends to exacerbate* the situation.

~

stiit' or

SC'

solicit
lis' it

~

astute
styiit'

advocate
ad' va kat

ineffectual
fek' chii

in'~

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. Since we felt that the ruling was arbitrary,* we were _ _ _ _ _ _ to obey it.
2. Daily the volunteers went out to
3. My neighbor was
the mortgage.

funds for the indigent* families.
enough to discern* the adverse* features of

4. The general was sure to
the bombings.

that we give the enemy no respite* from

5. The play was so blatantly* bad that the impresario* fired its _ _ _ _ _ _ director.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. loath

a. keen, shrewd

7. solicit

b. to be in favor of, to support

8. astute

c. not effective

9. advocate (v.)

d. unwilling, reluctant
e. to beg, seek earnestly

10. ineffectual

TODAY'S IDIOM

to have cold feet-to hesitate because of fear or uncertainty
My cousin was all set to join the paratroops,
but at the last moment he got coldfeet.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

55

NEW WORDS

WEEK

scrutinize
skrOt' n iz

9 •:•

DAY

4

nefarious
ni fer'

e ~s

amicable
am·~~

hal

vexatious
vek sa.' sh~s
malady
mal'~

de

MORE THAN SILENCE
The quarantine method for handling bigots implies more
than giving them the silent treatment. Prof. Fineberg urges
community-relations organizations to scrutinize the nefarious
activities of hate-mongers and to be prepared to furnish
information about them to amicable inquirers. When a
rabble-rouser is coming, those organizations should privately
expose him to opinion-molders. In addition, constructive
efforts should be taken to induce people to involve
themselves in projects for improving intergroup relations.
Bigger than the vexatious immediate problem is the need to
find out the cause for such bigotry and to counteract this
sinister* malady that afflicts a segment of our society.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The
buzzing of the mosquitoes as they surged* about our heads
nearly drove us insane.
2. Our

relations with Latin America are an asset* to hemispheric trade.

3. Once the virulent* _ _ _ _ _ _ had run its course. my temperature dropped.
4. We were distraught* upon hearing the venom* spewed* forth by the _ _ _ _ __
bigot. •

5. No sooner did the lawyer _ _ _ _ _ _ the extortion* note than she called
the police.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. scrutinize

a. annoying

7. nefarious

b. villainous, vicious

8. amicable

c. examine closely

9. vexatious

d. disease

10. malady

e. friendly, peaceful

TODAY'S IDIOM

to look a gift horse in the mouth-to be critical of a present
(from the practice of judging a horse's age by his teeth)
Although I didn't have much use for Uncle Roy's present, I took it with a big
smile since I have been taught never to look a gift horse in the mouth.
56

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

WEEK

9

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

There is an excellent book entitled How to Argue with a Conservative that gives the reader
the tools necessary for success in argumentation. At times you may have to engage in a
verbal skirmish* with a bigot.* It would be to your advantage if you had the proper words
at your fingertips.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. adverse
2. advocate
3. amicable
4. asset
5. astute
6. bigot
7. blatant
8. entourage
9. extortion
10. impresario
11. ineffectual
12. loath
13. malady
14. nefarious
15. scrutinize
16. solicit
17. spew
18. venom
19. vexatious
20. virulent
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. to support
b. keen, shrewd
c. something of value
d. villainous
e. seek earnestly
f. organizer
g. annoying
h. followers
i. disagreeably loud
j. examine closely
k. poison
I. harmful
m. not effective
n. prejudiced person
o. unfavorable
p. friendly
q. unwilling
r. vomit
s. disease
t. getting money by threats

to sptll the beans
stiff upper lip
cold feet
look a gift horse in the mouth

Now check your answers on
page 298. Make a record of
those words you missed.
Once again, use those words
in original sentences.

u. to be critical of a present
v. hesitation because of fear
w. courage in the face of trouble
x. give away a secret

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1.
2.

3.
4.

5. ----------------57

WORDSEARCH 9

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

This

Century~

Deadliest Disease

When the American public started to hear about the AIDS virus in the 1980s,
there was a measure of concern but no real alarm. After all, some said, it was
a problem solely for a small group of intravenous drug users who shared dirty
needles, and for the homosexual community.
But as the numbers of afflicted people grew during the 1980s and 1990s, we
began to CD
the tragic news stories more closely. The deaths of
young people like Ryan White and Kimberly Bergalis, not members of the atrisk groups referred to above, convinced us that what was at first regarded
merely as a @
illness was actually a ®
threat to the
general community.
In the mid-1980s, ®
medical researchers were optimistic that a
vaccine for AIDS would be found in short order. Those predictions proved to
be inaccurate. In October 1992, former Surgeon-General C. Everett Koop said
that he doubted we would ever find a cure for the disease. With over 200,000
Americans already having succumbed to the ®
killer, and another
300,000 who were HIV-positive and could contract a full-blown form of AIDS,
Koop's statement sent chills throughout the country.
A prominent AIDS ex-pert, however, tobk issue with Koop. ''The fight will be
difficult," said Dr. Harley Smith, "but we will find an answer very shortly."
Now, in the twenty-first century, the answer has not yet been found.
Clues

CD 4th Day
® 4th Day
® 2nd Day
@ 3rd Day

® 4th Day

58

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

WEEK

10

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

inclement
in Idem' =tnt
peruse

P=- ruz'

JERRY HART'S SIXTH SENSE
An uneasy feeling had made Jerry Hart miserable all day long.
It was difficult to explain, but the similar sensations in the

premonition

pre· m=- nish • =tn

past had been accurate-trouble was on the way. Just as
some people can predict the onset of inclement weather
because of an aching in their bones, so could Jerry .detect
incipient* disaster. He sat at his desk, trying to peruse a
company report but his efforts were ineffectual.* The gnawing
at his insides, the tinge• of uneasiness, the premonition of
calamity that besieged* him would not desist. When the
phone rang, he recoiled with fear-it was his wife and she was
hysterical. Their son had been bitten by a mad dog!

desist
di ztst'
recoil
rt koil'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. After being admonished* by his father, he began to
daily.

the want ads

2. When the black cat crossed her path, Ellen had a

of disaster.

3. The pickets promulgated* a warning that they would not
efforts to enhance* their standard of living.
4. As the snake prepared to strike, the girls

in their
in horror.

5. She blamed her absence from the game on the
that was sour grapes.*

weather, but we knew

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. inclement

a. unfavorable, stormy

7. peruse

b. to read carefully

8. premonition

c. cease

9. desist

d. forewarning
e. draw back

10. recoil

TODAY'S IDIOM

to pay the piper-to bear the consequences
(from the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin)

The cruel leader was doing well at the present time, but
he knew that one day he might have to pay the piper.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

59

NEW WORDS

WEEK

pertinent
pert' n ant
mastiff
mas' tif

1 0 •:•

DAY

2

CRISIS!
As soon as Jerry Hart could get the pertinent facts from his

obsess

wife, he dashed out of the office on his way home. He jostled •
people in the hallway, implored* the elevator operator to
huny, and with flagrant• disregard for an elderly gentleman
jumped into the cab he had hailed. The twenty-minute
taxi ride seemed interminable* and all the while horrible
thoughts occurred to Jerry. Visions of an ugly mastiff with
foaming jaws obsessed him. A crowd of people had gathered
in front of his house so that Jerry had to force his way
through them. Little Bobby was on his bed, surrounded by
a doctor, a policeman, Jerry's doleful wife, his two daughters,
and a half-dozen wan neighbors.

ab ses'
doleful

dot· fal
wan
won

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The stockbroker was _ _ _ _ _ _ with the idea of becoming a painter.
2. My nervous neighbor bought a pugnacious• _ _ _ _ _ _ to frighten burglars.
3. _ _ _ _ _ _ expressions abounded* throughout headquarters on the night of the
election.
4. During the trial the astute• lawyer was able to elicit* the _ _ _ _ _ _ information
from the key witness.
5. Mter the tension, his normally ruddy face was _ _ _ _ _ _ and tired.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. pertinent

a. sad, melancholy

7. mastiff

b. to the point

8. obsess

c. sickly pale

9. doleful

d. to haunt, preoccupy

10. wan

e. large dog

TODAY'S IDIOM

on the carpet-being scolded
Because of her repeated lateness, Betty's boss called her on the carpet.

60

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 298

WEEK

10

•!• DAY

NEW WoRDS

3

histrionics
his· tre on· tks
elusive
I

A TIME FOR DECISION
The doctor explained the situation calmly. avoiding
histrionics. First of all, they didn't know whether the dog had
rabies. Secondly, the elusive dog had frustrated all attempts
to find him so far. Finally, the decision would have to be made
whether Bobby was to undergo the painful vaccination
administered daily for two weeks. Mrs. Hart said that a
neighbor who had seen the dog claimed that it had been
foaming at the mouth, barking, and growling constantly-all
symptomatic of rabies. But the policeman interjected that
there hadn't been a case of a mad dog in the county in over
twenty years: he repudiated* the neighbor's report,
advocating* that they do nothing for at least another day. Mr.
and Mrs. Hart sat down to think about their next step.

to· slv

frustrate
frus· trat
symptomatic
t~ mat· ik

simp·

interject

in· t.,r

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The warden _ _ _ _ _ _ the prisoners' attempt to escape by adding more guards.
2. Most viewers hate it when a commercial is _ _ _ _ _ _ into a suspense drama.
3. Saying that he would not tolerate* her
temperamental actress.

. the director fired the

4. All his life he found happiness _ _ _ _ _ _ , but wealth easy to come by.
5. The sordid* rioting was _ _ _ _ _ _ of the problems facing the large cities.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. histrionics

a. having to do with signs or symptoms, indicative

7. elusive

b. hard to grasp

8. frustrate

c. insert, interrupt

9. symptomatic

d. display of emotions

10. interject

e. counteract, foil, thwart*

TODAY'S IDIOM

to show ones hand-to reveal one's intentions
When someone joined in bidding for the antique,
the dealer was forced to show his hand.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

61

NEW WORDS

WEEK

inert

10

•!• DAY

4

inert'
salient

sa' le ant

THE PERTINENT* FACTS ABOUT RABIES
"Give me some of the rudimentary* information about the
disease, Doc," said Jerry, glancing toward the inertfigure of
his son. "Well, as you know, the malady* used to be called
'hydrophobia' (fear of water) because one of the symptoms is
an inability to swallow liquids. Actually, it is caused by a live
virus from the saliva of an infected animal. If saliva gets into
a bite wound, the victim may get rabies. The virus travels
along the nerves to the spine and brain. Once the salient
characteristics appear (ten days to six months) then death is
imminent" "What are the symptoms?" asked Mrs. Hart.
"Pain and numbness, difficulty in swallowing, headaches
and nervousness. Also, muscle spasms and convulsions."
The squeamish neighbors who were engrossed in the
doctor's remarks gasped. "I think we should go ahead
with the injections," the distraught* Mrs. Hart said. "I've
heard enough."

imminent

tm· a nant
squeamish
skwe' mish
engrossed
en grost'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The senator loathed* it when people said that an atomic war was _ _ _ _ __
2. When his
partner complained about a lack of ethics,* the
businessman laughed at his innocence.
3.

in his crossword puzzle, he failed to notice the paucity* of customers
in the restaurant.

4. One of the _ _ _ _ _ _ features of her poetry is a dependence upon
euphemisms.*
5. Seeing the _ _ _ _ _ _ player, the manager dashed out onto the field.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

7. salient

a. outstanding, prominent
b. without power to move

8. imminent

c. likely to happen, threatening

9. squeamish

d. absorbed

6. inert

10. engrossed

e. easily shocked, over sensitive
TODAY'S IDIOM

to tilt at windmills-to fight imaginary enemies (from Don Quixote)
The vice president told the committee, "We're really on your side,
and if you fight us you'll be tUting at windmills."
62

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

WEEK

10

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

At the end of this week's study, you will have covered 200 words and 40 idioms. In addition,
you will have seen many of those words used several times in subsequent lessons. If you
have been operating at only 75% efficiency, you have, nevertheless, added substantially to
your arsenal of words.
Here's a thought: wouldn't it be wonderful if through genuine attention to the daily dosage
you could move up to 80%---or even 90%? Start by matching the 20 words with their
meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition in the appropriate answer space.
Did somebody say 100%?

REVIEW WORDS
1. desist
2. doleful

3. elusive
engrossed
frustrate
histrionics
imminent
inclement
inert
interject
mastiff
obsess
pertinent
peruse
premonition
recoil
salient
squeamish
symptomatic
wan

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

DEFINITIONS
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
I.

m.
n.
o.

p.
q.
r.
s.
t.

sad
draw back
foil
cease
interrupt
stormy, harsh
indicative
appropriate
powerless to move
large dog
outstanding
read carefully
preoccupy
easily shocked
forewarning
about to happen
hard to grasp
pale
absorbed
display of emotions

IDIOMS
21 .
22.
23.
24.

u.
v.
w.
x.

to pay the piper
on the carpet
to show one's hand
to tilt at windmills

Now check your answers on
page 298. Make a record of
those words you missed.

to reveal one's emotions
being scolded
fight imaginary enemies
to bear the consequences

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1.

2.
3.
4.

5.
63

WORDSEARCH 10



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

The Potato that Strangled Idaho
People who are CD
about the sight of blood or @
in horror
from most forms of violence would do well to avoid some of the movies now
being shown at their local cinemas. Producers have learned ·that films that
scare the patrons out of their seats, ironically, put millions of fans into those
in the goose pimple-inducing spectacles that
seats, keeping them ®
flash across the screen.
Of course, each movie carries with it a rating that indicates its suitability for
certain age groups, either because of its subject matter, language,
presentation, or level of violence. Pictures with a "G" rating are approved for
all audiences. while. at the other end of the scale. those that are given an "X"
rating are for adults only with no children allowed under any circumstance.
Getting an "R" rating indicates that the movie is restricted (no one under 18
admitted without an adult) but some Hollywood moguls consider the "R" to
be the magnet that insures box office success. And we can be sure that as
long as shock films ring up a merry tune on the cash registers, producers will
from making them.
not @
A director who specializes in making gory films involving monsters, vampires.
and brutal serial killers boasted in a college lecture that his work was in good
that in his
taste. One student who disasgreed was provoked to ®
opinion the diet of "shock-schlock" movies was in worse taste than those
pictures that contained vulgar language and nudity. "At least they're honest,"
he declared.
Clues

CD 4th Day

®

lst Day

@ 4th Day
@ lst Day

®
64

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

11 •:•

WEEK

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

poignant
poi' ny~nt
inundate
tn' un dit

THE SEARCH FOR THE DOC (CONTINUED)
Meanwhile, the Harts had notified the local radio stations to
broadcast a poignant appeal for the dog's owner to come
fmward. The station was inundated with phone calls but all
leads were fruitless. From what Bobby had told them, a huge
dog had leaped out from a red station wagon in the
supermarket's parking lot. After biting Bobby it vanished. The
six-year-old was too concerned with the bites he had received
to see where the dog disappeared to. The boy's stacy was
garbled. but he did remember that the animal was gray and
had a collar. There was little tangible* evidence to go on, but the
police remained sanguine.

fruitless
frO.t' Us

garbled
gAr' l»ld
sanguine
sang·~n

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The sermon was

enough to bring tears to the brash* delinquent's

eyes.
2. Although the message was

3. After a

. its salient* points were clear enough.

attempt to wrest* control of the government, the traitors

were incarcerated.*
4. Even though his boat was almost _ _ _ _ _ _ . the skipper was loath* to radio

for help.
5. Because the malignancy* had gone unchecked, the surgeons were not

_ _ _ _ _ _ about the patient's chances.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. inundate

a. useless

7. fruitless

b. confused, mixed up

8. poignant

c. optimistic

9. garbled

d. to flood

10. sanguine

e. moving, painful to the feelings

TooAY's IDIOM
to feather one's nest-grow rich by taking advantage of circumstances

While working as the tax collector, he adroitly* feathered his own nest.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

65

NEW WORDS

WEEK

phlegmatic
fleg mat' ik
corroborate
ka rob' a nit

11

•!• DAY

2

NO RELIEF
The normally phlegmatic Jeny Hart was deeply upset.
1\venty-four hours had passed without result, and even if the
rabies could not be corroborated, Jeny was determined to see
that his son received the vaccine. At the suggestion of some
friends, he organized a comprehensive search party, zealously
fanning out in circles around the supermarket. They knocked
on every door, inspected every dog, and came back emptyhanded. Although the Harts were sick with wony (they had to
be coerced into going to sleep), little Bobby seemed to be in
great spirits. The excruciating* vigil continued.

comprehensive
kom' prt hen' stv
zealous

zel' as
coerce

ko ers'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Harriet's egregious• error disturbed even her _ _ _ _ _ _ employer.
2. The fund raiser was so _ _ _ _ _ _ that he solicited* money from a Salvation
Army Santa Claus.
3. In order to get the job, you had to go through the drudgery• of filling out a ten-page
_ _ _ _ _ _ questionnaire.
4. The elusive• fugitive was

by his attorney into surrendering.

5. Even the swiildler's nefarious* accomplice refused to

his alibi.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. phlegmatic

a. enthusiastic

7. corroborate

b. calm, hard to rouse to action

8. comprehensive _ _

c. confirm, support

9. zealous

d. thorough

10. coerce

e. to force

TODAY'S IDIOM
Fair-weather friends-unreliable, they fail one in time of distress
The general was chagrined• to learn that so many of his supposed
supporters were actually faiT-weather friends.

66

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

WEEK

11

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

elapse
1 laps·

THE POLICE FIND THE DOG

m~

Forty hours had elapsed before the police work and the
publicity paid off. By meticulously checking the registrations
of every red station wagon in the neighborhood and then
cross-checking dog licenses, the police narrowed the search
to four owners. After a few telephone calls, the apologetic
owner was located and directed to bring her muzzled German
shepherd to the Hart domicile. Bobby identified the dog, and
the animal was taken to a veterinary's clinic to have the
necessary tests performed. The lax owner, Mrs. McGraw,
admitted that the dog had a sporadic mean streak, but she
scoffed* at the idea of rabies. Jerry Hart noticed for the first
time in two days that his uneasy feeling had departed.

meticulous
tik' ya bs
domicile

dom· ~ sil
lax
laks
sporadic
spa rad· ik

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Inadvertently,* Emma had allowed two months to _ _ _ _ _ _ before paying
her rent.
2. The lackluster* battle was punctuated by _ _ _ _ _ _ mortar fire.
3. A man's _ _ _ _ _ _ is his castle.
4. Because the watchman was _ _ _ _ _ _ , thievery was rampant* at the
warehouse.
5. The _ _ _ _ _ _ musician had nothing but disdain* for his disorganized friends.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. elapse

a. careless, negligent

7. meticulous

b. to slip by

8. domicile

c. occasional

9. lax

d. home

e. careful

10. sporadic

TODAY'S IDIOM

to sow one's wild oats-to lead a wild, carefree life
During his teen years, the millionaire avidly* sowed his wild oats.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 298

67

NEw

WoRDS

11

WEEK

rash

•!• DAY

4

rash
conjecture
k~n

jek · ch~r

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL
The Harts were greatly relieved to learn that the rash
coryecture about the dog was not true. Because the German
shepherd was not rabid, the necessity for the painful
treatment was obviated. The police gave the dog's owner a
summons for allowing the animal to go unmuzzled. Little
Bobby was treated to an ice cream sundae and a Walt Disney
double feature. The neighbors searched for other lurid
happenings, and Jeny Hart went back to his office. "What
kind of dog was that?" his secretary asked. "Oh, his bark was
worse than his bite," quipped Jeny.

obviate
ob'

ve at

lurid

hir· id
quip
kwip

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. It was sheer _ _ _ _ _ _ on the detective's part but it led to the arrest of the
vexatious• counterfeiters.
2. The newspaper switched from mundane* coverage to
3. It was exceedingly
longshoreman.

reporting.

of the lightweight to insult the belligerent•

4. The necessity for preparing sandwiches was
was postponed.

when the picnic

5. Hamlet remembered that Yorick was always ready with a lusty _ _ _ _ __
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. rash (adj.)

a. do away with, eliminate

7. conjecture

b. joke

8. obviate

c. guess

9. lurid

d. sensational

10. quip

e. too hasty, reckless

TODAY'S IDIOM

windfall-unexpected financial gain
When the bankrupt company struck oil,
the surprised investor received a windfall of $20,000.
68

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 298

WEEK

11

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

Many teachers have jested about their students who confused rabies with rabbis, Jewish
clergymen. We know that those who get the message of this book, true vocabulary mastery,
will make few such errors.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. coerce
2. comprehensive
3. conjecture
4. corroborate
5. domicile
6. elapse
7. fruitless
8. garbled
9. inundate
10. lax
11. lurid
12. meticulous
13. obviate
14. phlegmatic
15. poignant
16. quip
17. rash
18. sanguine
19. sporadic
20. zealous
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. to flood, to swamp
b. home
c. painful to the feelings, moving
d. useless
e. reckless
f. confirm
g. calm, sluggish
h. sensational
i. hopeful
j. do away with
k. confused, mixed up
I. guess
m. to pass by
n. careless
o. occasional
P· thorough
q. careful
r. to force
s. enthusiastic
t. to joke

to feather one's nest
fair-weather friends
to sow wild oats
windfall

u.
v.
w.
x.

to lead a wild life
unexpected financial gain
unreliable acquaintances
provide for oneself at the expense of others

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 298. Make a record of
those words you missed. If
you were able to get them all
right, use the five spaces to
create antonyms for numbers
7, 8, 10, 17, and 19.

MEANINGS

1.

2. ----------------3.

4.

5. -----------------

69

WORDSEARCH 11
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Assuming Blunders
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the
republic for Richard Sands."
"Deliver us from evil. Lead us not into Penn Station."
Teachers who train students to memorize and then do rote recitations
interpretation of the
sometimes find that the youngsters have a actual words. Eliza Berman, an educator who is <1>
about her own
use of language, invited colleagues to send her examples of confusion in
students' writings. Little did she realize that they would quickly _®____
her letterbox with their pet mistakes. As a result, Ms. Berman was able to
list of howlers that include the following:
compile a fairly @)
"The inhabitants of ancient Egypt were called Mummies. They lived in the
Sarah Dessert and traveled by Camelot."
"Homer wrote The Oddity in which Penelope was the first hardship Ulysses
endured on his journey."
"Socrates died from an overdose of wedlock."
"King Alfred conquered the Dames."
"Indian squabs carried porpoises on their backs."
"Under the Constitution, the people enjoy the right to keep bare arms."
"In the Olympic Games, the Greeks ran, jumped, hurled the bisquits and
threw the java."
"Lincoln was America's greatest Precedent."
Ms. Berman is not too ®
about eliminating such errors from pupils'
compositions and test papers. Her advice: enjoy!

Clues

CD 1st Day
@ 3rd Day
@ 1st Day

@ 2nd Day

®
70

1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 298

WEEK

12

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

diatribe
di' a trib
inhibition
in' a bish' an or
in' hi bish' an

OFF BROADWAY
When Monte Ziltch told his boss, Mr. Foy, that he was
quitting as an accountant to become an actor, the man was
convulsed with laughter. Mter Mr. Foy realized that Monte
was obsessed* with the idea, he became quite serious,
launching into a diatribe on the importance of responsibility
in the younger generation. Monte confessed that he had been
developing ulcers as an accountant, and when his
psychiatrist suggested that the sickness was a result of
inhibitions Monte agreed. Now a fortuitous opportunity to get
into show business required Monte to make an immediate
decision. Mr. Foy stormed out of the office, muttering
incoherently about hippies, beatniks, and others of that ilk

fortuitous
fo tu' a bs
incoherent

in'

ko hir' ant

ilk
ilk

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. When a large expenditure is imminent,* my father goes into a long _ _ _ _ __
on the need for economy.
2. It is often fruitless* to argue with racists, bigots*, and others of that _ _ _ _ __

3. Since the patient's speech was garbled* and

, we could only

conjecture* as to his message.
4. The meeting was a

one, but the jealous husband construed* it as

pre-arranged and clandestine.*
5. Mter two drinks the usually phlegmatic* dentist lost all his _ _ _ _ __

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. diatribe

a. kind, sort

7. inhibition

b. disjointed

8. fortuitous

c. accidental

9. incoherent

d. bitter criticism

10. ilk

e. restraint

TODAY'S IDIOM

to wear one's heart on one's sleeve-to make one's feelings evident
People who wear their hearts on their sleeves frequently suffer emotional upsets.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

71

NEw

WoRDS

WEEK

prestigious

pre suj·

12

•!• DAY

2

~s

placard

plak· ard

AN All-ROUND MAN
The need for a decision came about when Monte was invited
to join a prestigious summer stock company, starting in
mid-June. As a mature "apprentice," he would be required
to take tickets, paint scenery, prepare placards, assist with
lighting, costumes, and props, and carry an occasional
spear in a walk-on role. Since the company would stage five
major plays during the summer, as well as a half-dozen
shows for children, there was a chance that Monte might
actually get a part before too many weeks had elapsed.* In
addition, he would be attending the drama classes that were
an integral part of the summer theater. The remuneration
would be nominal but at last Monte Ziltch would be fulfilling
a life-long ambition.

integral

tn·

t~

gr.,l

remuneration
ri myii. n~

ra. sh~n

nominal
nom·~ n~l

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The police posted a _ _ _ _ _ _

~sking

2. A salient* feature of the
of employees.

all citizens to desist* from looting.

company's success was its fair treatment

3. Derek Jeter's _ _ _ _ _ _ from the New York Yankees made him a millionaire
many times over.
4. For allowing his ferocious mastiff* to appear on a commercial, the trainer was paid
a _ _ _ _ _ _ sum.
5. She seemed to be an unimportant member of the president's entourage* but actually
she played an
role in White House affairs.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. prestigious

a. essential

7. placard

b. poster

8. integral

c. slight

9. remuneration

d. reward, pay

10. nominal

e. illustrious

TODAY'S IDIOM

to wash dirty linen in public-to openly discuss private affairs
"Let's talk about it privately," his uncle said,
"rather than wash our dirty linen in public."
72

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

WEEK

12

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

expunge
ek spun.r

flamboyant

FROM LEDGERS TO SCRIPTS

Dam boi'ant

During the first weeks of the summer, Monte Ziltch didn't
even have time to consider whether he had made an
egregious• mistake. He was too engrossed* with his work,
performing a thousand and one odd jobs around the theater.
First there was the opening production of A Chorus Line, then
two weeks of The Fantasticks, followed by a poignant• Diary of
Anne Frank, which did excellent business. All through those
weeks, Monte painted, carried, nailed, collected, ran, studied,
and perspired. He had expunged all traces of debits and
credits from his mind, burying himself in the more
flamboyant world of the theater. Accounting became
anathema to him as the schism between his present utopia
and his former drudgery* widened.

anathema
a nath' a rna

schism
siz' am

utopia
yii to' pea

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. In Lost Horizon a character recoiled* at the idea of living in a _ _ _ _ __
2. A pernicious• _ _ _ _ _ _ developed between the two sisters.
3. The traitor's name was

in his father's domicile.*

4. Our theatrical pages were inundated* with press releases from the _ _ _ _ __
producer.
5. Mter having made the rash* statements, the senator wished that he could
_ _ _ _ _ _ them from the record.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. expunge

a. split

7. flamboyant

b. something greatly detested

8. anathema

c. place of perfection
d. erase

9. schism
10. utopia

e. showy, colorful

TODAY'S IDIOM
to save face-to avoid disgrace

Instead of firing the corrupt executive, they allowed
him to retire in order that he might save face.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

73

NEW WORDS

WEEK

timorous

12

•!• DAY

4

tim' ar as
truncated
trung' ka tid

IRONY FOR MERRYWEATHER
At last, Monte's chance to perform came. He had played the
timorous Lion in a truncated version of "The Wizard of Oz,"
which the apprentices had staged. But now there was an
open audition to cast the final show of the season. It was to
be a jaunty original comedy, given a summer tryout prior to
a Broadway opening. Monte, who by now had adopted the
stage name of Monte Merryweather, read for the producers.
hoping to get the part of the hero's fractious landlord.
Unfortunately, the competition was too rough-but the
director assigned Monte to a less ostentatious part. And so
for the first two weeks in September the stage-struck
accountant had a two-minute, two-line part. What was his
role? The hero's accountant!

jaunty
jon'

te

fractious

frak' shas
ostentatious

os · ten ta, shas

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. It is frustrating* to have one's lengthy remarks printed in
2. With his cap set at a
street.

form.

angle, the amicable* sailor strutted down the

3. In an _ _ _ _ _ _ display of histrionics* the star refused to perform.
4. Under duress* the normally _ _ _ _ _ _ husband was coerced* into demanding a
raise.
5. Roger's _ _ _ _ _ _ behavior compounded* the bad relationship he had already
had with his partner.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. timorous

a. fearful

7. truncated

b. cut short

8. jaunty

c. sprightly, gay

9. fractious

d. showy

10. ostentatious

e. quarrelsome

TODAY'S IDIOM

Indian summer-warm autumn weather
Parts of the country were deep in snow,
but the East was enjoying an Indian summer.
74

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

WEEK

12 •:•

DAY

5

REVIEW

How many of the new words have now become a part of your "working vocabulary"? At first.
their use may be conscious. even studied. However, the squeaks will soon disappear. Try a
few this weekend.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space. (Note the resemblance between flamboyant and
ostentatious).

REVIEW WORDS
1. anathema
2. diatribe
3. expunge
4. flamboyant
5. fortuitous
6. fractious
7. ilk
8. incoherent
9. inhibition
10. integral
11. jaunty
12. nominal
13. ostentatious
14. placard
15. prestigious
16. remuneration
17. schism
18. timorous
19. truncated
20. utopia
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
well-known
b. quarrelsome
c. kind. sort
d. poster
e. disjointed
f. sprightly
g. accidental
h. in name only. slight
i. restraint
j. reward
k. a curse
I. bitter criticism
m. erase
n. colorful
o. cut short
p. essential
q. fearful
r. showy
s. split
t. place of perfection
a.

wear one's h~art on one's sleeve
wash dirty linen in public
save face
Indian summer

Now check your answers on
page 299. Make a record of
those words you missed.

u.
v.
w.
x.

make one's feelings evident
warm autumn weather
to avoid disgrace
openly discuss private affairs

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ----------------2.

3. ----------------4.
5.

75

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Week 12)

•!•

Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.

1. The senator went into a lengthy (diatribe, remuneration) about
government waste in the milltary budget.
2. Most reformers are seeking to create a (schism, utopia).
3. Lorraine was criticized sharply for the (ostentatious, nominal) way in
which she furnished her apartment.
4. Anyone so (ilk, timorous) should not have been selected to guard the

castle.
5. My brother was promoted to a (prestigious, flamboyant) job in his
company.
6. Although his speech was (anathema, jaunty) we were able to sense its
underlying seriousness.
7. The failing grade was (expunged, truncated) from her record when she
submitted the excellent term paper.
8. I got my job as a result of a (fractious, fortuitous) meeting with the
director of personnel.
9. The bookkeeper is such an (integral, incoherent) part of our organization
that we pay her a very high salary.
10. We marched in front of the embassy with (placards, inhibitions) held
high.
11. Don't (save face, wash your dirty linen in public) if you plan to run for
office.

76

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

WORDSEARCH 12
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Negi~

Oprah/ Ellen/ et a/.

The television talk shows of our era, featuring such
public figures

as Regis Philbin, Oprah Winfrey, and Ellen De Generes, attract millions of
daytime viewers and constitute a powerful influence on the American scene.
When the media can hold the attention of so sizable a chunk of couch
potatoes, it pays to scrutinize it closely.
A student at Stanford University, doing her doctoral thesis o~ the unusual
popularity of the afternoon talk shows, noted the fierce competition among
those programs for guests who are off the beaten track. According to her:
"Almost every irregular,®.;:;_ _ _ _ life-style you can think of has already
been featured on one of the shows and probably on all of them, when you add
Mantel Williams, Jerry Springer, and others of that ®

who serve as

network hosts. They have shown teenagers who marry people in their sixties,
daughters and mothers who date the same man, men who have gone through
a marriage ceremony with other men, women with prominent tattoos, and
4 _ _ __
other people who are totally free of @..;;;;.


for our guests is so small," said a producer, "that these shows
are inexpensive to put on. And say what you want about good ·taste, millions
watch us every day, and as long as the ratings are that healthy, sponsors will
pay good money to be identified with us."
Clues

®
®

2nd Day
3rd Day
1st Day

@ 1st Day

®

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

77

NEW WORDS

WEEK

importune

13

•!• DAY

1

im' por tun'
incontrovertible
in' kon t.rn

ver' b hal

A VISIT TO THE PRESIDENT
In the winter of 1941, Enrico Fermi and a number of other
distinguished scientists importuned President Franklin
Roosevelt for authorization to begin an all-out effort in
atomic energy research. The scientists were alarmed by
incontrovertible evidence
of surreptitious German
experiments, and they asked for speedy approval. Italianborn Enrico Fermi was the ideal man to lead the atomic
research. Already in 1938 he had won the Nobel Prize for
work with radioactive elements and neutron bombardment.
Fermi had found a haven from the Fascists (his wife was
Jewish) and he knew that if the Germans were the first to
develop an atomic bomb it would mean that Hitler could
subjugate the entire world. The international race for atomic
supremacy was on.

surreptitious
s~r· ~p ttsh' ~s
haven
ha.' v~n
subjugate

sub' j~ gat

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Although Eddie was not sanguine* about his chances, he continued to
_ _ _ _ _ _ his boss for a winter vacation.
2. In inclement• weather our bam is a _ _ _ _ _ _ for many animals.
3. The dictator used duplicity* in order to
4. With a

his rivals.

movement, the meticulous• bookkeeper emptied the ash tray.

5. The expert's

testimony corroborated* the police report.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. importune

a. undeniable

7. incontrovertible- - b. ask urgently

8. surreptitious

c. conquer

9. haven

d. place of safety

10. subjugate

e. stealthy, accomplished by secret

TODAY'S IDIOM

to take the bull by the horns-to face a problem directly
Mter several days of delay, the minister decided to take the
bull by the horns, and so he sent for the vandals.
78

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

WEEK

13 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

ultimate
ul'.b mit
eventuate
1 ven'

THE ULTIMATE WEAPON TAKES SHAPE
Enrtco Fermi designed a device that could eventuate in a
chain reaction. It consisted of layers of graphite, alternated
with chunks of uranium. The uranium emitted neutrons, and
the graphite slowed them down. Holes were left for long
cadmium safety rods. By withdrawing those control rods
Fermi could speed up the production of neutrons, thus
increasing the number of uranium atoms that would be split
(fission). When the rods were withdrawn to a critical point,
then the neutrons would be produced so fast that the graphite
and cadmium could not absorb them. In that manner a chain
reaction would result. Slowly, Fermi's first atomic pile began
to grow in a subterranean room at Columbia University. The
big question remained-was it viable?

chil

at

emit
1 mit'

subterranean
sub' ta ni'
an

ne

viable

vi' a 1»1

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. A thorough investigation _ _ _ _ _ _ in a comprehensive• report.
2. After two years of confinement in a
and wan.•

dungeon, the prisoner was thin

3. The mayor issued a diatribe* against companies whose smokestacks _ _ _ _ __
poisonous fumes.
4. Gaining better housing for all was the

goal of the zealous• reformer.

5. When the schism• in the company was healed, a _ _ _ _ _ _ arrangement was
worked out.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. ultimate

a. underground

7. eventuate

b. final

8. emit

c. practicable, workable

9. subterranean

d. to give off

10. viable

e. to result finally

TODAY'S IDIOM

the lion's share-the major portion
Because the salesman was essential to the business,
he demanded the lion's share of the profits.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 299

79

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

premise

13 •:•

DAY

3

prem' is
jeopardize
jep' ~r diz
incredulous
in krej' ~I~
permeate

per' me at
propitious
p~

pish'

THE SQUASH COURT EXPERIMENT
As the pile grew, so did the entire project. Fermi moved his

materials to an abandoned squash court under a football
stadium at the University of Chicago. His pace accelerated
because they were proceeding on the premise that the
Germans were close to atomic success. Six weeks after the
pile had been started, its critical size was reached. Three
brave young men jeopardized their lives by ascending• the
pile, ready to cover it with liquid cadmium if anything went
wrong. Almost fifty scientists and several incredulous
obsetvers mounted a balcony to watch. One physicist
remained on the floor; it was his job to extract the final
cadmium control rod. Unbearable tension permeated the
atmosphere. Fermi completed his calculations, waited for a
propitious moment, and then gave the signal.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Acting on the _ _ _ _ _ _ that there were no burglars around, the police became

quite lax.•
2. After I had perused* the Yankee lineup, I was _ _ _ _ _ _ about their chances

of winning.
3. The trapeze artist was squeamish• about having to _ _ _ _ _ _ his life.
4. A terrible odor that was impossible to expunge•

the skunk handler's

clothing.
5. At a _ _ _ _ _ _ moment the flamboyant• movie star made her grand entrance.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. premise

a. favorable

7. jeopardize

b. endanger

8. incredulous

c. to spread through

9. permeate

d. skeptical

10. propitious

e. grounds for a conclusion

TODAY'S IDIOM
out of the frying pan into the fireto go from a difficult situation to a worse one
I thought I had escaped, but actually I went out of the frying pan into the fire.

80

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

WEEK

13

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

4

surmise
~r

miz'

curtail

kertar

THE ITALIAN NAVIGATOR LANDS
The chain reaction took place precisely as Enrico Fermi had
surmised. Mter twenty-eight minutes he curtailed the
experiment, giving the signal to replace the control rod. The
normally reserved scientists, unable to repress their
excitement, let out a tremendous cheer and gathered around
Fermi to shake his hand. Although it was time to celebrate,
some of the men remarked soberly that ..the world would never
be the same again." On December 2, 1942, the news of Fermi's
achievement was relayed in a cryptic telephone message:

repress
rl pres'
cryptic

krlp'tlk
inchoate
tn ko' it

'"The Italian Navigator has reached the New World."
..And how did he find the natives?"
..Very friendly."
The Atomic Age was inchoate-but truly here!

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Publication of the lurid* magazine was _ _ _ _ _ _ by the district attorney.
2. Although his remarks appeared

at first, we began to see how really

pertinent* they were.
3. I had to _ _ _ _ _ _ my desire to intelject* my criticism during the debate.
4. Edna had
that she would be charged a nominal* sum and so she
was outraged when she got the bill.
5. The young couple was disappointed to see the _ _ _ _ _ _ state of their new
house.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. surmise

a. puzzling

7. curtail

b. guess

8. repress

c. to put down

9. cryptic

d. to cut short

10. inchoate

e. in an early stage

TODAY'S IDIOM

to keep the pot boiling-to see that interest doesn't die down
Dickens kept the pot boUing by ending each chapter on
a note of uncertainty and suspense.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

81

REVIEW

WEEK

13

•!• DAY

5

No matter what the theme, no matter what the source, we can expect that important
concepts will require a mature vocabulary. This week's topic, scientific and biographical in
nature, serves as a vehicle for teaching you twenty worthwhile words. You now have the
chance to see whether you remember their definitions. Write the letter that stands for the
defmition in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. cryptic
2. curtail
3. emit
4. eventuate
5. haven
6. importune
7. inchoate
8. incontrovertible
9. incredulous
10. jeopardize
11. permeate
12. premise
13. propitious
14. repress
15. subjugate
16. subterranean
17. surmise
18. surreptitious
19. ultimate
20. viable
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
ask urgently
b. undeniable
c. guess
d. accomplished by secret
e. to put down
f. favorable
g. cut short
h. workable
i. underground
j. fmal
k. to result finally
I. to spread through
m. conquer
n. place of safety
o. endanger
p. a proposition for argument
q. skeptical
r. in an early stage
s. puzzling
t. to give off
a.

take the bull by the horns
the lion's share
out of the frying pan into the fire
keep the pot boiling

u.
v.
w.
x.

to maintain interest
from bad to worse
the major portion
to face a problem directly

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 299. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. - - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - -

82

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 13
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Drug Smugglers Beware
The message came to Officer Matt Jagusak: "Drug search
tomorrow-bring pig."
Jagusak, with the Union County New Jersey Sheriffs Department Search
and Rescue Unit, had to his superiors to put Ferris E. Lucas, a
super sniffer, to work. Lucas is a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig with a fantastic
olfactory sense that is one million times greater than a human's and could be
our®
weapon in breaking up the drug trade.
A canine trainer offered the pig to Union City, suggesting that its intelligence
and unique skill will make Lucas a @
fighter against illegal
narcotics. Jagusak has already taught his 55-pound porker-detective how to
find cocaine, hashish, and marijuana. While some law enforcement officials
at first, they quickly became believers when they saw the
were ®
Sherlock Holmes of the sty locate underground drug scents that had eluded
trained dogs.
"I don't care if it's a dog, a pig, or an elephant," Jagusak's boss said. "If it
benefits the department and our community, we'll try it."
Clues

CD 4th Day
@ 1st Day

® 2nd Day
@ 2nd Day

® 3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

83

NEW WORDS

WEEK

aspire

14

•!• DAY

1

;) spir'
inveigh
in va'

SUNDAY MORNING AT PEARL HARBOR
At breakfast time on Sunday morning, December 7, 1941,
Dorte Miller was serving coffee aboard the battleship West
Virginia. Dorie was black, and the highest job to which he
could then aspire in the U.S. Navy was that of messman.
While Dorie was technically a member of a great fighting
fleet, he was not expected to fight. Most Army and Navy
officers inveighed against blacks as fighting men. Although
blacks were nettled by such overt prejudice, Dorie Miller
apparently accepted being relegated to the role of a messhall
servant. Now, as he poured the coffee, Dorie was wondering
why the airplanes above were making so much noise on a
peaceful Sunday morning.

nettle
net' 1
overt

o' vert
relegate

rei' a gat

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the proper blanks.

1. Although the comic's quips* seemed to be mild, they began to _ _ _ _ _ _ the
nightclub's owner.
2. I had a premonition* that Eli would _ _ _ _ _ _ to the position of captain.
against the law that curtailed~ their freedom.

3. The pickets agreed to

acts of violence by the prisoner jeopardized* his parole.

4.

5. When they tried to

the star to a minor role she was furious.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. aspire

a. irritate

7. inveigh

b. open

8. nettle

c. assign to an inferior position

9. overt

d. to strive for

1o. relegate

e. attack verbally

TODAY'S IDIOM

to bury the hatchet-to make peace
After not speaking to each other for a year, they decided to bury the hatchet.

84

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 299

WEEK

14 •:•

DAY

NEW WoRDS

2

supine

su pin"

mammoth

mam· :l)th

THE INFAMOUS* ATTACK
The coffee cups suddenly went sptnntng as an explosion
knocked Dorte Miller flat on his back. Jumping up from his
supine position, the powerfully buUt messman from Waco,
T~s. headed for the deck. Eve:rywhere that Dorte looked he
saw smoke and mammoth warships lying on their sides.
Overhead, dozens of Japanese dive bombers controlled the
skies without a U.S. plane to repulse their attack. The havoc
was enormous. Without hesitating, Dorte joined a team that
was feeding ammunition to a machine gunner who was
making an ineffectual* attempt to protect their battleship
from being razed by the torpedo planes.

repulse

rt puis·
havoc
hav· :l)k
raze

niz

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the proper blanks.

1. From a - - - - - - position, the hunter emitted* the animal's mating call.
2. Following the revolution, the people _ _ _ _ _ _ the subterranean• dungeons of
the dictator.
3. Management is sure to
4.

any request for increased remuneration. •

placards* announced the opening of the new movie.

5. The virulent• plague caused

among the populace.

Definitions Match the new words with their meaning.

6. supine

a. ruin

7. mammoth

b. drtve back

8. repulse

c. huge

9. havoc

d. lying on the back

10. raze

e. destroy

TODAY'S IDIOM

Philadelphia lawyer-a lawyer of outstanding ability

His case is so hopeless that it would take a Philadelphia lawyer to set him free.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

85

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

lethal

Ie'

14 •:•

DAY

3

th~I

scurry

THE HEROISM OF DORIE MILLER

sker'e

Men all around Miller were succumbing* to the lethal spray
of Japanese bullets. He dragged his captain to safety and
turned back to see that the machine-gunner had been
killed. Dorie took the big gun and trained it on the incoming
bombers. Within the space of ten minutes he was credited
with destroying four bombers while dodging the bullets of
their fighter escorts. The enemy scunied away, having
struck the incisive blow that precipitated U.S. entrance into
World War II. Amidst the dead bodies and the ruined fleet
were the heroes such as Dorie Miller. The Navy had told him
that he did not have to fight buf he hadn't listened. The Navy
had attempted to stereotype him, but Dorie changed all that.

incisive

in si' siv
precipitate

prt sip, ~ tat
stereotype
ster' e ~ tip'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the proper blanks.

1. Our editor castigated* the proposal with his
2. Poe's hero watched the rats

commentary.
across his inert* body.

3. The jockey received a _ _ _ _ _ _ kick from the fractious* horse.
4. A quarrel was
reprehensible* will.

among the relatives after they heard the terms of the

5. The laconic* Clint Eastwood was a _ _ _ _ _ _ of the strong, silent Western hero.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. lethal

a. acute

7. scurry

b. run hastily

8. incisive

c. unvarying pattern

9. precipitate

d. deadly

10. stereotype

e. hasten

TODAY'S IDIOM

to gild the lily-to praise extravagantly
There was no need for the announcer to gild the lUy
because we could see how beautiful the model was.
86

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

WEEK

14 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

stentorian

sten tor' e an

singular

"FOR DISTINGUISHED DEVOTION TO DUTY"
Some months later Dorte Miller was serving on an aircraft
earner when Admiral Chester Nimitz, the Commander of the
Pacific Fleet, came aboard to preside over a special awards
ceremony. In stentorian tones the Admiral presented Miller
with the prestigious• Navy Cross, commending him for a
singular act of valor and "disregard for his own personal
safety." Miller's heroism helped to shatter the bias against
Mrtcan-Amertcans in the armed forces. Although he could
have accepted a sinecure at a U.S. naval base, Dorte chose to
remain in the combat zone where he was killed in action in
December, 1943.

sing' gye lar
valor
val·~r

bias
bi' as
sinecure

si'

n~

kytir

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the proper blanks.
1. The director was ousted* from his _ _ _ _ _ _ when he angered the mayor.
2. In his customary
tones, the sergeant reprimanded* those who
thought the army was a haven• for incompetents.
3. The word "surrender" is anathema• to people of _ _ _ _ __

4. A viable* peace was brought about as a result of the diplomat's _ _ _ _ __
.contribution.
5. The bigot's* _ _ _ _ _ _ precipitated* a fistfight.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. stentorian

a. prejudice

7. singular

b. soft job

8. valor

c. courage

9. bias

d. extraordinary

10. sinecure

e. loud

TODAY'S IDIOM

to steal one's thunder-to weaken one's position
by stating the argument before that person does
I had planned to be the first to resign from
the club, but my cousin stole my thunder.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 299

87

REVIEW

WEEK

14 •:•

DAY

5

Many people agree that a lawyer should be skillful with words. A Philadelphia lawyer, • it
goes without saying, must have an extensive vocabulary in order to help him or her present
a case.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. aspire
2. bias
3. havoc
4. incisive
5. inveigh
6. lethal
7. mammoth
8. nettle
9. overt
10. precipitate
11. raze
12. relegate
13. repulse
14. scurry
15. sinecure
16. singular
17. stentorian
18. stereotype
19. supine
20. valor
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. huge
b. evident, open
c. courage
d. to strive for
e. banish, assign to inferior position
f. deadly
g. soft job
h. prejudice
i. keen, acute
j. run quickly
k. hasten
I. remarkable, uncommon
m. attack verbally
n. drive back
o. lying on the back
p. destroy
q. conventional custom
r. irritate
s. ruin
t. loud

bury the hatchet
Philadelphia lawyer
gild the lily
steal one's thunder

u.
v.
w.
x.

to praise extravagantly
outstandingly able
to beat someone to the punch
make peace

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 299. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - - -

4. - - - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - - - -

88

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 14
•!•

Using the clues listed below. fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Sugar and Spice and Everything Nice
Teen Talk Barbie. the best-selling $50 model. has gone a step too far in the
opinion of the American Association of University Women. Representatives of
that group were to hear that one of the four phrases that the doll
is programmed to utter is, "Math class is tough."
For years the university professors. as well as members of feminist
against the ®
that portrays girls as
organizations. have ®
weak math and science students. "Because that brainwashing message is
conveyed to girls at an early age. they come to accept what we consider to be
•" said Dr. Ellen Kaner, a Dallas chemist. "We are just
a blatant @
beginning to make progress in our campaign to recruit women for
challenging. well-paying careers in math and science," she added, "and were
shocked to learn that Barbie is spreading such harmful nonsense."
Executives of the company that manufactures Teen Talk Barbie had to
®
to set matters right. They admitted that the phrase in question.
one of 270 selected by computer chips. was a mistake. In a press release.
their president said, "We didn't fully consider the potentially negative
implications of this phrase. Not only will we remove it immediately but will
swap with anyone who bought the offending doll."
We wonder how Ken feels about the matter.

Clues

®
®

1st Day
1st Day
3rd Day

@ 4th Day

®

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 299

89

NEW WORDS

complicity
k::lm plis · d

WEEK

DAY

1

te

liquidation
lik · Wd da · shdn

DANNY ESCOBEDO GOES TO JAIL
In 1960, a young Chicagoan, Danny Escobedo, was given a
20-year jail sentence for first -degree murder. Danny had
confessed to complicity in the killing of his brother-in -law after
the police had refused to allow him to see his lawyer. Actually,
Danny was tricked into blaming a friend for the liquidation of
his sister's husband, thereby establishing himself as an
accomplice. Despite the fact that Danny later recanted his
confession, he was found culpable and jailed. Danny had been
stereotyped* as a hoodlum and nobody raised an eyebrow
over the hapless* felon's* troubles.

accomplice
;, kom· plis
recant
rt kant·

culpable
kur pd

15 •:•

ool

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. Proceeding on the premise* that the broker was guilty of
swindle, the detective followed him surreptitiously.*

in the

2. After the

of the gang leader, a mammoth* conflict arose among his
ambitious lieutenants who aspired* to be boss.

3. Once the incontrovertible* evidence was offered, the sezvant was held
_ _ _ _ _ _ in the theft of the jewels.
4. When the clergyman refused to
, his superiors were so nettled* that
they relegated* him to an isolated parish in Alaska.
5. Although he was judged as a minor _ _ _ _ _ _ , the driver had actually played
an integral* part in planning the crime.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings. Two of the words are very close
in meaning.
6. complicity

a. deseiVing blame

7. liquidation

b. partnership in wrongdoing

8. accomplice

c. an associate-in crime

9. recant

d. disposal of, killing

10. culpable

e. withdraw previous statements

TODAY'S IDIOM

woolgathering-absentmindedness or daydreaming
When the young genius should have been doing his homework,
he was frequently engaged in woolgathering.
90

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

WEEK

15 •:•

DAY

2

NEW WORDS

abrogate
ab'~git

alleged
a lejd'

ESCOBEDO'S LAWYER APPEALS
Bany Kroll, a Chicago lawyer, took an interest in Danny
Escobedo's case. Kroll felt that his cllent's rights under
the Constitution had been abrogated . Since the alleged
accomplice, • Escobedo, had been dented access to an
attorney, Kroll asked the courts to invalidate the conviction.
He proposed that lawyers be entitled to sit in when the police
question a suspect but the 1111nois courts rejected that on the
grounds that it would effectively preclude all questlonlng by
legal authorities. If such a law were upheld, the police felt
that 1t would play havoc• with all criminallnvestlgaUons.

access
ak' ees
invalidate
in val' a dit
preclude

prt ldQd'

Sample Sentences Use the new wordS in the following sentences.
1. The manager was distraught* when he realized that the sluggers sickness would
_ _ _ _ _ a World Series victory.

2. It is symptomatic* of some newspapers that a n - - - - - · criminal is regarded
in print as guilty.
3. The wealthy uncle decided to _ _ _ _ _ his inane4' nephew's sinecure. •

4. The general was sure to
the court-martial's decision once he learned
of the flagrant* bias* of the presiding officer.
5. Once the druggist had been duped* into opening the store, the addict gained
_ _ _ _ _ to the pep pills.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. abrogate

a. admittance

7. alleged

b. reported, supposed

8. access

c. to deprtve of legal force, to nullify

9. invalidate

d. prevent

10. preclude

e. abolish

to whitewash-to conceal defects,
to give a falsely virtuous appearance to something
Although a committee was appointed to tnvesUga.te the corruption, many
citizens felt that their report would be a whltewash of the culprtts. •
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

91

NEW WORDS

WEEK

persevere
per·~

15 •:•

DAY

3

vir·

landmark
land· mark·

AN HISTORIC SUPREME COURT RULING

extrinsic
ek strin · sik
declaim
dt klam·
fetter
fet· ~r

Lawyer Kroll persevered in his defense of Danny Escobedo.
The case was argued before the Supreme Court, and in
1964, in a landmark decision, the Court reversed Danny's
conviction. Legal aid, said the judges, must be instantly
available to a suspect. "'A system of law enforcement that
comes to depend on the confession," one Justice declared,
"'will, in the long run, be less reliable than a system that
depends on extrinsic evidence independently secured
through skillful investigation." A Justice who declaimed
against the decision said, however, ..1 think the rule is illconceived and that it seriously fetters perfectly legitimate
methods of criminal enforcement."

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Collectors avidly* sought the rare coin for its _ _ _ _ _ _ value.
2. If we _ _ _ _ _ _ , we can overcome many of our inhibitions. •
3. The Battle of Midway was a

victory in the U.S. campaign for
ultimate• victory over the Japanese in World War II.

4. I knew that my father would
fabrics.

against Mother's choice of ostentatious•

5. The senator inveighed* against the policy because he felt it would _ _ _ _ _ _ our
Air Force.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. persevere

a. to hamper

7. landmark (adj.}_ _

b. foreign, coming from outside

8. extrinsic

c. speak loudly

9. declaim

d. persist

10. fetter (v.)

e. historic, turning point of a period

TODAY'S IDIOM

to break the ice-to make a start by overcoming initial difficulties
The auto salesman had a poor week, but he finally
broke the ice by selling a fully equipped Cadillac.
92

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

WEEK

15

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

4

paragon
par' a gon
nomadic

THE EFFECTS OF THE ESCOBEDO DECISION
After Danny Escobedo's release from prison, hundreds of
inmates began suits for their freedom on the grounds that their
rights had been violated, too. Each c1tse was heard on its
merits, and in numerous instances people who had been
convicted of serious offenses were freed because of the new
standards established in the Escobedo case. After getting out,
Danny was not a paragon of virtue, according to the police. He
led a nomadic existence, drifting from job to job, and was
arrested frequently. With asperity , and, a few choice epithets ,
Danny referred to police harassment. • Although the Escobedo
case was acontroversial one, most agree that it inspired better
police training, better law enforcement procedures, and
improved scientific crime detection.

no mad' ik
asp~rity_

a sper ate
epithet
ep· a thet
controversial
kon' tra ver·

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. In the desert, _ _ _ _ _ _ tribes wander back and forth, enduring much
privation.•
2. The town planners looked upon their utopia* as a _ _ _ _ _ _ for other
communities.
3. Some school principals attempt to repress• the publication of _ _ _ _ __
editorials.
4. We were amazed at the display of _ _ _ _ _ _ from our normally phlegmatic*
neighbor.
5. A bitter quarrel was precipitated* when both politicians hurled vile _ _ _ _ __
at each other.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. paragon

a. harsnness of temper

7. nomadic

b. model of excellence

8. asperity

c. wandering

9. epithet

d. debatable

10. controversial

e. descriptive name
TODAY'S IDIOM

the grapevine-a secret means of spreading information
The grapevine has it that Ernie will be elected
president of the school's student council.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

93

REVIEW

WEEK

15

•!• DAY

5

Police who have resorted to wire-tapping have been able to get evidence that was useful in
gaining convictions. In a sense, everyone who listens to you is wire-tapping your
conversation. Are the "detectives· impressed with the extent of your vocabulary? By the end
of this week you will have gained a greater familiarity with 300 words and 60 idioms-enough
to educate a conscientious wire-tapper.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space. (Numbers 1 and 13 are close in meaning.)

REVIEW WORDS
1. abrogate
2. access
3. accomplice
4. alleged
5. asperity
6. complicity
7. controversial
8. culpable
9. declaim
10. epithet
11. extrinsic
12. fetter (v.}
13. invalidate
14. landmark (adj.)
15. liquidation
16. nomadic
17. paragon
18. persevere
19. preclude
20. recant

DEFINITIONS
a. descriptive name
b. coming from outside. foreign
c. supposed. reported
d. deserving blame
e. destruction. disposal of
f. an associate in crime
g. model of excellence
h. bitterness of temper
i. persist
repeal by law
prevent
I. speak loudly
m. partnership in wrongdoing
n. to deprive of legal force. cancel
o. renounce previous statements
p. to hamper, to chain
q. admittance
r. wandering
s. historic
t. debatable

t.

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

woolgathering
to whitewash
break the ice
the grapevine

u. a means of spreading information
v. absentmindedness
w. to conceal defects
x. make a start

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on

page 300. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - - -

5. - - - - - - - - -

94

MEANINGS

NEW WORDS

WEEK

indigenous
in dij' ;.1n ;.15
gregarious
gr;.l ger' es

e

habitat
hab' ;.1 tat
cursory
ker· s;.1r

e

interloper
in' t;.1r lo' per

16

•!• DAY

1

MEET THE BEES
One of the most interesting inhabitants of our world is the
bee, an insect that is indigenous to all parts of the globe
except the polar regions. The honeybee is a gregarious insect
whose habitat is a colony that he shares with as many as
80,000 bees. Although the individual bees live for only a few
days, their colony can be operative for several years. A
cursory study of the activities of these insects reveals an
orderliness and a social structure that is truly amazing. For
example, bees in a particular hive have a distinct odor;
therefore, when an interloper seeks access* they can identify
him quickly and repulse• his invasion.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Sherlock Holmes took a _ _ _ _ _ _ glance at the cryptic* message and decoded
it instantly.
2. The forest was replete• with the kind of wildlife that is _ _ _ _ _ _ to Mrica.
3. Electric eyes, watchdogs, and other nuances• were there to keep out an _ _ _ __
4. The alcoholic was found supine* in his favorite
5. At the party, the

Ryan's Bar.

hostess scurried* from group to group, making

friends and influencing people.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. indigenous

a. hasty, not thorough

7. gregarious

b. native

8. habitat

c. natural environment

9. cursocy

d. sociable

10. interloper

e. an unauthorized person

TODAY'S IDIOM

in a bee line-taking the straightest, shortest route
(that's the way a bee flies back to the hive after he has gathered food)
When the couple left, the babysitter made a bee line for the refrigerator.

96

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

WORDSEARCH 15
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Questionable Advertisements
The Nostalgia Factory, a Boston art gallery, staged an exhibit of
advertisements that had outraged various segments of the community. For
example, one of the fast food chains ran a 1V commercial that showed
unattractive school cafeterta workers in hairnets, making that expertence less
tasty than a visit to Roy Rogers. Another ad that drew criticism from
psychiatrists and groups such as the Alliance for the Mentally Ill suggested to
readers that, if they had paid $100 for a dress shirt, they were fit candidates
for a straitjacket. Similar sensitivity had restricted ad writers from using terms
such as "nuts" or "crazy."
Why such protests and where do they come from? Who is asking companies
to CD
contracts with those agencies that are ®
in creating
racist types of commercial messages? Parents who took exception to the
Burger King spot that announced, "Sometimes You Gotta Break the Rules,"
said no to it because it gave the wrong message to their children. And when
a potato chip maker's ad featured a "bandito," angry Mexican-Americans
used some choice ®
in denouncing such a stereotype.
The conclusion to be reached is that segments of the population have become increasingly vocal about "insensitive" ads, demanding that
corporations @
and never again commission advertisements that
are clearly ®
, provocative, and harmful to good human
relationships.
Clues
Q) 2nd Day

@ 1st Day

® 4th Day
@ 1st Day

®

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

95

NEw WoRDS

prolific
Uf' lk

pr~

bulwark
bul' wark

QUEENS, WORKERS, DRONES
Each colony of honeybees consists of three classes: a) the
queen who is a prolific layer of eggs; b) the worker who is the
bulwark of the colony; and c) the sedentary drone whose only
function is to mate with a young queen. The queen lays the
eggs that hatch into thousands of female workers; some
queens live as long as five years and lay up to one million eggs.
The frugal worker builds and maintains the nest, collects and
stores the honey, and is the antithesis of the lazy drone, or
male honeybee, who does not work and has no sting. When the
drone is no longer needed, the workers, in effect, liquidate•
him by letting him staive to death. It'~ a cruel, cruel world!

sedentary

sed' n ter' e
frugal

rru· g~I
antithesis

an ttth' ~ sis

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The usually _ _ _ _ _ _ novelist was frustrated* by her failure to come up with
a good plot.
2. Len, the gregarious• twin, was the _ _ _ _ _ _ of Lon, the reticent one.
3. The typist shook off the fetters• of her
climbing expedition.
4.

life and joined a mountain

shoppers occasionally badger• supermarket managers for bargains.

5. Some feel that the United States should be a
democracies around the world.

to the inchoate•

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. prolific

a. producing abundantly

7. bulwark

b. thrifty

8. sedentary

c. protection

9. frugal

d. exact opposite

10. antithesis

e. largely inactive, accustomed to sitting

TODAY'S IDIOM

the world, the flesh, and the devil-temptations that cause man to sin
By entering the monastery he sought to avoid the world, the flesh. and the devil.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

97

NEW WORDS

WEEK

altruistic

16

•!• DAY

J

al" trOIs· Uk

embellish
ember ish

SPOTLIGHT ON THE WORKER
Let us examine the activities of the altruistic workers in
greater detall. After the workers have constructed a hive of
waterproof honeycomb (made from beeswax), the queen begins
to lay eggs in the first cells. While some workers embellish the
hive, others fly out in search of nectar and pollen. With their
long tongues they gather nectar and use their hind legs to cany
the pollen from the flowers. They fly directly back to the hive
and then dance around the honeycomb, their movements
indicating the direction of the flowers. Meanwhile, other
workers have been cleaning cells, caring for the young, and
guarding the precious cacheof nectar. Another special coterie is
entrusted with heating or cooling the hive. Dedicated to the
welfare of the queen and the entire insect community, all of
these workers display a complete absence of cupidity

cache
kash
coterie
kO'tri
cupidity
kyU pkr ~ te

Sample Sentences Use the new words In the following sentences.
1. Through a fortuitous* remark, the _ _ _ _ _ _ of the art thieves was discovered.
2. We warned him that his reprehensible*
would eventuate* in a loss of
all his friends.
3. The good-hearted doctor went Into the jungle purely for
reasons.
4. A
of bridge players made our clubroom their permanent habitat.*
5. Evecytime the irate* motorist told about the accident he had a tendency to
_ _ _ _ _ _ the story.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

altruistic
embellish
cache
coterie
cupidity

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

secret hiding place
unselfish
small group having something in common
adorn, touch up
greed

TODAY'S IDIOM

to make bricks without straw-to attempt to do something
without having the necessary materials (In the Bible we read
that the Egyptians commanded the Israelites to do so)
My uncle's business schemes always fail because
he tries to make bricks without straw.
98

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

WEEK

16

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

4

.
virtuosity
ver· chi.i os· ;) te
temerity

b mer·;) te

THE SAGA OF THE QUEEN BEE
Although the virttwsity of the workers is remarkable, the
queen bee is really the main story. Workers choose a few
larvae to be queens, feeding them royal jelly, a substance rich
in proteins and vitamins. While the queen is changing from a
larva to a pupa, a team of workers builds a special cell for her.
Soon the young queen hatches, eats the prepared honey, and
grows strong. Mter she kills any rivals who have the temerity
to challenge her, an amorous note is injected. She flies from
the hive and mates with one or more drones on her first flight.
Then the process of egg laying begins. When her progeny
saturate the hive, scouts are dispatched to find a new
location, and the bees swarm after their leader to begin the
amazing cycle again.

amorous
am· ;)r ;)S
progeny
proj·;) ne
saturate
sach·;)

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences; remember, past tenses
may be required.
1. A landmark* in the history of _ _ _ _ _ _ drama is Romeo and Juliet.
2. The eminent* artist, famous for his
beatniks alike.

, was admired by classicists and

3. The Bantu chief and all his _ _ _ _ _ _ were noted for their valor.*
4. For having the
to declaim* against the majority leader, the freshman
senator was given the worst committee assignments.
5. Television in the new century was
shows.

with the rebirth of the old quiz

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. virtuosity

a. descendants

7. temerity

b. full of love

8. amorous

c. soak, fill up completely

9. progeny

d. foolish boldness

10. saturate

e. great technical skill

TODAY'S IDIOM

to have the upper hand-to gain control
I had him at my mercy, but now he has the upper hand

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 300

99

REVIEW

WEEK

16

•!• DAY

5

Even if you are as busy as the proverbial bee, you can always manage the flfteen to twenty
minutes that are required for these daily vocabulary sessions.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the deflnition
in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. altruistic
2. amorous
3. antithesis
4. bulwark
5. cache
6. coterie
7. cupidity
8. cursory
9. embellish
10. frugal
11. gregarious
12. habitat
13. indigenous
14. interloper
15. progeny
16. prolific
17. saturate
18. sedentary
19. temerity
20. virtuosity
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. secret hiding place
b. thrifty

c. enjoying the company of others
d. exact opposite

e. adorn
unselflsh
g. small exclusive group
h. greed
i. not thorough, hasty
j. descendants
k. an unauthorized person
I. native
m. largely inactive
n. natural environment
o. foolish boldness
P· fill up completely
q. protection
r. full of love
s. great technical skill
t. fertile

f.

in a bee line
the world, the flesh, and the devil
make bricks without straw
have the upper hand

u. directly
v. gain control
w. attempt something without necessary
materials
x. temptations

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 300. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. - - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - -

100

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 16



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Cheating a Cheater
"Our neighborhood was so tough," the comedian joked, "that two guys held
up a bank and were mugged as they ran to their getaway car."
Later that evening, as Roy and Timmy were discussing the comic's routine,
Roy was reminded of a true (he said) story that went like this:
Mr. D., the gang kingpin in our community, loved money. Like Silas Marner,
weaver of George Eliot's novel, he enjoyed counting his
the was concealed in a wall safe
treasure each Friday night. Mr. D's ®
behind a painting in his office. The $50 and $100 bills made his hands dirty
as he counted them but Mr. D didn't mind. The filth of the lucre did not
disturb him at all.
One Friday evening, Roy continued, a brash @
had the ..;;:.@_ _ __
to try to steal the ill-gotten gains. Having bought the combination from a
relative who had installed Mr. D's safe, he stuffed his loot into a laundry bag
and was halfway out the door when he spied a $10 bill on the floor. His
®
made him go back for that small change, and in that moment, Mr.
D. arrived on the scene.
The quick-thinking thief blurted out, "I'll have the shirts back on Friday."
Hoisting the laundry bag over his shoulder, he was out the door before the
confused mobster could figure out what had happened.
Timmy, who had listened patiently, said, "I don't believe a word of that story
because it would take a guy with a great deal of starch to pull it offl"
Clues


2nd Day

® 3rd Day
® 1st Day
@ 4th Day

®

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

101

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

perpetrate
per· IX> tnit
consummate
kan sum· it

DAY

1

A PLAN TO FOOL THE NAZIS
One of the truly remarkable stories of World War II concerns
a ruse• that was perpetrated with such conswnmate skill that
it saved the lives of many Allied troops and helped to shorten
the war. The simple, bold, and ingenious subterfuae which
British officers concocted is the subject of Ewen- Montagu 's
classic, The Man Who Never Was. In short, the idea was to
plant fallacious documents concerning the Allied invasion of
Europe upon a dead officer, have his body recovered by
agents who would transmit the false information to
Germany, and then obseiVe the effects of the plan.

subterfuge
sub· br fyilj
concoct
kon kokt·
fallacious

f;,) Ia·

17 •:•

sh~s

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Because the inspector had given only cursory• attention to the reports, I surmised*
that his conclusion would be _ _ _ _ __
2. Johnny Cochran, the famous and controversial* lawyer, gave _ _ _ _ __
attention to the preparation of every case.
3. It was necessary for the interloper* to
to gain access* to the exhibit.

a convincing story in order

4. In order to
the swindle, the jaunty* confidence man adopted an
amorous• approach toward the wealthy widow.
5. The experienced teacher realized that Ricky's stomachache was merely a
_ _ _ _ _ _ to keep him from taking the French test.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. perpetrate

a. devise

7. consummate

b. complete, of the highest degree

8. subterfuge

c. commit

9. concoct

d. ruse, • trlck

10. fallacious

e. misleading

TODAY'S IDIOM

to draw in one's horns-to check one's anger, to restrain oneself
The performer drew in his horns when he saw
that his critic was an eight-year-old boy.
102

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

WEEK

17

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

2

manifold
man' a fold
assiduous

"MAJOR MARTIN" GOES TO WAR
After Commander Montagu and his colleagues had been given
official approval for their dangerous escapade, they
encountered manifold problems. First, they conducted an
assiduous search for a body that looked as though it had
recently been killed in an airplane disaster. Then, a detailed
history of the man had to be invented that would be so
impeccable that the enemy would accept its authenticity. This
meant documents, love letters, personal effects, keys.
photographs, etc. Each step was fraught with difficulty, but
the schemers were unbeltevably resourceful. As a result, in
the late spring of 1942, "Major Martin" was prepared to do his
part for his country.

a sif 0 as
impeccable

im pek' a

~I

fraught
frot
resourceful
ri sOrs' fal

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. Burdened by her
responsibilities, the young executive was
precluded* from enjoying her new wealth.
2. Fear permeated• the crippled airplane as the passengers realized that their situation
was
with danger.
3. Although basically frugal, • his taste in clothing is _ _ _ _ __
4. The store owner was _ _ _ _ _ _ enough to run a sale the day after his building
had been razed* by the flames.
5. Florence Nightingale was a paragon• of mercy in her _ _ _ _ _ _ care for the
wounded soldiers.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

manifold
assiduous
impeccable
fraught
resourceful

a. able to meet any situation
b. faultless
c. complex, many
d. devoted, attentive
e. filled

TODAY'S IDIOM

to put the cart before the horse-to reverse the proper order, do things backwards

My assistant was so eager to get the job done
that he often put the cart before the horse.
ANSWERS ARf ON PACE 300

103

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

murky
merke
component
k~m po"lo mmt

•!• DAY

3

THE PLOT THICKENS
A subma.Iine took the body out to sea. Then, "Major Martin,"
the man who never was, was sUd into the murky Atlantic
waters off the coast of Huelva, Spain. Attached to this courier's
coat was a briefcase that contained the components of the
hoax. Shortly thereafter, the Spanish Embassy notified the
British that the body had been recovered. But Commander
Montagu learned that the important documents had already
been scrutinized* and later resealed so that the British would
not be suspicious. The secret information was transmitted to
the German High Command, through a labyrinth of
underground networks, to be evaluated. Now the true test of
the months of assiduous• planning would come-the question
remained, would the Germans swallow the bait?

hoax

hoks
labyrinth
lab'~

17

rtnth

evaluate
1 val' yii

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The practical joker had the temerity* to perpetrate• a _ _ _ _ _ _ upon the Dean

of Boys.
2. A good motion picture producer should be skilled in all the manifold*

_ _ _ _ _ _ of film-making.
3. After wandering through the
, the young hero came face to face with
the dragon who was indigenous• to the caves.
4. When I asked the English teacher to
incisive• comments were very helpful.
5. The
former style.

my plan for the term paper, her

quality of the artist's latest painting is the antithesis* of her

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. murky

a. dark, obscure

7. component

b. element

8. hoax

c. deception

9. labyrinth

d. arrangement of winding passages

10. evaluate

e. appraise, find the value of
TODAY'S IDIOM

to turn the tables-to turn a situation to one's own advantage
The wrestler thought that he could pin me to the mat,
but I quickly turned the tables on him.
104

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

WEEK

17 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

exult

eg zult'
attest

A PUZZLE FOR HIS MAJESTY
The conspirators had reason to exult, for all evidence attested
to the fact that the German High Command was gullible
about "Major Martin." Their defense troops were moved away
from the true invasion sites and deployed to areas that were
inconsequential. Subsequently, when the actual attack took
place, Allied casualties were minimized. Mter the war,
Commander Montagu received a medal from the king of
England. At the presentation ceremony, the king politely
inquired where the young officer had earned his citation. "At
the Admiralty," Montagu replied, presenting the king with a
genuine enigma.

~test·

gullible

gul' ~hal
deploy

di plot'
enigma
i nig'

m~

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Explaining that the bookkeeper was merely a _ _ _ _ _ _ dupe,* the judge freed
him from complicity* in the crime.
2. As the audience watched the master _ _ _ _ _ _ his chess pieces, they
applauded his virtuosity.*
3. An expert was summoned to
to the authenticity of the Rembrandts
found in the Nazi cache* of stolen masterpieces.
4. When the College Board scores were promulgated,* my sister had good cause to
5. I could not solve the _ _ _ _ _ _ of why an altruistic* person should exhibit
such cupidity.*

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
a. to certify
b. easily cheated or fooled
c.. to position forces according to a plan
d. riddle
e. rejoice greatly

6. exult

7. attest
8. gullible
9. deploy
10. enigma

TODAY'S IDIOM

a chip off the old blocka son who is like his father (from the same block of wood)

When we saw the alcoholic's son enter the liquor store,
we assumed that he was a chip off the old block.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

105

REVIEW

WEEK

17

•!• DAY

5

Major Martin, if he had lived, would have used the word "bonnet" to refer to the hood of his
auto, and he might have referred to a truck as a "lony." As you can see, there are differences
between American and British English. But Major Martin, undoubtedly, would have known
all the words below-do you?
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space. (Note the similarity between numbers 13 and 20.)

REVIEW WORDS
1. assiduous
2. attest
3. component
4. concoct
5. consummate
6. deploy
7. enigma
8. evaluate
9. exult
10. fallacious
11. fraught
12. gullible
13. hoax
14. impeccable
15. labyrinth
16. manifold
17. murky
18. perpetrate
19. resourceful
20. subterfuge

DEFINITIONS
a. spread out in battle formation
b. a trick
c. busy, attentive
d. confirm as accurate, vouch for
e. devise
f. a riddle, puzzle
g. element, part
h. able to meet any situation
i. perfect, complete
j. filled
k. misleading, false
I. rejoice greatly
m. faultless
n. easily fooled
o. winding passages
p. find the value of, review
q. many
r. deception
s. commit
t. dark, obscure

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

draw in one's horns
put the cart before the horse
turn the tables
chip off the old block

u. restrain oneself

v. turn a situation to one's own advantage
w. do things backwards
x. son who is like his father

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 300. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. - - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - - -

106

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 17
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Brothe~;

Can You Spare a Dimel

The U.S. Department of Health and Human SeiVices, in a CD
review
of Social Security disability payments, focused on Jack Benson, a_®_ _ __
Seattle panhandler. Mr. Benson had claimed that whatever money he collects
on the street can be compared to the funds raised by legitimate charities,
and, therefore, he is entitled to a federal deduction. Government officials
regard his analogy as ®
and disagree. It is their contention that,
since Benson's income is unearned, it should be subtracted from his
disability payments.
Mr. Benson may not be highly regarded as a street beggar but that didn't stop
him from going into the Federal District Court in Oregon to plead that his
appeals for cash are an art form, thereby making him eligible for most of the
$4 72 a month that he had been receiving. Not so, declared the government,
quoting from a 1990 ruling that found that "money received through begging
is better classified as 'gifts' rather than as 'wages' or 'net earnings from selfemployment.'"
4 _ _ _ _ , has not given up.
Mr. Benson's lawyer, plunging into the legal 0....:..
She countered that, if Jack merely sat on a street corner with his hand out,
the government had a good case. However, in her words, "Jack Benson is a
®
professional who has elevated begging to a respectable level
because of his skill in actively seeking contributions."

It may take all of Benson's talent as a salesman to get the government to put
some money in his collection basket.

Clues

CD 2nd Day
@ 2nd Day
@ 1st Day
@ 3rd Day

®

1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 300

107

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

abortive
~bar· tiv

18

•!• DAY

1

modify
mod'~

TEACHING CHIMPANZEES TO TALK

fi

Two resourceful* psychologists at the University of Nevada
have made splendid progress in vocabulary development in
chimpanzees. Following a number of abortive attempts to
teach French, German, or English to chimps, the
researchers persevered* until they hit upon the American
Sign Language system that is often used by deaf persons.
They have had to modify the language somewhat in order to
accommodate the animals' spontaneous gestures. With a
mixture of innate movements and learned ones, some
laboratory chimps now have an extensive vocabulary.

accommodate
~

kom'

~

dat

spontaneous

span ta' ne

~s

innate
i

nat' or in' at

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. His

cunning allowed him to see through the spy's subterfuge. •

2. The divers made an
waters.

attempt to rescue the dog from the murky*

3. Because Phil refused to _ _ _ _ _ _ his philosophy, the directors were forced to
invalidate* his appointment.
4. My English teacher admonished* me: "I realize that the speech was to be
_ _ _ _ _ _ , but it was not supposed to be incoherent• or fraught* with
fallacious• statements."
5. A quarrel was precipitated* when the dietician refused to _ _ _ _ _ _ the
patient's special needs.
Definitions If vocabulary is getting to be your stock in trade,* you should have no
trouble in matching the new words with their meanings.
6. abortive

a. fruitless,• useless, failing

7. modify

b. to make fit, adjust to

8. accommodate

c. natural

9. spontaneous

d. without preparation, unrehearsed

10. innate

e. to change

TooAv's IDIOM
under the wire--just in time
Hank hesitated about his term paper for two months
and finally submitted it just under the wire.
108

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

WEEK

18 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

veneer
\'C) ntr'
myriad

CHIMPANZEES ARE SURPRISINGLY SMART

e~

mtr'

Washoe, the chimpanzee, has more than a veneer of
intelligence; she can signal her desire to eat, go in or out, be
covered, or brush her teeth. In addition, she can make signs
for ''I'm sony," "I hurt," "Huny," "Give me," and a myriad of
other terms that are familiar to young children. This urbane
animal can indicate that she craves more dessert by putting
her fingers together ("more") and then placing her index and
second fingers on top of her tongue ("sweet"). It is irrelevant
that Washoe cannot actually talk. What is important, however,
is the consummate* ease with which she has mastered her
daily assignments.

urbane
er ban'
crave

kriv
irrelevant
i rei'~

wnt

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Why did Silas Marner _ _ _ _ _ _ wealth and practice cupidity*?

2. Once the hoax had been concocted*, a

of problems arose.

3. The defendant was alleged* to have been an army deserter, but the judge said that
was
to the case.
4. By embellishing* her work with _ _ _ _ _ _ humor, the sophisticated playwright
succeeded on Broadway.
5. The lieutenant confessed to a _ _ _ _ _ _ of ignorance in order to properly
evaluate* his corporal's resourcefuh1ess. *
Definitions Take the bull by the horns* and match the new words with their meanings.

6. veneer

a. to desire

7. myriad

b. countless number

8. urbane

c. polished, witty

9. crave

d. thin covering

10. irrelevant

e. not related to the subject

ToDAY's IDIOM

to be at large-not confined or in jail
Since the dangerous criminal was at large,
all the townspeople began to buy dogs for protection.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

109

NEW WORDS

WEEK

deem
dem

18

•!• DAY

J

inherent

in hir' ant
buff

buf
romp

romp
latent

lat' nt

EASY TO TRAIN
The chimpanzees are deemed by scientists to be the closest
to man of all the living apes: consequently, they are fairly
easy to train. Several years ago, two married researchers
embarked on an interesting project: they reared and trained
a chimp in almost the same manner as they would have
raised a child. The animal did beautifully, convincing the
couple of the inherent ability of the chimpanzee. Cinema buffs
who have seen Tarzan's clever monkey romp through the
jungle also recognize the latent intelligence of those animals.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. Whom do you

to be the bulwark* of the Republican party?

2. The fir~men did not have to cajole* the enthusiastic
them extinguish the bla?.e.

into helping

3. When the intercity competition began, our team was supposed to _ _ _ _ __
over our hapless• rivals.
4. At the age of 42, the artist first became cognizant* of his _ _ _ _ _ _ genius.
5. Certain mice have an _ _ _ _ _ _ alertness that enables them to conquer the
researchers' labyrinths.•
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. deem

a. lying hidden

7. inherent

b. to move in a lively manner

8. buff (n.)

c. inborn

9. romp

d. a fan, follower

10. latent

e. believe, to judge

TODAY'S IDIOM

to go against the grain-to irritate
My uncle is in favor of some protests, but
certain demonstrations go against the grain.
110

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

WEEK

18 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

tortuous
tor~

chu ~s

itinerant

i

MORE FACTS ABOUT CHIMPS
Chiplps In the laboratory have demonstrated their ability to
find their way out of the most tortuous maze. They can press
buttons, manipulate levers, avoid shocks, etc. When food is
placed out of reach, the animals can prepare a ladder of boxes
to reach it. In his natural habitat• the chimpanzee is
something of an itinerant. He goes his nomadic* way through
the jungle, living on fruit, insects, and vegetables. With the
aid of his long, powerful hands he can swing rapidly from tree
to tree and cover considerable ground In his peregrinations.
Chimps are loyal in their conjugal relationships, taking only
one mate at a time. That may be another barometer of these
animals' superior intelligence.

tin~ ~rant

peregrination
per ~ gt"Cl wi~ s~n
conjugal
kon· ja gal
barometer
t.,r

~rom'~

Sample Sentences Use the new words In the following sentences.
1. The other drivers were nettled* about the ease with which our car ascended* the
_ _ _ _ _ _ road.
2. Arguments over money have often led to _ _ _ _ _ _ havoc. •
3. The sedentary* twin was content to follow his brother's _ _ _ _ _ _ on a map.
4. Signs were posted in the lobby to prevent
ilk* from entering.

beggars and others of that

5. The warmth of Mr. Smythe's greeting each morning may be construed* as an
excellent
of his health.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. tortuous

a. wandering

7. itinerant

b. winding

8. peregrination

c. travel

9. conjugal

d. relating to marriage

10. barometer

e. Instrument for measuring change

TooAv's IDIOM

to wink at-to pretend not to see
There was a plethora• of evidence to show that the border guards
would wink at illegal shipments if they were paid in advance.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

111

REVIEW

WEEK

18

•!• DAY

5

While it is true that scientists have had remarkable success in teaching chimpanzees to
communicate, we can be certain that even super-monkeys would have difficulty with any of
the words below. However, higher animals who apply themselves can master all of them.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space. (Note the similarity between numbers 8 and 9.)

REVIEW WORDS
1. abortive
2. accommodate
3. barometer
4. buff (n.)
5. conjugal
6. crave
7. deem
8. inherent
9. innate
10. irrelevant
11. itinerant
12. latent
13. modify
14. myriad
15. peregrination
16. romp
17. spontaneous
18. tortuous
19. urbane
20. veneer

DEFINITIONS
a. not related to the subject

b. thin covering
c. fruitless, failing
d. natural
e. polished, civilized
f. to make fit, adjust to
g. on the spur of the moment
h. move in a lively manner
i. to desire
j. instrument for measuring change
k. winding
I. inborn
m. believe, to judge
n. going from place to place
o. a fan, follower, enthusiast
p. travel (n.)
q. relating to marriage, connubial*
r. countless number
s. to change
t. lying hidden

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

under the wire
to be at large
go against the grain
wink at

u. pretend not to see
v. just in time
w. to irritate
x. not confined or in jail
WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

Now check your answers on
page 301. Make a record of

1. - - - - - - - -

those words you missed.

2. - - - - - - - -

3. - - - - - - - -

4. - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - -

112

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 18
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

A Shameful Situation
The plight of the migrant farm worker continues to frustrate the
U.S. Labor Department. court officials, legislators. religious groups. and
community agencies. Men, women, and chiJdren toil six and seven days a
week to earn as little as $10 to $20 a week after being overcharged for their
food, medicine, and basic living needs. They are housed in ramshackle
dormitories. often with non-functioning toilets-a of their
employers' contempt for them; they lack hot water and showers, and are
given food that is barely fit for human consumption.
Unscrupulous contractors scour the countryside in search of homeless,
®
• and unemployed men and women, offering to put them to work
at good jobs picking fruits and vegetables. The U.S. Labor Department
of complaints of abused workers, issues fmes,
investigates the ®
and revokes the licenses of contractors. But many such shady employers pay
to be operating expenses) and continue to
the fines (which they ®
run company stores that cheat the workers, subjugate them with drugs and
alcohol, ®
them with advances on their paltry wages at high
interest. and use violence against those whom they regard as troublemakers.
Fred Jones. a typical migratory worker from South Carolina, claims to have
worked for $6 cash out of his $158 check. His story is repeated by hundreds
of others who have been treated shabbily by corrupt contractors. Until
sufficient funds are allocated by state and federal agencies, and until there is
the proper public response, these abuses will continue.
Clues

CD 4th Day
@ 4th Day

®

2nd Day

@ 3rd Day

®

1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

113

NEW WORDS

WEEK

megalomania
meg·

~

19

•!• DAY

1

lo rna· n~

profligate
1~ git

prof
strife
strif

legion

Ie· j~n
coup
kii

TROUBLE IN RURITANIA
King Andre of Ruritania was affltcted* with megalomania,
and the people of his country suffered, as a result. After ten
years of his profligate rule, the treaswy was bankrupt,
unemployment was rampant*, domestic strife was mounting,
and the number of the king's opponents who were
incarcerated* were legiDTl Following a bloodless coup, his
nephew, Prince Schubert, took command of the poor nation.

Sample Sentences Based upon your understanding of the new words, as discovered
from the context, place them in the spaced provided.

1. With a singular* disregard for his family, the _ _ _ _ _ _ husband spent his
salary on alcohol.
2. Each spouse said that the other was culpable* for their conjugal* _ _ _ _ __
3. "The number of my followers is

," said the flamboyant* politician.

4. The necessity for executing the leaders of the abortive* _ _ _ _ _ _ was obviated*
when they committed suicide.
5. Hitler's _ _ _ _ _ _ was a veneer* for-his insecurity and feelings of inferiority.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. megalomania

a. discord, disagreement

7. profligate

b. revolution

8. strife

c. wasteful

9. legion

d. a large number

10. coup

e. abnormal desire for wealth and power

TooAY's IDIOM

to play possum-to try to fool someone;
to make believe one is asleep or dead
Sensing that his life was in jeopardy*, the hunter
played posswn until the voracious* lion disappeared.
114

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 301

WEEK

19 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

amnesty

. am~~ ste
expatriate

PRINCE SCHUBERT IN ACTION
Prince Schubert's first move was to declare an wnnesty for
political prisoners and to invite home all Ruritanian
expatriates. Those who had been jailed on false charges were
exonerated by special tribunals. The young leader announced
that he would abrogate• all of the oppressive fiats that his
predecessor had promulgated. • Things began to look up
temporarily for the citizens who perceived in Prince Schubert
the sincerity, idealism, and honesty that had been lacking in
the mendacious King Andre.

ek spa-treat
exonerate

eg zon · ~ ratfiat

tr ~t
mendacious

men da·

sh~s

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the folloWing sentences.
1. The publisher's

claims led to a myriad* of law suits.

2. When the jwy began to deliberate, they were prepared to
culprit.*

the

3. The itinerant* poet, living abroad for twenty years, was a voluntary _ _ _ _ __
4. One cannot govern by
, the sedentary* mayor quickly learned: it is
necessary to get out and meet the citizens if you want their cooperation.
5. We recognized the dictator's _ _ _ _ _ _ as an obvious feint* that would be
withdrawn after Christmas.

Definitions It w1ll be a red letter day* for you if you can match the new words with their
meanings.
6. amnesty

a. an exile

7. expatriate

b. lying, untrue

8. exonerate

c. a general pardon

9. flat
10. mendacious

d. to free from guilt

e. an official order, a decree

TODAY'S IDIOM

it's an ill wind that blows nobody goodsomeone usually benefits from another person's misfortune
When the star quarterback broke his leg, the coach gave the rookie his
big chance and the youngster made good: the coach mumbled, "It's an ill wind."
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

115

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

parsimonious
pAr' ~

19

•!• DAY

J

mo ne C)$

pecuniary
pi kyO.'
er'

ne

e

dismantle
dis man' tl
sumptuous

sump· chii C)S
underwrite
un' dC)r rit'

REFORM MOVEMENT
In order to improve Ruritania's financial position, an astute•
but parsimonious treasurer was installed and given wide
pecuniary powers. He tried to get the little country back on
its feet by slashing all waste from its budget, dismantling
King Andre's sumptuous palaces, and firing all incompetents.
In addition, Prince Schubert was able to get the United States
to underwrite a substantial loan that would enable him to
start a program of public works. Even so, Ruritania was still
in desperate trouble.

Sample Sentences Prove that you are not a flash in the pan* by using the new words
correctly in the following sentences.

1. I plan to _ _ _ _ _ _ the stereo set and clean all the components. •
2. The

feast was prepared with impeccable* care.

3. Unless my boss modifies• his _ _ _ _ _ _ attitude, a fractious• picket line is
going to be erected.
4. Clarence Day deemed* that _ _ _ _ _ _ matters are best handled by men.
5. When our rivals agreed to
suspicions began to form in my mind.

the cost of our trip, a myriad* of

Definitions If you made mistakes above, you can now save face• by matching the new
words correctly with their meanings.
6. parsimonious

a. agree to finance

7. pecuniary

b. financial

8. dismantle

c. to strip of covering, take apart

9. sumptuous

d. miserly

10. underwrite

e. lavish

TODAY'S IDIOM

to know the ropes-to be fully acquainted with the procedures
The president of the senior class knew the ropes and quickly taught me my duties.

116

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 301

WEEK

19 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

restrictive
ri strik' tiv
balk

bok

DISAPPOINTMENT AND DEDICATION
When Prince Schubert asked for additional restrictive
measures, the people began to balk. Speaking on radio, the
young reformer explained the reasons for higher taxes and food
rationing; he was blunt when he stated the need for personal
sacrifices. Nevertheless, the resistance to reform was great, and
nostalgia for the "good old days" of King Andre began to grow.
The people admitted that graft and corruption had been rife
under Andre, but at least "everybody got his slice of the pie."
Although Prince Schubert was tempted to quit, he determined
that he would help the people in spite of themselves.

blunt
blunt
nostalgia
no stal' j~
rife

rif

Sample Sentences Don't pass the buck*! Use the new words in the following sentences
yourself.
1. The rebel's innate* hatred of _ _ _ _ _ _ decrees led him to crave* freedom all
the more.
2. A string of caustic* epithets* was directed at the recruit by his _ _ _ _ __
sergeant.
3. Although the former farm girl pretended to be urbane*, a feeling of _ _ _ _ __
always came over her when she heard country music.
4. Criticism of the author was
used to praise him.

among the coterie* of intellectuals who

5. Jimmy was a lawbreaker, but he would _ _ _ _ _ _ at the idea of carrying a
lethal* weapon.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. restrictive

a. widespread

7. balk (v.)

b. plain spoken

8. blunt

c. to refuse to move

9. nostalgia

d. yearning for the past

10. rife

e. harsh, confining

TODAY'S IDIOM

behind the eight ball-in trouble
Susan found herself behind the eight ball in
chemistry when she failed to do the term project.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 301

117

REVIEW

WEEK

19

•!• DAY

5

Rurttania is a mythical kingdom, impossible to find on a map and difficult to find in a
dictionary. The words that you are about to review, however, are all legitimate, acceptable
dictionary words.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. amnesty
2. balk
3. blunt
4. coup
5. dismantle
6. exonerate
7. expatriate
8. fiat
9. legion
10. mendacious
11. megalomania
12. nostalgia
13. parsimonious
14. pecuniary
15. profligate
16. restrictive
17. rife
18. strife
19. sumptuous
20. underwrite
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. revolution, overthrow
b. unrest, discord
c. take apart, disassemble
d. lavish
e. to free from guilt
f. agree to finance
g. false, lying
h. an exile
i. abnormal desire for power
j. plain spoken
k. harsh, confining
I. to refuse to move
m. wasteful
n. an official order, a decree
o. widespread
p. large number
q. financial
r. a general pardon
s. miserly
t. yearning for the past

to play possum
an ill wind
know the ropes
behind the eight ball

u.
v.
w.
x.

someone profits from another's misfortune
be fully acquainted with procedures
in trouble
try to fool someone

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 301. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. _ _ _ _ _ _ __

2. - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - -

5. - - - - - - - -

118

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 19



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Ogopogo
Accounts of supersized creatures such as the Loch Ness Monster and the
Abominable Snowman are • Despite the lack of hard evidence,
some people continue to believe that the depths of our lakes and isolated
mountain caves remain the dwelling places of fantasy figures.
Now, a new star for the credulous has surfaced. Japanese television was
a search for Ogopogo, a long-necked reptilian creature
asked to®
said to inhabit Lake Okanagan in the mountains of south-central British
Columbia. Ogopogo stories are ®
in that area as people produce
photos of rippling water and shadows resembling an enormous serpent with
flippers, gliding slowly in large circles.
Those who @
at what they regard as nonsense and pagan
superstition are quite ®
in belittling Ogopogo fans. Nevertheless,
the legends, which have a life of their own, happily, have brought thousands
of tourists and business to the Okanagan Valley.
Recognition of the creature now exists in British Columbia's environmental
law which provides protection for Ogopogo. The official description reads, "An
animal in Okanagan Lake, other than a sturgeon, that is more than three
meters in length, and the mates or offspring of that animaL"
Been wondering about the creature's name? Ogopogo comes from an English
music hall song: "His mother was an earwig; his father was a whale; a little
bit of head and hardly any tail-and Ogopogo was his name."
Clues

CD lst Day
® 3rd Day
® 4th Day
@ 4th Day

® 4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

119

NEW WORDS

WEEK

reviled
ri vild'
derogatory

di rog'

~

tor

e

indict
in dit'
nebulous

neb' y~

l~s

pesky

pes'ke

20

•!• DAY

1

LA CUCARACHA-THE COCKROACH
The poor cockroach has been called the "most reviled
creature on the face of the earth." Nobody loves him~xcept,
perhaps, another cockroach. Fiction, nonfiction, and poetry
are replete* with derogatory references to these ubiquitous*
bugs. Public health officials are quick to indict the insects
as carriers of viruses that cause yellow fever and polio.
Although past evidence has been somewhat nebulous, recent
studies also show that an allergy to roaches may contribute
significantly to asthma. Little wonder, therefore, that the
pesky cockroach is under attack.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Because the contract offer was a _ _ _ _ _ _ one, the union leaders balked*

at it.
2. Ezra Pound, the expatriate* poet, was _ _ _ _ _ _ for his pro-Fascist remarks.
3. When the grand jmy refused to

him, the mobster was exonerated.*

4. Evecy time his accountant called with
vecy blunt* with him.

pecuniary* problems, Ben was

5. The columnist was ordered to recant* her _ _ _ _ _ _ statements.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. reviled

a. annoying

7. derogatocy

b. belittling*, disparaging*

8. indict

c. unclear, vague

9. nebulous

d. scolded

10. pesky

e. accuse

TODAY'S IDIOM

left holding the bag-to be left to suffer the blame
The profligate* businessman left his distraught* partner holding the bag.

120

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

WEEK

20

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

2

redolent
red'l~nt

repose
ri

WAITER, PLEASE TAKE THIS BOWL
OF SOUP BACK TO THE KITCHEN
In addition to menacing our health, cockroaches are smelly,
filthy, and ugly. Upon entering a cellar that ts redolent with
their aroma, you are not likely to forget the odor. And when
you spy the foul culprits• creating havoc• in your sugar bowl
or in repose atop your chocolate cake, your disposition may
be exacerbated. • Roaches are omnivorous and will feast
upon such disparate items as wallpaper, upholstery, nylon
stockings, and beer. No one can accuse the hungry and
thirsty bugs of being abstemious.

paz'

omnivorous
om ntv' ~r ~s
disparate
dis' ~r it
abstemious

ab ste' me

~s

Sample Sentences The words above fit into the blanks below.
1. While the palace guards were in

, the rebels' coup• began in earnest.

2. Coach Fischer issued a fiat• that required that his players be _ _ _ _ __
3. The
scent that came from the bakery created in Eloise a sense of
nostalgia* for her grandmother's bread.
4.

eaters find the dietary laws in some hotels to be too restrictive.•

5. Regardless of how
by the general amnesty. •

their crimes were, all the prisoners were freed

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. redolent

a. different

7. repose (n.)

b. fragrant

8. omnivorous

c. moderate in eating or drinking

9. disparate

d. eating any kind of food

10. abstemious

e. state of rest

TODAY'S IDIOM

a lick and a promise-to do something in a hasty and superficial manner
The meticulous• housewife was in so much of a hurry that
she could only give the apartment a lick and a promise.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

121

NEW WORDS

WEEK

extant
ek' stmt or
ek stant'

vicissitudes ·
sis· ~ tlldz

20

•!• DAY

3

THE ROACH LIVES ON

v~

Cockroaches are the oldest extant winged insects, having
been traced back over 350 million years. They have endured
the vicissitudes of weather, natural disasters, war, and
planned liquidation.* They reside comfortably in caves in
South America, in transcontinental airplanes, on mountain
tops, in Park Avenue edifices. and in television sets. The
climate may be sultry or frigid but roaches persevere. • In the
words of one writer, 'The miraculous survival of the roach is
explained by its inherent• adaptability." In fact, a trenchant
analysis made the point that any forthcoming nuclear war
will be won by roaches, not Russians, Chinese, or Americans.

edifice
ed' a fis
sultry
sui' tre
trenchant
tren' ch~nt

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Hundreds of
same prolific• forger.
2. The

copies of Shakespeare's signature came from the
of life in the Medical Corps are not for the squeamish. •

3. We originally planned on a skyscraper but had to settle for a truncated*
4. When he learned that the movie was to be replete* with _ _ _ _ _ _ scenes,
the cautious banker refused to underwrite• its cost.
5. General Fox submitted a _ _ _ _ _ _ report on the enemy's latent* strength.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. extant

a. keen, incisive•

7. vicissitudes

b. difficulties

8. edifice

c. extremely hot and moist, torrid

9. sultry

d. still existing

10. trenchant

e. a building

TODAY'S IDIOM

tongue in cheek-insincerely
Speaking with his tongue in his cheek, the parsimonious*
employer promised to double everyone's wages.
122

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

WEEK

20

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

4

puissant
pyii · ~ sent or
pyii is' nt

TONGUE IN CHEEK*?
The U.S. Public Health Service admits to frustration* in its
attempts to destroy the cockroach. As soon as the scientists
devise a puissant chemical, some bugs succumb.* But the
hardy ones suiVive and breed a resistant strain. Since the
average female produces close to three hundred descendants,
little hope is held out for a final solution to the roach problem.
Nevertheless, extermination campaigns continue unabated.
Surprisingly, some sentimental souls become maudlin as they
consider the persecution of the insects. A wriier noted for his
levity made a lugubrious plea for a crash program of aid for the
cockroach, calling him "a victim of his slum environment."

un·

unabated
~ bat· id
maudlin
mod'l<)n
levity
lev·~

te

lugubrious
h1 go' bre ~s

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. She advocated* _ _ _ _ _ _ music as appropriate background for the funeral
scene.
2. Although the debater's rebuttal was
3. The plague continued
deliver the note to Romeo.

, it was totally irrelevant.*
, and the hapless* Friar John was unable to

4. A good barometer* of the reunion's success was the number of _ _ _ _ _ _ songs
that the alumni sang.
5. Dean Flanigan admonished* us for our _ _ _ _ _ _ at the graduation exercises.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. puissant

a. sentimental

7. unabated

b. very sad

8. maudlin

c. lightness of disposition

9. levity

d. without subsiding

10. lugubrious

e. powerful

TODAY'S IDIOM

to take the wind out of one's sails-to remove someone's advantage
Although Edna was bristling* with anger when she stormed in, I took the wind
out of her sails by voicing my own displeasure at the way she had been treated.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

123

REVIEW

WEEK

20

•!• DAY

5

There are many choice epithets* for cockroaches, and over the centuries man has been most
resourceful* in concocting* adjectives to descrtbe the insects. Whether you are going to get
excited over a roach, write a poem, take a College Board examination, or compose a letter to
a loved one, it helps to have a rich vocabulary.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Wrtte the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. abstemious
2. derogatory
3. disparate
4. edifice
5. extant
6. indict
7. levity
8. lugubrious
9. maudlin
10. nebulous
11. omnivorous
12. pesky
13. puissant
14. redolent
15. repose
16. reviled
17. sultry
18. trenchant
19. unabated
20. vicissitudes
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. different
b. sentimental
c. building
d. very sad
e. humor, lightness of disposition
f. vague, not clear
g. expressing a low opinion
h. eating any kind of food
i. accuse
j. state of rest
k. still existing
I. powerful
m. annoying
n. fragrant
o. moderate in eating or drtnking
p. keen, sharp, biting
q. torrid
r. difficulties
s. without subsiding
t. scolded

left holding the bag
a lick and a promise
tongue in cheek
take the wind out of one's sails

u.
v.
w.
x.

insincerely
left to suffer the blame
do something in a cursory* manner
remove someone's advantage

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 301. Make a record of
those words you missed.

1. - - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - - - - - - -

4. ----------------5. ------------------

124

MEANINGS

HAPLESS HEADLINES
(From Week 20)

•!•

Restore meaning to the headlines below by inserting the word that the
careless typesetter omitted.
Pesky
b. Maudlin
c. Repose
d. Abstemious
e. Sultry
f. Vicissitudes
g. Redolent
h. Levity
i. Derogatory
j. Unabated
k. Reviled
I. Puissant
m. Nebulous
n. Trenchant
o. Lugubrious
p. Disparate
q. Indict
r. Extant
s. Omnivorous
t. Edifice
a.

1. Rioting Continues _ _ _ _ _ _ in Men's Correctional Facility

2. Torch Singer's
3.

Songs Raise Temperature in Night Club
Life-Style Results in Huge Weight Loss for Actor

4. Architect Celebrated for New All-Glass _ _ _ _ __

5. Serious Judge Will Tolerate No _ _ _ _ _ _ in His Courtroom
6. Grand Jury Set to

Bookkeeper in Million Dollar Fraud

7. Baseball Manager to Apologize for
Umpire

Remarks about

8. Only Three Copies of Shakespeare's Handwriting _ _ _ _ __
Says Elizabethan Scholar
9. Handicapped Climbers Overcome Many
Mt. Everest

to Scale

10. Dictator _ _ _ _ _ _ by South American Patriots

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

125

WORDSEARCH 20

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Chlorine Compounds on Trial
The chances are that the water supply where you live is disinfected by
chlorine, one of the elements on the periodic table. Yet, -=CD~--2 _ _ _ _ , identifying it as a health
complaints about chlorine continue ®-=.
and environmental risk.
Greenpeace, the environmental activist group, stands ready to-=®=----chlorinated organic elements, alleging that they are toxic. The Federal
Environmental Protection Agency is reexamining the health hazards that are
prevalent when materials containing chlorine are processed at high
temperatures. And, worldwide, nations are banning chlorine compounds that
destroy the earth's protective ozone layer. Harsh treatment, it would seem, for
one of nature's basic elements, a component of the table salt we use.
When we enter a pool that is @
with the aroma of chlorine, we don't
element now being blamed for tumors,
associate it with the ®
reproductive problems, arrested development, destruction of wildlife, and
sundry other ills that plague our planet.
A scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund thinks that chlorinated
chemicals should be phased out. "We know they will be persistent if they get
into the environment," she said. 'They are soluble, so they will build up in the
fat of fish, birds, and people."

Clues

CD 1st Day
@ 4th Day

®

1st Day

@ 2nd Day

®

126

1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 301

WEEK

21

•!• DAY

1

NEW WORDS

scion
si'~n

indoctrinate

LOCKED IN AN IVORY EDIFICE*

in dok' ~nat

Prince Siddhartha Gautama was the scion of a family of
warrior-kings in northern India. He was being indoctrinated
for the time when he would assume his father's throne.
Growing up in an atmosphere of opulence, the young prince
was constantly shielded from the cruel realities of the world.
An army of obsequious seiVants and tutors catered to his
every desire, providing Siddhartha with instruction in riding,
fencing, dancing, and painting-while lavishing fulsome
praise upon him. It wasn't until the prince was thirty that he
took the first step that led to his becoming the Buddha, one
of the world's greatest spiritual leaders.

opulence

op' ~

l~ns

obsequious
~b

se' kwe ~s
fulsome

rur &lm

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences. (Which two words are
almost synonymous?)
1. It was not until the wreckers began to dismantle* the old edifice• that they discovered
its real _ _ _ _ __
2. As the
of a family of wealthy bankers, Rothschild never had to face
the vicissitudes• of life.
3. Uriah Heep's _ _ _ _ _ _ manner nettled* all but the most gullible.•
4. In order to
praising communism.

the captive, his jailers repeatedly reviled* capitalism while

5. The actress received _ _ _ _ _ _ compliments from her friends but trenchant•
criticism from the reviewers.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. scion

a. seeking favor, fawning

7. indoctrinate

b. child, descendant

8. opulence

c. wealth, riches

9. obsequious

d. excessive, insincere

10. fulsome

e. to teach certain principles

TODAY'S IDIOM

two strings to one's bow-two means of achieving one's aim
The salesman had two strings to his bow-if a phone call
didn't get results, he would appear in person.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 302

127

NEW WORDS

WEEK

lush

21

•!• DAY

2

lush
destitution
des' b bi' shcln

ponder

pon' d~r
supplication
sup' 1~ ki' sh~n
decadence
dek' ~ d~ns

SIDDHARTHA'S EYES ARE OPENED
One day, Prince Siddhartha expressed the desire to leave his
lush surroundings and ride out among his people. He was
profoundly shaken by the misery, destitution. disease, and
excruciating* pain with which his people were constantly
afflicted. • Retiring to his room to ponder over what he had
seen, he remained there for several days, deaf to the
supplication of those who pleaded with him to come forth. It
seemed to Siddhartha that his life had been redolent• with
decadence, and he was determined to make amends.

Sample Sentences ·Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. The

stage setting drew applause from the theater buffs. •

2. In the hospital, the alcoholic had time to
abstemious. •

over the need to be

3. As the traveler followed the tortuous• path up the Kentucky mountain, he was
sickened by the
which he saw.
4. Through
the members.

, the fraternity head hoped to end the strife* among

5. Rumors of Rome's _ _ _ _ _ _ were rife* among the barbarian tribes.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. lush

a. decay

7. destitution

b. extreme poverty

8. ponder

c. to consider carefully

9. supplication

d. earnest prayer

10. decadence

e. luxurious, elaborate

TODAY'S IDIOM

on tenter hooks-in a state of anxiety
(cloth used to be stretched or "tentered" on hooks)
The indicted* clerk was kept on tenter hooks by the district attorney.
128

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 302

WEEK

21

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

penance
pen·~ns

ascetic
tk

~set'

THE ENLIGHTENED ONE
Siddhartha exchanged his sumptuous• garments for a
monk's yellow robe and went out into the world to do penance
for what he considered to be his previous life of sin. First he
would cleanse himself by becoming an ascetic; then he would
study Hindu wisdom in order to be prepared to help his
suffering people. After six years of desultory wandering and
attracting only a handful of disciples, Siddhartha came to a
huge tree near the Indian city of Gaya. For seven weeks he sat
beneath its branches, seeking an answer for his personal
torment. Finally, it is said, he underwent a metamorphosis,
becoming the Enlightened One-the Buddha.

desultory
des'~l

tor'e

disciple

da si' pal
metamorphosis
met· a mar· fa sis

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Billy the Vampire is the only extant• _ _ _ _ _ _ of Count Dracula.
2. In a remarkable

, her lugubrious* mood changed to one of levity.•

3. Following a lengthy diatribe* against mendacity*, the priest imposed _ _ _ _ __
upon the sinner.
4. The cave of the
former mansion.

lacked the opulence• and lush* decoration of his

5. Larry's compositions proceed in a _ _ _ _ _ _ manner despite the supplication•
of his English teacher.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. penance

a. change

7. ascetic (n.)

b. atonement for sin

8. desultory

c. occurring by chance, disconnected

9. disciple

d. one who practices self-denial and devotion

10. metamorphosis

e. follower

TODAY'S IDIOM
the fat is in the fire-the mischief is done
We implored* him to desist* but he said that the fat was already in the ft.re.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

129

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

bona fide

bo'

n~

21 •:•

DAY

4

fid'

salvation
sal va' sh~n
materialism
tir' ~ liz~ am

e

m~

nurture

ner' ch~r
nirvana
nir va.' na

LOVE OVER HATRED
GOODNESS OVER EVIL
Buddha outlined the three paths that men might travel:
worldly pleasure, self-torment, and the middle path. Only
through the middle path could man achieve bona fide peace
and salvation. One had to repudiate* materialism. keep his
self-control, restrict speech, be open-minded, never lie or
steal, reject selfish drives, nurture goodness, etc. Buddha
continued to preach until the age of eighty. spreading the
philosophy that man has the power to shape his own destiny.
1brough good deeds and pure thoughts man may reach
nirvana Interestingly enough, the man who objected to
traditional religious worship was to become idolized by
millions throughout the world.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
good will, the management will do anything to
accommodate* its guests' special needs.

1. In order to

2. When we saw the hundreds of
petitions, we realized that the
number of people who supported the candidate was legion.*
3. The megalomaniac* believed that he alone had the answer to mankind's
4. Rosalie found solace* in the conviction that one day mankind would reach

Shangrt-la, Utopia,* _ _ _ _ __
5. Disciples* of _ _ _ _ _ _ may know the price of evecything but the value

of nothing.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. bona fide

a. to nourish, support

7. salvation

b. attention to worldly things and neglect of spiritual needs

8. materialism

c. freedom from care and pain, Buddhist heaven

9. nurture

d. genuine

10. nirvana

e. deliverance from ruin
TODAY'S IDIOM

like Caesar~ wife--above suspicion
Mrs. Drake would have to be like Caesar's wife so that no tinge•
of scandal would embarrass her husband, our new mayor.
130

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

21

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

For the past twenty weeks, each of these review exercises has contained a bit of propaganda
to point up the need for you to expand your vocabulary. This week is no exception.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. ascetic
2. bona fide
3. decadence
4. destitution
5. desultory
6. disciple
7. fulsome
8. indoctrinate
9. lush
10. materialism
11. metamorphosis
12. niivana
13. nurture
14. obsequious
15. opulence
16. penance
17. ponder
18. salvation
19. scion
20. supplication
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. one who practices
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
I.

m.
n.
o.

p.
q.
r.
s.
t.

self~denial

wealth
concern with possessions
luxurious
decay
disconnected, random
deliverance from ruin
extreme poverty
to teach certain principles
excessive
nourish
heavenly place
descendant
earnest prayer
consider carefully
follower
atonement for sin
seeking favor
change
genuine

two strings to one's bow
on tenter hooks
fat is in the fire
like Caesar's wife

u. in a state of anxiety
v. two means to achieve one's aim
w. above suspicion
x. the mischief is done

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 302. Make a record of
those words you missed.

MEANINGS

1. - - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - -

3. - - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - - - - - -

131

WORDSEARCH 21
• Using the clues listed below. fill in each blank in the following story
•.•
with one of the new words you learned this week,
History'S Most Extraordinary Personl
In a celebrated essay about Joan of Arc. Mark 1\vain wrote movingly of her
brief moment in the spotlight-two short years in which she made an
indelible mark on world history. At age 16 she was illiterate, had never
strayed from her sleepy little village, knew nothing of military combat. or
she was named
courts of law. But at age 17. in a complete CD
Commander-~n-Chief of the French army, vowing to restore her king to his
throne. Joan attracted many fervent followers. and a@
called her
"France's ...;;;@_ _ __
After much gallantry in battle. this
heroine was brought low by
treachery at the French court and captured by the enemy. Joan defended
herself brilliantly at a court trial. although she could neither read nor write.
She was able to forecast future events with remarkable accuracy. correctly
predicting her own martyrdom.
@....;;;.4_ _ _ _

Mark 1\vain understood how geniuses such as Napoleon, Edison, and Wagner
could develop but one could®
the facts for a lifetime without being
able to explain how this humble peasant girl could display the qualities of a
mature statesman, a learned jurist, and a military wizard. He concluded:
"Taking into account her origin, youth, sex. illiteracy, early environment. and
the obstructing conditions under which she exploited her high gifts and made
her conquests in the field and before the courts that tried her for her lifeshe is easily and by far the most extraordinary person the human race has
ever produced."
Clues

®
®

3rd Day
3rd Day
4th Day

@) 4th Day

®

132

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

22

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

juxtapose
juk sta poz'
plight
plit

FEMALE ALCOHOLICS
When we juxtapose the words "woman" and "alcoholic" many
readers are surprised. However, the plight of America's several
million female alcoholics is rapidly increasing in intensity.
But the statistics are inexact because it is estimated that
there are nine covert alcoholics for every one under treatment.
Women drink to help themselves to cope with life's
vicissitudes.• They drink because of financial pressures,
incompatibility, frustration, • and related reasons.

covert
ko'v~rt

cope

kop
incompatibility
1n ~tam pat'~ bll' ~ te

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. If we were to _ _ _ _ _ _ our philosophies, your materialism• would conflict with
my idealism.
2. Judge Felder commented with aspertty• upon the wife's charge of _ _ _ _ __
3. Just how our club's president is able to
personalities is something I'll never understand.
4. The
moved us to tears.

with so many disparate*

of the refugees who wandered about in a desultory* fashion

5. Woodrow Wilson stated that he found - - - - - - agreements to be
reprehensible.*

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. juxtapose

a. quality of being mismated, lack of harmony

7. plight

b. to place side by side

8. covert

c. predicament, dangerous situation

9. cope

d. secret, hidden

10. incompatibility

e. to be a match for, to be able to handle

TODAY'S IDIOM

plea bargain-to agree to plead guilty to a lesser charge
so as to avoid trial for a more serious offense.
The defendant finally took his lawyer's advice and agreed
to a plea bargain of third-degree assault
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

133

NEW WORDS

WEEK

incapacitated
in' k~ pas' ~ bit id
fabricate
fab' r.> kat

•!• DAY

2

A PROFILE OF THE WOMAN
WHO DRINKS TO EXCESS

connubial
~nO'

22

The typical alcoholic woman is above average in intelligence,
in her forties. married, with two children. She started drinking
socially in high school or college. Although frequently
incapacitated. she can fabricate a story skillfully and thus
conceal her true physical condition. She often attributes her
alcoholism to connubial stress, boredom, or depression. A
large percentage of the women give family histories of
alcoholism. Most female drinkers would demur at the
appellation of "alcoholic"-and that makes their treatment all
the more difficult.

be ~I

demur
di mer'
appellation
ap'~la'sh~n

IMPORTANT NOTE: How good a detective are you? Did you spot
one of the new words that had been introduced earlier?
(fabricate) It should be part of your vocabulary now. From
time to time in the lessons that follow, your alertness will be
tested as a previously learned word is reintroduced.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Dave's metamorphosis* from an honest person to one who could _ _ _ _ __
an alibi so adroitly* was amazing.
2. The widow grew maudlin* as she reminisced about her former
bliss.
3. I will have to
even if I receive a bona fide* invitation to run for the
G.O. council.
4. Because he was the scion* of the richest family on our block, Lenny was given the
_ _ _ _ _ _ of "Rockefeller."
5. He was ashamed to admit that a pesky* skin rash _ _ _ _ _ _ him for weeks at
a time.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. incapacitated
7. fabricate

8. connubial
9. demur
10. appellation

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

to object
a name
to lie, concoct*
related to marriage
disabled, made unfit
TODAY'S IDIOM

in apple pie or~er-in neat order, good condition
The house was in dreadful condition when Mrs. Maslow arrived.
but when she left it was in apple pie order.
134

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

22

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

escalation
es'k~li'sh~n

indifference

NEFARIOUS* EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL
Aside from the reasons offered earlier, doctors have other
interesting reasons for the escalation in female drinking. They
also indict* social acceptance and indifference to alcohol's
potential danger as contributmy factors. If women realized the
harmful extent of the cumulative effect of alcohol, they might
taper off in their public and recondite drinking. Forty-three
percent of the female alcoholics in a survey showed evidence
of liver damage, and a quarter of the whole group had a high
white-blood-cell count. Almost five percent of the patients
died shortly after their release from the hospital.

in dtf' ~r ~ns

potential

I» ten'

sh~l

cumulative
kyii · m~ 1~ tlv
recondite
rek' ~n dit

Sample Sentences If you can still see clearly after all the references to liquor, use the
new words in the following sentences.
1. Many derogatory* statements were heard from those who were opposed to further
_ _ _ _ _ _ of the conflict.
2. With complete
toward his personal safety, Lt. Regan openly
challenged the puissant• forces of the enemy.
3. When destitution* grips an area, there is excellent _ _ _ _ _ _ for trouble.
4. The _ _ _ _ _ _ effect of the summer's sultry* weather was to shorten everyone's
temper.
5. The poet's _ _ _ _ _ _ language precluded* any understanding of her theme.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. escalation

a. possible

7. indifference

b. accumulated

8. potential (adj.) _ _ c. secret, hidden, obscure
9. cumulative
10. recondite

d. an increase, intensification
e. lack of concern

TODAY'S IDIOM

apple polishing-trying to gain favor by gifts or flattery
If the way to advancement in this company is through apple polishing, I quit!

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

135

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

palliate

pare

22

•!• DAY

4

at

delude

dtlod·

DANGER SIGNALS

prelude

A potential* female alcoholic should be cognizant* of certain
danger signals:

prer yud

a. Using alcohol in an attempt to palliate her problems.
chimerical

ka mer· a kal
acknowledge
ak nor lj

b. Deluding herself about the extent of her drinking habits.
c. Drinking at regular time periods, both day and night.
d. Reliance upon alcohol as a prelude to a major social
obligation.
e. Making unrealistic promises about terminating* her
drinking.
f. Using alcohol as a medication for real or chimerical
illnesses.
If in evaluating* her drinking, a woman acknowledged that
several of the danger signals applied to her, she should see
a physician.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Monte refused to
the extrinsic* pressures that were causing him to
do poorly in his sophomore year.
2. We must not allow fulsome* praise to _ _ _ _ _ _ us about our actual abilities.
3. The drugs could only _ _ _ _ _ _ the symptoms, not provide the cure.
4. As a
his sins.

to his performance, the bullfighter vowed to do penance* for

5. The scheme sounded _ _ _ _ _ _ , but we were indoctrinated* to believe that it
could work.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. palliate

a. visionary, imaginary, fantastic

7. delude

b. alleviate, relieve without curing

8. prelude

c. introduction

9. chimerical

d. to fool

10. acknowledge

e. admit
TODAY'S IDIOM

the Draconian Code--a very severe set of rules (Draco, an Athenian lawmaker
of the 7th century B.C., prescribed the death penalty for almost every violation.)
The head counselor ran our camp according to his own Draconian Code.
136

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

22

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

If you're drtving, don't drtnkl Alcohol does not mix with gasoline! We have seen those slogans
on many billboards. Here's a new one: "If you use words, use good ones!"
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Wrtte the letter that stands for the definition
in the approprtate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

acknowledge
appellation
chimertcal
connubial
cope
covert
cumulative
delude
demur
escalation
fabrtcate
incapacitated
incompatibility
indifference
juxtapose
palliate
plight
potential (adj.)
prelude
recondite

DEFINITIONS
a. accumulated
b. admit
c. relieve without curtng
d. to lie
e. to fool
f. a name
g. predicament
h. secret
i. intensification
j. to be a match for
k. obscure, hidden
I. imaginary, fantastic
m. related to marrtage
n. possible
o. to place side by side
P· to object
q. introduction
r. lack of concern
s. lack of harmony
t. disabled

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

plea bargain
in apple pie order
apple polishing
Draconian Code

u.
v.
w.
x.

trying to gain favor
severe set of rules
admit guilt on a lesser charge
in good condition

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 302. Make a record of

1. - - - - - - - - -

those words you missed.

2. - - - - - - - - -

MEANINGS

3. - - - - - - - - -

4. - - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - -

137

WORDSEARCH 22

•!•

Using the clues listed below. fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Hair TodaJ; ...
The fact that a hair salon might charge $40 for a woman's shampoo and
haircut but only $20 for the same services for a man is a matter of
to most citizens. Not so to New York City's Commission on
Human Rights. which claimed that such a disparity is discriminatory.
Commissioner Dennis De Leon has targeted "gender-based" pricing as a
violation of city law.
Consider the

....;..@_ _ _ _

of the salon owners. They

@-=3_ _ _ _

the price

difference. explaining that it takes much longer to cut a woman's hair and
requires the use of additional products. But a spokesperson for the
Department of Consumer Mfairs said that beauty parlors will have to
®
with the situation honestly. just as dry cleaners and used-car
dealers did when they were apprised of the law.
"I know that women are fighting for equality," said the owner of a chain of
unisex hair salons, "but this is ridiculous. We cut a man's hair in no time but
we have to get more money from our female customers because their styling
and cutting takes so much longer."
The argument might be the _®____ to an important court case. A cityproposed settlement. however. is to have those salons that are cited for
violations of the law offer free haircuts to women for a period of three months
before having to pay a stiff fine for repeated offenses.
"It's easier to comply." shrugged one owner (bald. himself).

Clues


3rd Day

® 1st Day
@ 4th Day
@ 1st Day

® 4th Day

138

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

23

•!• DAY

NEW WoRDS

1

heterogeneous

het• ~r ~ je' ne

~s

gamut

gam· ~t

FROM ATO Z
Ellis Sloane, a teacher of science at a large metropolitan high
school, first paid little attention to the fact that his two biology
classes were so disparate* in their performance. In most
schools the classes are alphabetically heterogeneous, with
youngsters' names running the gamut from Adams to Zilch.
But Biology 121 had only A's and B's, whereas Biology 128
had Ts, Vs, Ws, Y's, and Z's. Mr. Sloane, a perspicacious
teacher, began to perceive* differences between the two
groups: while their reading scores and I.Q.'s were roughly
analogous. it was apparent that Biology 128 was replete* with
maladjusted students, while Biology 121 had the normal ones.

perspicacious

per· s~

ka· sh~s

analogous
~ nar~ g~

maladjusted
mat· ~ jus' tid

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. The Bureau of Child Guidance has been the salvation* for some _ _ _ _ __
children.
2. Our algebra class is a _ _ _ _ _ _ one in which bright students are juxtaposed*

with slower ones.
3. Senator Thorpe was
enough to realize that the scurrilous* charge
would have little effect upon the voters.
4. Although the lawyer acknowledged* that the two cases were hardly _ _ _ _ __
he still felt that he had a good precedent on his side.
5. The actress ran the _ _ _ _ _ _ of emotions in a poignant* performance that
thrilled the audience.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. heterogeneous _ _

a. range

7. gamut

b. acutely perceptive, shrewd

8. perspicacious

c. poorly adjusted, disturbed

9. analogous

d. comparable, similar

10. maladjusted

e. dissimilar

TODAY'S IDIOM

the distaff side-women (distaff was a staff used in spinning)
The men had brandy on the porch, while the distaff
side gathered to gossip in the kitchen.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

139

NEW WORDS

WEEK

phenomenon
r~ nom'~

23

•!• DAY

2

non

mortality

mar

tal'~

te

decade

dek'ad
susceptible
sep' b b~l

~

neurotic

nti rot' ik

WHAT'S IN A NAME?
As Mr. Sloane pursued his investigation of the phenomenon,
he discovered that a Dr. Trevor Weston of the British Medical
Association had corroborated* his findings. Dr. Weston had
studied British mortality rates over a decade, fmding that
people whose names began with letters ranging from "S" to
"Z" had a life expectancy that averaged twelve years fewer
than the rest of the population. Furthermore, those at the
bottom of the alphabet tended to contract more ulcers, were
more susceptible to heart attacks, and were more likely to be
neurotic than those at the top of the alphabet.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.

1. Irritability is one of the salient* features of a _ _ _ _ _ _ personality.
2. After a _ _ _ _ _ _ of connubial* acrimony,* the couple decided to consult with a
marriage counselor.
3. If a miner were to ponder* over the high
might want to quit.

rate in his occupation, he

4. Ethan Frome soon learned that his querulous* wife was
of ailments.
5. There was no paucity* of witnesses to describe the
saucer.

to a variety
of the flying

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. phenomenon

a. death

7. mortality

b. suffering from a nervous disorder

8. decade

c. ten years

9. susceptible

d. unusual occurrence

10. neurotic

e. easily affected, unusually liable

TODAY'S IDIOM

on the qui vive-on the alert
My mother is always on the qui vive for bargains.

140

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

23

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

3

pedagogue

ped'agog
enunciate

THE PERILS OF THE ALPHABET
Dr. Weston is convinced that the pedagogue is the culprit. •
Since teachers seat their pupils in alphabetical order, the "S"
to "Z" child is usually the last to receive his test marks, the
last to eat lunch, the last to be dismissed, and so on. As they
are the last to recite, these youngsters feel frustrated*
because what they had to say had usually been enunciated
earlier. The .irwrdinate amount of waiting that this group has
to do causes them to become irascible and jittery. "S" to "Z"
people also become quite introspective, convinced that they
are inferior to those at the top of the alphabet.

nun·

j

seat

inordinate
in Ord' nit

irascible
i ras' ~ hll

introspective
tn' tra spek' Uv

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Reporters were expecting the candidate to _ _ _ _ _ _ his policy on the
escalation• of the war.
2. His profligate• son made the parsimonious• old crank even more _ _ _ _ __
3. Since Alice is so gregarious• it surprised me to learn that she is also an
_ _ _ _ _ girl.
4. Mr. Ford is proud to be called a teacher, but he demurs• at the title of
5. In an attempt to show how assiduous• he was, the executive spent an
_ _ _ _ _ _ amount of time on his report.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. pedagogue

a. irritable

7. enunciate

b. excessive

8. inordinate

c. to utter, proclaim

9. irascible

d. looking into one's own feelings

10. introspective

e. teacher

TODAY'S IDIOM

to get one's back up-to become angry
Every time his mother mentioned getting a haircut,
the young guitarist got his back up.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

141

NEW WORDS

,perpetuate
~r pech. ii

WEEK

23

•!• DAY

4

at

mandate

man· dat
compensatory
kam pen· SQ to•

IN THE NATURE OF EDUCATIONAL
REFORM
Mr. Sloane did not want to perpetuate the disorders that
stemmed from the alphabetical arrangement. Not only did he
reverse the seating in his other classes, but he began to
badger* the school's administration for a mandate to bring
about such changes throughout the building. He called it a
compensatory factor to neutralize the catastrophic effects of
the traditional policy. Soon, Mr. Sloane earned the
appellation• of "Mr. Backwards."

re

neutralize

mr trn liz
catastrophic
kat· a stror· ik

Sample Sentences Use the new words in the following sentences.
1. Don Ricardo hoped that his son would
the family business, but
Manuel was too involved with chimerical* schemes to want to run a restaurant.
2. If the draconian* regulations are to continue unabated, • they will have
_ _ _ _ _ _ results.
3. Dr. Meyers prescribed medication to
incapacitated* my uncle.

the acid condition that had

4. As a prelude* to his victory speech, the mayor announced that he considered the
large vote to be a
from the people.
5.

education may help minority groups to cope* with their plight.*

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. perpetuate

a. serving to pay back

7. mandate

b. an authoritative order or command

8. compensatory _ _

c. to counteract

9. neutralize

d. to cause to continue

10. catastrophic

e. disastrous

TODAY'S IDIOM

to bring home the bacon-to earn a living, to succeed
The man's inability to bring home the bacon was the
actual reason for the couple's incompatibility.•
142

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

23

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

You may not know the alphabet from aardvark to zymurgy, but you can certainly cope* with
analogous to susceptible.
Match the twenty words with their meanings. Write the letter that stands for the definition
in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. analogous
2. catastrophic
3. compensatory
4. decade
5. enunciate
6. gamut
7. heterogeneous
8. inordinate
9. introspective
10. irascible
11. maladjusted
12. mandate
13. mortality
14. neurotic
15. neutralize
16. pedagogue
17. perpetuate
18. perspicacious
19. phenomenon
20. susceptible
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. disastrous
b. irritable
c. teacher
d. disturbed
e. to cause to continue
f. comparable, similar
g. shrewd
h. authoritative command
i. dissimilar
j. range
k. counteract
I. having a nervous disorder
m. excessive
n. looking into one's own feelings
o. unusual occurrence
p. death
q. easily affected
r. serving to pay back
s. ten years
t. to utter, proclaim

the distaff side
on the qui vive
to get one's back up
bring home the bacon

u. women
v. on the alert
w. become angry
x. earn a living

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Now check your answers on
page 302. Make a record of
those words you missed.

MEANINGS

1. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
2. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

3. - - - - - - - - 4. - - - - - - - - - 5. - - - - - - - - - YOU ARE NOW AT THE MID-POINT OF THE BOOK, AND YOU SHOULD PLAN TO DEVOTE SOME ADDITIONAL
TIME TO A REVIEW OF THOSE WORDS THAT YOU MISSED DURING THE PAST TWENTY-THREE WEEKS.

143

WORDSEARCH 23

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Microsociety-An Antidote for School Boredom
Money, taxes, employment. legislation-these are topics that we associate
with the adult world. George Richmond, a Yale graduate who became a
in the New York City school system, felt that elementary school
youngsters could also be interested, even excited, about such issues. He
experimented in his own classes with the Microsociety in which basic
instruction takes place and is reinforced as pupils operate their own
businesses, pass laws, live within the parameters of a constitution that they
drafted, seek redress within their own judicial system, buy and sell real
estate, and so on.
Richmond's book on the Microsociety came to the attention of the school
board in Lowell, Massachusetts, and their members decided to give it a try in
the results were quite remarkable:
1981. In much less than a ®
students exceeded the norm in reading and math; 8th graders passed college
level exams: school attendance went up to 96%; and the dropout rate took a
nosedive in Lowell.
In Microsociety's @
classes, mornings are given over to the
traditional curriculum. In the afternoon, the students apply what they
learned in activities that run the @
from keeping double entry
books, doing fmancial audits, running a bank, and conducting court sessions
to engaging in light manufacture that leads to retail and wholesale
commerce.
Other ®
school systems have since adopted George Richmond's.
innovative ideas. "Microsociety," said a Yonkers, New York principal, "gets
kids to role-play life!"
A Time Magazine reporter was much impressed with Microsociety's results:
"Such an approach would go a long way toward making U.S. public schools
a cradle of national renewal."

Clues
G) 3rd Day
@ 2nd Day

® 1st Day
@ 1st Day

®

144

1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 302

WEEK

24 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

anthropologist
an' thrn pol' a jist
bizarre
ba zar'

PRIMITIVE MAGIC
In the course of their studies of other cultures,
anthropologists have reported numerous customs and
practices that seem bizarre to the average American. Many
primitive people believe that certain inanimate objects have a
will of their own and possess some magical powers. These
fetishes may be simple things like a particular feather of a
bird or a unique pebble. The fetish might have derived its
power, according to members of some tribes, from a god who
lives within the object and has changed it into a thing of
magic. Fetishes need not only be natural objects, however. An
artifact such as a sculpture or carving is also believed to
possess supernatural powers.

in

inanimate
an'~ mit
fetish
fet' ish
artifact

ar' b fakt

Sample Sentences Now use your new words in the following sentences.
1. Stones are

objects that have no life of their own.
2. It has been suggested that the man who builds a better mousetrap will find the world
beating a path to his door to possess this _ _ _ _ __
3. The explorers saw the golden statue and thought of how much money it would bring
them. But their lives would be in danger if they moved it because it was a powerful
_ _ _ _ _ _ to the natives.
4. Margaret Mead, the famous

, fascinated thousands of readers with
her studies of South Seas islanders.
S. It would be rather
for a young man to come to school wearing
a dress.

Definitions If you have studied the reading selection and the sample sentences, now try
your hand at matching your new words with their definitions.
6. anthropologist __

a. an object made by hand, rather than a thing as it occurs in

7. artifact

b.

8. bizarre

c.

9. fetish

d.

10. inanimate

e.

nature
lifeless
an object that is thought to have magic powers
an expert in the study of the races, beliefs. customs, etc. of
mankind
odd, peculiar, strange, weird
TODAY'S IDIOM

to get down off a high horse-to act like an ordinary person
When Susan discovered that the young man who was trying to make conversation with
her was the son of a milltonaire, she immediately got down off her high horse.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

145

NEW WORDS

WEEK

taboo
t~

24

•!• DAY

2

bu·

imprudent
im prod· nt
prohibition
bish·

pro·~

FORBIDDEN
~n

imperative

im

per·~

tiv

taint

tint

An outgrowth of the idea of a fetish* is the closely related
practice of taboo. Whereas the gods or supernatural powers
merely inhabit an object that is a fetish and lend it magic,
they will punish the imprudent native who violates their
prohibition of an act or use of an object or word that has
become taboo. If a taboo has been broken, it becomes
imperative for the offender to be punished. In many cases,
however, the taint on the community may be removed after
the priests have performed a special ceremony. Often, the
violator of the taboo will be punished or die merely through
his own fears of the terrible thing he has done.

Sample Sentences Has the context in which your new words appear given you clues to
their meaning? Try now to use them in these sample sentences.
1. Unsanitary conditions in the bottling factory caused hundreds of cases of soda to be
_ _ _ _ _ _ by dirt and foreign objects. The health department refused to allow
the soda to be sold.
2. Although a New Jersey high school principal placed a
on boys
wearing their hair long, one student fought in the courts and won his case.
3. It is considered _ _ _ _ _ _ to give your computer code word to anyone not fully
known to you.
4. It is _ _ _ _ _ _ for certain South Seas islanders to eat some foods before
they many.
5. In the nuclear age it has become _ _ _ _ _ _ for the nations of the world to learn
to live in peace.

Definitions Now is your chance to test your knowledge of your new words by matching
them with their definitions.
6. imperative
7.
8.
9.
10.

imprudent
prohibition
taboo
taint (n.)

a. contamination, undesirable substance that spoils
something
b. the act of forbidding certain behavior
c. urgent, necessary, compulsory
d. forbidden by custom or religious practice
e. unwise, not careful
TODAY'S IDIOM
the first water-of the best quality, the greatest
Lebron James is obviously a basketball player of the
first water who would be of enormous value to any team.

146

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

WEEK

24

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

universal

ya·

n~

ver·

~1

contemptuous
kan temp· chO ~s

AN ABSURDITY
Although it is probably universal human behavior to be
contemptuous of the bizarre* superstitions practiced by
inhabitants of unfamiliar cultures, it seems to be somewhat
imprudent* to laugh at others before one takes a good, hard
look at the absurd taboos* and fetishes* one accepts as part
of one's everyday life. Isn't it somewhat absurd when the
"dyed-in-the-wool" bigot, who illogically fears the taint* of
close association with blacks (behavior that resembles fear of
a taboo). spends most of the summer lying in the sun trying
to acquire the color he claims to abhor? Since doctors tell us
that excessive sun-tanning may be a cause of skin cancer, our
strange yearning for sun-darkened skin has all the qualities
of a fetish.*

absurd
ab serd·
bigot
big· at
abhor
abhor·

Sample Sentences Did the starred review words seem familiar to you? Yet, how many
were totally foreign several days ago? Keep up the good work now by using your new
words in the following sentences.
1. Bob felt
of his best friend after he saw him cheating during an exam.
2. The teacher felt like laughing after he heard Sally's
excuse for not
having done her homework.
3. One politician, a notorious
, hopes to get support as a presidential
candidate on the basis of his prejudices and intolerance.
4. I
some one who is constantly changing channels with a remote while
I'm trying to read in the same room.
5. Would relations between countries be simpler if a _ _ _ _ _ _ language were
spoken rather than hundreds of separate ones?

Definitions Match your new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

abhor
absurd
bigot
contemptuous _ _
universal

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

ridiculous
present everywhere
expressing a feeling that something is worthless
a person who is intolerant of other people or ideas
to detest, to despise
TooAv's IDIOM

dyed-in-the-wool-set in one's ways
He was a dyed-in-the-wool Republican who would not consider voting for a Democrat.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

147

NEW WORDS

WEEK

vulnerable

24

•!• DAY

4

vur n~r ~ 1»1

entreaty

entre· te
tradition
tr~ dish'

GESUNDHEIT!
During the Middle Ages most people believed that the devil
could enter our bodies when we sneezed, because at that
propitious* moment we left our bodies vulnerable. However,
this catastrophic* event could be avoided if another person
immediately made an entreaty to God. This was how the
practice began of saying "God bless you" after someone
sneezes. Although the tradition continues today, few people
are aware of its history. A superstition originates in
ignorance-when people are unsure of the causes of events.
But it continues inviolable over the years because it usually
represents our deepest fears.

~n

originate
~

Iif ~mit

inviolable
In v1· ~ 1~

b~l

Sample Sentences Use these new words in the following sentences.

1. Some bad habits _ _ _ _ _ _ in adolescence and continue throughout a
person's life.
2. The murderer made a(n)

to the governor for a pardon.

3. Despite the inexorable* torture, 007 kept the
leading to the underground headquarters.

secret of the labyrinth*

4. It appears that many computers are _ _ _ _ _ _ to "viruses" that can cause
great damage.
5. Eskimos have a(n) _ _ _ _ _ _ of rubbing noses to show affection.
Definitions

6. vulnerable

a. begin, arise

7. entreaty

b. capable of being injured

8. tradition

c. custom that has been handed down

9. originate

d. appeal, plea

10. inviolable

e. safe (from destruction, etc.)

TODAY'S IDIOM

blue chip-a highly valuable asset, stock, or property
In poker, the blue chips are those with the highest value.

My father's broker recommended that for safety we invest in blue chip stocks only.
148

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 303

WEEK

24

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

And today it's time to strengthen your word knowledge again. You've noticed, of course, that
the matching definitions are not always the definitions you may have been familiar with.
This is the way language works. It is impossible to provide a one-word synonym or simple
definition for a word that you will always be able to substitute for it. Therefore, in our weekly
review we hope not only to check your learning. but also to teach you closely related
meanings.
Match the best possible definition with the word you studied. Write the letter that stands
for that definition in the appropriate answer space.
REVIEW WORDS
1. abhor
2. absurd
3. anthropologist
4. artifact
5. bigot
6. bizarre
7. contemptuous
8. entreaty
9. fetish
10. imperative
11. imprudent
12. inanimate
13. inviolable
14. originate
15. prohibition
16. taboo
17. taint
18. tradition
19. universal
20. vulnerable
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. a hand-made object
b. unwise
c. one who is not tolerant of others' ideas
d. completely protected
e. a magical object
f. widespread
g. begin, arise
h. person who studies mankind's customs
i. forbidden
j. long-standing practice
k. weird
I. able to be hurt
m. looking down on someone or something
n. to utterly hate
o. without life
P· forbidding of certain actions
q. necessary
r. ridiculous
s. plea, appeal
t. contaminate

to get off one's high horse
of the first water
dyed-in-the-wool
blue chip

Check your answers on page
303. Record your errors
and their correct meanings.
These words must be studied
independently if you want
to master them. Use them
in original sentences. Also,
study the several different
definitions a good dictionary
provides for each of these
problem words.

u.
v.
w.
x.

the greatest
a highly valued asset
to act like an ordinary person
set in one's ways

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1.
2.

3. -----------------

149

ADJECTIVE LEADERS AND NOUN FOLLOWERS
(From Weeks 21-24)
a. fulsome
b. covert
c. bona fide
d. lush
e. bizarre
f. susceptible
g. inviolable
h. taboo
i. catastrophic
j. inanimate
k. imprudent
I. maladjusted
m. connubial
n. heterogeneous
o. inordinate

Directions Write the letter corresponding to the vocabulary word (above) in
the space provided opposite the noun (below) that it is most likely to precede.
1. bliss
2. diamond
3. praise

4. amount
5. incident
6. purchase
7. meeting

8. object
9. earthquake
10. law

150

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

WORDSEARCH 24
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following sto.ry
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Map Makers at Work
We are all caught up in the events that change histo.ry and the shape of the
countries in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Each time a count.ry changes
its name or its borders, there are some people who have their work cut out
for them. They are the map makers-the cartographers. These skilled artists
to believe that this year's borders will remain fixed. Has
know it is CD
there ever been an @~2_ _ _ _ border?
Looking through an atlas of just a few years back, we realize it is simply an
@
of an ever-changing world. If there is one thing for map makers
to do, it is to realize how @
it is for them to keep abreast of world
events.
The study of world histo.ry is replete with exciting events that have shaken
the economic and political past. Geography is the physical rendering of these
events. As history moves and changes our lives, it is up to the cartographer
lines of a map and shape the picture of this world in
to take the ®
motion.

Clues

CD 2nd Day
@ 4th Day

@ 1st Day
@ 2nd Day

® 1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

151

NEW WORDS

WEEK

awesome

25 •:•

DAY

1

ci~m

eruption
i rup' sh~n

THE EXPLOSION OF KRAKATOA
There are few sights that are more impressive and awesome
than the eruption of an active volcano. There are few natural
events that so singularly* dwarf man's pWly attempts to
control his environment. Perhaps the greatest volcanic
eruption of modern times took place in 1883 when the island
of Krakatoa in Indonesia blew up as the result of a volcanic
explosion. An enormous tidal wave resulted that proved
catastrophic* to the nearby coasts of Java and Sumatra.
New islands were formed by the lava that poured out, and
debris was scattered across the Indian Ocean for hundreds
of miles. Volcanic material, dispersed seventeen miles into
the atmosphere, created startlingly beautiful sunsets for
years afterwards.

puny
pyii'ne
debris
bre'

d~

dispersed
dis persd'

Sample Sentences Relying on the contextual clues in the paragraph above, use the new
words in the following sentences.
1. Fred had been known for his gentle ways, so his friends were stunned by the

_ _ _ _ _ _ of angry words that issued from him.
2. We were surprised by the
resistance put up by the voracious* tiger
to its capture.
3. Mter her house had burned to the ground, Mrs. Wiley searched through the
_ _ _ _ _ _ for her valuable jewehy.
4. Many of those who witnessed tl1e first atomic explosion reported that it was an
_ _ _ _ _ sight.
5. The fluffy seeds of the milkweed are _ _ _ _ _ _ by the wind.
Definitions Now take the final step in learning the new words.
6. awesome

a. scattered, spread, broken up

7. debris
8. dispersed
9. eruption
10. puny

b. weak, unimportant
c. inspiring terror, weird
d. ruins, fragments
e. bursting out

TODAY'S IDIOM

as broad as it is long-it makes very little difference
Since both jobs pay $7.25 an hour and are equally boring,
it is about as broad as it is long whether I take one or the other.

152

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

NEW WORDS

obliterate
~but·~

rit

deplorable

dt plor·

A UNIVERSAL* DANGER
Man's ability to obliterate life on this planet has increased at
a rapid rate. We are now faced with the deplorable prospect of
new weapons that can cause destruction of life and property
on a scale far beyond our imagination. No matter who takes
the first step to initiate a conflict, the possibility exists that
the conflagration will spread and envelop the world. Much
thought has been given to ways and means of preventing this
catastrophe.* Some consider it mandatory* that the nuclear
powers seek agreement on methods of limiting and controlling
these weapons, for in the absence of such an agreement, we
may rue the day atomic energy was made practical.

~ ~~

initiate

1 nish·

eat

conflagration

kon.

n~

gra. sh~n

rue
ni

Sample Sentences Complete the sentences by filling in the blanks.

1. Who could imagine a more bizarre* story than the one having to do with a cow
causing the
in Chicago?
2. No matter how one tries to delete material from a computer, it is almost impossible
to
it.
3. You will

that display of histrionics• when I asked you to help.

4. She could not imagine how she was going to get him to
conversation about marriage.

a

5. The hometown fans thought the umpire's decision was - - - - - Definitions Let's put the new words together with their meanings.

6. obliterate

a. regret

7. deplorable

b. sad, pitiable

8. initiate

c. erase, wipe out

9. conflagration

d. start, set going

10. rue

e. great fire

TODAY'S IDIOM

blow hot and cold-swing for and against something

I told Charlie to give up his summer job and come cross-country
biking with us. He's blowing hot and cold on the deal at this point.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 303

153

NEW WORDS

WEEK

congenial

25 •:•

DAY

3

k~nje' ny~l

hoard
hord

TAKEN FOR GRANTED
The presence of an ever-flowing supply of fresh, clean water
is taken for granted. Unfortunately, this congenial condition
is fast disappearing. As our population increases, as
industry consumes more water each year, the level of our
underground water supply sinks measurably. There is no
way to hoard water: there are many ways to consetve it.
During a particularly dry spell, New York City found its
resetvoirs going dry. Only then did the residents begin to
heed the sage advice to limit the wasteful uses of water.
Under the aegis of the Water Commissioner, citizens were
encouraged to develop habits that would save water. The
continued imprudent* waste by each of us of this most basic
resource will work to the detriment of all.

sage
saj
aegis

e' jis
detriment
det' r~ m~nt

Sample Sentences Here's your opportunity to use your new words.

1. Isn't it a pity we can't _ _ _ _ _ _ the ideal days of autumn?
2. A man may be a
his youngsters.

everywhere, but at home he's called a "square" by

3. The tree in front of my house has the dubious* honor of being the spot voted the
most
by the dogs of the neighborhood.
4. It was fortuitous* that at the last moment the mayor offered the _ _ _ _ _ _ of
his office in finding a solution to the problem.
5. A settlement that causes _ _ _ _ _ _ to neither side is imperative.*

Definitions Remember, words may have many synonyms.
6. congenial

a. injury, damage, hurt

7. hoard (v.)

b. sympathetic, agreeable

8. sage

c. shield, protection, sponsorship

9. aegis

d. hide, store, accumulate

10. detriment

e. wise man, philosopher

TODAY'S IDIOM

in the doldrums-in a bored or depressed state
Mary has been in the doldrums since her best friend moved away.

154

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

WEEK

25 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

longevity
Ion jev· t) te
imbibe

AN AGELESS STORY

im bib"

Evecy so often we can read about a man or woman who has
reached an age far beyond the limits we ordinartly expect.
Reports of a man in Chile or a woman in Turkey who has
celebrated the 105th or llOth birthday occur regularly. The
natural question is, to what do these people owe their
longevitY? Frequently, the answer concerns the fact that the
ancient one liked to imbibe regularly of some hard liquor. The
photograph will show an apparently vi.Tile man or robust
woman. Somehow, people who reach this advanced age seem
to remain eternally sturdy. There are no signs that they have
become senile Smoking a pipe, or sewing on some garment,
these rare specimens of hardy humanity are far from the
doddering folk we expect to see.

virile
vir· tll
senile

se· nil

doddering
dod" tlr ing

Sample Sentences Use the new words in these sentences.
1. Far from being _ _ _ _ _ _ , the old woman was considered the sage• of the
neighborhood.
2. Scientists have placed the _ _ _ _ _ _ of the planet earth unbelievably into
the future.
3. It was deplorable* for us to see her _ _ _ _ _ _ around the house with the aid
of a cane.

4. If you _ _ _ _ _ _ , don't drive!
5. The boys struck

poses to attract the girls on the beach.

Definitions Here's your chance to match the new words with their meaning.
6. longevity

a. long duration of life

7. imbibe

b. masterful, manly

8. virile

c. drink

9. senile

d. infirm, weak from old age

10. doddering

e. trembling, shaking

TODAY'S IDIOM

burn the midnight oil-study or work late into the night
If I'm going to pass the test tomorrow, I will have to bum the midnight oU tonight.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

155

REVIEW

WEEK

25

•!• DAY

5

Week by week your word-power is being built. It's like putting money in the bank.
Remember. in our language there may be many synonyms and related meanings for each
word. Knowing one synonym is good, but you will reap greater benefits from knowing
several. Below is the matching review for this week.

REVIEW WORDS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

aegis
awesome
conflagration
congenial
debris
deplorable
detriment
dispersed
doddering .
eruption
hoard
imbibe
initiate
longevity
obliterate
puny
rue
sage
senile
virile

DEFINITIONS
a. trembling. shaking with old age
b. regret
c. bursting out
d. infirm. weak as a result of old age
e. wise man, philosopher
f. ruins. fragments
g. weak, unimportant
h. protection. sponsorship. shield
i. agreeable. sympathetic
j. broken up. scattered. spread
k. sad. pitiable
I. hurt. damage. injury
m. drink
n. great fire
o. manly. masterful
p. inspiring terror. weird
q. set going. start
r. accumulate. save, store up
s. long duration of life
t. wipe out. erase

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

as broad as it is long
blow hot and cold
in the doldrums
burn the midnight oil

u. in a bored or depressed state
v. makes very little difference
w. swing for and against something
x. work late into the night

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on page
303. Don't neglect words
you fail to answer correctly.
These problem words can
be mastered quickly if you
write them down, look up
their meanings, and practice
using them.

156

1. -----------------

2. -----------------

3. -----------------

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 25
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Save the Whales, at Least
11ave we all become tired of the much used word "environment"?
How often we hear or read about the state of the world's rivers,
forests, air, and earth. When we lose sight of the fact that countless numbers
of creatures have become extinct because their environment could no longer
sustain them, then we ignore the possibility that these same changes could
many species that we take for granted.
Our life-style, and that of the billions of others on this earth, puts waste into
the air and water. We may®
this careless behavior. While there may
still be enough clean water and air for us, the loss of animals and plants can
only be a @
to a good life for the generations that follow.
No one suggests that the solutions to our environmental problems are easy.
The nations and people of the world are in competition for the limited riches
of this planet. It will take the sagest and most dedicated leaders, under whose
®
educated and concerned citizens will live and work, to protect the
environment.
Clues

CD

2nd Day

@ 2nd Day

®
®
®

2nd Day
3rd Day
3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

157

NEW WORDS

WEEK

lethargic
~~their-

26

•!• DAY

1

jik

prevalent

prev·

INFORMING THE PUBLIC

~ l~nt

Public opinion ha..q an important place in a democracy. The
public, often lethargit; ts susceptible* to a wide variety of
influences. The most prevalentof these is the mass media.
These communications media-the press, radio, and
television-have a paramount position In initiating, •
influencing, and shaping public opinion. Bearing this
responsibility, the mass media are often accused of being
remissin their duty to inform the public. There has b'--.:.... ~
great deal of hostilecomment leveled against these opinion
molders.

paramount
par·~

mount

remiss
ri mis·

hostile

hos·u

Sample Sentences Based upon your understanding of the new words as discovered from
the context. place t..ltem in the spaces provided.
1. The audience became e.nremely _ _ _ _ _ _ when the bigot• began to attack

minority groups.
2. Long hair among boys is so _ _ _ _ _ _ today, there is no longer a prohibition
against it in most schools.
3. We are all susceptible* to a _ _ _ _ _ _ feeling after a heavy meal.
4. A good politician seeks the

issue in his c-ommunity.

5. We would be
if we overlooked the importance of the Internet to the
interchange of ideas and .information.

Definitions Matching words and definjtlons will prove you've learned them.
6. lethargic

a. prevailing, common, general

7. prevalent

b. lazy, indifferent

8. paramount

c. antagonistic, angry

9. remiss

d. supreme, foremost

10. hostile

e. careless, negligent

TODAY'S IDIOM

to split hairs-to make fine distinctions
The mother and child spent a great deal of time arguing about the
hair-splitting question of whether •going to bed• meant lights out or not.
158

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

26 •:•

WEEK

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

rebuke
ti bylik.

aversion
~

THE LACK OF FOREIGN NEWS
The critics rebuke the press for the fact that most newspapers
devote somewhat less than 10 percent of their news space to
foreign items. In many hundreds of papers this falls below two
percent. Why is there thtsaversion to foreign news? Newsmen
claim that readersevince no interest in foreign affairs. In order
to increase reader interest in foreign news, the vogue among
editors is to sensationalize it to the point of distortion. Many
other papers do only the most superficial kind of reporting in
this area.

ver·

zh~n

evince
i vtns·

vogue

vog
st:i"

superficial
fish· ~1

~r

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The female

to mice is considered absurd• by boys.

2. Mer a
examination of the injured motorist, the doctor said that
hospitalization was imperative. •
3. Many a husband has been given a
office party.

for having imbibed* too fully at an

4. Youngsters often do not _ _ _ _ _ _ any curiosity about the lives of their parents
or grandparents.
5. Good manners are always in _ _ _ _ __

Definitions Match the new words with theh· definitions.
6. rebuke {v.)

a. on the surface, sUght

7. aversion

b. criticize, reproach, reprtmand

8. evince

c. strong dislike, opposition

9. vogue

d. fashion

10. superficial

e. show plainly, exhibit

TODAY'S IDIOM

to strike while the iron is hot-to take an action at the right moment
As soon as John heard that his father had won in the lottery, he
struck while the iron was hot and asked for an increase ln his allowance.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 303

159

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

jettison
jet" C) SC)n

26

•!• DAY

J

inevitable
in ev·

C)

b hal

lucrative
hi' m tiv
tussle

tus·

C)}

intrinsic

in tnn· sik

PLAYING IT SAFE
The average newspaper office receives many times the
amount of foreign news than it has space to print. The editor
must include or jettison items as he sees fit. It is inevitable
that his ideas of what the reader want to know, or should
know, are decisive. Because the newspaper owners do not
want to endanger a lucrative business, there is the constant
tussle between personal opinion and the desire not to offend
too many readers or advertisers. It is intrinsic to the
operation of all mass media that they avoid being extremist
in their news coverage or editorials.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Our conscience must always
is taboo.•

against our yearning* for what we know

2. Man sets the price of gold; it has no
3. The pilot decided it would be imprudent• to
populated area.

value.
his fuel over the

4. It is _ _ _ _ _ _ that children question what their elders accept as tradition. •
5. Each year the contracts offered to star sports figures become more _ _ _ _ __

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. jettison

a. sure, certain, unavoidable

7. inevitable

b. essential, natural, inborn

8. lucrative

c. a rough struggle

9. tussle (n.)

d. profitable

10. intrinsic

e. throw overboard, discard

TooAY's IDIOM

once in a blue moon--on a very rare occasion
His wife complained that they go out to dinner and a show once in a blue moon

160

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

WEEK

26 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

~

acute
kyiit'

gist
jist

A FAVORITE NEWS SOURCE
The electronic media-television and radio-have more acute
problems than does the press when it comes to news
reporting. A normal broadcast can cover only a small part of
a news day. The object is to transmit the gist of a story
without supplying its background. Another difficulty of
electronic news broadcasting is its transient nature; the
viewers or listeners may miss an important story if their
attention wanders. On the other hand, because radio and
television present news in a more terse and exciting way, they
are accepted as the most cogent presentation of news and are
preferred and believed above newspapers by most people.

transient
tran··sh~nt

terse
tc~rs

cogent

ko· J~nt

Sample Sentences A slow and thorough study is needed today.
1. After the catastrophe,* there was an _ _ _ _ _ _ need for emergency housing.
2. The young lover was susceptible* to

feelings of jealousy when he saw

his sweetheart dancing with his best friend.
3. She tried to get the

of her message into a 25-word telegram.

4. The mayor made a
statement in which he rebuked* his election
opponent for making a contemptuous* accusation.
5. The best debator makes the most

presentation.

Definitions This day's work requires careful study.
6. acute

a. forceful, convincing, persuasive

7. gist

b. concise, brief, compact

8. transient

c. essence, main point

9. terse

d. passing, short-lived, fleeting
e. sharp, keen, severe

10. cogent

TODAY'S IDIOM

sleep on it-postpone a decision while giving it some thought
He didn't want to show his hand* immediately, so he
agreed to sleep on it for a few more days.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 303

161

REVIEW

WEEK

26

•!• DAY

5

If you've ever watched or played baseball. you know how important a base hit is to each
batter. Before the game players spend as much time as possible taking their batting practice.
During the game the batter concentrates on every pitch. In the same way, each day you are
getting in your "batting practice," and the weekly review is your chance· to build up your
"batting average." Collect new words with the same concentration that baseball players
collect base hits.

REVIEW WORDS
1. acute
2. aversion
3. cogent
4. evince
5. gist
6. hostile
7. inevitable
8. intrinsic
9. jettison
10. lucrative
11. paramount
12. prevalent
13. rebuke
14. remiss
15. superficial
16. lethargic
17. terse
18. transient
19. tussle
20. vogue

DEFINITIONS
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
I.

m.
n.
o.
p.

q.
r.
s.
t.

show plainly, exhibit
fleeting. passing, short-lived
throw overboard, discard
forceful. convincing, persuasive
on the surface, slight
a rough struggle
compact. brief, concise
reprimand, reproach, criticize
tnborn, natural, essential
fashion
main point, essence
severe, keen, sharp
lazy, indifferent
negligent, careless
unavoidable, certain, sure
opposition, strong dislike
foremost, supreme
general, common, prevailing
angry, antagonistic
profitable

IDIOMS
21. to strike while the iron is hot
22. to split hairs
23. sleep on it
24. once in a blue moon

Check your Jnswers on page
303. Take that extra moment
now to review and study the
words you got wrong.

u.
v.
w.
x.

on a very rare occasion
postpone a decision
take action at the right moment
to make a fine distinction

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
1. - - - - - - - - -

2. - - - - - - - - -

3. - - - - - - - - -

162

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 26

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

The Wild West
History tells us that, in a showdown 1n 1881, a notorious outlaw, Billy the
Kid, was killed. At least that is the belief. The real Billy the Kid,
V/illiam Bonney, is believed to have escaped and lived for many years in
Texas. In fact, a man named Brushy Bill Roberts claimed to be the grown-up
Billy the Kid.
When Roberts died in 1950, there was the....::®____ question about his
true identity. As a result, a computer was brought in to test whether there
was anything other than a ®
resemblance between the two men. A
photo of the Kid and a photo of Roberts were compared on the computer.
In a @
report from the computer technician, the identity of Roberts
was proved to be different from that of ihe real Billy the Kid. Thus, computer
analysis allows us to ®
the idea that Billy the Kid survived the
famous gun duel.

Clues

®
®

1st Day
3rd Day
2nd Day

@ 4th Day

® 3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 303

163

NEW WORDS

WEEK

pinnacle
pin·5 k~l

27

•!• DAY

1

array
~

A MUSICAL WORLD

ra.'

obscure
~b

skytir·

ardent

ard· nt
culminate

kul'

m~

nat

Music reached its pinnacle in the nineteenth century. Every
leading nation produced its share of great composers. There
was a bewildering array of national schools and musical
styles as the once obscure musician came into his own. Music
became a widespread and democratic art. The ardent music
lover turned to Vienna as the music center at the beginning of
the nineteenth century. However, Paris was not far behind,
especially in the field of operatic music. As the century
progressed, the Germans became paramount* in orchestral
and symphonic music. The growth of German music can be
said to have culminated with Ludwig van Beethoven.

Sample Sentences Take command of the new words in these sentences.

1. The president faced an imposing
2. The party will

of reporters.

with the award for the most original costume.

3. The _ _ _ _ _ _ of fame and success is often a transient* stage.
4. The

baseball fan went to every home game.

5. Space telescopes are making our _ _ _ _ _ _ planets ever clearer.
Definitions Match-up time for new words and definitions.
6. pinnacle

a. passionate, eager

7. array

b. summit, peak, top, crown

8. obscure (adj.)

c. arrangement, system

9. ardent

d. unknown, lowly, unclear

10. culminate

e. reach the highest point

TODAY'S IDIOM

to break the ice-to make a beginning,
to overcome stiffness between strangers

All after-dinner speakers break the ice by telling
a story or joke at the start of their speeches.
164

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

WEEK

27

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

2

constrict
k~n

strtkt·
prodigy
je

prod·~

A GIANT COMPOSER
Beethoven was able to free music from the traditions• that
had tended to constrict it. He was a child prodigy who held an
important musical post at the age of 14. He was a successful
concert pianist, but when his health began to fail he turned
to composing. Even though bereft of hearing at the age of 49,
he did not falter in his work. Some of his later compositions
reflect his sadness with his physical condition, but they also
evince• an exultation about man and life.

bereft
bi reft·
falter

for

t~r

exultation
eg· zul ta · sh~n

Sample Sentences Place the new words in these sentences.
1. The catastrophe* left him _ _ _ _ _ _ of all his possessions.
2. She was filled with
maximum.

when she learned her SAT score was near the

3. It is imprudent• for a youngster to _ _ _ _ _ _ her circle of friends so that there
is no opportunity to meet new people.
4. There is universal* wonder when some
perform at the age of 4 or 5.

appears on the stage to

5. Though he knew well the danger involved, the knight did not

as he

entered the dragon's cave.

Definitions Your personal test follows through matching.
6. constrict

a. triumphant joy

7. prodigy

b. stumble, hesitate, waver

8. bereft

c. deprived of

9. falter

d. limit, bind, squeeze

10. exultation

e. marvel, phenomenon

TODAY'S IDIOM

loaded for bear-to be well prepared
When the enemy finally attacked the positions, the defenders were loadedfor bear.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 304

165

NEW WORDS

WEEK

vitriolic
vtt•

2-7

•!• DAY

3

re or ik

invective

in vek' ttv

A WORTHY SUCCESSOR

besmirch

A successor to Beethoven was Johannes Brahms. Also a
prodigy,* he was the object of vitriolic attacks by other

bi smerch"

composers because of the individuality of his work. They
heaped invective upon him for the intensely emotional
quality and Germanic style of his writings. However, it was
impossible to besmirch his talents for long, and he was soon
one of the most popular composers in Europe. He produced
voluminous varieties of compositions. Today, in retrospect,
his originality is appreciated, and he is placed among the top
romantic composers.

voluminous
va Iii rna nas
retrospect

ret' ra spekt

Sample Sentences Complete the following sentences with the new words.
1. It is difficult t.o keep _ _ _ _ _ _ out of our discussion about the enemy.
2. One has to be amazerl"'at the
stored on computer chip.

amount of information that can be

a

3. The candidate trted to _ _ _ _ _ _ his opponent's record.
4. In the future we will, in
ordinary.

, regard today's bizarre* behavior as quite

5. The _ _ _ _ _ _ language used by critics of the new play tended to obliterate* its
good qualities.

Definitions Study the paragraph and sample sentences for the meanings.
6. vitriolic

a. insulting, abusive speech

7. invective

b. bulky, large

8. besmirch

c. soil, stain, dim the reputation

9. voluminous

d. biting. burning

10. retrospect

e. looking backward

TODAY'S IDIOM

to bring down the house--to cause great enthusiasm
Popular entertainers can be counted on to bring
down the house at every public performance.
166

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

WEEK

27 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

egotist

e· g; tist

humility

hyO

GRUFF BUT LIKEABLE
In his private life Brahms was considered by his friends as an
egotist He had an extremely lofty opinion of himself and his
talents. He was not noted for his humility Along with this
quality. Brahms was known for his pungent sense of humor.
While his closest friends could accept his biting jokes, others
found him difficult to warm up to. Brahms was an inveterate
stay-at-home. Cambridge University conferred an honorary
degree upon him, but he was adamantabout staying at home
and did not go to receive the honor. Despite the. ardent• and
romantic nature of his music, Brahms never found the right
girl and remained single throughout his life.

mn· ~ te

pungent
pun· j;nt
inveterate
in vet•

ad·

er it

adamant
0) mant

Sample Sentences Use the new words in these sentences.
1. Doctors agree that it is imperative• that _ _ _ _ _ _ smokers give up that
imprudent* habit.
2. The _ _ _ _ _ _ odor of burning leaves marks the autumn season.
3. The umpire was _ _ _ _ _ _ about his decision to call the runner out.
4. \Ve all expect _ _ _ _ _ _ from the actors and actresses who win the
Academy Awards.
5. However, we should not be surprised that an award winner is an _ _ _ _ __
about his or her performance.

Definitions Make the new words yours through the match-ups.
6. egotist

a. humbleness, modesty, meekness

7. humility

b. a vain, conceited person

8. pungent

c. unyielding, inflexible

9. inveterate

d. sharply stimulating, biting

10. adamant

e.

~abitual,

firmly established

TODAY'S IDIOM

to pull one·s weight-to do a fair share of the work
Everyone in a pioneer family had to puU his or her own weight.

ANSWERS ARE ON rAGE 304

167

REVIEW

WEEK

2 7 •:•

DAY

5

Another week to build your vocabulary. Words stand for "things." The more "things" you can
recognize, the better able you are to deal with the complicated and changing world. New and
unusual situations are more easily handled by those who can utilize the largest number of
"things" we call words.

REVIEW WORDS
1. adamant
2. ardent
3. array
4. bereft
5. besmirch
6. constrict
7. culminate
8. egotist
9. exultation
10. falter
11. humility
12. invective
13. inveterate
14. obscure
15. pinnacle
16. prodigy
17. pungent
18. retrospect
19. vitriolic
20. voluminous
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
reach the highest point
inflexible, unyielding
triumphant joy
looking backward
peak, crown, summit
a conceited, vain person
g. bind, limit, squeeze
h. biting, burning
i. insulting, abusive speech
j. system, arrangement
k. modesty, meekness, humbleness
I. phenomenon, marvel
m. stain, soil, dim the reputation
n. sharply stimulating
o. deprived of
p. bulky, large
q. hesitate, waver, stumble
r. eager, passionate
s. firmly established, habitual
t. unclear, unknown, lowly
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

to break the ice
to pull one's own weight
to bring down the house
loaded for bear

u. to be well prepared
v. to cause great enthusiasm
w. to make a beginning
x. to do a fair share of the work

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 304. A word missed
can now be made part of
your vocabulary quite easily.
Review the paragraph,
sample sentence, definition,
and then write your own
sentence using the word.

168

1. -----------------2. -----------------3. ------------------

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 27



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Hot Enough For Youl
In CD
the year 1990 was a year of record high temperatures across
the United States. The cause of this problem is complex. There are many
proposed explanations, from an increase of population to the greenhouse
effect. If. in fact, temperatures are continuing to rise as a result of human
activity. there should be an®
search for the causes and the cures.
Scientists are looking into even the most ®
aspects of modem society
to determine what might be the long-range effects of our activities. They hope
that investigations will ®
in a program to change the harmful ways
we contribute to a dangerous trend.
A small increase in the earth's temperature.wflllead to major difficulties for
everyone. We should not ...::®_ _ _ _ in our efforts to avoid such disasters.

Clues
Q) 3rd Day
@ lst Day

®

1st Day

@ 1st Day

®

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

169

NEW WORDS

WEEK

vulnerable

vul'

28

•!• DAY

1

n~r ~ b~l

bedlam

bed'

A DANGEROUS SPORT

l~m

cacophony
k~

kof

~

ni

exploit

eks' ploit
propinquity

pro ping'

~ tt

Racing car drivers are vulnerable to dangers that other
sportsmen seldom face. Drivers agree that controlling a car
at top speeds on a winding course is a singularly* awesome*
experience. There is the bedlam caused by the roaring
motors that move the car from a standing start to 100 miles
an hour in eight seconds. One is shaken by the cacophony
of the brakes, larger than the wheels and producing during
the course of a 350-mile race enough heat to warm an eightroom house through a hard winter. The driver needs to be
on the alert to exploit any mistake by an opponent, and he
must be constantly aware of the propinquity of sudden
death. All of this makes car racing one of the most
demanding games of all.
How was yow· recall today? Did you spot vulnerable as a
reintroduced word?

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the sentences.
1. Astronauts are alert to the _ _ _ _ _ _ of sudden accidents.
2. The egotist* is

to slights and insults.

3. Electronic music is considered nothing more or less than

4. Advertisers spend large sums to

by many.

the lucrative* teenage market.

5. The winning team's dressing room was a scene of _ _ _ _ __

Definitions Match your new words to their defmitions.
6. vulnerable

a. discord, harsh sound, dissonance

7. bedlam

b. open to attack, susceptible

8. cacophony

c. profit by, utilize

9. exploit (v.)

d. nearness in time or place

10. propinquity

e. confusion, uproar

TODAY'S IDIOM

a white elephant-a costly and useless possession
When he discovered the 30-volume encyclopedia, dated 1895,
in his attic, he knew he had a white eleplw.nt on his hands.
170

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

WEEK

28 •:•

DAY

NEw WoRDS

2

disgruntled
dis grun · bld
infallible
in

THE MYSTERY OF CREATIVITY
In order to create, it is said that a man must be disgruntled.
The creative individual is usually one who is dissatisfied with
things as they are; he wants to bring something new into the
world-to make it a different place. There is no infallible way
to identify a potentially creative person. The speed-up tn the
sciences has forced schools and industry to seek a pwtacea
for the shortages that they face. The need to discover and
develop the creative person has been the source of much
study. The paramount• objectives of the studies are to
eradicate anything that w1ll impede the discovery of creative
talent and to exploit* this talent to the limit.

far~

ool

panacea
pan·.~

se· ~

eradicate
1 rad'·l kat

impede
im ped'

Sample Sentences Place the new words in these sentences.

1. It is the prevalent• mood for youngsters to be _ _ _ _ _ _ with the world
situation.
2. Many people hoped that the United Nations would be the
problems of our time.
3. The criminal trted to

for the

all of the witnesses to the bizarre* murder.

4. An _ _ _ _ _ _ sign of spring is the blooming of the crocus.
5. Nothing could

the bigot• from his vitriolic* verbal attack.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. disgruntled

a. exempt from error, right

7. infallible

b. unhappy, displeased

8. panacea

c. wipe out

9. eradicate

d. cure-all

10. impede

e. interfere. block, hinder

TODAY'S IDIOM

lock, stock, and barrel-entirely, completely
The company moved its operations to another state lock, stock, and barrel

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 304

171

NEW WORDS

WEEK

sedate
si dat'

28 •:•

DAY

J

equanimity

e' ~ ntm' ~ te
compatible
k~m pat'~ ~1

serenity
ren';,)

~

te

revere
ri vir'

THE DUTCH
The first impression one gets of Holland is that it is a calm,
sedate and simple land. The slow rhythm of life is even seen
in the barges on the canals and the bicycles on the roads.
One gradually discovers this equanimity of daily existence is
not in accord with the intrinsic* nature of the Dutch. These
people are moved by strong feelings that are not compatible
with the serenity of the world around them. There is a conflict
between the rigid, traditional* social rules and the desire for
liberty and independence, both of which the Dutch revere

Sample Sentences Pay attention to the fine differences in meaning.
1. There is something absurd* about a well-dressed, _ _ _ _ _ _ man throwing

snowballs.
2. The
3. The speaker lost his
started to laugh.

of the countryside was shattered by the explosion.
and began to use invective* when the audience

4. The boy and girl discovered they had many _ _ _ _ _ _ interests.
5. There are not many people in this world whom one can _ _ _ _ __
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. sedate

a. peaceful repose

7. equanimity

b. quiet, stlll, undisturbed, sober

8. compatible

c. evenness of mind, composure

9. serenity

d. honor, respect, admire

10. revere

e. harmonious, well-matched

TODAY'S IDIOM
a feather in one's cap--something to be proud of
If she could get the movie star's autograph, she knew it would be a feather in her cap.

172

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 304

WEEK

28 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

irrational
i rash'

~n ~1

avarice
av' ~r Is

TULIP FEVER
The tulip reached Holland in 1593 and was, at first. looked
upon as a curiosity. There soon developed an irrational
demand for new species. Specimens were sold at awesomely*
high prices. In their avarice, speculators bought and sold the
same tulip ten times in one day. The entire Dutch population
suffered from the craze. There was an insatiable desire for
each new color or shape. At one point a man purchased a
house for three bulbs! Before long the inevitable* crash came
and the demand for bulbs quickly reached its nadir. A $1,500
bulb could be bought for $1.50. With the moribund tulip
market came financial disaster to thousands of people.

insatiable

in

sa. sm l»l

nadir

ni'dar
moribund
bund

m6r'~

Sample Sentences Fill in the blank spaces with the new words.
1. Who is not vulnerable* to some measure of _ _ _ _ _ _ ?
2. The American consumer appears to have an

need for new products.

3. He looked upon the last-place finish of his team with equanimity;* from this

_ _ _ _ _ _ the only place to go was up.
4. We ought to expect some

behavior from a senile* person.

5. With the expansion of the supermarket, the small, local grocery store is in a
_ _ _ _ _ _ state.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. irrational

a. lowest point

7. avarice

b. dying, at the point of death

8. insatiable

c. unreasonable, absurd

9. nadir

d. greed, passion for riches

10. moribund

e. cannot be satisfied

TODAY'S IDIOM

out on a limb--in a dangerous or exposed position
He went out on a limb and predicted he would win the election by a wide margin.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

173

REVIEW

WEEK

28

•!• DAY

5

You have been learning how to use many new words by seeing them in a natural situation.
Each day's story is the setting in which you meet the new words. The weekly review enables
you to isolate the word and its many meanings. In this way you can reinforce your
understanding and word power. At this point you have learned almost 600 words. Keep up
the good work.
REVIEW WORDS
1. avarice
2. bedlam
3. cacophony
4. compatible
5. disgruntled
6. equanimity
7. eradicate
8. exploit
9. impede
10. infallible
11. insatiable
12. irrational
13. moribund
14. nadir
15. panacea
16. propinquity
17. revere
18. sedate
19. serenity
20. vulnerable

DEFINITIONS
a. susceptible, open to attack
b. exempt from error, right
c. well-matched, harmonious
d. lowest point
e. at the point of death, dying
f. peaceful repose
g. cure-all
h. uproar, confusion
i. harsh sound, discord, dissonance
j. wipe out
k. sober, still, quiet, undisturbed
I. nearness in time and place
m. displeased, unhappy
n. absurd, unreasonable
o. cannot be satisfied
p. utilize, profit by
q. composure, evenness of mind
r. passion for riches, greed
s. hinder, interfere, block
t. admire, respect, honor

IDIOMS
__
__
__
__

21.
22.
23.
24.

lock, stock, and barrel
out on a limb
a feather in one's cap
a white elephant

The answers can be found on
page 304. Consistent study
and use of difficult words
will work quickly to bring
them into your daily
vocabulary.

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

1.
2.
3.

174

u. a costly and useless possession
v. entirely, completely
w. in a dangerous or exposed position
x. something to be proud of

MEANINGS

DOING DOUBLE DUTY
(From Weeks 25-28)

•!•

Select seven of the twelve words below that can be used as more than
one part of speech (for example: noun and verb, noun and adjective).
Then compose sentences using each word both ways.
1. hoard
2. revere

3. transient
4. pungent

5. falter
6. sedate
7. sage
8. rebuke
9. paramount
10. obscure
11. exploit
12. senile

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 304

175

WORDSEARCH 28

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Head My lips
For many years it has been the goal of computer specialists to perfect a
machine that would understand human speech. The problem is that the
speaker has to be alone and in a quiet room. Noise will Q)
the
of a special room, the computer works
computer's ability. In the®
well.
Now, math wizards are trying to develop a computer that will read lips despite
. While some of us think it ®
to believe
any surrounding ®
that a computer can read lips, the experiments go on. And there has been
some success.
Progress in all aspects of computer science has been so remarkable that we
hesitate to rule out any possibility. There is one®
rule about the
world of computers: the seemingly impossible gets done more quickly than
we ever imagined.
Clues

CD 2nd Day·
@ 3rd Day

®

lst Day

@ 4th Day

®2nd Day

176

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

1

NEW WORDS

A SPORT FOR EVERYONE

obes'

WEEK

29 •:•

DAY

lithe
li:t:H
obese

Of the many highly popular sports in the United States,
football must be rated around the top. This sport allows the
speedy and lithe athlete to join with the slower and obsese one
in a team effort. The skills and strengths of many men are
welded together so that one team may work as a unit to gain
mastery over its opponent. The knowledgeable adherent of a
team can follow action covering many parts of the playing
field at the same time. He is in a state ofbliss when his team
executes a movement to perfection. However, there is no one
more pathetic than the same fan when the opposition
functions to equal perfection.

adherent

ad hir· ~nt
bliss

blls
pathetic

I» thet" ik

Sample Sentences Use the new words in these sentences.
1. The disgruntled* _ _ _ _ _ _ switched his loyalty to the opposition party.
2. It was a pleasure to watch the _ _ _ _ _ _ body of the ballet dancer as she
performed the most difficult steps.
3. There is something
about a great athlete who continues to compete
long after he has been bereft• of his talents.
4. His insatiable* hunger for sweets soon made him _ _ _ _ __
5. Oh, what
could be seen in the eyes of the ardent• couple as they
announced their engagement!
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. lithe

a. backer, supporter

7. obese

b. very fat

8. adherent

c. sad, pitiful, distressing

9. bliss

d. graceful

10. pathetic

e. happiness, pleasure

TooAv's IDIOM
on the spur of the moment-on impulse, without thinking
On the spur of the TTWment he turned thumbs down* on the new job.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

177

NEW WORDS

WEEK

exhort
eg zort'
apathy
ap' ~the

fracas
fni' bs
inebriated
in
a tid

e' bre

adversary

ad' ~r ser' e

29

•!• DAY

2

RAH! RAH! RAH!
The spectators at a football game play more than a
superficial* role. A spirited cheer from the stands often gives
the player on the field a reason to try even harder. Cheer
leaders exhort the fans, who may be in a state of apathy
because their team is losing, to spur on the team. In
particularly close games between rivals of long standing,
feelings begin to run high, and from time to time a fracas
may break out in the stands. WhUe the teams compete
below, the fan who is a bit inebriated may seek out a
personal adversary. On the whole the enthusiasm of the
spectators is usually constricted• to cheering and shouting
for their favorite teams.

Sample Sentences Complete the sentences with the new words.
1. The feeling of
was so prevalent• during the election campaign that
the candidates hardly bothered to make speeches.
2. Doctors

obese• individuals to go on diets.

3. He was usually sedate, • but when
4. The

he became hostile. •

started when he besmirched* my good name.

5. My _ _ _ _ _ _ became disgruntled* because my arguments were so cogent. •

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. exhort

a. opponent, enemy, foe

7. apathy

b. drunk, intoxicated

8. fracas

c. lack of interest, unconcern

9. inebriated

d. urge strongly, advise

10. adversary

e. noisy fight, brawl

TODAY'S IDIOM

a fly in the ointment-some small thing that spoils or lessens the enjoyment
He was offered a lucrative• position with the firm, but the fly in the
ointment was that he would have to work on Saturday and Sunday.
178

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 304

WEEK

29

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

indolent
ln' dl ~nt
gusto

THE 23-INCH FOOTBALL FIELD
The football fan who cannot attend a contest in person may
watch any number of games on television. This has the great
advantage of pennittlng an indolent fan to sit in the comfort of
his living room and watch two teams play in the most
inclement* weather. However, some of the spirit, the gusto, is
missing when one watches a game on a small screen away from
the actual scene of the contest. Also, the viewer is constantly
exposed to a ga.rrul.ous group of announcers who continue to
chatter in an endless way throughout the afternoon. Should
the game be a dull one, the announcers discuss the most banal
bits of information. Even in the poorest game there is constant
chatter involving one platitude after another about the
laudable* performances of each and every player.

gus'

to

garrulous
gar'~l~s

banal

bi' nl
platitude
tQd

plat'~

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the sentences.
1. He began to eat the food served at the sumptuous feast with _ _ _ _ __
2. Men believe that women's conversation is filled with _ _ _ _ _ _ comments
concerning clothing or food.
3. During the most sultry* days of summer, one often hears the _ _ _ _ _ _ , "Is it
hot enough for you?"
4. The _ _ _ _ _ _ person goes to great lengths to eschew* work.
5. She was usually so _ _ _ _ _ _ , we considered anything under a five minute
speech as a cryptic* remark.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. indolent

a. enthusiasm, enjoyment, zest

7. gusto

b. commonplace or trite saying

8. garrulous

c. lazy

9. banal

d. talkative, wordy

10. platitude

e. trivial, meaningless from overuse

TODAY'S IDIOM

to take French leave-to go away without permission
The star player was fined $100 when he took French leave from the tratntng camp.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

179

NEW WORDS

WEEK

pique

29

•!• DAY

4

pek
dilettante

dil

~

Ulnt'

atypical

a up·~ k~I

nondescript

non·

d~

skript

wane

wan

WHAT'S ON?
One day each week is set aside for college football, and
another for the professional brand. Most fans enjoy both
varieties. Nothing can put an avid* viewer into a pique more
quickly than missing an important contest. It is the dilettante
who eschews• the amateur variety and watches only the
professional games. The atypical fan will watch only his
home team play; however, enthusiasts will continue to view
the most nondescript contests involving teams that have no
connection with their own town or school. Some intrepid*
fans have been known to watch high school games when that
was all that was offered. Public interest in football grows each
year, while interest in other sports may be on the wane.

Sample Sentences Complete these sentences with the new words.

1. The _ _ _ _ _ _ will scoff* at those who admit that they know very little about
modern art.
2. It is the _ _ _ _ _ _ fisherman who does not embellish* the story about the
fish that got away.
3. The detective had little to go on because of the _ _ _ _ _ _ nature of the
criminal.
4. Many virulent• diseases are now on the _ _ _ _ __
5. He showed his

by slamming the door.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. pique

a. decrease, decline

7. dilettante

b. fit of resentment

8. atypical

c. one who has great interest, but little knowledge

9. nondescript

d. nonconforming

10. wane (n.)

e. undistinguished, difficult to describe

TODAY'S IDIOM

in the arms of Morpheus-asleep; Morpheus was the Roman god of dreams
The day's activities were so enervating, he was soon in the arms of Morpheus.

180

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

WEEK

29

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

The regular, consistent study of these daily stories is the salient• clue to your success.
Sporadic* study tends to disrupt the learning process. Don't give in to the temptation to put
your work aside and then rush to "catch up."

REVIEW WORDS
1. adherent
2. adversary
3. apathy
4. atypical
5. banal
6. bliss
7. dilettante
8. exhort
9. fracas
10. garrulous
11. gusto
12. indolent
13. inebriated
14. lithe
15. nondescript
16. obese
17. pathetic
18. pique
19. platitude
20. wane
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. urge strongly, advise
b. enemy, foe, opponent
c. graceful
d. pitiful, sad, distressing
e. lazy
f. meaningless from overuse, trivial
g. fit of resentment
h. difficult to describe, undistinguished
i. unconcern, lack of interest
j. intoxicated, drunk
k. very fat
I. pleasure, happiness
m. zest, enjoyment, enthusiasm
n. trite saying
o. one with little knowledge and great interest
p. nonconforming
q. brawl, noisy fight
r. supporter, backer
s. wordy, talkative
t. decline, decrease

on the spur of the moment
in the arms of Morpheus
to take French leave
a fly in the ointment

u. asleep
v. something that spoils or lessens the enjoyment
w. to go away without permission
x. without thinking, on impulse

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on page
304. Quick reinforcement of
words you do not yet know
will help you retain them.
Right now ... put down the
words and meanings. Then,
write a sentence using the
word correctly.

MEANINGS

1. - - - - - - - - 2. - - - - - - - - 3. - - - - - - - - -

181

WORDSEARCH 29

•!•

Using the clues listed below, flU in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Each

Citizen~

Ohligation

Of all the democracies in the world, the United States has the most lackluster
record when it comes to citizen participation in elections. Every four years the
• Often the eligible voter
experts try to analyze the reasons for voter CD
turnout at election time falJs below 50%. This, after months of political
situation.
campaigning, including televised debates, is a ®
No matter how hard the candidates woo the voters, the end results are often
that they would rather stay home
disappointing. Are the voters so ®
watching television than cast a ballot? Does the voter feel that the candidates
after another and is therefore turned off?
are stating one @)
The right to vote is so precious that revolutions have taken place where it has
been denied. The civil rights struggles of the past .were sparked by those who
had been denied this right. The greatest ®
of democracy in this
country is said to be the failure of citizen participation in the election process.

Clues
Q) 2nd Day

® 1st Day
® 3rd Day
@ 3rd Day

®

182

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 304

WEEK

30 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

extinct
ek stingkt'
idyllic

i dil' tk

IN DAYS GONE BY
The man who best described the now extinct Ufe aboard a
steamer on the Mississippi River is Mark Twain. Having
actually worked aboard the river boats, his writing captures the
tranquil* or turbulent• events of those days. In his book about
Ufe on the Mississippi, Twain recalls the idyllic times when man
was not in such a great rush to get from one place to another.
One chapter deals with the races conducted between the
swiftest of the boats. When a race was set, the excitement
would galvanize activity along the river. Politics and the
weather were forgotten, and people talked with gusto• only of
the coming race. The two steamers "stripped" and got ready;
evecy encumbrance that might slow the passage was removed.
Captains went to extremes to lighten their boats. Twain writes
of one captain who scraped the paint from the gaudy figure
that hung between the chimneys of his steamer.

galvanize

gal' v~ niz
encumbrance
en kum' brans
gaudy
go'

de

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Today, the trend* is to more and more
dress.
2. It is amazing how lithe* football players can be, despite the _ _ _ _ _ _ of the
safety features of their uniforms.
3. The dinosaur is an _ _ _ _ _ _ species.
4. City dwellers often yearn for the _ _ _ _ _ _ life in the country.
5. A dictator will use any pretext• to

his people into aggressive actions.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

extinct
idyllic
galvanize
encumbrance
gaudy

a. burden, handicap, load
b. showy, flashy
c. simple, peaceful
d. excite or arouse to activity
e. no longer existing

TODAY'S IDIOM
forty winks-a short nap
During the night before the big test, he studied continuously,
catching forty winks now and then.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

183

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

condescend

30 •:•

DAY

2

kon' di send'
candor
kan' dar

THE JOHN J. ROE
Mark Twain's boat was so slow no other steamer would
condescend to race with it. With the utmost candor; Twain
comments that his boat moved at such a pathetic* pace, they
used to forget in what year it was they left port. Nothing
would mortify Twain more than the fact that fenyboats,
waiting to cross the river, would lose valuable trips because
their passengers grew senile* and died waiting for his boat,
the John J. Roe, to pass. Mark 1\vain wrote in a jocose
manner about the races his steamer had with islands and
rafts. With quiet humor he continued to malign the riverboat,
but his book is replete* with love for this sort of life.

mortify

mor' b fi
jocose

Jo kos'
malign

rna lin'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. He had such disdain* for us, he would not _ _ _ _ _ _ to speak before
our group.
2. It is most common to _ _ _ _ _ _ the wealthy for their avarice.*
3. It is difficult to be

in the presence of so many doleful* people.

4. When we cannot speak with

, we utilize euphemisms.*

5. Good sportsmanship requires that one not

a defeated adversary.*

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. condescend

a. humorous, meny

7. candor

b. abuse, slander

8. mortify

c. stoop, lower oneself

9. jocose

d. frankness, honesty

10. malign

e. embarrass, humiliate

TODAY'S IDIOM
from pillar to post-from one place to another

The company was so large and spread out, he was sent
from pUlar to post before he found the proper official
184

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 305

WEEK

30

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

3

omnipotent

om

nip'~

bnt

zenith

ze' nith

THE RIVERBOAT PILOT
The riverboat pilot was a man considered omnipotent by all.
Mark Twain once held that high position. He writes that he
felt at the zenith of his life at that time. Starting out as a
fledgling pilot's apprentice, he could not abjure• dreams of
the time he would become, ..the only unfettered and entirely
iildependent human being that lived in the earth." Kings,
parliaments, and newspaper editors, Twain comments, are
hampered and restricted. The river pilot issued peremptory
commands as absolute monarch. The captain was powerless
to interfere. Even though the pilot was much younger than
the captain, and the steamer seemed to be in imminent•
danger, the older man was helpless. The captain had to
behave impeccably,• for any criticism of the pilot would
establish a pernicious• precedent that would have
undermined the pilot's limitless authority.

fledgling
Oej' ling
peremptory

pa remp' br e
precedent
d;:mt

pres'~

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. Under the aegts• of an adroit* master, he reached the _ _ _ _ _ _ of his career.
2. We would scoff* at anyone calling himself _ _ _ _ __
3. There is no _ _ _ _ _ _ for voting when there is no quorum. •
4. The

poet lived a frugal• life.

5. No one had the temerity* to disobey the officer's _ _ _ _ _ _ order.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. omnipotent

a. summit, top, prime

7. zenith

b. little known, newly developed

8. fledgling

c. absolute, compulsory, binding

9. peremptory

d. custom, model

10. precedent

e. almighty, unlimited in power or authority

TODAY'S IDIOM

in the lap of the gods--out of one's own hands
I handed in my application for the job, and now it is in the lap of the gods.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

185

NEW WORDS

WEEK

wheedle
hwe' dl
rustic
rus' tik
jubilant
ju' lxl bnt
decorum
dt kOr' ~m
charlatan
shAr' 1~ tan

30 •:•

DAY

4

THE DOUBLE CROSS
Many incidents that took place aboard his ship are re-told by
1\vain. One has to do with a wealthy cattle man who was
approached by three gamblers. The cattle farmer had let it be

known that he had a great deal of money, and the gamblers
were trying to wheedle him into a card game. He protested that
he lmew nothing about cards. His rustic appearance confirmed
that fact. On the last night before landing the three gamblers
got him drunk. When the first hand was dealt, a jubilant
expression came over his face. The betting became furious. All
of the proper deconun was put aside, and ten thousand dollars
soon lay on the table. With the last wager one of the gamblers
showed a hand of four kings. ills partner was to have dealt the
sucker a hand of four queens. At this point the victim, the
charlatan, removed the veneer* of respectability, and showed a
hand of four aces! One of the three professional gamblers was
a clandestine* confederate of the "rich cattle farmer." They had
been planning this duplicity* for many weeks.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The child tried to _ _ _ _ _ _ from her mother the place where the cookies had
been cached.*
2. They could discern* that the faith healer was a _ _ _ _ __
3. The
life is supposed to be a tranquil* one.
4. Repress* your uncouth* manners and act with _ _ _ _ _ _ at the party.
5. We were _ _ _ _ _ _ when our indolent* cousin got a job.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. wheedle
7. rustle
8. jubilant
9. decorum
10. charlatan

a. coax, persuade, cajole*
b. joyful, in high spirits
c. politeness, correct behavior
d. pretender, fraud
e. countrified, unpolished

TODAY'S IDIOM

Achilles heel-weak spot
He wanted to lead an ascetic* life, but his obsession with liquor was his Achilles heel.

186

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WEEK

30

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

Because you are learning these new words in context, they will stay with you. It is the
natural method for seeing new words. Your ability to master words as they appear in normal
situations should cany over to your learning many other words as you read.

REVIEW WORDS
1. candor
2. charlatan
3. condescend
4. decorum
5. encumbrance
6. extinct
7. fledgling
8. galvanize
9. gaudy
10. idyllic
11. jocose
12. jubilant
13. malign
14. mortify
15. omnipotent
16. peremptory
17. precedent
18. rustic
19. wheedle
20. zenith
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. arouse or excite to activity
b. humiliate, embarrass
c. little known, newly developed
d. in high spirits, joyful
e. peaceful, simple
f. honesty, frankness
g. unpolished, counutfied
h. top, prime, summit
i. load, handicap, burden
j. merry, humorous
k. correct behavior, politeness
I. unlimited in power or authority, almighty
m. no longer existing
n. lower oneself, stoop
o. persuade, coax, cajole*
p. binding, compulsory, absolute
q. showy, flashy
r. slander, abuse
s. fraud, pretender
t. custom, model

Achilles heel
forty winks
in the lap of the gods
from pillar to post

u. a short nap
v. weak spot
w. from one place to another
x. out of one's own hands

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on page
305. Go right to it. Learn
the words you have missed.
Make them as much a part of
your vocabulary as the other
words you knew correctly.

MEANINGS

1. - - - - - - - - 2. - - - - - - - - -

3. - - - - - - - - -

187

WORDSEARCH 30



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

The Environmental Society
A great deal of controversy surrounds the efforts of environmentalists to
. In
protect rare species of animals and birds from becoming order to save these creatures from destruction stemming from a loss of
forests or water pollution, environmentalists try to ®
large numbers
of people to pressure politicians into passing conservation legislation. Often,
however, these proposed ®
laws are thought to be a burden placed
upon business, resulting in a loss of employment.
As the world enters the 21st century, the energy and food requirements of an

increasing population are at odds with those who would set aside land for
birds or animals. There is a great temptation to @
the motives of
environmental advocates. It will take people of good will and ®
to
resolve the many difficulties that lie ahead.

Clues

CD 1st Day
@ 1st Day

® 3rd Day
@ 2nd Day

® 2nd Day

188

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WEEK

31

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

heresy
her'~

se

prudent
pnld' nt

CHOOSE SAGELY*
Today. the paramount* influence in the forming of public
opinion is propaganda. It is not a heresy to our democratic
beliefs to state that pressure groups play an important part in
our lives. Propaganda makes one vulnerable* to the
influences of others. The prudent person will choose between
cogent* and specious* propaganda efforts. While propaganda
has the ostensible purpose of informing the public, the most
fervid propagandists use methods that must be examined by
the thoughtful citizen. The ability to distinguish the spurious
from the true facts requires more than a perfunctory*
examination of prevalent• propaganda efforts.

ostensible

o sten'

~~I

fervid
fer· vtd
sp~r~ous

spyur e

~s

Sample Sentences Use care. The words have many meanings.
1. His

appeal for action threw his adherents• into a frenzy•.

2. He accused the leader of the opposition of political
was exhorted* to burn his effigy•.
3. In the bedlam* that followed it was not

. and the mob
to appear too apathetic*.

4. While the
enemy was the opposition leader, the main purpose of this
rash* behavior was the eradication* of all opponents.
5. In the conflagration* that followed, no one questioned whether the original charge
had been _ _ _ _ __

Definitions Study the fine differences. Be sure how to use them.
6. heresy

a. intense, enthusiastic, passionate

7. prudent

b. false, counterfeit, specious•

8. ostensible

c. unbelief, dissent, lack of faith

9. fervid

d. wise, cautious

10. spurious

e. outward, pretended, seeming

TODAY's IDIOM

cold shoulder-to disregard or ignore
She was so piqued* at his uncouth* behavior,
she gave him the cold shoulder for over a week.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

189

NEW WORDS

WEEK

propagate
prop';, gat
anomaly
;, nom';,

le

innocuous
i nok' yii ;,s

surfeit

ser' fit
milieu
me lyu'

31

•!• DAY

2

A FREE SOCIETY
In a free society it is intrinsic* that individuals and groups
have the inherent* right to propagate ideas and by to win
converts. We do not look upon an idea different from ours as
an anomaly that should be precluded*. Nor do we permit only
innocuous or congenial* beliefs and forbid those that we
believe are dubious* or spurious•. In a counby of competing
pressures we are accosted* by a sw:feit of propaganda that
tends to overwhelm us. Thus, we live In a milieu of ubiquitous*
bombardment from countless, and often unrecognized,
propagandists.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. I must Inveigh* against your attempt to
system will result In a panacea* for all problems.

the belief that your political

2. It is Incongruous* to find an abstemious* person In a

of avarice*

and affluence*.
3. Siamese twins are considered a birth _ _ _ _ __
4. There appears to be no such thing as an _ _ _ _ _ _ heresy*.
5. When can we expect a respite* from the

of 1V commercials?

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. propagate

a. excess, superabundance

7. anomaly

b. environment, setting

8. innocuous

c. irregularity, abnormality

9. surfeit

d. produce, multiply, spread

10. milieu

e. harmless, mild, innocent

TODAY'S IDIOM

without rhyme or reason-making no sense
Without rhyme or reason the pennant-winning
baseball team decided to jettison* its manager.
190

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 305

WEEK

31 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

3

strident

strid' nt
concomitant
kon kom'., bnt

WHO LISTENS?
As the quantity of propaganda becomes greater, ideas are
presented in more strident tones in order to overcome

the increased competition. Those who are the targets of the
propaganda find it more difficult to discern• between or
analyze the new and expanded pressures. The concomitant
situation that develops with the stepped-up propaganda is one
in which the individual retreats into a state of lassitude. He
has an aversion• to all attempts to influence him. So we can
see the intrinsic* weakness inherent• in an increased level of
propaganda. It has the deleterious result of reducing its
E;.[ficacy upon the individuals or groups who were its objective.

lassitude

las'., tud
deleterious

del' ., tlr' e as
efficacy

ef'., ka se

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. There are many _ _ _ _ _ _ dangers to obesity. •
2. Her

voice added to the bedlam. •

3. After the frenzy* that accompanied the burning of the effigy, • they were all acutely*
aware of a feeling of _ _ _ _ __
4. The gist* of the report was that smoking will have a _ _ _ _ _ _ effect on

health.
5. The _ _ _ _ _ _ of new drugs cannot be determined without a plethora*
of evidence.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. strident

a. power to produce an effect

7. concomitant

b. bad, harmful

8. lassitude

c. accompanying. attending

9. deleterious

d. weariness, fatigue

10. efficacy

e. shrill, harsh, rough

TODAY'S IDIOM

swan song-final or last (swans are said to sing before they die)
The ex-champion ~aid that if he lost this fight it would be his swan song.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 305

191

NEW WORDS

WEEK

dissent
di sent·

31

•!• DAY

4

ferment
f~r·

THE PEOPLE DECIDE

ment

attenuated
~ten· yti
tid

a

arbiter

ar· 00 t~r
incumbent
in kum·

~nt

The place of propaganda in a milieu* that is not free differs
from its place in an open society. In a dictatorship there is
no competing propaganda. Those who dissent from the
official line may do so only in a clandestine* manner. Where
there is no open ferment of ideas, the possibility of
discerning* the true from the spurious* is attenuated. In a
democracy, the inevitable* arbiter of what propaganda is to
be permitted is the people. It is incumbent upon each citizen
to choose between competing propagandas while remaining
cognizant* of the value for a democracy in the existence of all
points of view.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. It is _ _ _ _ _ _ on us to be zealous* in combatting the deleterious* effects

of drugs.
2. With each generation it becomes the vogue* for the youth to be in a state

of _ _ _ _ __

3. The gist* of his ominous* suggestion was that we _ _ _ _ _ _ from the majority
opinion.
4. The strength of her appeal was _ _ _ _ _ _ by the flamboyant* embellishments*
for which many had a strong aversion.*
5. The Supreme Court is our ultimate* _ _ _ _ _ _ of legality.
Definitions Always be cognizant* of the fact that words are used in the paragraphs and

sentences with only one meaning. They often have many others. Look up the word
incumbent for a good example.
6. dissent (v.)

a. morally required

7. ferment

b. weakened, thinned, decreased

8. attenuated

c. differ, disagree, protest

9. arbiter

d. uproar, agitation, turmoil

10. incumbent (adj.)

e. judge

TODAY'S IDIOM

to get the sack-to be discharged or fired
Despite the fact that he was so obsequious* toward the boss,
he got the sack because he was lethargic* about doing his job.
192

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WEEK

31

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

Once more it is time to review this week's words. Always keep in mind that the use of the
word. its context. determines its meaning. Used as a noun, a word has a different meaning
than when it is used as an adjective or a verb. First, master the words as they appear in the
daily stories. Next. look up other meanings in your dictionary. Try writing sentences with
the additional meanings.

REVIEW WORDS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

anomaly
arbiter
attenuated
concomitant
deleterious
dissent
efficacy
ferment
fervid
heresy
incumbent
innocuous
lassitude
milieu
ostensible
propagate
prudent
spurious
strident
surfeit

DEFINITIONS
a. agitation, turmoil, uproar
b. attending, accompanying
c. abnormality, irregularity
d. cautious, wise
e. protest, differ, disagree
f. rough, harsh, shrill
g. multiply, spread, produce
h. lack of faith, dissent, unbelief
i. morally required
j. power to produce an effect
k. setting, environment
I. counterfeit, false, specious•
m. judge
n. harmful, bad
o. superabundance, excess
p. enthusiastic, passionate, intense
q. decreased, weakened, thinned
r. mild, innocent, harnUess
s. fatigue, weariness
t. seeming, pretended, outward

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

cold shoulder
swan song
to get the sack
without rhyme or reason

Check your answers on page
305. Get to work learning
the words that gave you
trouble.

u. to be discharged or fired
v. making no sense
w. final or last
x. to disregard or ignore

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ----------------2. ----------------3. -----------------

193

WORDSEARCH 31



••• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Cross My Palm with Silver
People are fascinated by those who say they can predict the future. Fortune
tellers continue to attract gullible customers, and horoscopes are examined
to worry about in the day ahead.
daily to see if there is something CD
One specialtst who seems to have found a way to predict something of our
future is the palm reader. It is her belief that a long .. life line" in the hand
means the customer will enjoy longevity.
While this appears to be a ®
way to predict long life, a study done
in England measured "life lines" of 100 corpses and came up with_®_ _ __
support for the claim: the length of life matched the length of line. The longer
the line, the older the person lived to be.
However, there are scientists who@
\vith believers in this apparent
connection. The .. life line" of older people is longer only because the hand
becomes more wrinkled with age. Length of line is a ®
of length of
life, not the reverse, say scientists.
Clues

CD 3rd Day
@ 1st Day

®

1st Day

@ 4th Day

®

194

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WEEK

32 •:•

DAY

1

NEw WoRDS

profound
prn found'
alleviate

ANYONE FOR COOGLE?

0)

As automation permeates• many new areas of life, its effect
upon us becomes concomitantly* more projowul. Information

le' ve at

prodigious
prn dij' O)S

processing, blogs, search engines of all types have found their
ways into businesses, as well as our homes, schools, and
libraries. Here they alleviate the burden of storing and
providing us with an accumulation of information that is
becoming more prodigious in this era of specialization and
threatening to inundate• our society.
Youngsters in the primary grades now know how to
manipulate their computers to extract information that would
have taken their grandparents an eternity to produce.
Machines whose celerity can scan thousands of words in
nanoseconds help expedite the selection of pertinent•
information for those schoolchildren.

expedite
ek'

SO)

spO)

dit

celerity
ler' ~ te

Sample Sentences Insert your new words below.
1. 'vVe hoped that the arbiter• would _ _ _ _ _ _ the solution to the fracas• that had

been so elusive• for a long time.
2. He accepted the lucrative* position with _ _ _ _ __
3. It is easy to construe• a superficial* remark tote a
4. If we cannot
them.

one.

the harmful effects entirely, at least we can attenuate*

5. The enemy made a _ _ _ _ _ _ effort to repress* the uprising.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. profound

a. cany out promptly

7. alleviate

b. speed, rapidity

8. prodigious

c. make easier, lighten

9. expedite

d. deep, intense

e. extraordinary, enormous

10. celerity

TODAY'S IDIOM

ivory tower-isolated from life; not in touch with life's problems
Many artists have been said to be living in an ivory tower.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

195

NEW WORDS

WEEK

usurp
yU zerp'

32

•!• DAY

2

paltry

pol' tre

EVERYONE IS TALKING

condone
k~n don'
trivial
triv' ~1

e

bizarre
00 zAr'

Can anyone under the age of 20 remember a time when the
dial telephone was the only method of voice communication
over long distances? What a bizarre concept this must seem
for today's youth. It has become an antiquated* cultural
form of personal contact. The instrument for the modern
communicator is the cell phone, which has usurped the
wire-connected stationary model. With cell phone companies
competing for customers, they eschew* offering a
paltry number of minutes of talking time. The cell phone
user can take advantage of a plethora* of special deals and
carry on with significant or trivial conversations for
seemingly endless time, and in almost any location. Often,
these personal talks are held in the most public places, and
those within hearing find it difficult to condone the
inconvenience caused by the indiscriminate* use of this
ubiquitous* instrument.
Don't look back at the "new words." Did you spot bizarre as
a reintroduced word?

Sample Sentences (note the similarity of trivial and paltry)

1. Most of us scoff" at and belittle* _ _ _ _ _ _ behavior.
difference of opinion into a prodigious* conflict.
3. It is during a period of ferment* that a dictator can
power.
4. Do you expect me to
that reprehensible* act with such celerity?*
5. The most _ _ _ _ _ _ defects may have a deleterious* effect upon the efficacy*
of that new process.
2. They exacerbated* a

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. usurp
7. paltry
8. condone
9. trivial
10. bizarre

a. petty, worthless

b. excuse, pardon
c. seize, annex, grab
d. of little importance, insignificant
e. fantastic, odd
TODAY'S IDIOM

to feather one's nest-to enrich oneself on the sly or at every opportunity
He played up to his senile* aunt in the hope of
feathering his nest when she made out her will.
196

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WEEK

32 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

3

menial

me' ne el
venerable

ven· ar a hal

THE FUTURE IS HERE
We have ardently* taken to the cell phone as a replacement for
the venerable dial-up model. The most striking feature of the
cell phone is the variety of uses to which it can be put.
The dial-up phone is restricted to the menial task of mere
conversation. For the garrulous* person who isn't restricted to
one place, the mobile cell phone has a myriad* of uses. Should
one be in an area that requires silence, there is an ability to
utilize the succinct text messaging feature. Should one come
upon an ambiguous event that one wishes to keep, one may
photograph it or make it into a film for further study. Do not
preclude* from the list of uses the access to your computer,
music, and weather reports. One can hardly imagine an
extraneous technical marvel that will not embellish* the cell
phone in the future.

extraneous

ek stni' ne

e>S

ambiguous
am big' yil ~s
succinct

sak stngkt'

Sample Sentences Complete the sentences with the new words.
1. The prodigy* revered* the _ _ _ _ _ _ master.
2. To those who could understand every nuance* of the cryptic* message, there was
nothing
about it.
3. He could say the most vitriolic* things in a _ _ _ _ _ _ way.
4. Although she did not find it congenial,* we cajoled* our daughter into doing some of
the
tasks around the house.
5. The astute* voter is not susceptible* to the many _ _ _ _ _ _ shibboleths* that
saturate* a politician's speech.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. menial

a. vague, undefined, not specific

7. venerable

b. humble, degrading

8. extraneous

c. respected, worshiped

9. ambiguous

d. foreign, not belonging

10. succinct

e. brief, concise
TODAY'S IDIOM

the writing on the wall-an incident or event that
shows what will happen in the future
In retrospect* he should have seen the writing on the wall when his
girlfriend gave him only a cursory* greeting on his birthday.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

197

NEW WORDS

WEEK

archaic

32 •:•

DAY

4

ar ka lk
emulate
em' y;;, Icit
facetious
(;;, se' sh~s
rabid
rab' id

salubrious
s;;, hl' bre ~

IT'S HAPPENING NOW
The flood of new technology makes each modem maiVel
appear archaic within the briefest time period. An assiduous•
examination of today's communication methods will make
clear how quickly a rabid purchaser of the newest product will
want to emulate friends and buy the next one. The cell phone
that can track down the location of a user, or the musicdownloading pod that has a potential* to record almost
countless songs are soon to be replaced with more powerful
and exciting products. It would not be facetious to claim that
scientists will persevere• in devising ways for us to contact
each other by voice, photographs, and print messages that
give us access• to a more salubrious social network.

Sample Sentences Use the new words in these sentences.
1. Some maintain that the ascetic* leads a _ _ _ _ _ _ life.
2. With all candor, • I cannot wish for a return to the
Urnes when a
moribund* society provided an opulent• existence for some, but a loathesome"' life
for the majority.
3. There is something
about an egotist* who has the temerity* to
begin a speech with, "In all humillty* . . . ."
4. It is not prudent• to malign* or castigate, • or be derogatory• in any way toward
a
political adherent. •
5. The wish to _ _ _ _ _ _ a great person is laudable. •

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. archaic

a. healthful, wholesome

7. emulate

b. out of date

8. facetious

c. rival, strive to equal

9. rabid

d. comical, humorous, witty

10. salubrious

e. fanatical, furious, mad

TODAY'S IDIOM

on the bandwagon-joining with the majority; going along with the trend
Most advertisements showing many people using a product hope to
convince the viewer to get on the bandwagon and buy the item.
198

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WEEK

32

5

•!• DAY

REVIEW

When you can analyze a sentence and determine from the context the meaning of a
previously unknown word, you are functioning at the best level. These words will become a
permanent part of your ever-growing vocabulary.

REVIEW WORDS
1. alleviate
2. ambiguous
3. archaic
4. bizarre
5. celerity
6. condone
7. emulate
8. expedite
9. extraneous
10. facetious
11. menial
12. paltry
13. prodigious
14. profound
15. rabid
16. salubrious
17. succinct
18. trivial
19. usurp
20. venerable
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. out of date
b. concise, brief
c. intense, deep
d. annex, grab, seize
e. wholesome, healthful
f. degrading, humble
g. rapidity, speed
h. fantastic, odd
i. humorous, comical, witty
j. not belonging, foreign
k. enormous, extraordinary
I. pardon, excuse
m. furious, mad, fanatical
n. undefined, vague, not specific
o. carry out promptly
p. lighten, make easier
q. respected, worshiped
r. strive to equal, rival
s. insignificant
t. petty, worthless

to feather one's nest
ivory tower
the writing on the wall
on the bandwagon

u. joining with the majority
v. an event that predicts the future
w. out of touch with life
x. to enrich oneself at every opportunity

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ----------------Check your answers on page
305. Take that extra moment
now to review and study the
words you.got wrong.

2. -----------------

3. -----------------

199

SELECTING ANTONYMS
(From Weeks 29-32)
•:• Here are fifteen words taken from the last four weeks of study. Select
and underline the correct antonym for each.

1. adversary (partner, foe}

2. dilettante (amateur, professional}
3. indolent (lazy, active}
4. inebriated (drunk, sober}

5. candor (falsehood, honesty}

6. gaudy (conservative, showy}
7. zenith (acme, nadir}
8. prodigious (huge, tiny}
9. condone (condemn, approve}
10. ambiguous (clear, confusing}
11. spurious (authentic, false}
12. innocuous (harmful, harmless}

13. deleterious (harmful, helpful}
14. succinct (concise, wordy}

15. rustic (rural, urbane}

200

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

WORDSEARCH 32



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

A Formidable Opponent
One of the most interesting tests of a computer's ability to "think" occurred
in 1992. The world's chess champion, a man of mental ability in
this sport, was challenged to compete against the most powerful computer
programmed to play chess. The question was, could a machine @
a
human's place as the best chess player in the world?
The match took place before hundreds of chess enthusiasts and was recorded
on film. While the computer lacked the champion's experience and emotional
capacity, it worked with such ®
that it could search ahead for many
thousands of choices, well beyond what any human could envision. In fact,
the computer had already defeated many @
chess masters in
preparation for the contest.
The result of this test match was®
as far as human self-esteem was
concerned. The champion won fairly easily. However, there is almost total
agreement that it is only a matter of time before we have an electronic chess
champion, one incapable of making a blunder. At that point it will be
checkmate for all of us.
Clues

CD 1st Day
@ 2nd Day
@ 1st Day
@ 3rd Day

®

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 305

201

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

complacent
k~m

33

•!• DAY

1

phi' snt

somber

AT A LOSS

som' ~r

With the trivial* sum of five dollars in his pockets, Robert
Lacy was feeling far from complacent about the future. In
fact, it was his somber estimate that no matter how frugal*
he was, his money would run out before the next day. He
owed $3.50 in debts to friends; with the remainder he would
have to eat enough to maintain his strength. Hunger would
debilitate him to the point where he could not continue his
feiVid* search for Evelyn. There was no hope of an impetuous
stranger suddenly thrusting money upon him. There was
still less solace* for him in the hope that, after all this time,
he might develop the occult power that would give him a
mental image of where Evelyn could be found.

debilitate

di bil' ~tat
impetuous
im pech' ii

~s

occult
~

kult'

Sample Sentences Use the new words in these sentences.
1. The guard was so
about the danger of escape that he gave the
prisoner only a cursory* inspection.
2. We should be prudent• in our play or work during very hot weather, because the sun
has the power to eneiVate• and
those that scoff* at its effects.
3. He looked for a propitious• moment to exhibit his

abilities.

4. The deleterious• results of his irate• outburst put the previously jocose* audience in
a
mood.
5. They were so moved by the idyllic* setting, they exchanged surreptitious, •

_ _ _ _ _ _ kisses.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. complacent

a. secret, mysterious, supernatural

7. somber

b. impulsive

8. debilitate

c. self-satisfied

9. impetuous

d. weaken

10. occult (adj.)

e. gloomy, sad

TODAY'S IDIOM

to hit the nail on the head-to state or guess something correctly
When Charlie said there were 3,627 beans in that jar, he hit the nail on the head.

202

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

WEEK

33 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

discreet
dis kret'
foment
foment

MAKING PLANS
Robert had arrived in New York a week earlier. He had begun
by asking discreet questions of Evelyn's former landlord.
There was no need to foment opposition at the very beginning.
The landlord was recondite, • and all Robert had been able
to glean from the cryptic* replies was that Evelyn had moved
to a residence that catered to single women. Robert was in a
hapless* situation; in this immense city his quarry could be
hiding in one of dozens of such places. This would obviate•
the possibility of his dashing from one place to another in an
impetuous• manner. His search, while it had to be concluded
with celerity, • could not be carried out in such slovenly
fashion. He required a succinct• and meticulous• plan.

glean
glen
quarry

kwor'e
slovenly
sluv' an le

Sample Sentences Use the new words in these sentences.

1. In order to _ _ _ _ _ _ trouble, they fabricated* a deplorable* and blatant*
untruth.
2. She loathed* doing menial* tasks, and she did them in a
3. Although it seemed inane, • they sought their
surroundings that were not its natural habitat•.

manner.
in the midst of rustic*

4. Despite the plethora• of offers to write her life story, the recently divorced movie
queen kept a
silence.
5. The reporters could not _ _ _ _ _ _ anything from her servants.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. discreet

a. careful, cautious, prudent•

7. foment

b. gather, collect

8. glean

c. something hunted or pursued

9. quarry

d. disorderly, carelessly

10. slovenly

e. stir up, instigate

TODAY'S IDIOM

on the dot-exactly on time
Despite his having taken forty winks, • he got to his appointment on the dot.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

203

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

abjure

33 •:•

DAY

3

ab jur·

reproach
r1

proch·

A NEWSPAPER AD
On the premise• that Evelyn knew she was being sought,
Robert's first step was to abjure fruitless• searching and
place an ad in the leading morning newspaper. He would
importune• in a most careful way for her return. The ad
read, "Evelyn. Come out of hiding. I do not reproach you for
your actions. I expect no penitent confession. There is
nothing ambiguous• about my offer. Please contact. Robert."
He added a box number for a reply. When Robert went to the
paper the next morning, he felt sanguine• about the chances
of locating her. His evanescent concerns disappeared; there
was a letter for him, and with tremulous• fingers he tore it
open. It contained one sentence, and it was tantamount to a
challenge; "If you really care about me, you will find me by
midnight, Friday, Evelyn."

penitent
pen·~ t~nt

evanescent
ev· ~ nes· nt
tantamount

tan· b mount

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The inveterate• gambler became _ _ _ _ _ _ and contrite• when faced with the
results of his reprehensible• behavior.
2. The optimist knows that the vicissitudes• of life are _ _ _ _ _ _ , and she always
looks on the sanguine• side of things.
3. You should not condone• his sordid* behavior; rather, _ _ _ _ _ _ him for his
fractious• manner.
4. At the zenith* of his career, he was
to a final arbiter* on matters of
economic policy.
5. In vain, the entire family tried to importune• him to
gambling.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

abjure
reproach
penitent
evanescent
tantamount

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

equivalent, identical
rebuke, reprimand
renounce, abstain from
regretful, confessing guilt
fleeting, passing, momentary

TODAY'S IDIOM

to take under one's wing-to become responsible for
As the new term began, the senior took the freshman wtder her wing.

204

ANSWERS ARE ON PACiE 306

NEW WORDS

propensity

te

p~ pen·~

wary

wer' e

AT THE BALLET
Evelyn was an anomaly*: she had a propensity. for folk music
and rock and roll dancing, and, at the same time, she was an
avid* fan of classical ballet. At one time she had been a
fledgling• ballet dancer. Robert headed for a theater where
a venerable* ballet company was performing. He knew he
had to be wary so that Evelyn mJght not see him first. It was
Tuesday evening; two days gone with so little to show. Only
three more remaining before the deadline set by Evelyn.
He tried hard to allay the sudden fear that came over him
that he might not locate her. Nothing would deter him from
succe~dingl And so, although he was far from a connoisseur
of the dance, he was standing among the throng* in the lobby,
hoping it would be a propitious• evening for him.

allay
~

18'

deter
di ter·
connoisseur

kon' a ser'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The _ _ _ _ _ _ scoffs* at the dilettante,* who has only a veneer* of knowledge.
2. It is difficult to
the concern of parents about how susceptible* their
children are and how easily they succumb* to drugs.
3. Some girls have a

for swarthy* men who wear gaudy* clothes.

4. Her father warned her to be
of adding the encumbrance* of a steady
boyfriend as this would attenuate* her chances of finishing college.
5. This did not
her from getting into a depiorable* situation due to
her rash* and perverse• actions.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. propensity

a. hinder, discourage

7. wary

b. expert

8. allay

r:. disposition, inclination, bent

9. deter

d. calm, soothe

10. connoisseur

e. watchful. shrewd

TODAY'S IDIOM

out of one'S depth-in a situation that is too difficult to handle
We thought he knew the ropes,* but we found him behind the
eight ball* because he was out of his depth.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

205

REVIEW

WEEK

33

•!• DAY

5

While each day's story has five new words, there are many others that are repeated from
previous weeks. These words are placed within the stories so that you might practice your
grasp of their meanings. Repetition will help guarantee that these words will be firmly fixed
as part of your ever-expanding vocabulary.

REVIEW WORDS
1. abjure
2. allay
3. complacent
4. connoisseur
5. debilitate
6. deter
7. discreet
8. evanescent
9. foment
10. glean
11. impetuous
12. occult
13. penitent
14. propensity
15. quarry
16. reproach
17. slovenly
18. somber
19. tantamount
20. wary
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. stir up, instigate
b. disorderly, carelessly
c. regretful. confessing guilt
d. abstain from, renounce
e. weaken
f. self-satisfied
g. discourage, hinder
h. bent, inclination, disposition
i. sad, gloomy
j. identical, equivalent
k. something hunted or pursued
I. watchful. shrewd
m. supernatural, mysterious, secret
n. impulsive
o. rebuke, reprimand*
p. momentary, passing, fleeting
q. prudent,* careful, cautious
r. collect, gather
s. expert
t. soothe, calm

out of one's depth
to hit the nail on the head
to take under one's wing
on the dot

u.
v.
w.
x.

exactly on time
in a situation that is too difficult to handle
to become responsible for
to state or guess something correctly

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 306. The routine for
checking and study should
be well implanted by now.
Some weeks you will have
no words wrong. At other
times, you may have several.
Don't be discouraged by
the differences from week
to week

206

1. ------------------

2. -----------------3. ------------------

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 33
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Good Enough to Eat?
There seems to be universal agreement that exposure to the ultraviolet light
from the sun is deleterious to one's health. Also, except for tobacco industry
spokesmen, there is no dispute about the damage done to us from cigaret~e
smoke. What is shocking is the fact that almost everything we once regarded
as either beneficial, or harmless, soon gets challenged by scientists. We are
urged to foods that have high fat content. There go butter and
cheese. Even milk has now been added to the list of foods of which we must
be_®_ _ __
Whatever diet we are on, we cannot become ...::.®_ _ _ _ about its nutritional
thought that, sooner or
value. We are left, ultimately, with the @
later, almost everything we eat or drink may be found to jeopardize our
health.
Given that there are many obstacles to maintaining good health, would it be
wise to embrace every new laboratory report in order to®
_____
information? Let's not discard old, proven, sensible food habits. Also, there is
always the possibility that ice cream sundaes will be found to cure baldness.
and that chocolate chip cookies will eliminate our cholesterol problems.

Clues

CD 3rd Day
@ 4th Day

®

1st Day

@ 1st Day

® 2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

207

NEW WORDS

WEEK

site
sit

34 •:•

DAY

1

vigil
vij' ;,I

ANOTHER PLAN
Robert was far from tranquil* as he waited in the lobby
for almost an hour after the performance had begun.
Disgruntled,* he quit the site of his vigil He had to face the
fact that he was making no tangible* progress. Tomorrow
he would telephone several women's residences. It was a
cumbersomeway of going about the hunt, but it was all that
he could think of at the moment. He would interrogate the
desk clerks, and perhaps he might uncover a pertinent•
clue to Evelyn's whereabouts. If he could only get someone
to divulge her hiding placer Perhaps tomorrow would
cuhninate* in success.

cumbersome
kum'

oor s;,m

interrogate
tn ter· ;, gat
divulge
d;, vulj'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. With rancor* he faced the _ _ _ _ _ _ job of transporting the voluminous*

records to his new office.
2. Before they began to

the criminal, they had to admonish* him that
his testimony might be used to incarcerate• him.

3. The hunter maintained a discreet* and wary*
propitious* moment to bag his quarry*.

as he waited for the

4. Even under duress, • he was adamant* and would not

5. The newly married couple selected the

the secret.
for their new home with

meticulous* care.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. site

a. unwieldy, burdensome

7. vigil

b. question

8. cumbersome

('.

9. interrogate

d. disclose, reveal

10. divulge

wakeful watching

e. location

TODAY'S IDIOM
to take a leaf out of someone's book-to imitate or follow the example

The chip off the old block* took a leaffrom his father's
book and never sowed wild oats*.
208

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 306

WEEK

34

•!• DAY

NEw WoRDS

2

fluctuate
fluk' chu

at

unmitigated
un mit' e» ga· tid

A HOPE DASHED
The next day, Wednesday, saw Robert become more
frustrated.* He would fluctuate between high hopes of finding
Evelyn and unmitigated despair when he was almost ready to
desist• in his search. The phone calls had elicited* almost
nothing. Robert had rushed to one women's residence when
the clerk described a girl who might just be Evelyn. The desk
clerk phoned to her room on the pretext• that she had a
special delivery letter. Robert waited in the conunodious lobby,
replete• with large, antiquated pieces of furniture. He watched
from a discreet* distance as she came down the stairs. One
look at her wan* face, slovenly* dress, and disheveled hair
was enough to inform Robert that he needed no further
scrutiny.• This could not be his impeccable* Evelyn.

commodious
ke» mo' de e»S
antiquated
kwi tid

an·~

disheveled
de» shev' e»ld

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. He wasn't exactly an _ _ _ _ _ _ liar; he merely embellished* the truth a little.
2. In his sumptuous• house he had a
trophies as incontrovertible* evidence of his skill.

den in which he kept an array* of

3. Is it banal* to say that good manners are

in our milieu?*

4. The current trend* in the stock market is for stocks to _ _ _ _ _ _ in a sporadic*
fashion.
5. The nondescript, • indolent• beggar was in a _ _ _ _ _ _ condition.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. fluctuate

a. large, spacious

7. unmitigated

b. shift, alternate

8. commodious

c. disorderly clothing or hair

9. antiquated

d. unrelieved, as bad as can be

10. disheveled

e. out-of-date, obsolete

TODAY'S IDIOM

brass tacks-the real problem or situation
After some moments of congenial* levity, • they got down to brass tacks.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

209

NEW WORDS

WEEK

tenacious

34 •:•

DAY

3

tina.' shas
fa~ade

fa sad'

TO THE POLICE
Thursday was his next-to-last day. He had been tenacious in
following up every lead. Now he was behind the eight ball.*
He could hardly galvanize* himself to do anything else. The
jQ.9ade of hope he had worn for almost a week was
crumbling; there was nothing left to be sanguine* about. In
desperation he turned to the police and placed his problem
within their jurisdiction.* They asked many questions, and
they requested that he not expurgate* anything. Some of the
questions seemed asinine When they inquired about his
relationship to the missing girl, he replied, with a grimace.
"Fiancee." When they suggested she might be hiding in that
part of the city where the "punk" coterie* congregated, he
was incredulous* and accused the police of calumny against
her good name and reputation.

asinine

as· n in
grimace
g~

mas'

calumny

kal' am

ne

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. He held on to his antiquated* beliefs with a _ _ _ _ _ _ obsession.*
2. The woman was noted for her vituperative* _ _ _ _ _ _ against her innocuous,*
although senile,* neighbor.
3. She could not abjure* a
4. How

when she saw the disheveled figure.

of the boy to fabricate* that bizarre* story!

5. His face wore the most doleful* _ _ _ _ __
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. tenacious

a. false accusation, slander

7. fa~ade

b. silly, stupid

8. asinine

c. front, superficial appearance

9. grimace

d. tough, stubborn

10. calumny

e. facial expression of disgust

TODAY'S IDIOM

hook, line, and sinker-completely, all the way
The teacher fell for the practical joke hook, line, and sinker.

210

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

WEEK

34 •:•

DAY

NEw

4

WoRDS

pittance

pit'ns
au courant

o' kO raNt'

EVELYN DISCOVERED
Failure was imminent,* and Robert was bereft* of hope. It was
now Friday. Despite his abstemious* and parsimonious* way
of living, his money had been reduced to a mere pittance. A
penrerse* impulse brought him to the section where young
people in strange clothing and with uncouth* manners made
him recoil* in unmitigated* disgust. He had never been
au courant with the "hippies" and "punks." He was always
fastidious about proper dress and behavior. A moment later
he saw her! Evelyn! She was sitting at a table in a coffee shop,
surrounded by a coterie* of the most noisome individuals he
had ever seen. Evelyn was not incongruous, • for she herself
was unkempt So this was her new habitat! At that instant
Robert knew as an incontrovertible* fact that he had lost her.
With a grimace, • he turned and walked, a doleful* and
melancholy figure, toward the bus depot and home.

fastidious

fa stid'

e as

noisome

noi' sam
unkempt

unkempt'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Styles are such transient* things that what is _ _ _ _ _ _ today, is archaic*
tomorrow.
2. The tip he had been offered was a mere _ _ _ _ _ _ , and the taxi driver threw
it on the ground in disdain. •
3. Children think mothers are asinine* to get upset about
rooms.
4. It was inevitable* that they discover the hidden body by its
aroma.
5. He was so
about table manners that he lost his equanimity* when
his son reached for the bread.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. pittance

a. untidy, neglected

7. au courant

b. foul, unwholesome

8. fastidious

c. small amount

9. noisome

d. particular, choosy

10. unkempt

e. up-to-date

TODAY'S IDIOM

lily-livered-cowardly
The lily-livered gangster got cold feet* and spilled the beans.*

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

211

REVIEW

WEEK

34 •:•

DAY

5

As an "old hand" at vocabulary-building by the context method, you realize that this is the

most natural and effective way. However, you also know that there is work and selfdiscipline too. You should cany these fine qualities right through life. The words you learn
are valuable, the method is equally so.
REVIEW WORDS
1. antiquated
2. asinine
3. au courant
4. calumny
5. commodious
6. cumbersome
7. disheveled
8. divulge
9. fa~ade
1o. fastidious
11. fluctuate
12. grimace
13. interrogate
14. noisome
15. pittance
16. site
17. tenacious
18. unkempt
19. unmitigated
20. vigil
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. stubborn, tough
b. slander, false accusation
c. small amount
d. neglected, untidy
e. location
f. reveal, disclose
g. alternate, shift
h. disorderly clothing or hair
i. superficial appearance, front
j. facial expression of disgust
k. up-to-date
I. unwholesome, foul
m. wakeful watching
n. question
o. as bad as can be, unrelieved
p. out-of-date, obsolete
q. stupid, silly
r. choosy, particular
s. burdensome. unwieldy
t. spacious, large

brass tacks
hook, line, and sinker
lily-livered
to take a leaf out of someone's book

u. cowardly
v. completely, all the way
w. to imitate or follow the example
x. the real problem or situation

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
The answers can be found
on page 306. The method of
study and learning requires
quick review and re-use of
difficult words. Start now!

212

1. -----------------

2. ----------------3. -----------------

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 34



••• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Women in the Ring
What sport requires the timing of tennis, the energy of aerobics, the stamina
of cross-country running, and the physical contact of football? The answer is:
boxing. And now that seemingly male spectacle is attracting women. What was
brutality has been transformed in gymnasiums
once viewed as across the country into the latest form of workout, weight reduction, and
energy stimulator.
To suggest that women should not expose themselves to the sharp jabs and
powerful uppercuts of boxing because they are the "weaker" sex is
®
. Properly trained by experts, in good shape from punching bags
and jumping rope, women can be as ®
in the ring as men.
With women jockeys, race car drivers, hockey goalies, and basketball players,
it would require a man with®
prejudice, if not sheer ignorance, to
with the
argue that boxing is solely a man's sport. Anyone who is ®
status of liberated women need not be surprised by their entry into the ring.
Clues
Q) 2nd Day

®
®

3rd Day
3rd Day

@ 2nd Day

®

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

213

NEW WORDS

WEEK

parable

35 •:•

DAY

1

par'~ b~l

whimsical

hwim' za kdl

A MODERN AESOP

lampoon

lam pun'
countenance

koun'

~ n~ns

sanctimonious

sangk'

t~

mo' ne ClS

The telling of a story in simple terms that has an inherently*
important message is a venerable* art form. The parable may
be found teaching a moral lesson in the Bible. Aesop is an
incontrovertible* master of the fable. This story form is far
from antiquated* as shown by the whimsical approach to life
taken by the modern Aesop, James Thurber. His stories
lampoon the strange behavior of his fellow men. Thurber
seems unable to countenance the ideas that permeate• our
society regarding the rules by which we should live. Least of
all is he able to accept the sanctimonious notion that some
people promulgate• that good always wins out against evil.
Thurber's stories often take an exactly opposite didactic*
point of view.

Sample Sentences Note that some words do not have a one word definition. Frequently,
several words, or an entire sentence, is required.
1. Jonathan Swift was never reticent• to _ _ _ _ _ _ the egotist• in order to bring
him down with alacrity.*
2. What one person finds
. the other may find asinine.*
3. The expression, "Sour grapes,*" is the gist* of a famous
about a fox
who couldn't get what he wanted.
4. We should eschew* our
facade;* away with pretext!*
5. If we want to live in a salubrious* milieu,* we can not
the noisome*
fumes that are deleterious* to health.

Definitions Note the distinction between countenance as a noun and as a verb.
6. parable
7. whimsical

8. lampoon (v.)
9. countenance (v.)
10. sanctimonious

a. humorous, witty
b. hypocritically religious
c. tolerate,* approve
d. a moralistic story
e. ridicule

TODAY'S IDIOM

to pull up stakes-to quit a place
He could no longer rule the roost* or get the lion's share,*
so he puUed up stakes and moved on.
214

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

WEEK

35

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

2

equanimity

e ku~ nim' ~ te
MODERNIZING A PARABLE*

~

Thurber punctures in an incisive* way the platitudes* that
come from stories handed down through the generations.
These old saws are accepted by everyone. One such tale is
about a tortoise who had read in an ancient book that a tortoise
had beaten a hare in a race. The sage* old tortoise construed*
this story to mean that he could outrun a hare. With
equanimity he hunted for a hare and soon found one. "Do you
have the effrontery to challenge me?" asked the incredulous*
hare. "You are a nonentity," he scoffed* at the tortoise. A course
of fifty feet was set out. The other animals gathered around the
site*. At the sound of the gun they were off. When the hare
crossed the finish line, the flabbergasted tortoise had gone
approximately eight and three-quarter inches. The moral
Thurber draws from this debacle for the tortoise: A new broom
may sweep clean, but never trust an old saw.
Which of the five "new words" have you seen before? Answer
with equanimity.

effrontery
frun' br

e

nonentity
non en' b

te

flabbergasted
~r gast :Ki

flab·

debacle
da bc'l' kal

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. He was a precocious* youngster, but he soon reached the nadir* of his career, lost
all of his prestige*, and became a _ _ _ _ __
2. Do.you have th~
to take that supercilious* and facetious* attitude
toward something as sinister* as this?
3. These turbulent• times require a leader who does not go into a capricious* pique, •
but rather one who faces acrimonious* criticism with _ _ _ _ __
4. When the judge exonerated* the charlatan, • we were all _ _ _ _ __
5. The fortuitous* appearance of a relief column permitted an adroit* escape from
the imminent* _ _ _ _ __
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. equanimity

7. effrontery

8. nonentity
9. flabbergasted
10. debacle

a. calmness, self-control
b. astounded
c. boldness
d. ruin, collapse
e. one of no importance
TODAY'S IDIOM

to raise Cain-to cause trouble, make a fuss
When he found he was left holding the bag,* he decided to raise Cain.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

215

NEW WORDS

WEEK

vivacious
viva' sh~s

35

•!• DAY

3

gaunt

gOnt

THINGS HAVE CHANGED

mien
men

Thurber modernizes an old story that everyone has read or
heard. It has to do with a nefarious* wolf who kept a vigil* in
an ominous* forest until a little girl came along canytng a
basket of food for her grandmother. With alacrity, • this
vivacious youngster told the woJf the address to which she
was going. Hungry and gaunt the wolf rushed to the house.
When the girl arrived and entered, she saw someone in bed
wearing a nightcap and a nightgown. While the figure was
dressed like her grandmother, the little girl sunnised* with
only a perfimctory* glance that it didn't have the old lady's
mien. She approached and became cognizant* of the hirsute
face of the wolf. She drew a revolver from her purse and shot
the interloper* dead. Thurber anives at a moral for this story
that anyone would find difficult to refute: It is not so easy to
fool little girls nowadays as it used to be.

hirsute
her' st1t

refute
r1 fyilt'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. She had a

ofliumility,• but it was only a

2. He did not waste th-ne trying to
argument.

fa~ade.•

an irrelevant• and tortuous•

3. You may have discerned* that it is no longer the latest vogue* among boys to permit
their faces to become _ _ _ _ __
4. They were struck by the anomaly* of one twin who was phlegmatic* while the other
was _ _ _ _ __
5. Women strive for the slender and au courant* _ _ _ _ _ _ look.

Definitions Match the new words with their definition.
6. vivacious

a. thin, haggard

7. gaunt

b. lively. gay

8. mien

c. hairy

9. hirsute

d. appearance, bearing

10. refute

e. prove wrong or false
TODAY'S IDIOM

to leave no stone unturned-to try one's best, to make every effort
Since you're from Missouri, • I'll leave no stone untumed to convince you.

216

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

WEEK

35 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

pensive

pen' slv
whet

ANOTHER SURPRISE

hwet

Thurber's stories are written in a jocose• manner, but they
contain enough serious matter to make one pensive. He tells of
some builders who left a pane of glass standing upright in a field
near a house they were constructing. A goldfinch flew across the
field, struck the glass and was knocked inert. • He rushed back
and divulged* to his friends that the air had crystallized. The
other birds derided* him, said he had become irrational, • and
gave a number of reasons for the accident. The only bird
who believed the goldfinch was the swallow. The goldfinch
challenged the large birds to follow the same path he had flown.
This challenge served to whet their interest, and they agreed
with gusto. • Only the swallow abjw'ed. • The large birds flew
together and struck the glass; they were knocked into a stupor.
This r..aused the astute• swallow to wince with pain. Thurber
drew a moral that is the antithesis* of the cliche we all accept:
He·who hesitates is sometimes saved.

stupor
stQ'

p~r

wince
wins

cliche

kle sha'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. He was in such a
hearing my condolence. •
2. If you juxtapose• one
lessons about life.

as a result of the accident that thJs precluded* his
with another, you often get completely opposite

3. The hostile* rebuke* made the usually phlegmatic* boy _ _ _ _ __
4. You cannot
his desire for the theater with dubious• histrionics.•
5. The fervid* marriage proposal made the shy girl _ _ _ _ __

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. pensive
7. whet
8. stupor
9. wince
10. cUche

a. thoughtful, reflective
b. stimulate, stir up
c. a commonplace phrase
d. draw back, flinch
e. daze, insensible condition

TODAY'S IDIOM

tongue in one's cheek-not to be sincere
John's father surely had his tongue in h1s cheek when he told his son
to go sow wild oats• and to kick over the traces• at his kindergarten party.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

217

REVIEW

WEEK

35

•!• DAY

5

To strengthen your word power, keep adding words from all the sources you use during the
day. The words learned while reading this book give you a firm basis. School texts,
newspapers, magazines, etc., should all give you the opportunity to corroborate* the fact
that your vocabulary is growing, and they should also be the source for new words.

REVIEW WORDS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

cliche
countenance
debacle
effrontery
equanimity
flabbergasted
gaunt
hirsute
lampoon
mien
nonentity
parable
pensive
refute
sanctimonious
stupor
vivacious
whet
whimsical
wince

DEFINITIONS
astounded
b. one of no importance
c. witty, humorous
d. ridicule
e. hairy
f. prove wrong, disprove
g. flinch, draw back
h. self-control
i. collapse, ruin
j. hypocritically religious
k. a moralistic story
I. gay, lively
m. bearing, appearance
n. stir up, stimulate
o. boldness
p. approve, tolerate*
q. haggard, thin
r. reflective, thoughtful
s. a commonplace phrase
t. insensible condition, daze

a.

IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

tongue in one's cheek
to leave no stone unturned
to pull up stakes
to raise Cain

u.
v.
w.
x.

make a fuss, cause trouble
to make every effort, to try one's best
not to be sincere
to quit a place

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on page
306. Look back at the story
to check the use of each
word in its context. This will
help fix it in your mind.

1. ------------------

2. ------------------

3. ------------------

218

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 35



•.• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the follo\\ing story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Beam Me Up, Scotty
In 1966 a television program appeared that quickly established itself as the
most successful science fiction series, moved on to become a series of popular
fllms, and continues LTl reruns to be seen somewhere in this country every
night of the year. This original series, Star Trek, became so popular that there
are huge fan clubs across the country and the stars of the original series are
mobbed when t11ey make personal appearances.
What makes this form of science fiction so popular? Some may say that each
st.o:ry of the future is a showing us our own world through a
this
presentation of other worlds. There are those who would ®
analysts and argue that it is the odd characters, the ®
aliens, who
attract us. We watch with @
as worlds battle, knowing it will turn
out well in the end.
After many years and many TV episodes and movies, "Star Trek" and its
successors continue to ®
our appetite and bring excitement to our
screens. As long as space remains an almost total mystery, the unexplained
will capture our imaginations.

Clues
Q) 1st Day

®

3rd Day

@ 3rd Day
@ 2nd Day

®

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 306

219

NEw WoRDs

WEEK

genre
zhan' rn
candid
kan' did
unsavory
un sa.' v~r

36

•!• DAY

1

A LADY NOVELIST

e

degrade
di grad'
venial

ve' ne ~1

The nineteenth century saw the woman novelist attain the
same prestige• as men. England was prolific* in producing
women writers. One of the foremost in this genre was
Charlotte Bronte. In Jane Eyre she presented a candid
portrait of a woman caught up in a clandestine* affair with
a married man. Miss Bronte's readers were engrossed* in
this story. She took this unsavory subject and presented it
in a way that did not degrade the relationship. She showed
that true passion can be healthy. Miss Bronte did not
disparage* Jane's feelings or besmirch* her character. The
author was generous in her verdict. The affair was
considered merely a venial sin because Jane was never false
in her feelings or her actions.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Hany held the fallacious* belief that the menial* job would
in the eyes of his friends.
2. Betty's childish fabrications• were judged
mortified* her mother.

him
sins, although they

3. Modern abstract painting is a highly lucrative* _ _ _ _ __
4. It is reprehensible,* but it doesn't require much gossip to give a person a(n)
_ _ _ _ _ _ reputation.
5. In my _ _ _ _ _ _ opinion he is a sanctimonious• fool.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. genre

a. make contemptible, lower

7. candid

b. disagreeable, offensive, morally bad

8. unsavory

c. a certain form or style in painting or literature

9. degrade

d. pardonable, forgivable

10. venial

e. frank, open, honest

TooAv's IDIOM
keep a stiff upper lip-keep up courage, stand up to trouble

When he heard through the grapevine* that the fat was in the frre, •
he knew he had to keep a st![f upper lip so as not to spill the beans.*
220

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

WEEK

36

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

2

epitome
1 pit'~

me

dexterity

VICTOR HUGO

dek ster' ~ te

The epitome of French romantic Wiiters in the nineteenth
century was Victor Hugo. With the utmost dexterity he wrote
poetry. novels. and drama. His highly popular novels. Notre
Dame de Paris and Les Miserables. are replete• with melodramatic . situations and grotesque characters. He had a
profound* sense of social justice and a compassion for the poor.
hapless. • and downtrodden. He could not work under the
aegis* of Napoleon II and fled into exile. When the repugnant
rule came to an end. the expatriate• returned from exile. He
was received with adulation• and acclaim as the idol of the
Third Republic.

grotesque

gro tesk'
compassion

!Qm pash' ~n
repugnant
rf pug'

n~nt

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. He was made up in the most _ _ _ _ _ _ way for his role as a man from
outer space.
2. We all felt deep
for the innocent progeny.• who were bereft* of their
parents who had succumbed* during the conflagration. •
3. The Taj Mahal in India is said to be the
4. The sight of the corpse was
5. With

of grace as an edifice. •
to the squeamish* onlookers.

he thwarted* the pugnacious• and belligerent• adversary.•

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
&. epitome

a. strange. bizarre. • fantastic

7. dexterity

b. person or thing that embodies or represents the best

8. grotesque

c. distasteful. repulsive

9. compassion

d. sympathetic feeling. kindness

10. repugnant

e. mental or physical skill

ToDAY's IDIOM

to throw the book at someone-to give the maximum punishment
The judge got his back up• and threw the book at the criminal.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

221

NEW WORDS

WEEK

acme

36

•!• DAY

3

ak·me

copious
ko·

pe ~s

AN ENGLISH REALIST
The movement toward realism in the English novel of the
nineteenth century reached its acme with the works of
Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray. Charles
Dickens was a prolific* writer. Among his copious works are
Oliuer TI.vist, a candid* exposure of the repugnant• poor laws;
Nicholas Nickleby, in which the life of boys in a boarding
school is vehemently attacked; Hard Times, in which the
author wanted to depict the infamous• life in a factory during
;m early period of the industrial revolution; The Pickwick
Papers, about a naive gentleman who has numerous
misadventures. The novels, aimed at exposing the sordid*
and pernicious* elements of English life, were sald to have
helped galvanize* people into action leading to improvement
in these conditions.

vehemently

ve· ~ ment le
depict
dt ptkr

naive
nAev·

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.



1. At the

of his power, the dictator was obsessed* with the belief tl1at
those who dissented* were trying to usurp* his position.
2. As a perspicacious* newspaper reporter, he felt it incumbent* upon him to
_ _ _ _ _ _ the abortive* coup as a reprehensible* act.
3. The urbane* gentleman was flabbergasted* by the fervid* interest in wrestling shown
·
by the
young girl.
4. She lost her decorum* and wept
tears at the poignant* story.
5. He objected
to a vote taking place in the absence of a quorum.*

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.

acme
copious
vehemently
depict
10. naive

a.
b.
c.
d.
- - e.

unworldly, unsophisticated
violently, eagerly, passionately
peak, pinnacle,* zenith*
ample, abundant, plentiful
describe clearly, picture, portray

TODAY'S IDIOM

terra firma-solid, firm land
The rough ocean crossing took the wind out of his sails*,
and he was happy to be on terra firma again.

222

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

NEW WORDS

perfidious
J»r ftd- e ~s
covet
kuv·tt

A SCHEMING HEROINE
William Makepeace Thackeray was known for his moralistic
study of upper and middle class English life. His best known
work, Vwtity Fair, has as its central character Becky Sharp.
She is a perfidious woman who has an insatiable* desire to get
ahead in the world. She covets the wealth of one ma.a1, but
when maniage is not feasible* she succeeds in a plan to
ingratiate herself into the heart of her employer's son. Their
maniage is not a salubrious* one and Becky, who lives
ostentatiously,* forms a surreptitious* liaison with another
man. The affair culminates* in a debacle.* She is exposed, her
husband leaves her, and she must live in penwy in Europe.
This is the ignominious end for a clever, but misguided woman.

ingratiate

in

gra: she at
penury
pen· yer e

tg•

ignominious
min· e ~s

~

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Under the aegis* of a zealous* campaign manager, the candidate was able to

_ _ _ _ _ _ herself into the hearts of the public.
2. A favorite parable* has to do with teaching the lesson that one should not
_ _ _ _ _ _ that which belongs to someone else.
3. His fortune fluctuated* between _ _ _ _ _ _ and wealth.
4. They made an effigy of their

enemy.

5. There was bedlam* as the favored team went down to _ _ _ _ _ _ defeat
at the hands of the underdog.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. perfidious

a. treacherous. false

7. covet

b. want, envy, wish

8. ingratiate

c. humiliating, disgraceful

9. penury

d. poverty

10. ignominious

e. win confidence, charm

TODAY'S IDIOM

in seventh heaven-the highest happiness or delight
The oldest child was in seventh heaven when
her mother let her rule the roost* for a day.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

223

REVIEW

WEEK

36 •:•

DAY

5

Whether you read a classic novel or a modern one, the one thing they have in common is
their use of a rather extensive vocabulary. Don't be handicapped in your reading-increase
your vocabulary by constant study and review.

REVIEW WORDS
1. acme
2. candid
3. compassion
4. copious
5. covet
6. degrade
7. depict
8. dexterity
9. epitome
10. genre
11. grotesque
12. ignominious
13. ingratiate
14. naive
15. penury
16. perfidious
17. repugnant
18. unsavory
19. vehemently
20. venial
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. open, honest, frank
b. kindness, sympathetic feeling
c. zenith,* pinnacle,* peak
d. wish, envy, want

e. false, treacherous
unsophisticated, unworldly
g. fantastic, strange, bizarre*
h. lower, make contemptible
i. a certain form or style in painting or literature
j. repulsive, distasteful
k. plentiful, abundant. ample
I. poverty
m. portray, picture, describe clearly
n. person or thing that represents the best
o. morally bad, disagreeable, offensive
p. physical or mental skill
q. passionately, violently. eagerly
r. charm, win confidence
s. forgivable, pardonable
t. disgraceful, humiliating
f.

to throw the book at someone
in seventh heaven
terra firma
keep a stiff upper lip

u.
v.
w.
x.

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on page
307. Review incorrect words.

1.

2.

3.

224

keep up courage, stand up to trouble
to give maximum punishment
solid, firm land
the highest happiness or delight

MEANINGS

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Weeks 33-36)

•!•

Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.

1. We tried to (deter, divulge) him but he was determined to submit to

open heart surgery.
2. The reporter lost his job when he labeled the senator's remarks as
(unmitigated. asinine).

3. Freddie had the (effrontery, propensity) to ask Robin for a date after
having criticized her appearance.
4. Ordinarily. Jonathan was especially neat. but he looked quite
(disheveled. fastidious) at the end of our camping trip.
5. Mter hearing the bad news. the students left the auditorium with
(venial. somber) faces.
6. My Uncle Robert. who is really conservative about his investments.
made money on Wall Street by not being (impetuous, wary).
7. I knew I could confide in Caryl-Sue because she has a reputation for
being (discreet, sanctimonious).
8. The traitor's (perfulious, pensive) action resulted in the loss of many
lives.
9. Our water commissioner was (complacent, flabbergasted) to learn that
his own lawn sprinkler had been turned on during the water
emergency.
10. Sophie was accepted by our wide circle of friends because of her
(vivacious. tenacious) personality.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

225

WORDSEARCH 36

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you leatned this week.

1492-1992
We are all aware that 1992 was the year during which there were ...;;;CD_ _ __
reminders that it marked the SOOth anniversary of Columbus' arrival in this
part of the hemisphere. Along with the celebrations and historical
reenactmenis, there was controversy regarding the lives of those who had
been here for many centuries before that fateful event.
Historical research shows that it would be extremely _®____ to believe
that "civilization" began on this continent with Columbus' arrival. The Native
American tribes had formed nations and had come together in an
organization known as the Five Nations. They had regulations for governance
that were the ®
of self-rule and that became the models on which
our Constitution was partly based.
It was to remove the ®
portrayal of the Native American as savage
and wild Lltat historians adopted 1992 as the year to ®
them in
their true light as members of civil1zations worthy of study and respect.

Clues

CD 3rd Day
® 3rd Day
® 2nd Day
@ 4th Day

® 3rd Day

226

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 307

WEEK

J7

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

1

confront
k:m frunt·

antipathy

the

an tip'~

A MAN OF NATURE
Heruy Thoreau attempted to corifront the problem and solve
the enigma• of how one might earn a living and yet not
become an ignominious* slave to the task. He viewed the
industrial revolution with antipathy. Man in a servile role to
extraneous• possessions was a main target of his writings.
He believed that one could attain genuine wealth not by
accumulating objects or money, but through enjoyment and
perusal* of nature. By his own volition he gave up friends and
comforts for a two year sojourn by himself at Walden Pond.
What others might judge as penury, • was seen by Thoreau as
the epitome• of wealth.

servile
s8"' wl

volition

vo ltsh' ~n
sojourn
si>' Jern

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. He found his
with equanimity.•

position a degrading* one and could not accept it

2. The expatriate"' decided to make his

in France a permanent one in

order to give up his nomadic* way of life.
3. Why do we refuse to

the unsavory* problems of our times In a

candid* and incisive• way?
4. He was a tenacious* competitor, and at his own _ _ _ _ _ _ he placed his title
in jeopardy* on many occasions.

5. Her
towards men was based on rather nebulous• events that she
construed"' to prove that they were all perfidious. •

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. confront

a. temporary stay

7. antipathy

b. willpower, choice

8. servile

c. dislike, distaste, hate

9. volition

d. come face to face with

10. sojourn (n.)

e. slavish, submissive

TODAY'S IDIOM

to tighten one~ belt-to get set for bad times or poverty
He knew he would have to draw 1n hls horns- and
tighten his belt or he would wind up on skid row*.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

227

NEW WORDS

WEEK

austere

37

•!• DAY

2

6 stir'
felicitous
r~ lis'~ tas
halcyon
hal' se ~n
tenable

ten' a hal
superfluous

su per' flu as

THE GOOD LIFE
Thoreau's book about the austere but happy life at Walden
Pond propagated* his fame around the world. He built a
small hut and began living an ascetic* existence. He found
it to be a felicitous experience. In this idyllic* setting he was
able to spend his time reading, studying nature, writing, and
thinking. Far from being indolent,* he kept busy in many
ways. At the end of the experiment he recalled the halcyon
days with pleasure. He believed he had learned the secret of
the truly happy life. The only tenable way of life is one in
harmony with nature; material possessions are superfluous.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. When he found his sinecure* was no longer _ _ _ _ _ _ , he felt it a propitious*
time to resign.
2. Far from being ostentatious,* she was considered the acme* of fashion because of
her
manner of dress.
3. Because he was an itinerant* worker, he had to disdain* carrying _ _ _ _ __
equipment.
4. On that

occasion the amount of money he spent was irrelevant.*

5. During the turbulent* days of the war, they wished for the
earlier times.

days of

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. austere

a. supportable, defendable

7. felicitous

b. simple, unadorned, hard

8. halcyon

c. peaceful. calm

9. tenable

d. happy

10. superfluous

e. excessive, surplus

TooAv's IDIOM
off the beaten track-not usual, out of the ordinary
Because his ideas were always off the beaten track,
he lived under a sword of Damocles* on his job.
228

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

WEEK

37

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

motivate

mo' b vat
rationalize
rash' ~ n~ liz

THE MIND'S SECRETS
The study of the human mind and behavior has had many
prominent practitioners, but no one is more revered* than
Sigmund Freud. An Austrian physician, he is said to be the
father of psychoanalysis. He taught that man has a
subconscious mind in which he keeps repugnant• memories
that come to the surface surreptitiously* and motivate
behavior. Man often tries to rationalize hi~ actions, when, in
reality. they are really the result of suppressed memories
coming to the surface. Freud's approach to the disturbed
person was to attempt therapy by examining the dreams that
make cognizant• what the cause of the illness might be. Only
with the airing of deleterious, buried emotions can the person
move from the nascent stage to that of full health. Freud was
considered an iconoclast in the field of psychology when his
ideas first appeared at the beginning of the twentieth centucy.

therapy
ther' ~

pe

nascent
nas' nt
iconoclast
i kon' _, klast

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The
was in favor of jettisoning* one of the traditions that had become
an intrinsic* part of his life.
2. In order to complete the _ _ _ _ _ _ , the doctor said a trip to a warm, dty
climate was mandatocy.•
3. Complacent• people are difficult to _ _ _ _ _ _ to altruistic* actions.
4. It is pathetic* the way some citizens
their apathy* during election
years.
5. His beard was in its _ _ _ _ _ _ state; it would soon be a hirsute* masterpiece.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. motivate

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

7. rationalize

8. therapy
9. nascent

10. iconoclast

beginning to exist or develop
use or give a reason other than the real one
inspire, stimulate, provoke
image-breaker, attacker of beliefs
healing or curing process
TODAY'S IDIOM

a square peg in a round hole-an able man in the wrong job
It was a bitter pill to swallow* when they had to fire him
because he was a square peg in a round hole.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 307

229

NEW WORDS

erudite
er· dit

u

phobia

ro· be;

AMATEUR PSYCHOLOGISTS
The ideas of Freudian psychology have become part of our
everyday life. Our language is replete* with cliches* that have
their origin in Freud's writings. There is a surfeit* of amateur
psychologists who, with celerity,* analyze an individual's
problems from the slightest evidence. Despite their dubious*
education and training in this field, they discuss symptoms
and cures on a most erudite fashion. Should a person
express a fear of height, this phobia. is examined; events
from childhood are considered germane to the problem. Is
it possjble he or she was dropped as an infant? Perhaps
something in a dream is pertinent* to explain the feelings of
vertigo that accompany height. For some reason, non~ trained
people find the Freudian approach to the workings of the
human mind most conducive to their practicing as amateur
psychologists.

germane
j~r

man'

vertigo
ver' b go
conducive
k~n dO' siv

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. She could not countenance* the sight of a lethal* weapon; it was tantamount• to
a
with her.
2. The _ _ _ _ _ _ man was more than merely bilingual;"' he spoke five languages.

3. I would never have the temerity* to walk across t...he steel girders high up on a new
building: an onset of
would surely follow.
4. The bedlam* in the study hall was not
to good work habits.
5. Epithets* are not _ _ _ _ _ _ when motivating* a child to a task.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. erudite
7. phobia

8. germane
9. vertigo
10. conducive

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

very scholarly
dizziness
persistent fear, strong dislike
leading, helpful
appropriate, in close relationship to

TODAY'S IDIOM

to upset the apple cart-to overturn or disturb a plan or intention
It was a bitter pill to swallow* when they upset the
apple cart and elected a dark horse.*
230

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

WEEK

J7

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

The writings of Thoreau and Freud are repJet.e• with ideas that rt;quire deep thought. In
order to tackle their ideas, one must understand their vocabulary. Therefore, word mastery
is the key to unlocking ideas of some of our greatest thinkers.

REVIEW WORDS
1. antipathy
2. austere
3. conducive
4. confront
5. erudite
G. felicitous
7. germane
8. halcyon
9. iconoclast
10. motivate
11. nascent
12. phobia
13. rationalize
14. servile
15. sojourn
1G. superfluous
17. tenable
18. therapy
19. vertigo
20. volition
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. choice, \\1llpower
b. supportable, defendable
c. provoke, stimulate, inspire
d. leading, helpful
e. unadorned, simple, hard
f. hate, distaste, dislike
g. attacker of beUefs, image-breaker
h. tn close relationship to, appropriate
i. calm, peaceful
j. come face to face with
k. curing or. healing process
I. very scholarly
m. happy
n. submissive, slavish
o. beginning to develop or exist
p. dizziness
q. surplus, excessive
r. temporary stay
s. use or give a reason other than the real one
t. strong dislike, persistent fear

to upset the apple cart
to tighten one's belt
off the beaten track
a square peg in a round hole

u. not usual, out of the ordinary
v. an able man in the wrong job
w. to get set for bad times or poverty
x. to overturn or disturb a plan or intention

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ---------------Check your answers on
page 307.

2. ---------------3. ----------------

231

WORDSEARCH 37
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Make My Ostrich Burger Well Done
Just about 100 years ago, there arose an industry in the state of Arizona that
seems very odd to us today. We know of cattle ranches and sheep ranches,
but would you believe ... ostrich ranches? This CD
business became
popular as women found ostrich feathers a ®
addition to their
wardrobes.
Ostriches are easy to raise. They eat and drink less than cattle, and their eggs
days of ostrich
are large enough to feed ten people! During the @
ranching, feathers were sold for as much as $300 a pound, so it is easy to
see why that business was so attractive.
However, women's fashions changed after World War I, and the market for
a shrinking market. The price
ostrich plumes fell. Growers had to @
tumbled to about $10 for a bird. As ostrich feathers became®
in
the fashion world, ostrich ranching came to an end.
Interestingly enough. ostrich ranchers may be coming back into vogue because
nutritionists tell us that ostrich meat is low in cholesterol. We may not go wild
over the feathers, but pass the lean meat, please. Hold the mayo, too.
Clues

CD

3rd Day

@ 2nd Day

®

2nd Day

@) 1st Day

®

232

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

WEEK

38 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

glib
glib

homogenous

THE ENIGMA* OF FASHION

ho ~Je'ne~s

Of all the pressures young people face, the most pernicious•
is that of fashion. By this is meant the current vogue• in
dress. The teenagers, who are so glib when they speak of
"individuality," are turned into a homogeneous mass by the
latest craze in fashion. How can youngsters who vehemently*
resist advice from the older generation become so malleable in
the hands of those who "make" fashion? Perhaps the sudden
shifts in fashion occur fortuitously*. Or is there some group
who, through legerdemain, switches styles and customs on
us right before our eyes? Today's teenagers seem to be quite
gullible* when it comes to embracing the latest trend in
fashions. But then, they have their elders as sage• examples
to follow.

malleable
mal'

e ~~»I

legerdemain
lej

~r d~

man'
trend

trend

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The charlatan• was able to wheedle* money out of the naive• audience with a
_ _ _ _ _ _ talk on the medicine that would expunge• pain. ·
2. They could not follow the _ _ _ _ _ _ of his ideas, but his verbal dexterity*
galvanized* the gullible* listeners.
3. They were engrossed* as an ill man was "cured" before their eyes: some of the more
urbane• said it was _ _ _ _ __
4. He ingratiated* himself into their confidence, and the _ _ _ _ _ _ crowd was
shaped into a subjugated* mass.
5. While they started out as individuals, they became a _ _ _ _ _ _ group whom
he could motivate as he willed.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. glib
7. homogeneous

8. malleable
9. legerdemain
10. trend

a. capable of being shaped or formed
b. sleight of hand, deceptive adroitness•
c. smooth of speech
d. same or uniform
e. general direction

TODAY'S IDIOM
by hook or by crook-any way at all, at any cost
He had bought the white elephant• without rhyme
or reason•: now he had to get rid of it by hook or by crook.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

233

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

stagnant
stag' nant

38

•!• DAY

2

fatal

ra· u

THE ECONOMICS OF FASHION
In dress, the fashion appears to be "set" by a few foreign
designers and a handful of affluent* indMduals who purchase
these designs. The fashion industry is cognizant* of the fact
that fashions must change rapidly and often or their economy
would become stagnant For this industry it would prove fatal
if it were not vigilant* and prepared well in advance for a new
fashion trend. • As the old fashion becomes passe and a
new fashion seems to be in the making, the garment
manufacturers cannot afford to procrastinate. They rush large
sums of money into production for a mass market. Having
invested heavily, the manufacturers do everything possible to
tnfluence and motivate* the purchasers. Through every facet
of publicity and advertising the industry exploits* the natural
desire for people to be au courant* with the latest fashions.

passe
pa sa'
procrastinate
pro kras' ta nat
facet
fas' it

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the~e sentences.
1. To the consternation* of the distraught* parents they learned their son was accused
occasion.
of using the lethal* weapon on that
2. We wish for halcyon* days when the warlike solutions will have become
3. Edna recalled with nostalgia* many
of her school days.
4. We all tend to
when faced with an unsavory* task.
5. The iconoclast• has the propensity* for reproaching* those who feel complacent•
with leading a
existence.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

stagnant
fatal
passe
procrastinate
facet

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

delay, put off
motionless, dull, inactive
deadly, disastrous
one side or view of person or situation
outmoded, old-fashioned

TODAY'S IDIOM

to get up on the wrong side of the bed-to be in a bad mood
When his mother raised Cain* about his slovenly* room,
he accused her of getting up on the wrong side of the bed.
234

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

WEEK

38

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

foist
foist

stigmatize
stlg' 1m tiz

WHAT NEXT?
Once the fashion industry has been able tofoist a new style on
the teenager, the older generation tends to stigmatize it as some
form of rebellion. What is often ignored is that the young
consumers capitulate to what is originated* by someone outside
of their group. The feelings of individuality and audacity that
the teenager gets from a new style of dress result from the
propensity* of their elders to disparage• them. The actual
situation is that the clothing fashions soon become accepted by
all: there is nothing upsetting or revolutionary about them.
While people are becoming complacent• about the "new," the
clothing industry is busy planning how to tantalize the
teenager with next year's "fashion." This arbitrary* decision is
guaranteed to foment• consternation* among adults once again
in the following year.

capitulate
G pich' 0) lat

audacity

o das· 0) te
tantalize
tan' tl iz

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Despite tenacious* resistance, they were ousted* from the strongpoint and had to
_ _ _ _ _ _ to the enemy.
2. It was an asinine* thing to do-to _ _ _ _ _ _ his opponent as a bigot* and thus
exacerbate* an already bitter campaign.
3. It is common to hear people disparage* those who paint in the modern genre•: they
speak about the
of the artist who submits a high white canvas with
a black border as a serious work.
4. They are dubious• of such an artist and accuse him of trying to _ _ _ _ __
as a work of art a rudimentary* exercise.
5. It is reprehensible* to
a young child with the promise of a reward
for being good when you have no intention of giving it.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. foist

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

7. stigmatize

8. capitulate
9. audacity
10. tantalize

surrender, make terms
to mark with a disgrace
boldness, daring
pass off slyly. ,pass as genuine
tease or torment by offering something good, but not deliver
TODAY'S IDIOM

castles in the air-a dream about some wonderful future
People on Skid Row* often build castles in the air.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

235

NEW WORDS

WEEK

retort

38 •:•

DAY

4

n tort'
reticent

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

ret'~ ~nt

tacit
tas' it
chicanery
shi
n~ r

ka'

e

docile
dos' ~1

To the derogatory* comments from the older generation the
teenagers might retort that new fashions and styles are
adopted by the elders with alacrtty.• Though they complain,
women emulate• their daughters by shortening or lengthening
their hems. They may appear reticent about the bother and
expense of altering their wardrobe, but they give tacit approval
to the change by rushing to the department stores where they
jostle* each other to buy copies of the more expensive dresses.
The conclusion one might reach after observing how women
countenance• the arbitrary* changes year after year is that
they are naive* or victims of some chicanery practiced by the
clothing industry. Women may appear hapless* before the
intimidation• of "style," but the real truth may lie in the fact
that they are so docile because they secretly enjoy the yearly
excitement around the latest fashions.
There's another famUiar word reintroduced today. Did you
recognize reticent?

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The reporter divulged* the blatant
the contract.
2. Even the most
a pittance• for his hard labor.

involved in the awarding of

person may become fractious• when he gets only

3. His egregious• behavior brought a

reproach to his mother's eyes.
4. Most politicians are
when asked to divulge• their ambitions.
5. He refused to _ _ _ _ _ _ to the rash* question about his propensity*
for imbibing._*

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. retort (v.)

7.
8.
9.
10.

reticent
tacit
chicanery
docile

a. understood, implied, not stated
b. easy to manage
c. to answer, reply
d. silent or reserved
e. -trtckecy, tuiderhandedness
TODAY'S IDIOM

to maintain the status quo-to keep things as they are
You hit the naU on the head* when you said we ought to
maintain the status quo and not change horses in midstream. •

236

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

WEEK

38

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

No matter what the fashion in dress, the fashion in education is an extensive vocabulary.
Keep up with the fashion; build your vocabulary wardrobe.

REVIEW WORDS
1. audacity
2. capitulate
3. chicanery
4. docile
5. facet
6. fatal
7. foist
8. glib
9. homogeneous
10. legerdemain
11. malleable
12. passe
13. procrastinate
14. reticent
15. retort
16. stagnant
17. stigmatize
18. tacit
19. tantalize
20. trend
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. reserved, silent
b. pass as genuine, pass off slyly
c. disastrous, deadly
d. smooth of speech
e. one side or view of person or situation
f. daring, boldness
g. reply, answer
h. uniform, same
i. capable of being formed or shaped
j. put off, delay
k. make terms, surrender
I. underhandedness, trickery
m. not stated, understood, implied
n. to mark with a disgrace
o. inactive, dull, motionless
p. general direction
q. old-fashioned, outmoded
r. easy to manage
s. deceptive adroitness, • sleight of hand
t. tease or torment by offering something good, but fail to
deliver

castles in the air
to get up on the wrong side of the bed
by hook or by crook
to maintain the status quo

u.
v.
w.
x.

to be in a bad mood
a drearn about a wonderful future
at any cost, any way at all
to keep things as they are

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ---------------------Answers on page 307. Take
that extra few minutes now
to master the few words you
made errors with.

2. ---------------3. - - - - - - - - - - - -

237

WORDSEARCH 38

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

TV-The Octopus
Is there anyone you know who can remember a time when there was no
television? Perhaps a grandparent. but no one much younger is able to do so.
At the beginning, only a handful of stations existed. Early programs imitated
each other and tended to be CD
. Some time later, there was the cable
2 _ _ __
1V expansion and greater variety was available. The developing @.::::::
was for ever-larger numbers of programs dealing with information as well as
entertainment.
The 1V industry. never ®
when it comes to expanding viewer
interests, brought even more channels to the air, broadcasting 24 hours
every day of the week. The objective was to @
special groups ~th
programs directed to special tastes and interests. Soon channels devoted to
games, to how to fix or make things, to romance dramas, to cartoons. etc.,·
sprang into existence. It appears that every ®
of a viewer's interest
is being addressed. As more and more channels come on the air, as the result
of new technology. the variety is expanding beyond anything imagined by
those who can recall the beginnings of this magical medium.
Clues

CD 1st Day
@ 1st Day

®

4th Day

@ 3rd Day

®

238

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 307

39

WEEK

•!• DAY

NEW WoRDS

1

saga

sA'ga
belated

bt tat' ttd

RULE, BRITTANIA
An unforgettable saga of World War II has to do with the small

French coastal town of Dunkirk. There, in 1940, thousands of
British troops made a belated escape from the awesome*
power of the German army and air force. They were removed
by an array* of private boats, from huge yachts to decrepit
fishing boats. At their own volition,* the skippers came close
to the shore, while German planes bombed implacably.* They
remained imperturbable under heavy fire. When their vessels
were loaded, they dashed back to England. Once unloaded,
they did not vacillate, but returned with equanimity* to their
vigil* in the danger zone. The British proved once again that
they are paragons* of comradeship in times of jeopardy.*

decrepit
di krep' it
imperturbable
tm' }X)r ter' lxllxll

vacillate
vas'., lat

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. The
of a lone man confronting* the turbulent* oceans in a small boat
is an exploit* we fmd laudable.*
2. The speaker remained
while his audience shouted caustic*
comments about his mendacious* activities.
3. The ingrate* refused to accept Cindy's

gift.

4. When released from incarceration,* he was gaunt* and _ _ _ _ __

5. We are all familiar with the cliche* that he who

is lost.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. saga

a. hesitate, fluctuate

7. belated

b. heroic story

8. decrepit

c. broken down, worn out

9. imperturbable _ _ d. late, delayed
10. vacillate

e. calm, steady, serene

TooAY's IDIOM
a sacred cow-a person or thing that cannot be criticized
(From India, where cows may not be harmed because of religious rules)

I decided to throw down the gauntlet* by exposing the boss's son who
had been ruling the roost* as the sacred cow of the business.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

239

NEW WORDS

WEEK

staunch

39

•!• DAY

2

stonch
opprobrium
~pro·

bream

Machiavellian
ea vel ean

Mak.

unconscionable

un kon · sha ne bal
pandemonium

pan· da mo. ne am

THE GOOD GUYS VS. THE BAD GUYS
The international adventure stories prevalent• on television
follow meticulously* a plot that is inexorable* in its
development. Those on the side of law and justice face
perfidious• men and organizations. These are anathema• to
those values the staunch heroes would defend. These
infan1ous• men have no capacity for compassion, • and they
treat the lovely women with opprobrium. The intrepid* heroes
are placed in deleterious• situations as a result of
the Machiavellian maneuvers of their opponents. One
unconscionable act of duplicity-' follows another until the total
destruction of the "good guys" seems at hand. At the last
moment, usually anlidst the pandemonium of a battle, the
cause for which the heroes strive trlumphs. However, evil is
ubiquitous,* and next week another fracas• will erupt.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The coach heaped _ _ _ _ _ _ upon the fledgling* ball player.
2. We are ready to rationalize*

activities on the part of our stde if they

are to the detriment• of our adversary. •
3. It was

to Abraham Uncoln to keep a book he had borrowed without
making tenacious• efforts to return it.

4. There was _ _ _ _ _ _ as the presidential nominee entered the convention stte. •
5. She is such a

friend, my reprehensible* actions do not cause a

schism• between us.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. staunch

a. scorn, insult

7. opprobrium

b. strong, trusty, firm

8. Machiavellian

c. without conscience, unreasonable

9. unconscionable- - d. governed by opportunity, not principled
10. pandemonium __

e. disorder, uproar

TODAY'S IDIOM

. through thick and thin-in spite of all sorts of difficulties
He decided to stick with his fatrweather friends* through thick and thin.

240

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

WEEK

39

•!• DAY

NEw WoRDS

J

flay

fli
demeanor
dime" nar

A FAMOUS MUTINY
One of the most repugnant* names in popular legend is that of
Captain William Bligh. He was the captain of the H. M.S. BolUlty
in 1789, and the mutiny that erupted* aboard that ship was
the basis for a film in which Charles Laughton portrayed Bligh
as an awesome* bully and an unmitigated* villain. He would
flay both the body and the spirit of anyone who crossed him.
The crew developed such an aversion* to Bligh's mortifying
actions and demeanor that, led by Fletcher Christian, they set
the captain and 17 shipmates off in a lifeboat in the South
Pacific. The ship continued to the Pitcairn Islands where the
crew remained to live with the islanders. Laughton's delineation
of Bligh remains as the image we have of him. Only recently
has any attempt been made to vindicate Captain Bligh and to
remove the heinous reputation that permeates* histocy.

delineation
di lin"
shan

e a'

vindicate
vin' da

kit

heinous

ha' nas

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. The mayor tried to _ _ _ _ _ _ his actions that had been called capricious* and
irrational* by critics.
2. He castigated* his opponents and went to great lengths to
them with
accusations of megalomania. •
3. His
was atypical*; usually phlegmatic*, he was belligerent• and
garrulous* during the broadcast.
4. "TTle most
thing I have done," he said in a stentorian* voice, ..is
eradicate* the untruth that my party is not compatible* with progress."
5. Then he gave an incisive*
of his fulsome* opponents as an
antiquated* group, complacent* about the noisome* conditions in a moribund* city.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. flay
7. demeanor
8. delineation
9. vindicate
10. heinous

a. hatefully evil
b. absolve, justify
c. sketch, description in words
d. conduct, bearing
e. strip off skin, scold harshly

TooAv's IDIOM
to take by storm-to make a fast impression
The new opera star took the critics by storm and carried the day.*

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

241

NEW WORDS

WEEK

turpitude
tt~ r · J» tii
infraction
in frak· shan

39

•!• DAY

4

FAIR PLAY!
Recently, there has been an attempt to improve Captain
Bligh's tainted* image. Historians maintain that there was no
turpitude in Bligh's actions aboard the H.M.S. BoW1ty.
Perhaps he was imprudent* in failing to keep his temper
under control. While an infraction aboard ship was quickly
criticized, Bligh never carried out those callous actions the
movie dramatized in order to depict* an evil man, say his
defenders. After the mutiny, Captain Bligh astutely* navigated
the lifeboat with the other 17 men for over 3,000 miles to
safety. This prodigious* feat alone, say those who would
restore Bligh's good name, should be enough to allow for a full
redress of the wrongs that have been blamed on him for over
150 years. While the coterie* defending Captain Bligh do not
ask the public to praise him, they do request a more
benevolent* attitude toward this traditionally* reprehensible*
figure, and an end to the vituperation heaped upon him for
these many years.

callous

kar as
redress
ri dres·

vituperation
Vi tu' J»r a· shan

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. We do not condone* or tolerate* an
of even the most trivial kind.
2. It takes a
person to watch with equanimity* as a gullible,* naive* gfrl
falls for the line of a loathsome* boy.
3. How easy it is to heap _ _ _ _ _ _ upon someone at the nadir* of his career.
4. There seems to be no way to
a grievance against at omnipotent*
ruler.
5. From any facet* of his life, the acme* of moral _ _ _ _ _ _ was reached by
Adolph Hitler.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. turpitude
7. infraction
8. callous
9. redress
10. vituperation

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

unfeeling
vileness, evil wickedness
to right a wrong, remedy
violation
blame, abuse
TODAY'S IDIOM

to be in fine fettle-to be in high spirits, or feeling well

He did a lot of woolgathering* and was in .fine fettle
during the whole of the Indian summer.*
242

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

WEEK

39

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

Our Brttish cousins have a vocabulary that differs from ours in many ways. Isn't it fortunate
that we have to be responsible for the Amertcan version of this language only?
REVIEW WORDS
1. belated
2. callous
3. decrepit
4. delineation
5. demeanor
6. flay
7. heinous
8. imperturbable
9. infraction
10. Machiavellian
11. opprobrtum
12. pandemonium
13. redress
14. saga
15. staunch
16. turpitude
17. unconscionable
18. vacillate
19. vindicate
20. vituperation
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. descrtption in words, sketch

b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
I.

m.
n.
o.

p.
q.
r.
s.
t.

firm, trusty, strong
fluctuate, hesitate
violation
abuse, blame
serene, steady, calm
uproar, disorder
hatefully evil
scold harshly, strtp off the skin
beartng, conduct
not prtncipled, governed by opportunity
heroic story
delayed, late
unfeeling
evil, wickedness, vileness
worn out, broken down
unreasonable, without conscience
to rtght a wrong
justify, absolve
insult, scorn

through thick and thin
to take by storm
a sacred cow
to be in fine fettle

u.
v.
w.
x.

to make a fast impression
in spite of all sorts of difficulties
to be in high spirits, feeling well
a person who cannot be criticized

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ----------------The answers can be found
on page 308.

2. ----------------3. -----------------

243

WORDSEARCH 39

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Psst . .. Need World Series Ticketsl
Think about this for a moment. Is there anything wrong in buying something
for one·dollar and reselling it for two dollars? Naturally, you would be correct
if you saw nothing amiss with this transaction; it's the way a capitalist
economy works. But, if you bought a ticket to a rock concert or baseball game
for ten dollars and sold it for twenty, you would be committing an ..:;;CD_ _ __
of the law. You might ask, "What's so ®
about this?" The answer is
that you would be guilty of the practice known as "scalping." Does an
individual who offers a scarce ticket at a price above the original price descxve
the ®
connected with the word "scalping"?
These hard-working and Iisk-taking individuals see themselves as gobetweens in a world where people are willing to spend additional money for a
in the
popular event. However, law enforcement officials remain®
face of all reason as they arrest and fine these enterprising salesmen. Those
®
believers in punishing law-breakers find nothing wrong with
trying to halt the scalping of tickets. For others, it is a way of doing business
that they claim hurts no one and is in keeping with a profit-driven economy.
Clues


4th Day

® 3rd Day
@2nd Day
@ 1st Day

® 2nd Day

244

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

WEEK

40 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

rhetoric
ret" ~r Jk
clique
klek

A POLITICAL SHOW
There are few forms of entertainment more enjoyable than
watching a glib* politician run for office. Most politicians have
prepared speeches dealing with the prevalent• topics of the
day. They can maintain a fervid* flow of rhetoric for hours at a
time. In each locallty where he .is to appear, the advance work
is prepared by a clique of trustworthy aides. In preparation for
the show, they have dispersed* leaflets, put up posters, and
sent out cars and trucks with loudspeakers to extol the
erudite• qualities of their candidate. Soon, the crowd gathers.
Loyal party workers come forward to shake the hand of their
mentor. Now, with the facile solutions to complex problems
carefully memorized, the show is ready to begin. One moment
facetious, • the next moment profound, • the candidate works
to convince the incredulous• among the voters.

extol

ek stol'
mentor

men· tar
facile
fas· .,}

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. It is not long before a young star has a _ _ _ _ _ _ around him who
sporadically* get their names into the newspapers.
2. At a time that requires tangible• proposals, all he offers is unconscionable•
3. The detective interrogated• the adamant• prisoner in such a _ _ _ _ _ _ way
that he confessed after giving incontrovertible• evidence.
4. Youngsters scoff* when their elders
the halcyon• days of long ago.
5. Amidst the adulation"' of the throng, • the film star, in all humility,* credited her
_ _ _ _ _ _ as the one most responsible.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. rhetoric

a. counselor, coach, tutor
b. use (sometimes exaggerated) of language
c. easily accomplished or attained
d. praise highly
e. small, exclusive group of people

7. clique

8. extol
9. mentor
10. facile

TODAY'S IDIOM

to live in a fool's paradise-to be happy without a real basis
He lived in a fool's paradise while he sowed wild
oats•, but he soon had to pay the piper. •

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

245

NEW WORDS

WEEK

cant
kant
umbrage
urn' blij

•!• DAY

2

GETTING A GOOD LOOK

magnanimous

mag nan' ;:}

40

ffiC}S

vilify
vii' ;:} fi
elucidate
1 to·~ dat

The television press interview is conducive* to close
scrutiny* of a candidate. His public speeches may contain
many cant phrases, but a sharp question by an astute*
reporter can destroy a cliche • filled statement. The politician
now will procrastinate* in his answer; a new facet* of his
personality may be revealed by his demeanor.* Perhaps he
will take umbrage at a suggestion that he favors the
affluent.* His record is searched for evidence that he has
been equally magnanimous to the indigent.* He accuses the
reporter of attempting to vilify him. Is he being accused of
turpitude* in office? It is time to discreetly* go on to another
topic. The candidate wishes to extol* the virtues of his
program and record. The press wants to allude* to things
that keep him in the midst of controversy. They insist that
he elucidate positions that the politician would rather leave
in a nebulous* state.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. We feel so sanctimonious* when we
the character of a felon*.
2. The diplomat was astute* enough to see through the
of the
Machiavellian* ambassador.
3. A somber* examination of those indigent* families, bereft* of hope, sunken in
apathy,* should motivate* us to be more
in our attempts to improve
their lot.
4. I was flabbergasted* when he took _ _ _ _ _ _ at my whimsical* remarks.
5. The judge ordered the censor to
his reasons for removing passages
from the book in such a capricious* manner.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. cant

a. insincere or almost meaningless talk

7. umbrage

b. to make clear
8. magnanimous _ _ c. resentment, offense
9. vilify
d. malign,* slander
10. elucidate
e. generous, noble
TODAY'S IDIOM

the sum and substance--the heart or substantial part
The sum and substance of our pyrrhic victory* was that

our hopes for a stable future had gone up in smoke.*
246

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

WEEK

40

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

J

vapid
vap'ld

unwieldy
un

SEEING IS LEARNING
While we are all cognizant* of the importance of words to
create certain impressions, gesture is relegated* to a much
lesser role. Gestures are an important concomitant* to even
the most vapid speech, enhancing it and giving the hearer
something to look at while he listens. The value of seeing at the
same time as listening was shown when a class at a university,
unwieldy because of its large size, was split up. One group was
put into a room in close proximity to good loudspeakers. Every
nuance* of the lecturer's voice could be heard clearly. Because
they had no person on whom to place their attention, they
soon took on the appearance of extreme lassitude: most
students became lethargic* and rested their heads on their
desks. The separation of visual and aural communication
tended to vitiate the learning process. The listening group
received grades lower than those received by those who could
look at as well as hear the instructor.

wer de'

proximity
prok stm' ~

te

lassitude
las· a tiid

vitiate
vish'

eat

Once more your keen eye and memory were being tested. Did
you recognize lassitude as being from an earlier lesson?

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. As the scion* of an affluent* family, he was often in

to opulence.*
2. After playing with his progeny* in the enervating* sun, he staggered back to his
room where he was overcome with _ _ _ _ __
3. As a concomitant* to his belligerent* and vituperative* antipathy* toward his
government, he became an expatriate,* but he found it a
life.
4. Kyra was so disgruntled* about having to move the
piano, she
procrastinated* for days.
5. The irrelevant* evidence seemed to _ _ _ _ _ _ the prosecutor's case and
precluded* a conviction.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. vapid

7. unwieldy
8. proximity
9. lassitude
10. vitiate

a. bulky, difficult to handle
b. destroy the use or value
c. uninteresting, dull
d. nearness
e. weariness, weakness
TODAY'S IDIOM

on pins and needles-to be on edge, jumpy
He was on pins and needles while he cooled his heels* in the principal's office.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

247

NEW WORDS

WEEK

augment

40 •:•

DAY

4

og ment·
fatuous
fach· u ~

THE HAMMY OLD DAYS
Actors depend upon their ability to gesticulate• almost as
much as upon speech to obtain their desired histrionic*
effects. With them, gesture seiVes much more than merely
to augment speech. When their communication is by gesture
alone, it is called pantomime. In the early silent motion
picture period, gestures were fl~boyant. • To show that he
was distraught* about the danger in which the heroine had
been placed, the hero would go through the most fatuous
actions. He would stagger, beat his breast, tear hts hair, and
contort hts face into the most doleful* appearance. There
weren't many simple or restrained gestures in hts repertoire.
The heroine, to indicate her love, would fling her arms wide
and ardently* jump into her sweetheart's arms. It was only
much later that actors became skilled enough to
communicate with the audience through discreet• gestures
and almost imperceptible changes in facial expression that
could transmit nuances• of emotion.

contort
bn tort·
repertoire
rep· ~r twAr
imperceptible
tm· par sep· h)

~1

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The new employee wanted to gain favor with his boss, and his obsequious• desires led

to the most
behavior.
2. Her virtuosity* was demonstrated by the works she performed from her _ _ _ __
3. He had always appeared virile, • so that the
decline toward senility*
went unnoticed until he succumbed* and began to use a cane.
4. The paroxysm• of coughing seiVed to
her body until she could gain a
respite.•
5. The parsimonious• octogenarian* sought to _ _ _ _ _ _ his wealth by removing 1t
from its cache* and placing it in a bank.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6. augment
7. fatuous
8. contort
9. repertoire
10. imperceptible

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

extremely slight or gradual
enlarge, increase
foolish, s1lly, inane•
twist violently
works that an artist is ready to perform
TODAY'S IDIOM

to have at one's fingertips-to have thorough knowledge, to have ready
He had at his .fingertips an extensive repertoire. •

248

ANSW£RS ARE ON PACE 308

WEEK

4

REVIEW

If there's one thing a politician must know how to do, it is to use words effectively. He must
weigh carefully each. and every utterance. He must also select the proper word for the
audience he is addressing. You may never run for office, but it would be comforting to know
you were ready for it-vocabulary-wise!

REVIEW WORDS
1. augment
2. cant
3. clique
4. contort
5. elucidate
6. extol
7. facile
8. fatuous
9. imperceptible
10. lassitude
11. magnanimous
12. mentor
13. proximity
14. repertoire
15. rhetoric
16. umbrage
17. unwieldy
18. vapid
19. vilify
20. vitiate
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. twist violently

b. increase, enlarge
c. nearness
d. destroy the use 9r value
e. praise highly

f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
I.

m.
n.
o.

q.
r.
s.

t.

use (sometimes exaggerated) of language
to make clear
slander, malign*
difficult to handle, bulky
works that an artist is ready to perform
tutor, counselor, coach
noble, generous
insincere or almost meaningless talk
small, exclusive group of people
extremely slight or gradual
dull, uninteresting
weakness, weariness
inane, • foolish, silly
easily accomplished or attained
offense, resentment

to live in a fool's paradise
the sum and substance
on pins and needles
to have at one's fingertips

u. the heart or substantial part
v. to be on edge, jumpy
w. to have ready, to have a thorough knowledge
x. to be happy without a real basis

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 308. Get to work
learning the words that
gave you trouble.

MEANINGS

1. ---------------2. ---------------3. ----------------

249

HAPLESS HEADLINES
(From Weeks 36-40)

•!•

From the list of vocabulary words below choose the best ones to
complete each of the newspaper headlines.
a. Therapy
b. Facile
c. Fatal
d. Decrepit
e. Confront
f. Retort
g. Vehemently
h. Tacit
i. Legerdemain
j. Vapid
k. Phobia
I. Clique
m. Fatuous
n. Repertoire
o. Motivate
p. Capitulate
q. Glib
r. Lassitude
s. Mentor
t. Vertigo

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

U.S. Diplomats
Chinese over Alleged A-bomb Tests
Psychologist Claims Success in Treating Flying _ _ __
Rebels
. Throw Down Arms
Auto Accident Proves
to Family
Salesman Arrested in Con Game
Witness
Denies Allegation
Pentagon Asks for Funds to Replace"_ _ _ _ .. Aircraft
New Company Director Praises Former _ _ __
La Boheme is Mainstay of Opera Star's _ _ __

10. Speech

250

Urged After Stroke

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

WORDSEARCH 40
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

In

Thai/an~ Mum~

the Word

In this country we take for granted our right to speak out about our elected
officials in any way we wish, without fear of arrest or imprisonment. The most
at an
disrespectful language is allowed. While some may take CD
insult against the president, our Constitution protects that right.
Now, consider the country of Thailand. That land in southeastern Asia is
this
ruled by a king. What happens to an individual who fails to ®
monarch? There is a case of a person who joked that if he were king he could
sleep late every day and drink wine in the afternoon. For this somewhat
®
remark, he was sent to prison for seven ytars. Or take the stocy
of the woman who was hanging up the king's photograph. When the police
asked her what she was doing, she replied, ''I'm nailing it up there on my
wall." She said "it" instead of"the king's photograph" and for this®...:::._ _ __
alleged insult, she also was sent away for seven years.
While some U.S. citizens may=®____ our leaders, in Thailand the less
said the better.
Clues

CD 2nd Day
@ 1st Day

®

4th Day

@ 1st Day

®

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

251

NEW WORDS

WEEK

curry
ker' e
pall
pol

•!• DAY

1

QUEEN OF THE SUPERMARKET

succulent
suk' y;J l~nt
satiety
ti' ~

~

41

te

intrinsic
in trin' sik

The American housewife is queen of all she surveys in the
supermarket. She decides what items shall be purchased.
Grocery manufacturers are well aware of her power to make
one product a success and another a failure. They spend
huge sums developing new products with which to curry her
favor. Fearful that a successful product will soon begin
to pan the manufacturers, without cessation,"' come out
with "new and improved" versions to whet* her appetite.
Sometimes it is only a box or package that has been
changed-perhaps a colorful photo of a succulent meal on a
1V dinner box. In the larger supermarkets the housewife is
faced with a satiety of merchandise, particularly in the
copiously* stocked laundry detergent section. While there
may be almost no intrinsic difference among the many
brands, advertising and packaging serves to importune• her
to buy one rather than another.
Did you spot it? Th.e "new word" you've seen before? It's
intrinsic.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The connoisseur* of fine foods declared the restaurant the ultimate• in the
preparation of
meat dishes.
2. She coveted* the antiquated* locket even though it had only an _ _ _ _ _ _ value.
3. He discreetly* tried to
favor with his employer.
4. The host exhorted* his guests to eat to _ _ _ _ __
5. Those conditions were not conducive• to a felicitous• evening as the dance would
soon
for the lack of feminine companionship.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. curry

7.
8.
9.
10.

pall
succulent
satiety
intrinsic

a. excess, overly full, surfeit*
b. within itself, inherent*
c. to seek favor by flattery
d. juicy
e. cease to please, become dull
TODAY'S IDIOM

a pretty kettle of fish-a mess, troubles

He thought it was an innocent white lie,* but it got him into a pretty kettle offlsh.

252

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 308

WEEK

41

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

2

potpourri

pa' pQ ..e·
sanction

IT'S WHAT'S OUTSIDE THAT COUNTS
Packaging of grocery items is a facet• of advertising that is too
little appreciated by consumers. Walking up and down the aisles
of a supermarket, one seldom stops to analyze the indMdual
package in the potpourri of items on the shelves. The
manufacturer had to glean• and test many different designs
before he accepted the one you see in the array* before you.
Before he will sanction the use of a particular can, box, or bottle,
he must know many things about its efficacy.• He wants to
know if the colors attract: a white box may denote cleanliness, a
red one, strength. There may be a photo or a drawing that will
allude to the product's use or special qualities. A lackluster*
package may be fatal. • Next, the size and shape are important
elements. The housewife may want a small package for easy
storing, but a larger package may suggest economy. A round
bottle may look attractive, but a square one is easier to stack.
These are some of the insidious aspects of packaging, the main
purpose of which is to attract your attention as you peruse* the
crowded supermarket shelves.

sangk'sh~n

denote
di not'
allude
~ tod·
insidious
in sid' ~s

e

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. I cannot _ _ _ _ _ _ your lax* attitude towards the imminent* threat of a
conflagration.*
2. In some
way the glib* salesman played upon my repressed* desires
and sold me a gaudy* sports car.
3. You can be sure the candidate will _ _ _ _ _ _ to the moribund* state of our
economy and offer his panacea.*
4. A
of today's musical hits sounds more like cacophony* than harmony.
5. His levity* at such a serious moment
a lack of feeling.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. potpourri
7. sanction

8. denote

9. allude
10. insidious

a. sly, seductive, treacherous
b. hint, suggest
c. endorse, certify
d. medley, mixture
e. indicate, show, mean
TODAY'S IDIOM

the acid test-a severe test
The new job was an acid test of his ability to bring home the bacon.*

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

253

NEW WORDS

propriety

prn pri· ~

WEEK

41

•!• DAY

3

te

advent
ad' vent

"TRIED AND TRUE"
Few question the propriety of the current haste on the part of
manufacturers to bring out "new and improved" products at
the prevalent• rate. At one time, in the dim, distant past
before the advent of television, it was the vogue• for products
to be advertised on the merits of their "tried and true"
qualities. Few advertisers were impious enough to jettison•
any part of a product that had been accepted by the public.
Year after year, the local grocery store owner would proffer the
same box of cereal, the same house cleaner. The acceptance
was of the time-tested product, and it appeared almost
unconscionable* for the manufacturer to change his
merchandise. Today's spate of transient• products would
have been considered an anomaly* in those days.

impious
im'
~s

pe

proffer
prof ar
spate
spat

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. A few years ago there was a
of science-fiction films about awesome•
monsters causing pandemonium• on our planet, but after a surfeit* of that genre•,
their popularity began to wane.•
2. With the
of mandatory• safety inspections, some of the more
decrepit* automobiles have been eradicated. •
3. We question the
of making fun of obese• people.
4. I'd like to
my belated* congratulations on your 25 years of married
serenity.•
5. In the milieu• of city street life it is not atypical• to hear _ _ _ _ _ _ comments
about authority.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. propriety
7. advent
8. impious

9. proffer
10. spate

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

suitability, correctness
offer for acceptance
the coming of an important event
lacking respect, irreverent
rush, flood

TODAY'S IDIOM

a blind alley-a direction that leads nowhere
The modus operandi* was leading up a blind alley
and they were barking up the wrong tree. •
254

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 308

WEEK

41

•!• DAY

NEw WoRDS

4

shibboleth
shtb' ~lith
bogus

oo' g~s

WHAT'S IN A NAME?
Supermarkets now cany their own products to compete with
the national brands. These "house" brands are not in a
felicitous* position because they cannot be advertised widely.
Supermarkets overcome this encumbrance* by making these
brands less expensive. Many people believe the shibboleth.
"You get what you pay for," and they purchase items on the
premise* that quality varies as the price does. Are the claims
made by nationally advertised brands bogus? How can one
bread company substantiate its nutritive superiority over
another? As there is no incontrovertible* evidence, the more
expensive bread (or coffee, etc.) must compensate* by
increased advertising. They make inordinate* claims, using
those raucous techniques proven so successful in convincing
the frugal* consumer to switch to a more costly brand.

substantiate
~b

stan. she

at

nutritive
nii' t~ tiv
raucous
ro' k~s

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Mothers should be vigilant* that their children's food has the proper _ _ _ _ __
value.
2. There were
complaints about the inordinate* number of fatal*
accidents caused by inebriated* drivers.
3. People often try to compensate* for their deplorable* lack of culture by repeating the
_ _ _ _ _ _ , "I know what I like."
4. He had the audacity* to try to foist* a _ _ _ _ _ _ dollar on me.
5. The reporter wanted to elicit* the pertinent* facts from the reticent• witness so he
could
the charge of moral turpitude* against the high city official.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. shibboleth

a. pet phrase, slogan

7. bogus

b. harsh, shrill

8. substantiate

c. counterfeit, fake

9. nutritive

d. having nourishing properties

10. raucous

e. confirm, ratify
TODAY'S IDIOM

to twist around one's finger-to control completely
He winked at* the little girl's bad behavior; she had him twisted around her fmger.

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 308

255

REVIEW

WEEK

41

•!• DAY

5

You can be sure of a balanced language if you are well acquainted with all the products
(words) available in your supermarket (vocabulary).

REVIEW WORDS
1. advent
2. allude
3. bogus
4. cuny
5. denote
6. impious
7. insidious
8. intrinsic
9. nutritive
10. pall
11. potpourri
12. proffer
13. propriety
14. raucous
15. sanction
16. satiety
17. shibboleth
18. spate
19. substantiate
20. succulent

DEFINITIONS
a. suggest, hint
b. surfeit,* excess, fullness
c. coming of an important event
d. having nourishing properties
e. slogan, pet phrase
f. correctness, suitability
g. juicy
h. mixture, medley
i. mean, show, indicate
j. to seek favor by flattery
k. irreverent. lacking respect
I. fake, counterfeit
m. ratify, confirm
n. rush. flood
o. become dull. cease to please
p. treacherous, sly. seductive
q. certify. endorse
r. inherent,* within itself
s. offer for acceptance
t. shrill, harsh

IDIOMS
21. to twist around one's finger
22. the acid test
23 .. a pretty kettle of fish
24. a blind alley

u. a severe test
v. a directi<;m that leads nowhere
w. a mess, trouble
x. to control completely

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
1. ----------------Check your answers on
page 308.

2. ----------------3. -----------------

256

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 41
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Age Discrimination
One of the most forms of discrimination is that based upon age.
We have become aware through publicity and education that bias and
discrimination based upon race, color, creed, and sex are not to be accepted.
Through laws passed by the Congress of the United States and by individual
states, we agree that using these criteria for hiring, promoting, or firing in the
workplace is a @
and undemocratic excuse. Many lawsuits have
supported this most basic right to "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness"
protected by our Constitution.
Why is it, then, that so few question the ®
of preventing those
viewed as "too old" from getting positions, or, if already on the Job,
promotions? Advanced age also leads to the firing of such employees and
their replacement with younger applicants. Is there something @
in
youth that suggests that older workers cannot do the Job as well? Until age
discrimination goes the way of all of the other forms of prejudice, we may
the reasoning that "younger is better."
continue to ®

Clues
Q) 2nd Day
@ 4th Day
@ 3rd Day

@) 1st Day

®

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 308

257

NEW WORDS

WEEK

quandary

42 •:•

DAY

1

kwon· dCJr e
callous

kar CJs

YOU CAN'T HELP BUT WATCH

expedient

ek spe· de CJnt
negligible

neg· lCJ jCJ ool
blase
bla za·

The consumer is in a quandary about making a felicitous*
selection among the array* of products. The advertisers
must influence the malleable* consumer, and often they do
it in the most callous ways. Television offers many tangible*
advantages for reaching the consumer. As a result, the
consumer is inundated* by commercials. The advertiser
knows that a television commercial is the most expedient
way to reach large numbers of people. The cost for each
commercial film is prodigious,* but because the audience is
so large, the cost per viewer is negligible. Each commercial
is prepared in the most meticulous* way in order to catch
the attention of even the most blase viewer and hold it until
the message is through.
The reintroduced "new word" should have stood out
immediately. Did it? It's callous, of course.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. It was fortuitous* that the accident occurred when there were _ _ _ _ __
numbers of childreq in the buses.
2. He was in a
about which selection from his extensive repertoire* it
would be feasible* to perform for the children.
3. Because she had committed only a venial* offense, he thought it
to
abjure* a severe punishment.
4. Who can be
about the presence of many indigent* families in close
proximity* to affluence?*
5. People have become so _ _ _ _ _ _ about the once thrilling, now mundane*
flights into space.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. quandary
7. callous
8. expedient (adj.) _ _
9. negligible
10. blase

a. indifferent, not responsive to excitement

b. hardened, unfeeling
c. doubt, dilemma
d. advisable, fit
e. trifling, inconsiderable
TODAY'S IDIOM

to do one's heart good-to make one feel happy or better
It did my heart good to see that inveterate* egotist* eat humble pie.*

258

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

WEEK

42 •:•

DAY

NEw WoRDS

2

ennui
An'

we

comelr
kum' le

TRICKS OF THE TRADE
Some television commercials, trying to break through the ennui
built up in the viewer by the plethora* of competition, employ
humor. Others feature a comely girl as a pretext* for getting the
viewer to stay tuned in. At times raucous* music, accompanied
by some frenetic activities, is designed to preclude* the viewer's
loss of attention. The advertiser will employ every bit of artifice
at the film maker's command to make a trenchant* commercial. The diversity of appeals made to the viewer is a
concomitant* of the many ways people react to commercials. A
great deal of time and money has gone into placing the
consumer's psychological make-up under scrutiny. •

r~

frenetic
net' tk
artifice

Ar" b fts
~iversitr

d~

ver"

~

te

Sampie Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The omnipotent* dictator employed all of his rhetoric* to vilify* those who would be
brash* enough to suggest that a
of opinions should be expressed.
2. The fledgling* pianist knew that his mentor* would take umbrage* at his yawning
was overwhelming.
during the lesson, but the feeling of
3. He was reticent* about revealing his clandestine* meetings with a _ _ _ _ __
young girl counselor at this camp.
4. They furtively* employed every kind of

to be able to meet.

5. They were vigilant* in order that their surreptitious* meetings would not be
discovered, and it often required
changes of plans to preclude*
exposure.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. ennui

a. frantic, frenzied

7. comely

b. boredom

8. frenetic

c. beautiful, handsome

9. artifice

d. strategy, trickery

10. diversity

e. variety, change

TODAY'S IDIOM

worth one's weight in gold--extremely valuable, very useful
The coach said the new star center was worth his weight in gold.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

259

NEW WORDS

WEEK

qualm
kwa.m
expurgate
ek· spar gat

42

•!• DAY

3

GOING TO THE SOURCE
The wide diversity* of reasons people have for buying one
product rather . than another are investigated by the
advertising people in order to prepare efficacious*
commercials. They do not have the slightest qualm about
questioning the consumer about personal things in her own
domicile.* The consumer is requested not to expurgate her
answers. Generally, people are not reticent* and do not
begrudge giving the time and effort. The questions delve
rather deeply, and what the artless responses divulge* will
help the advertiser decide what to put into his next
commercial. After a large number of interviews, the copious*
results make it feasible* to prognosticate* how well the
commercial will do. The inteiViewer usually offers no
gratuity to the person who has helped, but often a sample of
the product is proffered* as thanks.

begrudge
bi gruf
artless
art· lis
gratuity

grn to·~ te

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. A successful television program can be built around the _ _ _ _ _ _ comments
of vecy young children.
2. At times, the producer must
some of the things said by these
children because they are too candid.*
3. He had a serious
about hunting for the nearly extinct* quany.*
4. He took umbrage* when I offered a
to augment* his small salacy.
5. She did not
paying the pittance* extra for a better coat.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. qualm

7.
8.
9.
10.

expurgate
begrudge
artless
gratuity

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

remove objectionable parts or passages
to be resentful or reluctant
innocent, naive
tip
twinge of conscience

TODAY'S IDIOM

to make the best of a bad bargainto change or go along with a poor situation
After he bought the white elephant,* he made the
best of a bad bargain and let sleeping dogs lie.*
260

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

WEEK

42 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

manifest
fest

man·~

delve
delv

IT SEEMS TO WORK
Despite the antipathy* toward commercials expressed by the
viewers, the remarkable success of television commercials in
selling products makes it manifest that the advertiser has
gleaned* what the viewer wants to see and hear from his
research interview. This has helped the advertiser delve
deeply into what motivates* people when they go into the
supermarket to purchase products. The advertising agency is
never capricious and can vindicate* spending large sums of
money on research. Having uncovered what the public wants,
the advertiser expedites* putting the requisite words, music,
and photographs of the product on rum. He will thus replenish
the never-ending, ubiquitous* television commercial supply
in the hope that the consumer will remember some facet* of
the rum and buy the product.

capricious
G prfsh·

~s

requisite
rek· w.l zit
replenish

rt plen· ish

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. If we
below and behind the rhetoric* and invective, • we may discover
the profound* reasons for the ferment* in our land.
2. He was reticent* about emulating* those who, after eating almost to satiety,• rushed
to
the food on their plates.
3. It was
that an arbiter* would be needed because neither side would
capitulate* to a planJoisted* on them by the other side.
4. When the acrimonious* discussion about his
actions had
attenuated, • he was able to vindicate• his conduct.
5. One mortifying*
for the position was that he would have to work for
one year under the aegis* of a fatuous• egotist. •

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. manifest

a. requirement
b. evident, obvious
c. fanciful, whimsical*
d. to rut again, to restock
e. dig. do research

7. delve
8. capricious

9. requisite
10. replenish

TODAY'S IDIOM

to make ends meet-to manage on a given income
He turned thumbs down* on a new car; he was
having enough trouble making ends meet, as it was.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

261

REVIEW

WEEK

42

•!• DAY

5

As you watch your next television commercial try to imagine what questions were asked by

the research people as they interviewed the possible consumers. Advertisers have to select
their words carefully. You can select words only when you have large numbers at your
command.

REVIEW WORDS
1. artifice
2. artless
3. begrudge
4. blase
5. callous
6. capricious
7. comely
8. delve
9. diversity
10. ennui
11. expedient
12. expurgate
13. frenetic
14. gratuity
15. manifest
16. negligible
17. qualm
18. quandary
19. replenish
20. requisite
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. to remove objectionable parts or passages
b. twinge of conscience
c. handsome, beautiful
d. strategy, trickery
e. fit, advisable
f. indifferent, not responsive to excitement
g. fanciful, whimsical*
h. to do research, dig
i. to be resentful or reluctant
j. inconsiderable, trifling
k. boredom
I. obvious, evident
m. to restock, fill again
n. change, variety
o. dilemma, doubt
p. unfeeling, hardened
q. frenzied, frantic
r. requirement
s. tip
t. naive, innocent

to make the best of a bad bargain
to do one's heart good
worth one's weight in gold
to make ends meet

u.
v.
w.
x.

extremely valuable, very useful
to make one feel happy or better
to manage on a given income
to change or go along with a poor
situation

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 309. Learn those
words you missed!

1. -----------------

2. ----------------3. -----------------

262

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 42

•:• Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following stacy
with one of the new words you learned this week.

An Historic Date
One event that takes place so rarely that almost no one alive when it happens
can remember the previous occurrence is the changing of the centwy
number. The passing of the number of years brings about the end
of the 20th centucy and the advent of the 21st. Is there anyone-=®_ _ __
enough to reach this historic date without experiencing the excitement of this
once-in-a-lifetime moment?
While we may feel that events in our lifetime happen in a-=-®_ _ _ _ way, the
stroke of midnight on December 31, 2000, ushered in a new century. It
served as a time to reflect upon the @

of events in our lives, both

positive and negative, that the 20th centucy encompassed. It is obvious to all
that the past 100 years have altered the world in ways no one could
anticipate at the end of the 19th centucy. There are many who
®...;_s_ _ __

into the past and make predictions for the new centucy. December 31, 2000,
was a time for reflection and promise.

Clues

CD
®

4th Day
1st Day

@ 4th Day
@ 2nd Day

®

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

263

NEW WoRDS

WEEK

roster

43 •:•

DAY

1

ros' br
stunted

stunt' id
atrophy
at'~

fe

maim

mam
ameliorate
~

me' ly~ rcit

IT TAKES MORE THAN MEDICINE
If one were to look at the roster of physical handicaps, one
would reach the somber* conclusion that the list is a long
one. Included would be stunted development of an arm or leg
due to a birth anomaly.* Others would be the result of a
crippling disease that has caused muscles to atrophy. The
list would go on with illnesses and injuries that maim and
debilitate.* Modem medicine has done much to ameliorate
the physical problems. However, there are an inordinate*
number of problems of the handicapped that have still to be
alleviated.* People are not naturally callous,* but in some
perverse* way they have the propensity* to repress* any
concern with the physically handicapped. The social
problems seem to be inherent* in our own attitudes.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. If you heap opprobrium* on an impious* child, it probably will not _ _ _ _ __

the conditions that led to the rebelliousness.
2. The coach knew he would have to add experienced players to the _ _ _ _ __
to compensate* for the spate* of freshmen on the team.
3. There seems to be voluminous* evidence that the mother's smoking will
_ _ _ _ _ _ the baby's growth.
4. The prodigy* allowed his musical talent to _ _ _ _ _ _ as he redirected his

career.
5. When it seemed that Reggie would _ _ _ _ _ _ his opponent, we broke up
the fight.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. roster
7. stunted

8. atrophy
9. maim
10. ameliorate

a. checked in natural growth, held back in growth
b. waste away
c. a list of names
d. improve, relieve
e. disable, cripple
TODAY'S IDIOM

to burn the midnight oil-to study or work until very late
The radio was such an enigma* that he had to burn
the midnight ou• for several nights in order to get it working.
264

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 309

WEEK

43

•!• DAY

NEW WoRDS

2

cynic
stn· lk

DOING THE RIGHT THING
The obstacles that frustrate• the physically handicapped
person who is seeking employment may turn him into a cynic.
Too often a prospective employer, with a rather unctuous
manner, actually tends to degrade* the handicapped by
proffering* employment that is really beneath them and their
abilities. The employer appears to be acting in a benevolent
manner, but this attitude shows no compassion,* for he really
expects the person seeking the job to remain subservient. This
iniquity cannot but give the handicapped a feeling that they
are being discriminated against. He does not expect a
sinecure,* but he has an aversion* to the prevalent* belief that
he should consider himself lucky to fmd any employment.

unctuous
ungk' chu ~s
benevolent

oo nev' ~ l~nt
subservient
~b

ser' ve

~nt

iniquity
in ik' ~ te

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. We had to wince* as we watched the newcomer tiy to wheedle* and ingratiate* himself
into the teacher's favor in the most
manner.
2. It is easy to become a
when the same adults who inveigh* most
vehemently* against the uncouth* actions that they say permeate* our youth drink
to satiety* and behave fatuously.*
3. We all have moments when we vacillate* between selfish and _ _ _ _ _ _ desires.
4. While his demeanor* remained imperturbable,* there was latent* anger at the
ignominious* and
role he had to play.
5. Those who are complacent* about any
in our society should be wary*
of the unsavory* consequences for all.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. cynic
7. unctuous
8. benevolent
9. subservient
10. iniquity

a. servile, obsequious*

b. pessimist, skeptic
c. affectedly emotional
d. kindly, charitable
e. injustice, wickedness

TODAY'S IDIOM

to lay one~ cards on t/Je table-to talk frankly
He knew he was out of his depth* so he laid his cards
on the table and asked for assistance.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

265

NEW WORDS

WEEK

largess
hir' jis
criterion
kri tir' ;m

e

43 •:•

DAY

3

A BETTER WAY

repent
ri pent'
mollify
mol' a fi
mercenary

mer' sa ner' e

Why is there any question about the propriety* of hiring the
physically handicapped? No one who understands their
needs can condone* this attitude. The offering of employment
should not be considered a largess. There should be no need
to vindicate* the hiring of a handicapped p6rSon. The only
criterion should be what he is capable of doing. If this is the
approach, the handicapped worker will not feel he is an
encumbrance* to his boss. The employer, on the other hand,
will find it conducive* to good work and will not repent his
having tried something new just to mollify his conscience.
Even for the most mercenary employer, there should be
no reticence* in eliciting* the best that is possible from the
handicapped worker.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. He felt it would be ignominious* for him to accept any _ _ _ _ _ _ from the
charlatan* whose Machiavellian* schemes had made him affluent. •
2. Behind the facade* of ostensible* benevolence* there was a _ _ _ _ _ _ streak.
3. The platitude, "I know what I like," is often used to rationalize* our lack of a
_ _ _ _ _ _ for things about which we are dubious. •
4. When Mother is in a pique* about some infraction* of a rule, it takes all of our
dexterity* to
her.
5. After every election we
, in a belated* criticism, the apathy* and
complacency* of so many people who failed to vote.

Definitions Match the new words with their defmitions.
6. largess

a. gift, gratuity*, liberality

7. criterion

b. model, standard, test

8. repent

c. motivated* by desire for gain, greedy

9. mollify

d. pacify, appease

10. mercenary (adj.) __ e. regret, desire to make amends
TooAv's IDIOM

a bolt from the blue-a great surprise
The windfall* from his distant cousin came like a boltjrom the blue.

266

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

WEEK

43 •:•

DAY

NEW WORDS

4

pariah
~ n·~

aloof
alOf

JUST BE YOURSELF
Socially, the handicapped person is often treated as apari.ah.
Most people hold themselves aloof from normal contact with
those who are "different." This social separation propagates•
additional feelings of antipathy*. If "normal" individuals
would socialize with the handicapped individual, they would
learn in a pragmatic way that these are people who happen to
have a physical handicap; the handicap does not make them
any less human. The iniquity* of assuming that ph}'sical
superiority equals moral superiority prevents all of us from
direct human relationships. As long as there is a vestige of
feeling that handicapped people are inferior, then we are all
handicapped in one way or another. Under the guise of
physical superiority we demonstrate a moral turpitude* that
is harmful to all.

pragmatic

prag mat· ik
vestige

ves· tij
guise

giz

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Mter therapy*, there remained hardly a _ _ _ _ _ _ of his phobia*.
2. He was stigmatized* as a

when he had the audacity* to boast of his
nefarious• and sordid* career printing bogus• money.
3. Although many people say this is a propitious• time to invest in the stock market,
there is a tenable argument for remaining - - - - - 4. In the
of maintaining national unity under military rule, there was a
paucity* of even innocuous• dissent•.
5. "You can't argue with success," was his
reply to derogatory* remarks
about a movie star who had only superficial* talent as an actor.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. pariah

a. manner, appearance, mien•
b. social outcast

7. aloof

8. pragmatic
9. vestige
10. guise

c. distant, apart, reserved
d. trace, evidence
e. practical, based on experience

TODAY'S IDIOM

to tell tales out of school-to reveal harmful secrets
The fat was in the fire• for the politician when his private secretary
started telling tales out of school about his secret sources of income.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

267

REVIEW

WEEK

43

•!• DAY

5

There are various kinds of handicaps. One that we can do something about, and you are
now doing it, is the language handicap. Our fullest potential can be realized only when there
is no barrier between what we want to say or write and our ability to express ourselves.
REVIEW WORDS
1. aloof
2. ameliorate
3. atrophy
4. benevolent
5. criterion
6. cynic
7. guise
8. iniquity
9. largess
10. maim
11. mercenary
12. mollify
13. pariah
14. pragmatic
15. repent
16. roster
17. stunted
18. subservient
19. unctuous
20. vestige
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
a. based on experience, practical

b. mien,* appearance, manner
c. a list of names
d. skeptic, pessimist
e. test, model, standard
f. desire to make amends, regret
g. obsequious,* servile
h. held back or checked in natural growth
i. social outcast
j. evidence, trace
k. waste away
I. charitable, kindly
m. appease, pacify
n. wickedness, injustice
o. cripple, disable
p. reserved, apart. distant
q. greedy, motivated* by desire for gain
r. liberality, gift, gratuity*
s. affectedly emotional
t. relieve, improve

to burn the midnight oil
to lay one's cards on the table
a bolt from the blue
to tell tales out of school

u.
v.
w.
x.

to reveal harmful secrets
a great surprise
to talk frankly
to study or work until very late

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
1. ----------------Check your answers on
page 309.

2. ----------------3. -----------------

268

MEANINGS

WORDSEARCH 43

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Whistle Blowing
There appears to be a question of how much loyalty employees owe to their
employers-whether private or governmental. Many companies go out of their
way to encourage employees to make suggestions that will improve the way
employer will not criticize or reprimand an
they operate. A CD
employee who points out problems having to do with the way other employees
are harming the business. In fact, it should be in the bosses' interest that the
person who has become known as a "whistle blower" is encouraged to alert
them to a problem.
However, many such whistle blowers face harsh punishment for calling
attention to illegal or unethical actions. The whistle blower soon becomes a
®
in the workplace. Under the @
of some minor error, or
other excuse, the informer might be demoted, transferred, or fired. This
@
often goes unreported. As a result, the employees go back to
"business as usual" without any change. They become used to whatever they
may see around them and to the belief that they should not make waves.
Thus, no attempt to ®
the situation actually takes place.
Clues
(i) 2nd Day

Q) 4th Day
@ 4th Day
@ 2nd Day

®

1st Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

269

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

nullify

nul'

C)

44 •:•

DAY

1

fi

deluge

HAVE WE MASTERED OUR
ENVIRONMENT?

del' yOj
futility

fyU

ur C) te

carnage
kar' nij
technology

tek not' C) je

Natural disasters tend to nullify the best efforts of mankind.
It is as though there are forces at work that are contemptuous• of our proud achievements. Who has not read of or seen
the waters that deluge our towns and cities, jeopardizing*
lives and culminating* in the destruction of the results of
endless work in the space of a few moments? We are all
vulnerable* to feelings of futility as we view the carnage
caused to cattle from the sudden inundation. • Despite the
laudable* advances made in technology, it can be seen that we
cannot yet say we have mastered our environment. Disasters
of this type, leaving only pathetic* vestiges• of homes and
shops, are accepted as inevitable, • and all we can do is to
attempt to ameliorate• the conditions that result.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. In spite of his efforts to cajole* the girl, she remained aloof, • and the _ _ _ _ __
of his efforts made him lugubrious. •
2. To our consternation, • modern
has made feasible* a spate• of lethal*
devices that could lead to the inadvertent• destruction of the world.
3. In order to
the height advantage of his adversary, • he abjured*
smoking and did an inordinate amount of exercise until he was the acme of litheness•
and dexterity.•
4. We found it impossible to mollify* the irate• owner of three prize cats as he viewed the
_ _ _ _ _ _ caused by our large dog.
5. The office was _ _ _ _ _ _ with requests for his autograph as the girls became
cognizant* of his identity.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

nullify
deluge (v.)
futility
carnage
technology

a. slaughter
b. tCI flood
c. abolish, cancel
d. applied science
e. uselessness
TODAY'S IDIOM

to build upon sand-to have a poor base, or not sufficient preparation
Because they were amateurs and without money, the political campaign
was buUt upon sand and the candidate was a flash in the pan. •
270

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

NEW WORDS

libel
li' 1»1
defamatory
dl fam· ~ t6r

e

GOOD NEWS-AND BAD
One of the latent• dangers indigenous• to our constitutional

plaintiff

guarantee of freedom of the press has to do with the protection
of the indMdual against the detriment• that might come from
news reports involving him. There are libel laws that protect
against false charges. If an indMdual believes his character or
Uvelihood have been damaged by a defamatory article, he can
sue. As the plaintiff he must refute• the story and show how
the defendant caused him harm by printing a canard. The
defendant attempts to substantiate* the truth of the article.
The printing of news may besmirch* an indMdual's character,
but there is no way to alleviate* this problem without changes
in the Constitution. This would be tantamount• to destroying
the efficacy* of our coveted* right to learn the truth from the
press. We all deprecate a situation in which someone suffers
because of exposure in the newspapers. Only when the harm
is caused by someone with a desire to maltgn* under the
guise* of printing the news can the individual expect to win
compensation• through the courts.

plan' ttf
canard
~nArd'

deprecate

dep· D kit

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The mayor vehemently* denied there was any antipathy* between the governor and
himself and blamed this
on their political opponents.

2. I resent your

remark that depicts• me as a culprit. •
3. The egregious• calumny* of the defendant worked to the advantage of the
4. Publishers of newspapers and magazines augment• their staff with lawyers to
represent them when they are sued for _ _ _ __
5. The cynic* will
iniquities• in our society.

the motives of anyone who tries to ameliorate• the

Definitions Study these carefully for the fine differences in meaning.
6. libel (n.)

a. express disapproval

7. defamatory

b. the complaining party, in law

8. plaintiff
9. canard
10. deprecate

c. degradation by writing or publishing
d. damaging character by false reports
e. a made-up sensational story
TODAY'S IDIOM

a pretty kettle of fish-a messy situation, a problem
He knew that when he attacked the sacred c.ow- he would be in a pretty kettle offtsh.
(Do you remember this idiom? It was used earlier in the book and should be familiar.)

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 309

271

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

reputed
ri pyQ' tid

44

•!• DAY

J

frail

A PHILOSOPHER FOR OUR TIME

frcil
potent

pat' nt

excoriate

ek skor' eat
devout

di vout'

Soren Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher who is reputed
to be the forerunner of the current vogue• of existentialism.
In appearance he was a frail and ungainly man. An
extremely erudite* thinker and writer, he was a potent force
in propagating• the new approach to life. His philosophy
would excoriate those who believed that man could stand
aside from life. In his philosophy it is a heresy• to take a
detached point of view; it is incumbent• upon the individual
to get involved. What is germane• is not that we exist, but that
our existence is determined by our acts. He was a religiously
devout man who feiVidly* believed that the individual is
always paramount. •

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. Even though she was piqued* at his indolent• manner, it was pathetic* to listen to
her
him in public.
2. His awesome* mental dexterity* compensated* for his _ _ _ _ _ _ physical
condition.
3. When Ben's muscles began to atrophy, • the doctor initiated* therapy* with a
_ _ _ _ _ _ new drug.
4. The drug is _ _ _ _ _ _ to have a salubrious• effect on nascent* conditions of
this type.
5. Although he was a _ _ _ _ _ _ adherent* of the party, he remained aloof* during
the vitriolic* primary campaign.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. reputed

a. thought, supposed, believed

7. frail

b. religious, sincere

8. potent

c. delicate, weak

9. excoriate

d. criticize severely

10. devout

e. powerful, strong, intense
TODAY'S IDIOM

to toe the mark-to obey or stick to a rule or policy
He wanted to kick over the traces, • but his parents made him toe the mark.

272

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

WEEK

44 •:•

DAY

4

NEw WoRDS
d~

THE ISLAND OF WILD DOGS
The saga• of the introduction of that diminutive song bird, the
canary, into the homes of the world as tame pets is an
interesting one. In the sixteenth century a trading ship going
to Italy stopped at an island named "Canis," from the Latin
word for wild dog, which could be found there in profuse
numbers, off the coast of Mrica. The dulcet song of the wild
birds whetted* the interest of the captain. In impromptu cages
hundreds were taken aboard to be traded. The sailors called
these gray-green birds, spotted with yellow, "canaries." As they
approached the island of Elba, near Italy, a malevolent storm
put the boat in jeopardy* of sinking. A member of the crew
released the birds, and the intrepid* canaries instinctively flew
towards land. The peasants on Elba took the wild canaries in
as pets. Eventually, the birds found their way into homes
throughout Europe where they were domesticated and bred
for variety of song and shades of colors. The canaries
prevalent• today differ greatly from the ones discovered over
four hundred years ago.

diminutive
min· y~ tlv
profuse
prn fytis'
dulcet
dul' sit
impromptu

lm promp' tii
malevolent
m~ lev'~ l~nt

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. As the music reached a frenetic* tempo, the audience lost all decorum* and broke
into
dancing.
2. He had no qualms* about opposing the clique• who insidiously* exerted a
_ _ _ _ _ _ influence on the president.
3. The connoisseur* was able to glean* a worthwhile painting from the _ _ _ _ __
variety of poor ones at the exhibit.
4. Europeans drive
cars because their narrow roads and high prices
for gasoline are not conducive• to or compatible* with our large ones.
5. The blase devotee• of the opera was awakened from his ennui* by the
_ _ _ _ _ _ tones of the new soprano.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

diminutive
profuse
dulcet
impromptu
malevolent

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

ill-disposed, ill-intentioned
tiny, small
spur of the moment, offhand
sweet or melodious to the ear
overflowing, abundant
TODAY'S IDIOM

to be under a cloud-to be in temporary disgrace or trouble
Until they discovered the real thief, he was wuler a cloud.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

273

REVIEW

WEEK

44

•!• DAY

5

The history, or derivation, of words is called "etymology." This is a fascinating study and it
gives insight to the background of words such as "canary," and thousands of others.
Knowing the history of a word helps you remember it.

REVIEW WORDS
1. canard
2. carnage
3. defamatory
4. deluge
5. deprecate
6. devout
7. diminutive
8. dulcet
9. excoriate
10. frail
11. futility
12. impromptu
13. libel
14. malevolent
15. nullify
16. plaintiff
17. potent
18. profuse
19. reputed
20. technology

DEFINITIONS
a. flood

b. express disapproval
intense, strong, powerful
sincere, religious
sweet or melodious to the ear
abundant, overflowing
g. slaughter
h. uselessness
i. criticize severely
j. damaging character by false reports
k. a made-up sensational story
I. small, tiny
m. cancel, abolish
n. ill-disposed, ill-intentioned
o. weak, delicate
p. the complaining party, in law
q. applied science
r. believed, thought. supposed
s. offhand, spur of the moment
t. degradation by writing or publishing
c.
d.
e.
f.

IDIOMS

21.
22.
23.
24.

a pretty kettle of fish
to be under a cloud
to toe the mark
to build upon sand

u.
v.
w.
x.

to be in temporary disgrace or trouble
to obey or stick to a rule or policy
a messy situation, a problem
to have a poor base, or not sufficient preparation

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
1. ---------------Check your answers on
page 309.

2. ---------------3. ----------------

274

MEANINGS

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Weeks 41-44)

•!•

Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.

1. The station's switchboard was (deluged, deprecated) by phone calls
when the popular soap opera was cancelled.
2. The (diminutive, frail) ballplayer proved that size doesn't matter in some
sports.
3. Peter was surprised when his normally nervous boss seemed so (blase,
alooj) about the bad financial news.
4. Our mouths began to water when the (dulcet. succulent) dish was set
upon the table.
5. Coming from a small city in Costa Rica, Ligia was not used to the
(potent, frenetic) pace of life in Boston.
6. With (bogus, insidious) identification papers, the terrorists attempted to
board the waiting airplane.
7. When the time came for Lisa to select a subject to major in, she found
herself in a (quandry, potpourri).
8. The (malevolent, benevolent) dictator was generally beloved by his
people even though he limited their freedoms.
9. Only a (negligible, manifest) amount of gas escaped from the laboratory
during the experiment.
10. The president of the School Board intended to (excoriate, nullify) the
parents at the opening meeting.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

275

WORDSEARCH 44

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Reprieve for Wolves
One of the most difficult problems to resolve has to do with the conflicting
interests of environmentalists and profit-making businesses. Examples of this
dilemma appear frequently. While the dispute about cutting down a forest to
preserve owls has been in the news, there appeared another conflict in the state
of Alaska. Hoping to increase the number of tourists who seek to hunt deer and
caribou, the State of Alaska ordered the killing of some of theCD
. .;. _ _ __
number of wolves who prey on those animals.
This resulted in a ®
of letters and articles condemning the
®
that would result from the anti-wolf policy. So, once again, the
environmentalists, who maintain that the natural balance should not be
interfered with, ran up against the Alaskan tourist industry. which wants to
attract hunters who will increase the state's revenue. Mter much publicity
about the wolf hunt and articles that tended to @
this policy, Alaska
decided to ®=s_ _ _ _ the proposed action.
Clues

CD 4th Day
@ 1st Day
@ 1st Day
@ 3rd Day

® 1st Day

276

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 309

WEEK

45 •:•

DAY

NEw WoRDS

1

wistful
wist'' r~•

raiment

IN DAYS OF YORE

ni' rmnt

Current novels are replete• with lurid* climes, carnage• and
death. Do you get wisiful when you recall the romantic tales
that begin with an innocent maiden travelling through the
rustle* countryside? She is dressed in glittering raiment. The
scene is idyllic. • Without warning, the group is set upon by a
virile* brigand, who, in the most perfunctmy• and callous•
fashion, carries her off. Pandemonium* results! Her entourage•
is in a state of bedlam. • Her corpulent escort is irate•, but
unable to do anything to thwart* this debacle. • All he can do is
rail against the catastrophe. What to do? What to do?

brigand
brig' ~nd
corpulent
kor' p~ ~nt
rail

nil

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The potpourri* of au courant* fashionable _ _ _ _ _ _ includes the fatuous•

and the discreet. •
2. While all disgruntled* men may

against malevolent• or
Machiavellian* leaders, democracy offers a way to ameliorate• iniquities• through
the ballot.

3. Is there any veracity* in the platitude* that _ _ _ _ _ _ men are jocose?*
4. To be candid,* there is little to be

about in the "good old days."

5. They captured the _ _ _ _ _ _ , and he was incarcerated* for a mandatocy*

period.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. wistful

a. dress, clothing

7. raiment

b. scold, use abusive language

8. brigand

c. longing, pensive,• wishful

9. corpulent

d. robber, bandit

10. rail (v.)

e. fleshy, obese, • excessively fat

TODAY'S IDIOM

to flog a dead horse-to continue to make an issue of something that is over
He thought he could keep the pot boiling* about his opponent's
winking at• clime, but he was .flogging a dead horse.

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

277

NEW WORDS

WEEK

raconteur
rak· on ter·

45

•!• DAY

2

sullen

WOE IS ME!

sur~n

The raconteur of our stocy about idyllic* times gone by goes on
to elucidate* how the comely* heroine is taken to the bandits'
hideout. There, a sullen crew of cutthroats is gathered. They
don't wish to procrastinate;* she must be taken immediately
to a foreign land where much treasure will be paid for her.
Their cupidity* knows no bounds. The leader wants to hold
her for ransom from her wealthy parents. The gang demurs;*
they are reticent.* There is a rift among the criminals. Their
leader remains truculent,* and they agree to wait for just
two days for the ransom money. An emisswy from the griefstricken parents is expected at any moment. The wan*
maiden, her spirits at their nadir,* has time to ruminate about
her lugubrious* fate.

rift

lift
emissary
ser'

em'~

e

ruminate
rii' m~ nat

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. He alluded* to the
caused in the school by the plethora* of hirsute*
boys who ignored the criterion* for appearance.
2. Well known as a(n)
, he was never chagrined* when asked to tell a
stocy from his large repertoire.*
3. Despite all attempts to mollify* her, she remained
about the levity*
caused by her slovenly• raiment.*
4. The obscure* countcy, an aspirant• for membership in the United Nations, sent a(n)
5. An anomaly* of our modern technology* is that the more we need to know, the less
time we have to _ _ _ _ __
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

raconteur
sullen
rift
emissacy
ruminate

a.
b.
c.
d.

ill-humored, grim
ponder, reflect upon
a skilled stocyteller
a split, an opening
e. an agent

TODAY'S IDIOM

the die is cast-an unchangeable decision has been made
The fat was in the fire* and the die was cast when he
decided to tell the white lie about how he had found the money.
278

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 31 0

WEEK

45

•!• DAY

NEW WORDS

3

taut

tot
livid
liv' id

TO THE RESCUE
Back at the castle, the situation is taut with emotion. The fair
maiden's mother is livid with fear and anxiety; she has attacks
of vertigo. • She talks about her daughter's audacity* in riding
out into the ominous• forests despite many similar ktdnappings.
The girl's father, a martinet who rules his family with an iron
hand, staunchly* refuses to pay the ransom. Iniquity* shall not
be rewarded! At this moment of crisis a heroic knight volunteers
to rescue our heroine; he has had a secret yen for the young
beauty. Avoiding rhetoric, • he pledges his all to castigate• those
responsible for this tgnomtntous• deed. He holds his life as a
mere bagatelle against the duty he owes his beloved mistress. At
the propitious• moment, he rides off to do or die for her.

martinet

mArt' net'
yen

yen
bagatelle
bag·~

tel'

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.

1. The rabid* baseball fan lost his equanimity* and became _ _ _ _ _ _ when the
star pitcher became pugnacious• and was removed from the game.
2. There was a
international situation caused by the proximity* of
unidentified submarines to our coasts.
3. When one enlists in the army, one expects to be under the aegis* of a _ _ _ _ __
4. His
for imbibing• and romping• with girls worked to his detriment•.
5. The little boy tried to wheedle* a larger allowance from his father by the caustic*
observations that it was a mere
when compared to the allowances
of his friends.
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. taut

7.
8.
9.
10.

livid
martinet
yen
bagatelle

a. strict disciplinarian
b. tense, keyed up, on edge
c. pale
d. a trifle
e. strong desire, strong longing

TODAY'S IDIOM

a eat's paw-a person used as a tool or dupe*
The spy used the innocent girl as a eat's paw to
get milita.Iy information from the grapevine.*
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 310

279

NEW WORDS

WEEK

callow

kar

•!• DAY

4

a

appalled
potd·

WELL DONE, SIR KNIGHT!

Cl

Seeking his adversaries,* the knight rides to their hideout.
Despite his callow appearance, he is reputed* to disdain*
danger and to be a prodigious* horseman. The kidnappers
lose their equanimity* at his approach. They are appalled at
the prospect, and they are in a quandary* as to which one
will meet him on the field of combat. The leader, under
duress,* rides out. "Do you have a penchantto die?" derides*
the knight. More vituperative* remarks follow. They spur
their horses toward each other. It takes but one blow for our
hero to decapitate the villain. The others flee to avoid their
imminent* destruction. The knight takes the maiden on his
horse, and they ride back to the castle. Their wedding soon
follows. Little does the knight realize that the fair maiden is
a garrulous* termagant who will make his life miserable with
caustic* remarks. Still, the cliche,* "And they lived happily
ever after," must conclude our fabricated* tale.

penchant
pen· ch~nt
decapitate
di kap · O:l tat
termagant

ter·

45

m~ g~nt

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. We do not _ _ _ _ _ _ criminals because of our aversion* to such repugnant*
punishments.
2. I do not wish to deprecate* your _ _ _ _ _ _ for cowboy music, but I find it banal.*
3. Why do you remain docile* while that _ _ _ _ _ _ besmirches, maligns* and
belittles* you?
4. Each long holiday weekend we are
at the carnage* on our highways.
5. It was deplorable* the way the capricious* girl led the
youth on a
merry chase.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. callow

7.
8.
9.
10.

appalled
penchant
decapitate
termagant

a. youthful, inexperienced
b. behead
c. a strong leaning in favor
d. a scolding woman, a shrew
e. dismayed, shocked

TODAY'S IDIOM

coup de grace--the finishing stroke
When my girlfriend left me, it was a bitter pill to swallow,*
but the coup de grdce was that she kept my engagement ling.

280

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 310

WEEK

45

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

Language grows and changes. In "days of yore" there were not nearly as many words in our
language as we have today. Within the next 50 years hundreds of new words will be added.
Educated and alert individuals make new words part of their vocabulary as quickly as they
come into accepted use.
REVIEW WORDS
1. appalled
2. bagatelle
3. brigand
4. callow
5. corpulent
6. decapitate
7. emissary
8. livid
9. martinet
10. penchant
11. raconteur
12. rail
13. raiment
14. rift
15. ruminate
16. sullen
17. taut
18. termagant
19. wistful
20. yen

DEFINITIONS
a. behead
b. shocked, dismayed

c. pale
d. a trifle
e. bandit, robber
f. an agent

g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
I.

m.
n.
o.

q.
r.
s.
t.

grim, ill-humored
clothing, dress
on edge, keyed up, tense
strict disciplinarian
wishful, pensive,* longing
a strong leaning in favor
an opening, a split
a skilled storyteller
inexperienced, youthful
excessively fat, fleshy, obese*
reflect upon, ponder
a shrew, a scolding woman
use abusive language, scold
strong desire, strong longing

IDIOMS
21. a eat's paw
22. the die is cast
23. coup de grace
24. to flog a dead horse

u. the finishing stroke
v. an unchangeable decision has been made
w. to continue to make an issue of something
that is over
x. a person used as a tool or dupe
WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

Check your answers on
page 310.

MEANINGS

1. ---------------2. ---------------3. ----------------

281

WORDSEARCH 45

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Henry VIII and British History
Students in the United States should consider themselves lucky when it
comes to studying the country's history. The United States has been a nation
for approximately 225 years. We would be CD
if we had to learn as
much history as students in Great Britain, for their history goes back some
1,000 years! In that time England has had many interesting and unusual
rulers. One who has fascinated us is Heruy VIII. Ruling some 450 years ago. he
for
became well known because of his many marriages and his ®
doing away with some wives who displeased him.
In physical appearance he was unattractive-he was large and ....;;;.®_ _ __
When his first wife could not bear him a son who would be heir to the throne,
he divorced her. This caused a break with the Pope who refused to recognize
the divorce. Henry VIII sent an @
to the Pope and renounced
her
Catholicism. He then married Anne Boleyn but decided to ®
after quickly tiring of her. His third wife died in childbirth, and he divorced
his fourth. His fifth, Katherine Howard, was also beheaded. Only his sixth
wife was able to live on after Henry's death in 1547. From this brief history
of only one English ruler. it is easy to imagine how much an English history
student must learn in order to prepare for an exam. In Henry VIII's case. one
would have to get a "head start."
Clues

CD 4th Day
@ 4th Day

® 1st Day
@ 2nd Day

®

282

4th Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

WEEK

46

•!• DAY

NIEW WORDS

1

ascertain

as' ~r t:an·
dormant
dOr' rmnt

A MIGHTY EMPIRE
One of the anomalies* of our approach to history is the
propensity* to study the venerable* empires of Europe, but we
do not feel it incumbent* upon us to ascertain anything about
the civilizations in our own hemisphere. We deprecate* the
history of this part of the world as though progress lay
dormant and that other peoples were irrelevant* until the
settlers of North America arrived at Plymouth Rock. In South
America, from 2000 B.c. until their empire reached its acme*
at the beginning of the 16th century, lived the Incas. The site*
of the capital city of the Inca empire, Cusco, lay at a height of
11,000 feet. This civilization is reputed* to have burgeoned
until it covered more than 2,500 miles of the western part of
the continent. Its population fluctuated* between 4 and 7
million. This empire had a highly efficacious* political and
social system. Its potentate ruled with absolute power. As the
empire conquered new lands, it would disseminate its
language, religion, and social customs.

burgeoned
ber' J~nd
potentate

pot' n tat
disseminate
di sem' ~nat

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. While some moribund* economies atrophied* after World War II, others
_ _ _ _ _ _ under the salubrious* effects of loans from the U.S.
2. In order to
the relationship between his girlfriend and his brother,
he kept a wary* and discreet* vigil. •
3. We are quick to
calumny,* but reticent* about things that may be
construed* as compliments.
4. He was appalled* at the apathy* concerning the important issue that had remained
_ _ _ _ _ _ for so long a time.
5. The callous*
kept an imperturbable* mien* when requested to
alleviate• the unconscionable* conditions existing in his land.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. ascertain
7. dormant

8. burgeoned
9. potentate
10. disseminate

a. spread, scatter
b. discover, fmd out about
c. resting, asleep
d. flourished, grew
e. ruler
TODAY'S IDIOM

straight from the shoulder-in a direct, open way
I took the wind out of his sails* by telling him straight from
the shoulder that I was not going to wink at* his apple polishing. •
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

283

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

derived
di rivd·
prerogative
pri rog· e1 tiv

DAY

2

A BATTLE FOR POWER
The Inca emperor derived his prodigious* power and authority
from the gods. The paramount* god was the sun god. It was
from him the ruler passed on his prerogative to rule to his
most astute* son. This nepotism had worked with great
efficacy* for centuries. The land holdings were immense;*
there were rich farmlands and llamas and alpacas for wool.
Precious metals were plentiful: silver, copper, bronze, and the
most sacred of all, gold. This metal resembled the sun god
whom they extolled.* There was no dearth of idols and
ornaments hammered from this gleaming metal. There was
always more gold coming from the mines to replenish* the
supply. At the acme* of his power, the Inca ruler died without
naming the requisite* successor. In 1493 two sons began an
internecine struggle for control. For the next 40 years the
empire sank into the lassitude* caused by civil war.

nepotism
nep· e1 tiz e1m
dearth
derth
internecine
in' te1r

46 •:•

ne· sn

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. The emissary* from the president tried to allay* the fears that a deleterious*
_ _ _ _ _ _ feud was inevitable within the party.
2. A pragmatic* philosopher _ _ _ _ _ _ the theory that we have noses in order
to hold up our eyeglasses.
3. Your efforts to ingratiate* yourself into your boss's favor are nullified* by the

unmitigated*
manifest* in this firm.
4. He gave his adversary* the dubious* _ _ _ _ _ _ of choosing the weapon by
which he was to meet his inevitable* end.
5. In the potpourri* of restaurants there is no _ _ _ _ _ _ of succulent• dishes.

Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. derived
7. prerogative
8. nepotism
9. dearth

10. internecine

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

scarcity, lack
involving conflict within a group, mutually destructive
an exclusive right or power
descended from, received from a source
favoritism toward relatives

TODAY'S IDIOM

to rub a person the wrong- way-to do something that irritates or annoys
The quickest way to rub a person the wrong way is to give him the cold shoulder.*
284

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

WEEK

46

•!• DAY



NEW WORDS

tyro

tiro
sophistry

A PERFIDIOUS* CONQUEROR
The feuding between the rival sons reached its pinnacle* in
1532; at that moment Francisco Pizarro came onto the scene. A
native of Spain, he was sojourning* in Panama when he heard
of the riches to be found in that far off land. Overwhelmed with
cupidity, • but still a tyro when it came to wresting* power and
wealth from hapless• people, he joined with an inveterate•
adventurer. They gathered a small band of mercenaries. • The
first two attempts failed, and Pizarro returned to Spain to
request authority and money in order to conquer the West Coast
of South America. Whether by sophistry or cajolecy,• he was
given the requisite* aid. With a force of 180 men, the dregs• of
society, he invaded Inca territocy. He reached the city where the
current ruler, Atahualpa, was holding court. The Incas
welcomed Pizarro who, in a factitious display of friendship,
heaped encomiums upon Atahualpa. Unknown to the Incas,
Pizarro had brought guns that were still beyond the technology*
of these people. The obloquy of his next act. ambushing the
Incas and taking Atahualpa prisoner, will live in the histocy
books that are replete• with tales of conquest.

sofa stre
factitious
fak tish· as
encomium

en ko' me am
obloquy
ob'la kwe

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Although he was erudite* about a copious• number of things, he was a naive, •
callow*
when it came to relating to· girls.
2. John Wilkes Booth's egregious• act remains an infamous• _ _ _ _ __
3. Her
made use of evecy glib* artifice. •
4. In the office he played the
role of a martinet, • while at home he
was filled with compassion•.
5. The modest prodigy* treated the fervid*
that followed his
performance as though they were a mere bagatelle. •
Definitions Match the new words with their definitions.
6. tyro

7. sophistry
8. factitious
9. encomium
10. obloquy

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

high praise
beginner, novice
false reasoning or argument
sham, artificial
disgrace, shame, dishonor
TODAY'S IDIOM

to draw in one"s horns-to become cautious
He knew he was out of his depth, • so he drew in his horns and quit the poker game.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

285

NEw WoRDS

WEEK

hyperbole
hi p~ r· ba le

46

•!• DAY

4

munificent

THE END OF AN EMPIRE

myO nif a sant

The Machiavellian* Pizarro held the captured Atahualpa for
ransom. He was adamant* about receiving a room filled with
gold to the height of a man's shoulder. This was taken as a
hyperbole at first, but Pizarro knew the gullible* Incas would
be munificent when it came to rescuing their sacred ruler.
They did not procrastinate,* and a frenetic* collection of gold
took place. Pizarro, to whom prevaricatiort* was natural in
dealing with the Incas, had no qualms* about executing their
ruler as soon as he had the gold. The Inca empire was
moribund,* but the charisma that surrounded Atahualpa was
such that, after his death, the Incas fought on tenaciously* in
his name for several years. Eventually, superior weapons
quelled* all opposition. A policy of genocide was adopted by
the Spanish conquerors, and almost two million of these
proud people died in the carnage* that followed. The saga* of
an ancient civilization thus came to an end.

prevarication

pri var· a ka· shen
charisma

ka riz' rna
genocide

jen· a sid

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in these sentences.
1. Even those who were not fans of the movie star candidly* admit the _ _ _ _ __

that surrounded him.
2. The United Nations has outlawed _ _ _ _ _ _ as the ultimate* crime, which
must be eradicated.*
3. Her constant
made her a par1ah* to her friends.
4. The rhetoric* soared into flagrant* _ _ _ _ __
5. He was surprised by the
parsimonious* termagant.*

gratuity* given by the usually

Definitions Match the new words with their defimtions.
6. hyperbole

a. quality of leadership inspiring enthusiasm

7. munificent

b. planned destruction of an entire people
c. deviation from the truth, lying
d. generous
e. exaggerated figure of speech

8. prevarication

9. charisma
10. genocide

TODAY'S IDIOM

to throw cold water-to discourage a plan or idea
I was going to pull up stakes* and move out lock, stock,
and barrel,* but my wife threw cold water on the whole thing.
286

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

WEEK

46

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

This is your last week. At this point you have worked with over 1100 of the most useful
words and idioms in our language. The fmcu review test will gtve you some idea of how well
you have mastered them. From time to ti1r1e you should re-read sections of this book to
refresh your memory. Remember, keep learning new words at every opportunity!

REVIEW WORDS
1. ascertain
2. burgeoned
3. charisma
4. dearth
5. derived
6. disseminate
7. dormant
8. encomium
9. factitious
10. genocide
11. hyperbole
12. internecine
13. munificent
14. nepotism
15. obloquy
16. potentate
17. prerogative
18. prevarication
19. sophistry
20. tyro

DEFINITIONS
a. lack, scarcity
b. favoritism towards relatives
c. novice, beginner
d. artificial, sham
e. lying, deviation from the truth
f. ruler
g. scatter, spread ·
h. an exclusive power or right
i. dishonor, disgrace, shame
j. high praise
k. quality of leadership inspiring enthusiasm
I. asleep, resting
m. grew, flourished
n. planned destruction of an entire people
o. false reasoning or argument
p. mutually destructive, involving conflict in a group
q. received from a source, descended from
r. generous
s. exaggerated figure of speech
t. find out about, discover

IDIOMS
21. to draw in one's horns
22. straight from the shoulder
23. to throw cold water
24. to rub a person the wrong way

u.
v.
w.
x.

in
to
to
to

a direct, open way
discourage a plan or idea
become cautious
do something to irritate or annoy

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 310.

MEANINGS

1. -----------------2. -----------------3. ------------------

287

WHICH WORD COMES TO MIND?
(From Weeks 45-46)
•:• Write the letter of the vocabulary word in the space adjacent to the
sentence or phrase that brings it to mind.
appalled
b. brigand
c. yen
d. tyro
e. corpulent
f. prerogative
g. genocide
h. nepotism
i. potentate
j. dearth
k. livid
I. decapitate
m. prevarication
n. raconteur
o. taut
p. internecine

a.

1. "Hiring your nephew, eh?"
2. "All hail the sultan!"
3. "I just looked in the mirror; tomorrow we start our diet."
4. The descent of the guillotine
5. "I have a strong desire to own Japanese currency."
6. George Washington to his father: "I cannot tell a lie."
7. Now showing: The Pirates of Penzance
8. Best storyteller in town
9. The Civil War
10. "He claims to have the right to change his mind."

288

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

WORDSEARCH 46

•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Word~ Word~

Words

You have been strengthening and building a basic vocabulary as you have
progressed through this book. The tests, quizzes, and exercises have helped
you Q)
how fa:r you· have advanced. We hope you have come to the end
of 11 00 Words You Need to Know with a command of vocabulary that has
®
from week to week. Your interest and attention have paid off in
many ways. You have ®
pleasure and knowledge from reading
passages on varied topics. You are better equipped to read, study, converse,
and write with confidence.
The objectives that started you working on building your vocabulary should
. A permanent desire to master new words
not now become @
should be an added value obtained from this book. We hope that any
®
you receive for your command of English vocabulary will spur
you on to more and greater mastery of words you need to know.

Clues

CD 1st Day

®

1st Day

@ 2nd Day
@ 1st Day

®

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 310

289

(From Week 1-46)

BURIED WORDS
•!•

Locate the word being defined from the review words of the week indicated. Then find
the embedded word that fits the definition (e.g .. the answer to the first example is
automaton. which contains the "buried" word tomato).
REVIEW WORD

BURIED WORD

1st Week:
machine that behaves like a person
unending

a common vegetable
a fixed limit. definite period of time

2nd Week:
to use lively gestures
basic, elementary

a twitching of face muscles
a small part of a dollar

3rd Week:
expression of sympathy
lacking brightness

a small portion, gratuity
a strong passion

4th Week:
able to be touched
publish

a sharp taste
a school dance

5th Week:
exemption
shortage

a joke, play on words
a large community

6th Week:
contrary
dread, dismay

a part of a poem or song
rear end of a boat

7th Week:
to end
relentless, unappeasable

school semester
a heavy rope or chain

Blil Week:
forerunner
distant

a drunken carousal. spree
give expression to feelings

9th Week:
harmful
followers

a regulation
anger

10th Week:
read carefully
appropriate

a trick
foreign

11th Week:
to pass by
confirm

part of a church
to enter and steal

290

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 311

BURIED WORDS
REVIEW WORD

BURIED WORD

12th Week:

bitter criticism
perfection

part of the body
mathematical term

13th Week:

undeniable
in an early stage

open to view
unit of measurement

14th Week:

soft job
to strive for

a function in trigonometry
a venomous serpent

15th Week:

debatable
an associate in crime

something found, a collection
parasitic insects

16th Week:

exact opposite
protection

a tax
military conflict

17th Week:

perfect, complete
spread out in battle formation

total
a tactic to frustrate or embarrass
an opponent

18th Week:

polished, civilized
going from place to place

destructive or ruinous thing
prong of a fork

19th Week:

lavish
agree to finance

a low place to collect water
formal or religious practice

20th Week:

very sad
moderate in eating or drinking

drag, move heavily
stop, hold back

21st Week:

descendant
decay

an electrically charged part of an
atom or molecule
a vulgar person, a heel

22nd Week:

relieve without curing
related to marriage

cease to please, a cloud
the core or point

23rd Week:

serving to pay back
unusual occurrence

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 311

an outlaw, a political conservative
a prophetic sign
291

BURIED WORDS
REVIEW WORD

BURIED WORD

24th Week:

unwise
looking down on someone or something

an overly modest person
entice. attract. allure

25th Week:

trembling. shaking with old age
hurt, damage, injury

strange
reduce by cutting. decorate

26th Week:

foremost. supreme
angry. antagonistic

a valley (poetical)
steps over a fence

27th Week:

hesitate, waver. stumble
inflexible. unyielding

change. vary. transform
an obstruction

28th Week:

hinder. interfere, block
uproar. confusion

mischievous child
false. cheap imitation

29th Week:

lack of interest
difficult to describe, undistinguished

walkway
style of writing

30th Week:

slander. abuse
persuade. coax. cajole

to arrange in line
pay attention

31st Week:

rough. harsh, shrill
harmful. bad

three-pronged instrument
take out, remove

32nd Week:

out-of-date
pardon, excuse

a bowlike curve or structure
to put on as a garment

33rd Week:

momentary. passing, fleeting
self-satisfied

thin plate giving wind direction
fine thread sewn in patterns

34th Week:

facial expression of disgust
spacious, large

a spice. a club carried by an official
disgusting. distasteful

35th Week:

a moralistic story
haggard. thin

292

can be cultivated
female relative

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 311

BURIED WORDS
REVIEW WORD

BURIED WORD

36th Week:

zenith, pinnacle. peak
wish, envy, want

a large book or volume
a small bay

37th Week:

temporary stay
beginning, to develop or exist

a round vase
the act of going up

38th Week:

easy to manage
underhandedness, trickery

a shaded walk
stylish. elegant

39th Week:

unreasonable, without conscience
abuse, blame

child, or descendant
to give out in measured amounts

40th Week:

works that an artist is ready to perform
weakness. weariness

forward, free, saucy
a young woman

41st Week:

slogan, pet phrase
rush, flood

trunk of a tree
the top of the head

42nd Week:

requirement
change, variety

locale, position
plunge into

43rd Week:

waste away
desire to make amends, regret

a memento of victory or success
closely confined

44th Week:

ill-disposed, ill-intentioned
abundant. overflowing

a brewed beverage
to blend by melting

45th Week:

strong desire, strong longing
inexperienced, youthful

to delight, fascinate, charm
to permit

46th Week:

artificial, sham
mutually destructive, conflict within
a group

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 311

perform, behave
to shut up, confine

293

WORDS IN CONTEXT
•!•

Complete the passage by filling in the missing words. Select the correct word from the
four given and insert the corresponding letter in the blank.

1.
of the 1V computerized games, many set owners have become
2.
With the
in trying to outwit the electronic toys. The
3.
finds it almost impossible to react quickly
4.
what is going on, the little lights have sped by. Those
enough. Before he or she can
5.
for thinking and reacting quickly find these games a
6.
who have a
problem. While the experts' behavior appears
7.
, they really are
8.
and
of1V
9.
. If one is
10.
about trying again and again, then the
11.
computer games can be mastered.

8.
9.
10.

(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)

11.

(a) effigy

1.
2.
3.

4.

5.
6.
7.

rhetoric
reticent
wary
ascertain
lassitude
perverse
conjugal
connubial
aloof
bogus

(b) prelude
(b) engrossed
(b) tyro
(b) obviate
(b) pall
(b) negligible
(b) frenetic
(b) brash
(b) affluent
(b) elusive
(b) malady

(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)

advent
slovenly
profuse
deem
legerdemain
lugubrious
devout
facile
overt
tenacious
paroxysm

(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)

retrospect
trivial
deplorable
cajole
penchant
glib
ambiguous
blunt
imperturbable
pecuniary
repertoire

It is

12.
that women have
13.
into fields of work that were, until recently, the
14.
of men. It did not happen because of the
15.
of the males, but it was largely
due to the
16.
insistence by women that they occupy their rightful place in our society.
While some men still
17.
women who seek to fill jobs previously closed to them, others
19.
for women should be their ability to do the
take the
18.
view that the only
20.
obstacles have no place in a democracy.
work, and that
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

294

(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)

unctuous
perpetuated
acme
largess
pernicious
deprecate
discreet
remuneration
puissant

(b) voluble
(b) burgeoned
(b) taboo
(b) ultimate
(b) tenacious
(b) aspire
(b) pragmatic
(b) reproach
(b) sporadic

(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)
(c)

manifest
advocated
antipathy
complicity
ostensible
permeate
precocious
duplicity
capricious

(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)
(d)

wistful
spewed
prerogative
avarice
phlegmatic
covet
rash
criterion
zealous

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 311

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

1

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

replete
eminent
steeped
voracious
indiscriminate

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
c
a
e
b

1. prognosticate
2. automatons
3. matron
4.abound
5. technology

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
b
e
c
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

compounded
annals
paradoxes
tinge
realm

Day4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
d
c
a

1. drudgery
2. badgers or
badgered
3. perceives or
perceived
4. implored
5. interminable

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
a
b
d

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
c
e
d

Day 5

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

•!• WEEK

n 7. i
o 8. h
r 9. e
d 10. t
g 11. j
l 12. s

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
p
b
c
q
a
f

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

laconic
accost
reticent
throng.
intrepid

1. voracious
2. interminable
3. tinge
4. realm
w 5. eminent
x 6. abound
7. perceive
8. badgers
9. automatons
10. technology
11. yes
12. yes
13. yes
14. yes

annals
replete
matron
implore
interminable

2

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

k
m
v
u

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
d
b
c
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

hapless
irate
furtive
plethora
felon

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
b
d
c

a

1. vigilant
2. adroit
3. fabricate
4. pretext
5. gesticulate

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
b

e
d

1. rudimentary
2. cajoled
3. enhance
4. nuance
5. avid

b

Day 5

WORDSEARCH 2

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

f
1
b

7.
8.
9.
s 10.
t 11.
m 12.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
i 18.

k
r
p
h
e

o 19. n
q 20. c
d 21. X
g 22. u
a 23. v
k 24. w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

felon
pretext
cajole
fabricate
vigilant

295

ANSWERS
·:·

WEEK]
Day 1

1. wrest
2. lackluster
3. caustic
4.loathe
5. reprimand .

Day 2
6. b
7. e
8.a
9. c
10. d

Day 3

1. incipient
2. infamous
3. dupe
4. jostle
5. inadvertent

6. a
7. c
8.d
9. b
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ominous
repudiate
bristle
tremulous
cessation

Day 4
6.d
7. e
8. b
9. a
10.c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

stipulate
euphemism
condolence
mundane
incongruous

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
d
e
c

Day 5
REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

·:·

g
h
d
n
m
t

7. j
8. e
9. q
10. c
11. 1
12. s

a
i
b
0
r
k

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

f
p
v
w

u

cessation
wrest
infamous
bristle
caustic

X

WEEK4
Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

WORDSEARCH 3
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

intimidate
feint
alacrity
belligerent
disdain

Day 2
6. e
7. a
8. c
9.d
10. b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

promulgate
brash

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

scoff

pugnacious
belittle

a
e
d
c
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

laceration
tangible
castigate
octogenarian
sordid

Day 4
6. a
7.c
8. b
9. d
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

scurrilous
aspirant
frenzy
dregs
solace

6. c
7. e
8.a
9.d
10. b

Day 5
REVIEW
1. t
7. a 13. d
2. i
8. p 14. f
3. j
9. g 15. h
4. k 10. c 16. e
5. m 11. b 17. 1
6. n 12. r 18.0

·:·

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

w

v
X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

alacrity
aspirants
dregs
sordid
tangible

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

belligerent
belittled
disdain
promulgated
scoff

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

egregious
acrimonious
duplicity
paucity
distraught

WORDSEARCH 4
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

aspirant
sordid
belittle
scurrilous
frenzy

u

WEEKS
Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

s
q

rampant
clandestine
ethics
inane
concur

Day 2
6. e
7. c
8. b
9.d
10. a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

culprit
inexorable
duress
admonish
flagrant

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
b
d
a

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.

t
7. f
e 8. a
p 9. 1
0 10. j
s. q 11. h
6. r 12. n

296

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

k
m
c
b
s
i

WORDSEARCH 5
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

d
g
w

v
X

u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ethics
pernicious
acrimonious
culprit
flagrant

d
c
b
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

impunity
elicit
tolerate
construe
pernicious

6.d

7. e
8. c

9. b
10. a

ANSWERS
·:·

WEEK

6

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

sally
affluent
consternation
feasible
discern

Day 2

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
b
e
a
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

precocious
perfunctory
deride
perverse
chagrin

6. b
7. a
8. c
9.d
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

laudable
disparaged
masticate
fiasco
eschews

a
d
e
c
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

dubious
quell
confidant
obsolescence
voluble

6. b
7. e
8. c
9.d
10. a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

terminate
forthwith
oust
revert
exacerbate

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

excruciating
reverberating
fretful
respite
succumb

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
b
a
c

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d

e

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
a
c
b
e

e

Day 5

REVIEW
1. J 7. n 13.
2. p 8. q 14.
3. 0 9. k 15.
4. b 10. g 16.
5. h 11. d 17.
6. I 12. r 18.

•!• WEEK

c
t
a
i
e
m

WORDSEARCH 6
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

s
f
v
u
w

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

quell
consternation
fiasco
discern
laudable

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

effigy
stymie
cognizant
flout
turbulent

X

7

Day 1

1. implacable
2. jurisdiction
3. paroxysm
4. skirmish
5. reprehensible

Day 3

Day 2

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
d

e
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

fray
indigent
arbitrary
monolithic
harass

c
b
a
d

Day 4

b
a

Day 5

REVIEW
1. t
7. c 13.
2. s 8. 0 14.
3. m 9. d 15.
4. J 10. i 16.
5. h 11. g 17.
6. e 12. a 18.

·:·

WEEK

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

emaciated
tranquil
sanctuary
surged
ascend

q
k
f
n
r
b

WORDSEARCH 7
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

I
p
X

w
v
u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

skirmish
turbulent
cognizant
indigent
reprehensible

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ubiquitous
remote
harbinger
thwart
malignant

8

Day 1

Day 2

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
a
c
b
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

sinister
besieged
afflicted
malnutrition
privation

6. b
7. e
8. d
9. a
10.c

6. b
7. a
8. d
9. e
10.c

Day 5

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

d 7. k 13. r
l
8. q 14. j
p 9. b 15. h
f 10. a 16. n
e 11. g 17. 1
s 12. 0 18. m

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
19. t
20. c
21. X
22. w
23.v
24. u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

afflicted
succumb
ubiquitous
malnutrition
tranquil
reverberating

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

thwarted
ascended
privations
fretful
cool our
heels

PARTS OF SPEECH
1. h
2. e
3. b
4. j
5. a
6. c

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

d
f
0

k
1
n

13. i
14. g. m

WORDSEARCH 8
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

succumb
sanctuary
harbinger
ascend
afflict

297

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

9

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

extortion
impresarto
bigot
asset
adverse

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
b
d
a

Day 3

1.-entourage
2. virulent
3. spew
4. venom
5. blatant

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
e
c
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

loath
solicit
astute
advocate
ineffectual

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
e
a
b
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

vexatious
amicable
malady
nefartous
scrutinize

6. c
7. b
8. e
9.a
10. d

Day 5
REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

•!• WEEK

WORDSEARCH 9

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

g
1
X

w
v
u

1. scrutinize
2.vexatious
3. virulent
4. astute
5. nefartous

10

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

7. i 13. s
a 8. h 14. d
p 9. t 15. j
c 10. f 16. e
b 11. m 17. r
n 12. q 18. k

0

peruse
premonition
desist
recoiled
inclement

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
b
d
c
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day4

Day 3

obsessed
mastiff
doleful
pertinent
wan

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
d
a
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

frustrated
interjected
histrionics
elusive
symptomatic

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
b
e
a
c

1.imminent
2.squeamish
3. engrossed
4. salient
5. inert

b
e
d
a
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
c
e
d

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
a
d
b

Day 5
REVIEW

•!• WEEK

d 7. p
a 8. f
q 9. i
s 10. e
c 11. j
t 12. m

poignant
garbled
fruitless
inundated
sanguine

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

phlegmatic
6. b
zealous
7. c
comprehensive 8.d
coerced
9.a
corroborate
10. e

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

h 19.g
1 20. r
0 21. X
b 22.v
k 23. u
n 24. w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

squeamish
recoil
engrossed
desist
interject

11

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 10

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
a
e
b
c

Day 4

Day 3
1. elapse
2. sporadic
3. domicile
4.lax
5. meticulous

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
REVIEW

l.r
7. d 13. j
2.p 8. k 14. g
3. l
9.a 15. c
4. f 10. n 16. t
5. b 11. h 17. e
6. m 12. q 18. i

298

WORDSEARCH 11

19. 0
20. s
21. X
22. w
23. u
24.v

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

garbled
meticulous
inundate
comprehensive
sanguine

conjecture
lurid
rash
obviated
quip

ANSWERS
12

•!• WEEK

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
e
c
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

Day 2

Day 1
1. diatrtbe
2.ilk
3. incoherent
4. fortuitous
5. inhibitions

placard
prestigious
remuneration
nominal
integral

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6. e
7. b
8. a
9.d
10. c

utopia
schism
anathema
flamboyant
expunge

6. d
7. e
8. b
9.a
10. c

1. truncated
2. jaunty
3. ostentatious
4. timorous
5. fractious

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
b
c
e
d

Day 5

·:·

WEEK

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

c 13. r 19.
e 14. d 20.
i 15. a 21.
16. j 22.
f 17. s 23.
h 18. q 24.

p

0

t
u
X

w

v

1. diatrtbe
2. utopia
3. ostentatious
4. timorous
5. prestigious
6. jaunty

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

expunged
fortuitous
integral
placards
wash your dirty
linen in public

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

prestigious
flamboyant
ilk
inhibitions
remuneration

13

importune
6.
haven
7.
subjugate
8.
surreptitious
9.
incontrovertible 10.

b
a
e
d
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

Day 2

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 12

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?

REVIEW
l.k
2. I
3. m
4. n
5. g
6. b

eventuated
subterranean
emit
ultimate
viable

6. b
7. e
8. d
9.a
10. c

1. premise
2. incredulous
3. jeopardize
4. permeated
5. propitious

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
b
d
c
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

curtailed
cryptic
repress
surmised
inchoate

d
b
a
e
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

sinecure
stentortan
valor
singular
bias

6. b
7.d
8. c
9. a
10. e

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 13

REVIEW
l.s 7. r
2. g 8. b
3. t
9. q
4. k 10. 0
5. n 11. I
6. a 12. p

•!• WEEK
nettle
aspire
inveigh
overt
relegate

f
e
m
i
c
d

19. j
20. h
21. X
22. w
23. v
24. u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

cryptic
importune
ultimate
viable
incredulous

6. d
7. c
8. b
9.a
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

incisive
scurry
lethal
precipitated
stereotype

14
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
e
a
b
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

supine
razed
repulse
mammoth
havoc

Day 4

Day 3

Day 2

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
d
c
a
b

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 14

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

d 7. a 13. n
h 8. r 14. J
s
9. b 15. g
i 10. k 16. l
m 11. p 17. t
f 12. e 18. q

19. 0
20. c
21. X
22.v
23. u
24. w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

nettled
inveighed
stereotype
bias
scurry

299

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

15

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 2

complicity
liquidation
culpable
recant
accomplice

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
d
c
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

preclude
alleged
abrogate
invalidate
access

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
b
a
c
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

extrinsic
persevere
landmark
declaim
fetter

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
e
b
c
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

nomadic
paragon
controversial
asperity
epithets

b
d
a
c
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

amorous
virtuosity
progeny
temerity
saturated

a
b
c
d
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

gullible
deploy
attest
exult
enigma

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
a
e
d

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
d
b
a
c

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
a
b
c
d

Day 5
REVIEW
1.j
7. t 13. n
2.q 8. d 14. s
3. f 9. 1 15. e
4. c 10. a 16. r
5. h 11. b 17.g
6. m 12. p 18. i

•!• WEEK

23.

X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 15
abrogate
culpable
epithets
recant
controversial

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

cache
cupidity
altruistic
coterie
embellish

24. u

16

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

19. k
20. 0
21. v
22. w

cursory
indigenous
interloper
habitat
gregarious

Day 2
6. b
7. d
8. c
9.a
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

prolific
antithesis
sedentary
frugal
bulwark

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
c
e
b
d

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
REVIEW
1. f
7. h 13. 1
2. r
8. i 14. k
3.d 9. e 15. j
4.q 10. b 16. t
5. a 11. c 17. p
6.g 12. n 18. m

•!• WEEK

w
v

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d
b
e
a

0

s
u
X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

frugal
cache
interloper
temerity
cupidity

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

hoax
components
labyrinth
evaluate
murky

17

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 16
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

fallacious
consummate
concoct
perpetrate
subterfuge

Day 2
6. c
7. b
8. d
9.a
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

manifold
fraught
impeccable
resourceful
assiduous

Day 3

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
REVIEW
1.c
7. f
2.d 8. p
3. g 9. 1
4. e 10. k
5. i 11. j
6.a 12. n

300

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

b
m
0

q
t
s

WORDSEARCH 17
19. h
20. b, r
21. u
22. w
23.v
24. X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

assiduous
resourceful
fallacious
labyrinth
consummate

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

18

Dar 1
innate
abortive
modify
spontaneous
accommodate

Da~ 2

6.a
7. e
8. b
9. d
10. c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

crave
myriad
irrelevant
urbane
veneer

Dar 3
deem
buff
romp
latent
inherent

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6. d
7. b
8. c
9.a
10. e

Day 4

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

tortuous
conjugal
peregrination
Itinerant
barometer

d
b
c
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

restrtctlve
blunt
nostalgia
rife
balk

d
b
e
c
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

lugubrious
puissant
unabated
maudlin
levity

6. e
7. c
8.d
9. b
10. a

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
c
d
e

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
b
d
a

Da 5
WORDSEARCH 18

REVIEW
1. c 7. m
13. s
2. f 8. 1, d 14. r
3. J 9. d, 1 15. p
4. 0 10. a
16. h
5. q 11. n
17. g
6. I 12. t
18. k

•!• WEEK
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

e
b
v
X

w
u

barometer
itinerant
myriad
deem
accommodate

19

Dar 1
profligate
strtfe
legion
coup
megalomania

6. e
7. c
8.a
9.d
10. b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Da~ 2
mendacious
exonerate
expatriate
fiat
amnesty

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
d
e
b

Dar 3
dismantle
sumptuous
parsimonious
pecuniary
underwrite

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Dar 5
WORDSEARCH 19

REVIEW

1. r
7. h
2. 1 8.n
3. j
9.p
4. a 10. g
5. c 11. i
6. e 12. t

•!• WEEK
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

s
q
m
k

19.
20.
21.
22.
0 23.
b 24.

d
f
x
u
v
w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

legion
underwrite
rife
balk
blunt

b

d
a
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Dar 3
extant
vicissiltides
edifice
sultry
trenchant

20

Dar 1
nebulous
reviled
Indict
pesky
derogatory

Dar 2

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
b
e
c
a

t.
2.
3.
4.
5.

J;~se.

J
.6.
abs ~mio"Ei§ ·- • · 7:
redolent
8.
omnivorous
9.
disparate
10.

Day 4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

6.e
7. d
8. a
9. c
10. b

Da 5

7.
g 6.
a 9.
c 10.
k 11.
i 12.
0

e
d
b
f
h
m

13. 1
14. n
15. j
16. t
17. q
18. p

WORDSEARCH 20

HAPLESS HEADLINES

REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

s
r
v
w

u

l.j

2.
3.
4.
5.

e
d

t
h

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

q

t
r
f
k

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

pesky
unabated
indict
redolent
reviled

X

301

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

21

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

opulence
seton
obsequious
indoctrinate
fulsome

Da~

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
c
a
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Da~

2

lush
ponder
destitution
supplication
decadence

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
b
c
d
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Da~

3

disciple
6.
metamorphosis 7.
penance
8.
ascetic
9.
desultory
10.

4

b
d
c
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

nurture
bona fide
salvation
nirvana
materialism

d
e
a
b
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

acknowledge
delude
palliate
prelude
chimerical

6. e
7. c
8. b
9.a
10. d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

perpetuate
catastrophic
neutralize
mandate
compensatory

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
e
b
a
c

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
d
c
a
e

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
b
a
c
e

Da 5
REVIEW

1. a 7. j
2. t 8. i
3. e 9. d
4.h 10. c
5. f 11. s
6.p 12. l

•!• WEEK
Da~

WORDSEARCH 21

13. k

19.
14. r 20.
15. b 21.
16. q 22.
17. 0 23.
18. g 24.

m
n
v
u
X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

metamorphosis
disciple
salvation
bona fide
ponder

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

escalation
indifference
potential
cumulative
recondite

w

22
Da~

1

1.juxtapose
6.
2. incompatibility 7.
3. cope
8.
4. plight
9.
5. covert
10.

b
c
d
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Da~

2

fabricate
connubial
demur
appellation
incapacitated

-

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
d
a
b

Da~

3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

4

Da 5
REVIEW

1. b 7. a 13.
2. f
8. e 14.
3. l
9. p 15.
4.m 10. i 16.
5. j 11. d 17.
6. h 12. t 18.

•!• WEEK

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

indifference
plight
acknowledge
cope
prelude

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

enunciate
irascible
introspective
pedagogue
inordinate

23
Da~

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 22

s 19. q
r 20. k
0 21. w
c 22. X
g 23. u
n 24.v

maladjusted
heterogeneous
perspicacious
analogous
gamut

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
a
b
d
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Da~

2

neurotic
decade
mortality·
susceptible
phenomenon

d
a
c
e
b

Da~

3

Da 5
REVIEW

1. f
2. a
3. r
4. s
5. t
6. j

302

7. i
8. m
9.n
10. b
11. d
12. h

13. p
14.1
15. k
16. c
17. e
18. g

WORDSEARCH 23

19. 0
20. q
21. u
22.v
23. w
24. X

1. pedagogue
l.. decade
3. heterogeneous
4. gamut
5. perspicacious

4

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

24

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 2

inanimate
artifact
fetish
anthropologist
bizarre

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
a
e
c
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

tainted
prohibition
imprudent
taboo
imperative

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
b
d
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

contemptuous
absurd
bigot
abhor
universal

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
a
d
c
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

originate
entreaty
inviolable
vulnerable
tradition

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
d
c
a
e

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
c
b
d
e

Day 5
REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

•!• WEEK

n 7. m
r 8. s
h 9. e
a 10. q
c 11. b
k 12. 0

13. d
14. g
15. p
16. i
17. t
18. j

19. f
20. I
21. w
22. u
23.x
24. v

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

m
c
a
0
e

WORDSEARCH 24

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6. k
7. b
8. j
9. i
10. g

imprudent
inviolable
artifact
imperative
inanimate

25

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ADJ. LDRS./NOUN FOL.

eruption
puny
debris
awesome
dispersed

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d
a
e
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

conflagration
obliterate
rue
initiate
deplorable

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
b
d
e

a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

hoard
sage
congenial
aegis
detriment

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
d
e
c
a

1. senile
2. longevity
J.doddering
4. imbibe
5. virile

e
a
d
c
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 5
REVIEW

l.h 7. I
2. p 8. j
3. n
9.a
4. i 10. c
5. f 11. r
6. k 12. m

•!• WEEK
hostile
prevalent
lethargic
paramount
remiss

q
s
t
g
b
e

19. d
20.0
21. v
22. w
23. u
24. X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

deplorable
obliterate
rue
detriment
aegis

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1. tussle
2. intrinsic
3. jettison
4. inevitable
5. lucrative

26

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

WORDSEARCH 25

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
d
e
c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

aversion
superficial
rebuke
evince
vogue

b
c
e
d
a

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

acute
transient
gist
terse
cogent

6. e
7. c
8. d

9. b
10. a

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 26

REVIEW

1. I
7. 0 13.
2. p 8. i 14.
3. d
9. c 15.
4.a 10. t 16.
5. k 11. q 17.
6. s 12. r 18.

h
n
e
m
g
b

19. f
20. j
21. w
22. x
23. v
24. u

1. prevalent
2. inevitable
3. superficial
4. cogent
5. jettison

303

ANSWERS
·:·

WEEK

27

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

array
culminate
pinnacle
ardent
obscure

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
d
a
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

bereft
exultation
constrict
prodigy
falter

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
e
c
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

invective
voluminous
besmirch
retrospect
vitriolic

Day 4
6.d
7. a
8. c
9. b
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

inveterate
pungent
adamant
humtlity
egotist

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

avarice
insatiable
nadir
irrational
moribund

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
d
e
c

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d
e
a
b

Day 5
REVIEW

1. b
2. r
3. j
4. 0
5. m
6. g

·:·

WEEK

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

WORDSEARCH 27

a 13. s
f 14. t
c 15. e
q 16. I
k 17. n
i
18. d

retrospect
ardent
obscure
culminate
falter

19. h
20. p
21. w
22.x
23. v
24. u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6. b
7.a
8. d
9. c
10. e

sedate
serenity
equanimity
compatible
5. revere

28

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.

propinquity
vulnerable
cacophony
exploit
5. bedlam

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
a
c
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

disgruntled
panacea
eradicate
infallible
impede

1.
2.
3.
4.

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
e
a
d

Day 5
REVIEW

1. r
7. j
2. h 8. p
3. i
9. s
4.c 10. b
5. m 11. 0
6. q 12. n

·:·

WEEK

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

adherent
lithe
pathetic
obese
bliss

WORDSEARCH 28

DOING DOUBLE DUTY

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

f
a
v
w

1.
3.
6.
7,

hoard
8. rebuke
transient 10. obscure
sedate
11. exploit
sage

X

1.
2.
3.
4.

impede
serenity
cacophony
irrational
5. infallible

u

29

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

e
d
g
I
t
k

Day 2
6. d
7. b
8. a
9. e
10. c

apathy
exhort
inebriated
fracas
5. adversary

1.
2.
3.
4.

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
c
e
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

gusto
banal
platitude
indolent
garrulous

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 29

REVIEW

1.r 7.o 13.j
2. b 8. a 14. c
3. i
9. q 15. h
4. p 10. s 16. k
5. f 11. m 17. d
6. I 12. e 18. g

304

19.n
20. t
21. X
22. u
23. w
24. v

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

apathy
pathetic
indolent
platitude
adversary

c
a
d
e
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

dilettante
atypical
nondescript
wane
pique

6. b
7. c
8. d
9. e
10. a

ANSWERS
·:·

30

WEEK

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 2

gaudy
encumbrance
extinct
Idyllic
galvanize

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
d
a
b

Day 3

1. condescend
2. malign
3. jocose
4. candor
5. mortify

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

c
d
e
a
b

zenith
omnipotent
precedent
fledgling
peremptory

Day 4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
a
b
c
d

1. wheedle
2. charlatan
3. rustic
4. decorum
5. jubilant

e
c
d
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

b
c
d
a
e

1. salubrious

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
e
b
c
d

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d
b
e
a

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
d
e
a

Day 5
REVIEW

l.f
2. s
3. n
4.k
5. I
6. m

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

WORDSEARCH 30

r
b
1
p
t
g

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

0

h
v
u
X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

extinct
galvanize
peremptory
malign
candor

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

concomitant
strident
lassitude
deleterious
efficacy

w

31

•!• WEEK

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

7. c
8. a
9. q
10. e
11.j
12. d

Day 2

fervid
heresy
prudent
ostensible
spmious

6. c
7. d
8. e
9.a
10. b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

propagate
milieu
anomaly
innocuous
surfeit

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
c
e
a
b

Day 4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

incumbent
ferment
dissent
attenuated
arbiter

Day 5
REVIEW

l.c
7. j
2. m 8. a
3. q 9. p
4. b 10. h
5. n 11. i
6. e 12. r

·:·

WORDSEARCH 31

s
k
t
g
d
1

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

deleterious
spurious
ostensible
dissent
concomitant

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

venerable
ambiguous
succinct
menial
extraneous

f
0
X

w
u
v

32

WEEK

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Day 2

expedite
celerity
profound
alleviate
prodigious

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
c
e
a
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

bizarre
paltry
usurp
condone
trivial

Day 3

6. c
7. a
8. b
9.d
10. e

Day 4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

2.
3.
4.
5.

archaic
facetious
rabid
emulate

Day 5
REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

p 7. r
n 8. 0
a 9. j
h 10. I
g 11. f
1 12. s

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

WORDSEARCH 32

SELECTING ANTONYMS

k
c
m
e
b
t

19. d
20. q
21. x
22. w
23.v
24. u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

partner
professional
active
sober
falsehood
conservative

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

nadir
tiny
condemn
clear
authentic
harmful

13. helpful
14. wordy
15. urbane

1. prodigious
2. usurp
3. celerity
4. venerable
5.salubrious

305

ANSWERS
·:·

WEEK

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

complacent
debilitate
occult
somber
impetuous

33

Day 1

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
d
b
a

Day 3

1. foment
2. slovenly
J.quarry
4. discreet
5. glean

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
e
b
c
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

penitent
evanescent
reproach
tantamount
abjure

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
b
d
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

connoisseur
allay
propensity
wary
deter

d
c
b
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

au courant
pittance
unkempt
noisome
fastidious

b
a
d
c
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

stupor
cliche
wince
whet
pensive

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
d
a
b

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
d
b
a

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
b
e
d
c

Day 5
REVIEW

·:·

WEEK

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

d 7. q 13.
t 8. p 14.
f 9. a 15.
s 10. r 16.
e 11. n 17.
g 12. m 18.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

unmitigated
commodious
antiquated
fluctuate
disheveled

c 19. J
h 20. 1
k 21. v
22, X
0
b 23. w
i 24. u

abjure
wary
complacent
somber
glean

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

tenacious
calumny
grimace
asinine
facade

34

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 33

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

cumbersome
interrogate
vigil
divulge
site

Day 2
6.
1.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
a
b
d

Day 4

Day 3
b
d
a
e
c

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 34

REVIEW

·:·

WEEK

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

p 7. h 13.
q 8. f 14.
k 9. i 15.
b 10. r 16.
t 11. g 17.
s 12. j 18.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

nonentity
effrontery
equanimity
flabbergasted
debacle

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

v
u
w

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
c
e
b
d

0

m
X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

unmitigated
asinine
tenacious
antiquated
au courant

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

mien
refute
hirsute
vivacious
gaunt

35

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

n
1
c
e
a
d

lampoon
6.
whimsical
7.
parable
8.
sanctimonious 9.
countenance
10.

Day 4

Day 3

Day 2
d
a
e
c
b

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 35

REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6,

306

s
p
i

7.
8.
9.
0
10.
h 11.
a 12.

q
e
d
m
b
k

13. r 19.
14. f 20.
15. j 21.
16. t 22.
17. 1 23.
18. n 24.

c
g
w
v
X

u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

parable
refute
hirsute
equanimity
whet

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

36

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
S.

Day 2

degrade
venial
genre
unsavory
candid

6. c
1. e

8. b
9.a
10. d

1.
2.
3.
4.
S.

Day 3

grotesque
compassion
epitome
repugnant
dexterity

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

b
e
a
d
c

acme
depict
naive
copious
vehemently

Day 4

6. c
7. d
8. b
9. e
10.a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ingratiate
covet
penury
perfidious
Ignominious

6.a
7. b
8. e
9. d
10. c

Day 5

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

·:·

c 7. m
a 8. p
b 9. n
k 10. 1
d 11. g
h 12. t

WEEK

WORDSEARCH 36

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?

13. r 19. q
14. f 20. s
15. l 21. v
16. e 22. X
17. j 23. w
18. 0 24. u

1.
2.
3.
4.
S.

deter
as1nine
effrontery
disheveled
somber

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Impetuous
discreet
perfidious
flabbergasted
vivacious

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

copious
naive
epitome
tgnomtntous
depict

37
Day 2

Day 1

1. servile
2. sojourn
3. confront
4.volition
5. antipathy

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
c
e
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

tenable
austere
superfluous
felicitous
halcyon

6. b
7. d
8. c
9.a
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Iconoclast
therapy
motivate
rationalize
nascent

c
b
e
a
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

phobia
erudite
vertigo
conducive
gennane

6. d
7. b
8.a
9. c
10. e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

chicanery
doctle
tacit
reticent
retort

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
c
e
b
d

Day 5

WORDSEARCH 37

REVIEW
1. f
7. h
2. e B.i
3. d 9. g
4. J 10. c
5. I 11. 0
6.m 12. t

•!• WEEK

s
n
r
q
b
k

19. p
20. a
21. X
22. w
23. u
24.v

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

nascent
felicitous
halcyon
confront
superfluous

6. b
7. c
8. e
9.a
10. d

1.
2.
3.
4.

capitulate
stigmatize
audacity
foist
tantalize

38

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

gllb
trend
legerdemain
malleable
homogeneous

6.
7.
B.
9.
10.

c
d
a
b
e.

fatal
passe
facets
procrastinate
stagnant

Day 4

Day 3

Day 2

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

s.

6. c
7. d
8.a
9.e
10. b

Day 5

WORDSEARCH 38

REVIEW
1. f
7. b 13.j
2. k 8. d 14. a
3.1
9. h 15. g
4. r 10. s 16. 0
5. e 11. 1 17. n
6. c 12. q 18. m

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

t
p
v
u
w

1. homogeneous
2.trend
3. reticent
4. tantalize
5. facet

x

307

ANSWERS
·:·

WEEK

39

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

saga
Imperturbable
belated
decrepit
vacillates

Day 2

6. b
7.d
8.c
9.e
10. a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

opprobrium
Machiavellian
unconscionable
pandemonium
staunch

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
a
d
c
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

vindicate
flay
demeanor
heinous
delineation

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
d
c
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

infraction
callous
vituperation
redress
turpitude

c
a
d
e
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

fatuous
repertoire
imperceptible
contort
augment

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
d
a
c
e

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
d
e
a

Day 5
REVIEW

l.m
2. n
3. p
4. a
5.j
6. i

•!• WEEK

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

WORDSEARCH 39

r 19. s
I 20. e
b 21. v
0 22. u
q 23. X
c 24. w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Infraction
heinous
opprobrium
imperturbable
staunch

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

proximity
lassitude
vapid
unwieldy
vitiate

40

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

h
f
d
k
t
g

clique
rhetoric
facile
extol
mentor

Day 2

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
d
a
c

2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

1. vilify

cant
magnanimous
umbrage
elucidate

a
c
e
d
b

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
REVIEW

•!• WEEK
succulent
intrinsic
curry
satiety
pall

19. h
20. d
21. X
22. u
23.v
24. w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

e
k
p
c
q

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

g
d
s
n
a

umbrage
extol
fatuous
imperceptible
vilify

41

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 40

HAPLESS HEADLINES

l.b 7. s 13. c
2. m 8. r 14. j
3. n 9. 0 15. f
4. a 10. q 16. t
5. g 11. I 17. i
6. e 12. k 18. p

Day 2

6. c
7. e
8. d
9.a
10. b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

sanction
insidious
allude
potpourri
denotes

Day 4

Day 3

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
c
e
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

spate
advent
propriety
proffer
Impious

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Day 5
WORDSEARCH 41

REVIEW

l.c
7. p 13. f
2.a 8. r 14. t
3. I
9. d 15. q
4. j 10. 0 16. b
5. i 11. h 17. e
6.k 12. s 18. n

308

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

m
g
X

u
w
v

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

insidious
bogus
propriety
intrinsic
sanction

a
c
d
b
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

nutritive
raucous
shibboleth
bogus
substantiate

6. a
7. c
8. e
9.d
10. b

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

42

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 2

negligible
quandary
expedient
callous
blase

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
b
d
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 3

diversity
ennui
comely
artifice
frenetic

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
a
d
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

artless
expurgate
qualm
gratuity
begrudge

Day 4
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
a
b
c
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

delve
replenish
manifest
capricious
requisite

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
c
a
d

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
e
d
a

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
e
d
c
a

Day 5

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

•!• WEEK

d 7. c
t 8.h
i 9. n
f 10. k
p 11. e
g 12. a

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

m
r
X

v
u

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

requisite
blase
capricious
diversity
delve

w

43

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 42

13. q
14.s
15. 1
16. j
17. b
18; 0

Day 2

ameliorate
roster
stunt
atrophy
maim

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
b
e
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

unctuous
cynic
benevolent
subservient
iniquity

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
d
a
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

largess
mercenary
criterion
mollify
repent

6. a
7. b
8. e
9.d
10. c

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

vestige
pariah
aloof
guise
pragmatic

Day 5

REVIEW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

•!• WEEK

p 7. b 13.
t
8.n 14.
k 9. r 15.
1 10. 0 16.
e 11. q 17.
d 12. m 18.

futility
technology
nullify
carnage
deluged

19. s
20. j
21. X
22. w
23. v
24. u

1. benevolent
2.pariah
3. guise
4. iniquity
5. ameliorate

44

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 43
i
a
f
c
h
g

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
b
e
a
d

1. canard
2. defamatory
3. plaintiff
4.libel
5. deprecate

Day 4

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d
b
e
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

excoriate
frail
potent
reputed
devout

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
c
e
d
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Impromptu
malevolent
profuse
diminutive
dulcet

Day 5

REVIEW
1. k 7. 1 13.
2. g 8. e 14.
3. j
9. i 15.
4. a 10. 0 16.
5. b 11. h 17.
6. d 12. s 18.

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
t
n
m
p
c
f

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

r
q
w

u
v

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

deluged
diminutive
blase
succulent
frenetic

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

bogus
quandary
benevolent
negligible
excoriate

WORDSEARCH 44
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

profuse
deluge
carnage
excoriate
nullify

X

309

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

45

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 2

raiment
rail
corpulent
wistful
brtgand

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
d
e
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Day 4

Day 3

rift
raconteur
sullen
emissary
ruminate

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
d
e
b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

livid
taut
martinet
yen
bagatelle

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
a
e
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

decapitate
penchant
termagant
appalled
callow

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

a
e
c
b
d

Day 5
REVIEW

l.b 7. f 13.
2. d 8. c 14.
3. e 9. j 15.
4.o 10. 1 16.
5. p 11. n 17.
6. a 12. s 18.

•!• WEEK

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

k
t
X

v
u
w

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

appalled
penchant
corpulent
emissary
decapitate

46

Day 1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH 45

h
m
q
g
i
r

burgeoned
ascertain
disseminate
dormant
potentate

Day 3

Day 2

6. b
7.c
8. d
9. e
10. a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

internecine
dertved
nepotism
prerogative
dearth

6. d
7. c
a.· e
9. a
10. b

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

tyro
obloquy
sophistry
factitious
encomiums

Day 4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

b
c
d
a
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

charisma
genocide
prevarication
hyperbole
munificent

Day 5
REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

310

t
7. 1 13.
m 8. j 14.
k 9.d 15.
a 10. n 16.
q 11. s 17.
g 12. p 18.

r
b
i
f
h
e

WORDSEARCH 46

WHICH WORD?

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

0

c
w
u
v
X

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

h
i
e
I
c

6.m
7. b
8. n
9. p
10. f

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ascertain
burgeoned
derived
dormant
encomium

6. e
7. d
8. c
9.a
10. b

ANSWERS
Buried Words
1st Week:

2nd Week:

3rd Week:
4th Week:

5th Week:

6th Week:

7th Week:

8th Week:
9th Week:

10th Week:

11th Week:

12th Week:

13th Week:
14th Week:

15th Week:

16th Week:

automaton
interminable
gesticulate
rudimentary
condolence
lackluster
tangible
promulgate
impunity
paucity
per9'erse
consternation
terminate
implacable
harbinger
remote
virulent
entourage
peruse
salient
elapse
corroborate
diatribe
utopia
incontrovertible
inchoate
sinecure
aspire
controversial
accompUce
antithesis
bulwark

17th Week:

18th Week:

19th Week:

20th Week:
21st Week:

22nd Week:

23rd Week:

24th Week:

25th Week:
26th Week:

27th Week:
28th Week:

29th Week:
30th Week:
31st Week:

32nd Week:

consummate
deploy
urbane
itinerant
sumptuous
underwrite
lugubrious
abstemious
scion
decadence
palliate
connubial
compensatory
phenomenon
imprudent
contemptuous
doddering
detriment
prevalent
hostUe
falter
adamant
impede
cacophony
apathy
nondescript
malign
wheedle
strident
deleterious
archaic
condone

33rd Week:

34th Week:

35th Week:

36th Week:
37th Week:

38th Week:

39th Week:

40th Week:

41st Week:
42nd Week:
43rd Week:

44th Week:

45th Week:
46th Week:

evanescent
complacent
grimace
commodious
parable
gaunt
epitome
covet
sojourn
nascent
malleable
chicanery
unconscionable
vituperation
repertoire
lauitude
shibboleth
spate
requisite
diversity
atrophy
repent
malevolent
profuse
penchant
callow
factitious
internecine

Words in Context
1.

c

2. b
3. b
4. a

d
b
b

9. d
10. c
11. d

13. b
14. d
15. a

18. b
19. d

8. c

12. c

16. b

20. c

5.
6.
7.

17.

a

311

FINAL REVIEW TEST
•!•

312

Below are 150 of the words that you have been studying, each followed by four
possible definitions. Write the letter of the correct answer in the appropriate space.
To attain a mark of 60o/o, you would have to get 90 correct answers: 105 correct
answers are worth a mark of 70%, 120 for 80%, 135 for 90%. After you have
completed the test, check your answers on page 318.
1. implore

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

reject
beg for assistance
summon
scold

11. sordid

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

varied
guilty
unable to speak
dirty

2. voracious

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

greedy
vicious
dull
careless

12. solace

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

pity
comfort
forgetfulness
great happiness

3. badger

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

to pester
to cheat
remind
to insult

13. acrimonious

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

bitter
brilliant
tender
out of tune

4. laconic

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

tense
bashful
troublesome
brief in expression

14. egregious

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

important
infected
remarkably bad
swollen

5. plethora

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

overabundance
helpless fit
a weakness
angry reaction

15. paucity

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

oveiWeight
deafness
shortage
doubt

6. cajole

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

force
demand
coax
promise

16. eschew

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

keep away from
sneeze repeatedly
invite
deny

7. inadvertent

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

unappetizing
unintentional
unaware
unknown

17. voluble

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

prtceless
talkative
sinful
whining

8. mundane

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

forgetful
friendly
doubtful
worldly

18. perfunctory

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

careless
hopeful
without end
evil

9. jostle

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

joke with
interrupt
to push
leap quickly

19. chagrin

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

loneliness
dismay
opportunity
suspicion

10. brash

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

impudent
stubborn
angry
upset

20. exacerbate

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

present arguments
plead with
question closely
irritate

FINAL REVIEW TEST
--

21. indigent

- - 22. stymie

23. fretful

- - 24. harbinger

--

--

(a)
(b)

unreasonable
watchful
(c) angry
(d) poor

33. corroborate

(a)
(b)

represent
confirm
(c) search
(d) produce

(a)
(b)

hinder
invent
(c) confiscate
(d) cancel

34. lurid

outraged
sensational
(c) capable
(d) guilty

(a)
(b)

lacking ambition
dark
(c) worrisome
(d) mischievous

35. sanguine

hopeful
objectionable
(c) rugged
(d) hard to discover

(a)
(b)

smooth-talker
leader
(c) forerunner
(d) bit of advice

36. sporadic

occasional
special
(c) to the point
(d) blotchy

(a)
(b)

(a)
(b)

(a)
(b)

25. sanctuary

(a)
(b)

cemetery
agreement
(c) place of protection
(d) approval

37. anathema

(a)
(b)

26. astute

(a)
(b)

keen
reliable
(c) cheap
(d) able

38. fortuitous

(a)
(b)

27. blatant

(a)
(b)

boastful
disagreeably loud
(c) blossoming
(d) rigid

39. archaic

(a)
(b)

28. nefarious

(a)
(b)

40. timorous

(a)
(b)

29. virulent

(a)
(b)

harmful
sloppy
(c) sickly
(d) revolutionary

41. eventuate

(a)
(b)

30. histrionics

(a)
(b)

unreasonable acts
nervousness
(c) display of emotions
(d) studies of the past

42. inchoate

(a)
(b)

31. salient

(a)
(b)

traveling
resentful
(c) sober
(d) outstanding

43. propitious

(a)
(b)

32. wan

(a)
(b)

pale
sleepy
(c) jealous
(d) unlucky

44. viable

(a)
(b)

hungry
watchful
(c) footsore
(d) villainous

--

treatment
violence
(c) apparatus
(d) a curse

lucky
significant
(c) accidental
(d) huge

rival
out of date
(c) healthful
(d) comical
courageous
ambitious
(c) fearful
(d) tense

to result finally
pay your respects
(c) borrow
(d) interrupt
vague
in an early stage
(c) uneasy
(d) ingenious
suspicious
hasty
(c) frank
(d) favorable

workable
sensitive
(c) tasty
(d) quiet

313

FINAL REVIEW TEST
--

--

45. incisive

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

acute
sluggish
massive
jittery

--

46. inveigh

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

compose
react to
attack verbally
penetrate

--

47. sinecure

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

urgent message
silly response
big responsibility
soft job

48. nettle

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

mix

suggest
irritate
suspend

57. perpetrate

(a)

plant

(b) consume in haste
(c)
(d)

slice
commit

58. assiduous

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

sly
thrifty
busy
educated

--

59. abortive

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

failing
outside the law
drowsy
unprepared

--

60. tortuous

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

spiteful
inflicting pain
frank
winding

--

61. peregrination (a) form of address
(b) travel
(c) insistence
(d) hospitality

--

49. abrogate

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

publish
portray
permit
cancel

--

50. extrinsic

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

loaded
containing wisdom
coming from outside
uncertain

62. myriad

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

geometric figure
voter's choice
countless number
minority decision

--

51. asperity

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

artful handling
bitterness of temper
foolishness
concern

63. fiat

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

police squad
official order
carriage
council

--

52. altruistic

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

unselfish
troublesome
dangerous
dignified

64. mendacious

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

lying
abusive
healing
merciful

--

53. sedentary

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

hypnotic
largely inactive
scornful
musical

--

65. profligate

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

soothing
obvious
distinct
wasteful

--

54. progeny

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

vigor
descendants
minority opinion
disease

--

66. disparate

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

different
critical
religious
uneven

--

55. cupidity

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

affection
fate
greed
harmony

--

67. lugubrious

(a) well-oiled
(b) warlike
(c) very sad
(d) beyond dispute

--

56. impeccable

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

faultless
bold
open to criticism
slow to respond

--

68. puissant

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

314

ordinary
studious
powerful
dictatorial

FINAL REVIEW TEST
--

69. desultory

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

disconnected
incomplete
polished
dry

--

70. fulsome

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

gratified
superior
sensitive
excessive

--

71. chimerical

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

accurate
imaginary
regional
rigid

--

72. recondite

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

observant
sincere
secret
willing to bargain

--

73. gamut

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

range
sleeve
intestine
bridge

--

74. irascible

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

conceited
patriotic
bumbling
trrttable

75. perspicacious (a) vicious
(b) shrewd
(c) sweaty
(d) light on one's feet

--

--

81. elucidate

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

hide
make clear
paint
sharpen

--

82. germane

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

sickly
foreign
charming
appropriate

--

83. mollify

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

tum against
appease
hope for
shorten

84. indolent

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

lazy
badly behaved
owing money
timely

--

85. impromptu

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

dangerous
not understood
wisely planned
spur of the moment

--

86. umbrage

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

dark color
offense
waste
generosity

--

87. artifice

{a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

trickery
historic finding
newness
gradual change

88. vacillate

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

follow closely
fluctuate
aggravate
dominate

76. taint

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

weaken
widen
contaminate
cause

77. aegis

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

fear
hope
kinship
protection

--

89. vestige

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

trace
cloak
entrance
hope

78. evince

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

prove
throw away
exhibit
wonder

--

90. adamant

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

ambitious
timely
wasteful
inflexible

79. termagent

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

shrew
insect
ruler
coward

--

91. nepotism

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

without religion
favoritism
patriotism
deception

80. mien

(a) appearance

--

92. reticent

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

reserved
in pain
cooperative
without example

(b)
(c)
(d)

hostile
cheerful
important

315

FINAL REVIEW TEST
- - 93. tyro

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

- - 94. staunch

ruler
beginner
fire-setter
wanner

evil smelling
tight fitting
whiten
{d) strong
(a)

_ _ 1OS. carnage

_ _ 106. aloof

96. taut

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)
(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

- - 97. mortify

- - 98. vapid

- - 99. covet

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)
(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)
(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

100. condone

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

_ _ 101. fatuous

_ _ 102. imbibe

sharing
self-control
hostility
lively
tense
make fun of
pale
gradual

_ _ 107. vertigo

108. foment

wet
quick
remarkable
foolish

_ _ 110. refute

disguise
wish for
bury
change

_ _ 111. celerity

(a)

h~avy

interesting
silly
important

(a)

drink

104. salubrious

112. heinous

316

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

_ _ 113. quandary

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

_ _ 114. efficacy

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

(a)

fashionable
boredom
together
hopeless

115. austere

sad
dangerous
painful
healthful

116. moribund

(b)
(c)
(d)

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

clear away
change

(a)

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

(c)
(d)

(b)
(c)
(d)

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

(b) enter

103. ennui

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

_ _ 109. inveterate

(b)
(c)
(d)

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

calm down
embanass
strengthen
pretend

repeat
punish
forbid
pardon

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

(b)
(c)

- - 95. equanimity

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)
(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

slaughter
carrying away
marriage
anger
painful
reseiVed
interested
dishonest
dizziness
color blindness
ambition
extreme height
become alcoholic
investigate
stir up
calm down
anxious
unknown
questionable
habitual
fame
waste
disobey
disprove
stardom
speed
clearness·
sourness
interference
talkative
evilly wicked
powerful
dilemma
quiet place
hopeful sign
crowd
cheapness
ease
mystery
effectiveness
wild
feverish
unadorned
wishful
marvelous
ambitious
gradual
dying

FINAL REVIEW TEST
__ 117. noisome

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

__ 118. spate

(a)
(b)

(c)
(d)

119. nadir

__ 120. halcyon

__ 121. pragmatic

__ 122. atrophy

__ 123. discreet

__ 124. callow

125. ruminate

__ 126. congenial

127. decorum

rush
excess
insult
shortage

(c)
(d)

climax
secret place
lowest point
happiest moment

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

peaceful
ancient
innermost
careful

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

repeating
fat
practical
imaginative

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

prize
begin again
change direction
waste away

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

patient
colorful
cautious
generous

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

cowardly
unfeeling
inexperienced
private

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

reflect upon
move away
reclassify
start anew

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

clever
agreeable
masterful
selective

(a)

behavior
attractiveness
liveliness
meeting place

(a)
(b)

(b)
(c)
(d)

128. banal

unwholesome
challenging
loud
newly arrived

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

not allowed
nearly finished
trivial
highly respected

- - 129. encomium

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

130. avarice

(a)
(b)

(c)
(d)

__ 131. malign

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

132. venial

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

highest prize
secret plan
new idea
high praise
clear path
wealth
greed
positive
statement
slander
exterminate
join with
dismiss
hopeless
unseen
pardonable
deadly

(c)
(d)

hard to hear
sweet to the ear
soft to the touch
easy to see

__ 134. entreaty

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

plea
agreement
capture
sudden end

__ 135. pensive

(a)

limited
thoughtful
aged
retired

133. dulcet

(a)

(b)

(b)
(c)
(d)

__ 136. bizarre

(a)

(b)
(c)
(d)

__ 137. requisite

138. livid

__ 139. pique

busy
in a huny
timely
fantastic

(b)
(c)
(d)

forgotten
thought
requirement
added problem
lovely object

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

disappointed
enraged
bored
pale

(a)

resentment
condition
(C) hidden from
light
(d) wishful thinking

(a)

(b)

317

FINAL REVIEW TEST
-

140. galvanize

(a) prepare to eat
(b) arouse to activity
(c) store away
(d) experiment

146. abhor

141. extol

(a) explain
apologize for
(c) praise highly
(d) describe honestly

_ _ 147. jocose

(b)

_ _ 142. allude

(a) dizzy
merry
(c) sticky
(d) talkative
(b)

(a) avoid

148. mentor

(b) cover up
(c)

(a) yearn for
(b) hate
(c) distrust
(d) join together

(a) coach
(b) enemy

yearn for

(c)
(d)

(d) suggest

stranger
writer

_ _ 143. slovenly

(a) slowly
(b) wisely
(c) dangerously
(d) carelessly

149. hirsute

(a) overly dressed
(b) out-of-date
(c) haiiy
(d) bald

_ _ 144. prerogative

(a) ask again
(b) exclusive right
(c) dMded power
(d) first born

150. excoriate

(a) complete
win easily
criticize severely
(d) clean thoroughly
(b)
(c)

(a) clothing
(b) arrest
(c) left over
(d) bright color

145. raiment

Answers to Final Review Test
'e

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318

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·z

PANORAMA OF WORDS
•:• Originally introduced in the preceding edition, this section, in which you
will find the 1100 words in sources as strikingly disparate as the Toronto
Globe & Mail, Truman Capote, William Shakespeare, Agatha Christie,
Thomas Mann, TIME, Machiavelli, and Tom Clancy, validates the contention that this selected group of vocabulary words has been widely
used by educated writers.
Most issues of your local newspaper, for example, will contain at least a
dozen of the words you have encountered in these pages. But they also
appear in advertisements, obituary notices, weather forecasts, cartoons, and brochures of all sorts. Wherever else you come in contact
with adult vocabulary-radio and 1V shows, news broadcasts, college
entrance exams, movie sc1ipts, books-you are likely to find more than
a few of the words in 11 00 Words You Need to Know.
Now, for a useful summary of what you have learned in the forty-six
lessons, read through "The Panorama of Words," noting the varied
sources of their usage. Be aware that some of the following quotations
have been a(lapted or edited for brevity.

319

PANORAMA OF WORDS
abhor "I abhor the process of hiring public
setvants." Senator Wayne Morse, speech,

assail her." William Shakespeare, Twelfth
Night

4/17/61

abjure "Galileo was summoned before the
inquisition where he was ordered to abjure
his theory." S. F. Mason, &ience Digest,

5/98

abortive "His company made an abortive
attempt to circle the enemy position but
they fell back under fire." Captain Ron
Herbert, Keep Your Medals
abounds

"A smart thriller that abounds

with suspense and excitement!" Newspaper
ad for film The General's Daughter

abrogate "I decided to abrogate the agreement since General Motors was not living
up to its part of the bargain." Paul Sawyer,
Seeking Justice

abstemious "Be more abstemious Or else,
good night your vow." William Shakespeare,
The Tempest

acknowledged "They used the Swiss
routes and camp sites-which they later
acknowledged-and by the end of April were
established in full strength at their fifth
camp." James Ramsey Ullman, "Victory on
Everest"
acme "He was the acme of a political figure." John Gunther, Inside U.S.A.
acrimonious "We quickly learn of the

acri-

relationship
between
the
Montagues and the Capulets." Playbill,
Summary of Romeo & Juliet
monious

acute "The candidate presented an acute
problem for his party because of his independent views." Jewell Bellush and Dick
Netzer, Urban Politics
adamant "The candidate was

adamant in
his refusal to answer an embarrassing question about his early use of drugs." TIME,

8/12/99

absurd "Many rules in the English language are absurd because they are based on
Latin rules." Bill Bryson, Mother Tongue

access "Everything was simplified, and we
were gaining access to infinity: soon the
moon, SOON THE MOON!" Editorial, Le
Figaro (Paris), 8/14/61
accommodate "The awards will be given
out at a place that will accommodate CSpan." James Barron, "Public Lives," New
York Times,

6/10/99

accomplice

"His chief accomplice was
Democratic boss John Dingell, who sold out
his party in the dark of night." Maureen
Dowd, "The God Squad," New York Times,

adherents ''The state employs a flag as a
symbol for adherents to the government as
presently organized." U.S. Supreme Court
decision. 1943
admonished "A little drummer boy grinned
in me face whin I had admonished him wid
the buckle av my belt for riotin' all over the
place." Rudyard Kipling, "The Courting of
Dinah Shadd"

adroit "Amazingly adroit in building model
airplanes while he was in junior high, Eric
moved on to an aeronautic career in his
twenties." Val Bakker, "Early Decision"
[adapted)

6/20/99

advent "Industrial canning and the

accost

of freezing have reduced home canning to a
curiosity." Molly O'Neill, New York Times,

Sir Toby: "You mistake, knight:

accost is front her, board her, woo her,

320

7/18/99

advent

PANORAMA OF WORDS
adversaries "Both fighters had nothing but
kind words to say about their adversaries."
Hal Butler, "The Battle in the Rain"

highways required immediate attention in
order to alleviate the long delays." The
Queens Courier, 1I 11 I 00

adverse "Illogical as

alludes "Gertrude Stein's phrase, 'A rose, is

it may seem, adverse
criticism can be very rewarding." S. Andhil
Fineberg, "Deflating the Professional Bigot"

advocates "Advocates of marriage classes

a rose, is a rose' alludes to nothing more or
less than what she writes." Alice B. Toklas,
Time Capsule. 1933

contend that giving teens these tools could
eventually curb the divorce rate." Jodie
Morse, "Hitched in Home Room," TIME,
6121199

aloof "Greta Garbo held herself so aloof

aegis

altruism "The conflict is between selfish-

"The Federal Reserve will remain
under the aegis of the veteran head who was
reappointed by the President yesterday."
New York Times, 115100

from her co-stars, they felt they had not
been introduced." Alistair Cooke, The Great
Movie Stars
ness and altruism." Former Senator Estes
Kefauver, campaign speech

ambiguous
afflicted

"It affiicted the neighborhood with

the stench of slime that was now laid bare."
Edmund Wilson, "The Man Who Shot
Snapping Turtles"

"If you disagree with a friend,
be firm, not ambiguous." Samuel Ornage,
The Golden Book

ameliorate "Our aim should be to ameliorate human affairs." John Stuart Mill

affluent "You are affiuent when you buy
what you want, do what you wish and don't
give a thought to what it costs." J. P.
Morgan, quoted in Crown Treasury of
Relevant Quotations

amicable "Their parting is effective Friday,

alacrity "When the price of A.T.&T. dropped

amnesty "No one is advocating wholesale

significantly, fund managers moved with
alacrity to accumulate more shares." Ted
David, CNBC Financial News

amnesty for inmates solely because of
advancing age." Tamerlin Drummond,
"Cellblock Seniors," TIME, 6121199

allay

amorous "A complete gentleman ought to

"The President's message was an
attempt to allay the fears of senior citizens."
"The Future of Medicare," Washington Post,
3/16198

and was described in their joint statement
as 'amicable'." Bill Carter, "Lou Dobbs Quits
CNN," New York Times, 619199

dress well, dance well, have a genius for love
letters, be very amorous but not overconstant." Sir George Etherege, The Man of
Mode

alleged

"I' harvested the intelligence that
Ricks was alleged to have laid off all that
portion of the State of Florida that has been
under water into town lots and sold them to
innocent investors." O'Henry, "The Man
Higher Up"

analogous "Not with the brightness natural to cheerful youth, but with uncertain.
eager, doubtful flashes, analogous to the
changes on a blind face groping its way."
Charles Dickens, Hard Times

alleviate "The report of the transportation

anathema "The founding document of the

division pointed out that the overcrowded

American Reform movement depicted ritual
321

PANORAMA OF WORDS
as anachronistic, even anathema in an
enlightened age." Samuel G. Freedman,
"The On-Reformation," New York, 6/21/99

arbiter of skating fashions." Maribel Y.
Vinson, .. Ice Maiden"

annals "He would begin these annals with
Columbus, and he would keep on with them
until his hand was too palsied to hold a
pen." Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee

arbitrary .. My arbitrary decision not to run
puts Massachusetts at a disadvantage and
probably was a mistake." Representative
Martin Meehan in Newsday, 6/1/99

from Olympus

anomaly "My mother was American, my
ancestors were officers in Washington's
army, and I am an anomaly." Winston
Churchill, speech, 1953

anthropologist "Burning tobacco,

anthro-

pologists have found, was a religious practice over 2000 years ago in the Mayan culture." Jownal of Urban Health. 9/99

antipathy "There is no need to anticipate
any antipathy from your future in-laws
when you plan a wedding." "Wedding
Guide," Courier-Life Publications, 7/99

arbiter "Sonja Henie became the supreme

archaic "Many procedures of the law have
long seemed archaic to laymen." Supreme
Court Justice William 0. Douglas, quoted in
San Francisco Examiner, 1/4/71
ardent "TTlere is no more ardent performer
than Judy Garland as she allows her emotions to shine through." Penelope Houston,
Sight and Sound, 1954
arrayed "She arrayed herself in what
seemed unbelievably beautiful clothes."
Shetwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio
artifact "In caves in Chile, remains of horses have been found along with human artifacts." A. Hyatt Verrill, The Strange Story of

antiquated "The custom of throwing rice at
a newly married couple is an antiquated
one, originally meaning a wish for many
children." "Wedding Guide," Courier-Life
Publications, 7/99

artifice "TTle successful advertiser will use
any artifrce to get his message seen." E. S.
Turner, The Shocking History of Advertising

antithesis "Drunkenness is the antithesis of
dignity." Bergen Evans, "Now Everyone is
Hip About Slang"

artless "Behind the naive, artless manner,
there was a woman scheming for success."
John Simon, Reverse Angle

apathy "The younger generation exhibits

ascended "As he set himself to fan the fire
again, his crouching shadow ascended the
opposite wall." James Joyce, "Ivy Day in the
Committee Room"

apathy toward the issue of freedom of the
press." Herbert Brucker, Journalist

appalled ..A calm and steady temperament
deserted him while he stared, appaUed. at
the contents." John Cheever, The Wapshot
Chronicle

appellation "He went under the appellation
of 'Pretty Boy' but to his victims he was anything but that." Dexter Holcomb, Did the
Roaring Twenties ReaUy Roar? [adapted]
322

Our Earth

ascertain "Scientists have been trying to
ascertain why dinosaurs became extinct so
suddenly." A. Hyatt Verrill, The Strange
Story of Our Earth

ascetic "You don't have to be an ascetic to
wonder if there isn't something a bit manic
about the pace of getting and spending in

PANORAMA OF WORDS
today's America." Paul Krugman, "Money
Can't Buy Happiness. Er, Can It?," New
York Times, 6/1/99

asinine "We have developed what I believe
is an asinine rating system for motion pictures." Harold Owen, Jr., The Motion Picture
asperity "The path of beauty is not soft and
smooth, but full of harshness and asperity."
Havelock Ellis, The Dance of Life

Voicemail and Caller ID that work the san1e
way wherever you go on our network."
Newspaper ad for Internet company, New
York Times, 6/12/99

atypical "He is an atypical candidate, without glamour, fame or wealth." New York
Post, 8/15/99
au courant "He seemed to be au courant
with everything." Arnold Bennett, Lord
Raingo

aspirants "A number of playwrights, small
audacity "Boldness be my friend! Arm me,

aspirants to the big screen, must already be
pricing ·beach houses in Malibu." Ross
Wetzsteon, Introduction to New Plays USA

audacity, from head to foot!" William
Shakespeare, Cymbeline

aspire "To humility indeed it does not even

augmented 'The Russian army was

aspire" John Henry Newman, The Idea of a
University

mented by helicopters and rocket-launching

aug-

tanks in its attack on the defenders."
Newsday, 11/27/99

assets "Berkshire Hathaway is a diversified
holding company with assets in manufacturing, insurance, aircraft safety training,
etc." "Warren's Buffet's Fabulous Fund,"
Mutual Funds Magazine. 6/99

austere puritan colonists who could never
imagine the city as it is today." Moses
Riechin, The Promised City

assiduously "Richard Greenberg is aiming
here for big laughs at the expense of the
generation he so assiduously chronicled in
the past." Peter Marks, "Making Mincemeat
of Boomer Values"

automaton "She's an automaton; she has
every quality in the world, and I've often
wondered why it. is with all that I'm so completely indifferent to her." W. Somerset
Maugham, The Treasure

astute From an astute standpoint, that's
exactly what the ballplayers should do
instead of running out to mob the other
guy." Tim McCarver, Baseball for Brain
Surgeons

avarice "He could not disguise his avarice
under a cloak of religion." Ambrose Bierce

atrophy "Some people thought that too
much reading would atrophy a girl's brain
forever." Ann McGovern, The Secret Soldier
attenuated "The players' strike resulted in
an attenuated and boring season." Sports
Illustrated, 10/96
attest "Thousands of satisfied users can
attest to the great features

such as

austere "New York City was founded by

aversion "During the last years of his
administration the mayor showed an aversion to taking political risks." Jewell Bellush
and Dick Netzer, Urban Politics
avid "CUNY will have no more avid and
fierce supporter for its mission than himself." Karen Arenson, "New Vice-Chairman
of CUNY," New York Times, 6/10/99
awesome "Africa has some of the most
awesome jungles in the world." John
Hersey, Into the Valley

323

PANORAMA OF WORDS
badger 'There are other do's and don'ts:
don't threaten your children, don't badger
them." Newspaper ad for Partnership for a
Drug-Free

America.

New

York

and South Korea." Howard French, "Two
Wary Neighbors Unite," New York Times,
814199

Times,

11/4/99

bagatelle "He saw the benefits to his people
as a mere bagatelle... Winston Churchill,

benevolence "My relationship to this land
is purely spiritual: It's a place of absolute
silence, absolute benevolence." Stephen
Trimble, Wilderness

Great Contemporaries

balk

"She rested on the stair-a young
woman of a beauty that should balk even
the justice of a poet's imagination." 0.
Henry, "Roads of Destiny"

banal "Mansfield Park is a bore! What
might have been attractive on a 1V screen
proved to be uninteresting and banal on the
big screen." "Koch Goes To The Movies,"
Queens Courier, 1I 12 I 00
barometer "We watched carefully to see the
ties that Mr. Smythe would wear as they
were a sure barometer of the mood he would
be in." Loring Brewster, "Vermont's Mr.
Chips"
bedlam 'There was bedlam as the crowd
awoke to the relief of victory." Dick
Thatcher, Against All Odds
begrudge

bereft 'The pictures of the bereft survivors
searching for their loved ones are painful to
see." Newsday, 9119199
besiege "He felt unable to carry the
Confederate lines and settled down to
besiege their fortifications." David Herbert
Donald, Lincoln
besmirch "A primary attack on any witness
against your client is an attempt to besmirch
his or her character." Quoted in New York
Times Magazine, 9120170

bias "U.S. SUIT CHARGES BIAS IN NASSAU COUN'IY PROPER1Y TAXES" Headline,
New York Times, 6115199

bigot "For only by claiming the limelight
can the bigot draw followers and an
income." S. Andhil Fineberg, "Deflating the
Professional Bigot"

"Taxpayers never seem to

begrudge the use of their money when spent

on local projects important to them."
Newsday,8122199

bizarre "The police claim they were
responding to the bizarre behavior of the
man when they were forced to shoot him."
New York Post, 9127199

belated

"When he made his belated
entrance into the political campaign, he was
told he had no chance." Jewell Bellush and
Dick Netzer, Urban Politics

blase "When he hit the home run that
broke the record, he could no longer maintain his previously blase attitude."
Newsday, 918198

belittle "To say this is not to

belittle subject

blatant "It's a classic blatant pyramid
scheme." Robert Hanley, "Gifting Club,"

matter, which is clearly essential to any
proper education." William H. Kilpatrick,
"Progressive Education"

New York Times, 6123199

belligerence "North Korea's

bliss "Is there anything to match the

belligerence in
planning to test a long-range missile has led
to a dramatic change of course for Japan

324

bliss

on a teenager's face the day she obtains her
license to drive?" Car and Driver, 9199

PANORAMA OF WORDS
bluntly "Managers will put it bluntly:
'You've got to catch the ball.' " Tim
McCarver, Baseball for Brain Surgeons

cacophony ..At his side he had a battery
run radio blasting forth a sickening cacophony of noise." Freeman Tilden, The National
Parks

bogus

lhe mayor denied his proposed
change in the election law was a bogus
attempt to seize more power." New York
Times, 9/25/99

cajole "We had to cajole tonight's guest to
come on the program because he's something of a hermit." Larry King on his CNN 1V
program, 8/25/99

bona fide "Milosevic, a bona fide villain,
will pay for his war crimes-we can be sure
of that." Editorial, Washington Post,
5/28/99

callous "The movie industry was callous in
the way it treated writers who came from
New York." Alex Ross, New Yorker, 2/23/98

brash "Baker's brash manner quickly
antagonized the other warehouse workers."
Seymour Broock, Labor Meets Its Match

callow "A group of newly arrived callow
students followed nervously at the director's
heels." Aldous Huxley, Crome Yellow

brigands lhe history of motion pictures

calumny

shows that, from the earliest silent films,
stories about western brigands would capture a large audience." John Simon, Reverse
Angle

"Overwhelmed by the calumny
heaped upon him for his prejudice, he
quickly resigned." Jewell Bellush and Dick
Netzer, Urban Politics

canard "It's a

bristle "No sooner had the dog caught sight
of him, however, than it began to bristle and
growl savagely." H. G. Wells, The Invisible
Man

canard to say I want to be a
millionaire: I just want to live like one."
Toots Shor, quoted in Life Magazine,
10/12/69

candid "Sweepstakes companies must be

buff "Grandpa was a stock market

buff,

hanging around the Dreyfus office most
every weekday and following the yo-yo Dow
Jones averages." Eloise Ryan Abernethy,
One FamUy's Finances [adapted)

more candid about the chances of winning a
prize." AARP Bulletin, 9/99

candor "He was struck by the

candor and
self-reliance of the women in these islands."
"Pacific Paradise," New York Times, 8/9/99

bulwark !hat England, hedged in with the
main, That water-walled bulwark. still
secure And confidant from foreign purposes." William Shakespeare, King John

cant "Although we hear much

burgeoned "In recent years programs on
AM, FM, shortwave and low-powered stations have burgeoned." Carlos Johnston,
"Intelligence Report" Summer 1998

capitulate "The embattled leader refused to

cache "Fagin drew from his

cant about
loving one's neighbor, life provides endless
examples of just the opposite." Paula Love,

The WUl Rogers Book

capitulate to demands for his resignation."
Newswee~

8/19/99

capricious lhe snow removal equipment
cache the box

which he had unintentionally disclosed to
Oliver." Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

is always ready to face the capricious weather changes during the winter." Newsday,
12/24/98

325

PANORAMA OF WORDS
carnage "Amid the carnage resulting from
the earthquake, many acts of courage can
be seen." New York Times, 9/20/99
castigates "Here is Holofernes commenting
upon Armando, a mad wordman who castigates another while himself vocalizes into a
fine frenzy." Harold Bloom, Shakespeare
catastrophic "Romeo changes enormously
under Juliet's influence, remains subject to
anger and despair, and is as responsible as
Mercutio and Tybalt for the catastrophic
event." Harold Bloom, Shakespeare
caustic "His habitual sullermess, stern disposition and caustic tongue produced a
deep impression upon our young minds."
Aleksandr Pushkin, "The Shot"

celerity "The human mind acts at times
with amazing celerity." Benjamin Cardozo,

chimerical "His utopia is not a chimerical
commonwealth but a practicable improvement on what already exists." George
Santayana, The Sense of Beauty
clandestine "Mr. DeLay's plan for another
'independent' group is nothing less than a
proposal to create a clandestine and corrupt
slush fund." Editorial, New York Times,
6/1/99
cliche 'The cliche 'Politics makes strange
bedfellows' certainly applies in this situation." Newsweek, 9/20/99
cliques "The tragic event points out the
danger of forming cliques in school that
shut out many." Newsday, 5/15/99
coerce "The loan sharks sometimes have to
coerce people in order to collect the debt."

Peter Kilborn, "Lenders Thrive on Workers
in Need," New York Times, 6/18/99

The Growth of the Law

cogent "This article paints a clear and
cessation 'The evolutions of the waltzers
were quieted, there was an uneasy cessation
of all things as before." Edgar Allan Poe,
'The Masque of the Red Death"

chagrin "He spent great energy and
achieved, to our chagrin. no small amount
of success in keeping us away from the people who surrounded us." James Baldwin,
Notes of a Native Son

charisma "Yali radiated charisma and energy as he led his people." Jared Diamond,
Guns, Germs, and Steel

charlatan "Many of my friends believe in
fortune tellers; I think they are charlatans."
Letter to "Dear Abby," New York DaUy News,
5/16/99
chicanery "As a profession, lawyers have
become associated with chicanery and confusion." People, 2/4/99
326

cogent picture of how to handle blowouts."
Car and Travel, 9/99

cognizant "I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states."
Martin Luther King, Jr., "Letter From
Birmingham Jail"
comely "An island peopled by the most
comely women to be seen anywhere, Bora
Bora is a must." TraveL 11/99
commodious "The new baseball stadium
offered a more commodious arena for the
fans and players." Sports Illustrated,
5/11/99
compassionate "In addition to professional
skills, patients want a physician who is compassionate." Advertisement for Matmonides
Medical Center, 9/25/95
compatible "The policies of the party are
not

compatible

with his conservative

PANORAMA OF WORDS
beliefs." U.S. News and World Report,
8/25/99

Columbia Presbyterian." "Prostate Update,"
Prostate Digest, 9/99

compensatory "The compensatory factor
was a new arrival; Anukul had a son born to
him." Rabindramath Tagore, "My Lord, the
Baby"

important book in the most condescending
and dismissing manner." Letter to New York
Times Book Review, 7/25/99

complacent "Weather experts warn not to
be complacent about the possibility of a dangerous hurricane." New York, 9/18/95

condolence "Words of condolence seem
very poor things and yet they are all one can
use to tell of one's sympathy." Maisie Ward,

condescending "The reviewer treated this

Father Maturin

complicity "After 1945, Hitler's Germans
replaced complicity with denial." Lance
Morrow, "Done in the Name of Evil," TIME,
6/14/99

component ''The F.B.I. did, in fact, develop
a racial component, the profile of serial
killers as predominantly white, male loners." Jeffrey Goldberg, "The Color of
Suspicion," New York Times, 6/20/99
compounded ''The match between England
and Argentina, always a blood feud, was
compounded by the memory of the
Falklands crisis." Henry Kissinger, "Pele,"
TIME, 6/14/99

comprehensive "Lecter was built up as a
superman, embodying absolute yet comprehensive evil." Christopher Lehmann-Haupt,
"Hannibal Lecter Returns," New York Times
Book Review, 6/10/99

concocting "I am concocting a seduction; I
do not require a pastry chef." Ben Brantley,
New York Times, 6/15/99
concomitant ''The doses of the drug were
increased with the concomitant result that
he quickly became an addict." Otto
Friedrich, Before the Deluge

concur "Dr. Fishbein did not

concur with

his colleague's diagnosis and urged the
Harper family to seek an opinion from the
head of the Urology Department at

condone "He does not condone the actions
of any of the participants in the impeachment hearings." New York Times Book
Review, 9/26/99

conducive "The quiet calm of this garden is
conducive to romance or repose." "The
Sophisticated Traveler," 9/26/99

confidant "Lecter rents a lavish house not
terribly far from the modest duplex of FBI
agent Starling, his antagonist/ confidant
during the period seven years earlier." Paul
Gray, "Dessert Anyone?," TIME, 6/21/99
conflagration "Did the firing of incendiary
tear gas canisters cause or contribute to the
conflagration?" New York Times, 9/3/99
confronts "When we gaze into a seeming
infinity of tomorrows, we face the challenge
that any generation confronts when it looks
ahead." Editorial. "2000 and Beyond," New
York Times, 1/1/00
congenial "Susan's congenial manner
made her a favorite in the rodeo." Lacey
Fosburgh, "All-Girls Rodeos," New York
Times, 8/17/99
conjecture "We read to understand how to
take care of ourselves, to prepare for the
unexpected, to conjecture what we would do
in similar situations." Annie Proulx. "They
Lived to Tell the Tale"
327

PANORAMA OF WORDS
conjugal Hillary is Our Lady of Perpetual
Coryugal Suffering; the patron saint of every

woman who's every been wronged."
Maureen Dowd, "Rudy in Reverse," New
York Times, 6/6/99

connoisseur 'This is the car for the

con-

noisseur who doesn't have to think about
cost." Car and Driver, 10/99

cope "Every single muscle in the body was
strained to the uttermost throughout the
watch to cope with the steering." Thor
Heyerdahl, Kon Tiki
copious "The wedding reception featured
copious amounts of food, drink, and music."
New York Times, 9/26/99

corpulent "When he squeezed his corpulent

Cakes and Ale

body into a chair he seemed to be stuck
there forever." Charles W. Thompson,
Presidents I Have Known

consternation "Father and son stared at

corroborated "Bill

connubial "I never could imagine connubial
bliss until after tea." W. Somerset Maugham,

Earth

corroborated the captain's statement, hurried back down the
glistening ladders to his duty." Hanson W.
Baldwin, "R.M.S. Titanic"

constricted "He grew up in slightly less

coterie "The aristocratic

constricted circumstances than his teammates." Darcy Frey, The Last Shot

Way

each other in consternation and neither
knew what to do." Pearl Buck, The Good

construed "Hemingway's simple approach
was construed as mysticism." Robert Ruark,
"Ernest Was Very Simple"

consummate

"Arnold Zweig, a writer of
consummate artistry. presents a picture of
delicacy and charm that hovers on the brink
of disaster." Roger Goodman, World- Wide
Stories

contemptuous "It is not difficult to feel contemptuous when studying the ugly behavior
of some of the powerful figures of motion
pictures." Pauline Kael, I Lost It at the
Movies

contort "He is an actor who can contort his
face into any number of shapes." People,
4/15/99
controversial "His three-year tenure was

coterie finally got
the upper hand." Edith Hamilton, The Greek

countenance

"Behind a most pleasant

countenance, this dictator has maintained a
most brutal regime." Newsweek, 2/21/98

coup "Newt Gingrich was nearly toppled in
a coup attempt in the House." Michael
Duffy, "Who Chose George?." TIME,
6/21/99

covert "In a

covert manner, Knute traveled
abroad that night." Sinclair Lewis, "Young
Man Axelbrod"

coveted "The moment has arrived for our
annual coveted 'Bloopie' Awards." William
Safire, New York Times, 7/18/99

crave "It's the perfect way for the Clintons
to hang on to the power, glamour and
excitement they both crave." Bob Herbert,
"It Could Happen." New York Times, 6/6/99

controversial and contained charges of

criterion "This new product is useful. but

racism." Monte Williams, "Roosevelt Island
Chief," New York Times, 6/10/99

the major criterion is its safety." Car and
Trave~ 10/99

328

PANORAMA OF WORDS
cryptic "Ms. Bogart, an iconoclastic director known for her cryptic reworkings of
everything, turns out to be an ideal interpreter for Gertrude Stein." Ben Brantley,
"Gertrude and Alice," New York Times.
6/14/99
culminated "The years of physical and
mental training culminated in the fulfillment
of a lifelong dream." Vim & Vigor, Summer
1998
culpable "When the jury found Stacy culpable, she collapsed in a state of shock."
Eloise R. Baxter, "Judgment Day"
culprit "We pointed out the tender age and
physical slightness of the little culprit."
Thomas Mann, "Mario and the Magician"
cumbersome "Grizzly bears may look cumbersome and awkward, but don't be
deceived." Nature, 2/97

cumulative "There can be an extraordinary
cumulative strength in Mr. Foote's plays."
Ben Brantley, New York Times, 6/18/99

cupidity "There is little real humor in this
picture of cunning and cupidity as revealed
by a petty contest for a paltry sum." Liam
O'Flaherty, "A Shilling"
curry "The candidates are visiting many
senior centers in an attempt to curry support among the elderly." AARP Bulletin,
9/99
cursory "Even a cursory glance at the text
of the peace agreement shows that the
Yugoslav leader has accepted NATO's
demands in full." Tim Judah, "What Do We
Do With Serbia Now?," New York Times,
6/4/99
curtail "A court decision to a freeze on regulations to curtail cross-state pollution was
unpopular." "EPA's Reduced Standards,"
Newsday, 6/15/99

cynical "A cynical view of phone calls or
mail offering free merchandise or membership is the safest approach." Newsweek.
6/7/98
dearth "There was no

dearth of criticism of
his work." H. L. Mencken, "The Case of
Dreiser"

debacle "After leading the league for most
of the season, September brought the debacle that ruined their hopes." Roger Kahn,
The Boys of Summer
debilitating "Exercise can help people overcome debilitating illnesses." Vim & Vigor,
Summer 1998
debris "They continued their support for
earthquake victims in the debris of collapsed houses." New York Daily News,
8/7/99
decade "Clearly, the first decade of the
21st century will be the 'e-decade,' as all
forms of e-commerce and e-ways of life continue to grow." Letter to the editor, New York
Times, 1/1/00
decadence "I said earlier that the

deca-

dence of our language is probably curable."
George Orwell, Politics and the English
Language

decapitate "The FBI hoped that the arrest
of the drug lord would decapitate the illegal
organization." David Denby, Beyond
Rangoon

declaimed "Some of the province's most
illustrious men visited the courthouse and
declaimed within its four walls." Hazel
Grinnell, Travel Journal

decorum "My father's sense of decorum
was shattered by his son's bad behavior in
the restaurant." Peter Balakian. Black Dog
of Fate

329

PANORAMA OF WORDS
decrepit

"Some schools are in such

decrepit condition that students will be

transferred to safer schools until repairs
can be made." NYC Schools Chancellor
Rudy Crew, Newsday, 7/6/99

deem "You shall stay here as long as the

least." Elizabeth Gray Vining, Windows for
the Crown Prince

denote 'The origins of the letters 'O.K.' to
denote 'all right' are not clear." Bill Bryson,
Mother Tongue

necessary."

depict "How can one depict the beauty and

"His defamatory remarks
about minorities are transmitted on the
Internet." TIME, 8/30/99

deplorable "The troops were amazed at the

degraded 'The world is weary of statesmen
who have become degraded into politicians." Benjamin Disraeli

deploy "Eisenhower expressed the hope

proper authorities deem
Bernard Malamud, The Fixer

defamatory

deleterious

'These statutes will have a

deleterious effect on the public interest."

Supreme Court Justice Tom Clark, speech,
1960

delineation 'There is no need for an exact
delineation of a standard for a permit to

hold a street meeting." Supreme Court
Justice Felix Frankfurter, decision, 1951

deluded "Mrs. Barrows had deluded herself
that you visited her last evening and
behaved in an unseemly manner." James
Thurber, 'The Catbird Seat"

deluge 'The art exhibit brought a deluge of
criticism because of its subject matter." New
Ybrk Daily News, 9/28/99

delve "We can help you delve deeper into
your destination and take you places most
travel companies miss." GrWl.d Circle Travel

impact of Grand Canyon in words or pictures?" Freeman Tilden, The National Parks
deplorable conditions in the refugee camp."
Newsweek, 5/12/97

that the United States would not be the first
to deploy a weapon so horrible." David
McCullough, Truman

deprecate "Why do they always deprecate
the efforts of a woman press secretary, but
rarely a man doing the same job?" New
York, 9/25/95

derided "He made his living in a vocation
so derided it has become a gag phrase: wedding singer." Joyce Wadler, "Public Lives,"
New York Times, 6/15/99

derived "His political success is

derived

mainly from the public awareness of his
prominent family." TIME, 2/16/98

derogatory

"When a communist father
noticed a religious program·· on 1V, he
uttered a derogatory statement and turned
off the program." J. Edgar Hoover, "Why Do
People Become Communists?"

Booklet

desist "My husband kicked me under the

demeanor "You could tell by her demeanor

table and warned me to desist." Phyllis
Krasilovsky, "Pumpernickel in My Purse,"
New York Times, 6/12/99

that she was more than a bit upset by the
unexpected news." New York Times, 9/7/99

demur "At first the Crown Prince would
demur, but after being prodded, he would

generally choose dictation, which he liked
330

destitute "Our Supreme Court has said
that any citizen has a Constitutional right to
have counsel. and that the court must
appoint a lawyer to defend the destitute."

PANORAMA OF WORDS
Joseph Welch, "Should a Lawyer Defend a
Guilty Man?"

desultory "Mortimer enters and, distracted
by what his aunts are doing, plants a desultory kiss upon Elaine's cheek." Joseph
Kessehing, Arsenic and Old Lace

deter "Concern for his job did not deter him
from making public the dangers of smoking." "Brave Politician," New York Times,
4/12/99

detriment

'The New York City Board of
Education voted not to renew the chancellor's contract as the majority viewed him as
a detriment to improvements in education."
New York Newsday, 1/4/00

devout 'This author has a devout following
among young readers." New York Times
Book Review, 7/25/98

dexterity "Ali built his career based on his
dexterity, both in the ring and in the use of
colorful language." Boxing, 3/95

diatribe "Rebecca Gilman's new play could
easily have been an easy diatribe against
racism." TIME, 6/7/99

dilettante "This art exhibit is not for the
dilettante; the subject matter is too shocking." New York DaUy News, 10/3/99

diminutive

"A. giant of a chef, he is a

diminutive, modest man." New York Post,

discreet "When questioned about her husband's illegal activities, she kept a discreet
silence." Newsday, 5/16/99

disdain "Hillary shows disdain for the idea
that matters other than policy are anyone's
business." Margaret Carlson, "Uh-Oh, the
Re·al First Lady Shows Up," TIME, 6/7/99

disgruntled 'The police believe the damage
was done by a disgruntled ex-employee."
Newsday, 5/16/99

disheveled

"The wind tugged at and

disheveled her hair." William Cowper, The
Task

dismantle "Wayne Huizenga's move to dismantle the World Series Marlin squad has

hurt the Florida team at the box office."
Ralph Kiner, baseball announcer, Fox
Sports [adapted!

disparage "It (government control) has been
called crackpot, but that doesn't disparage
it for me." E. B. White, One Man's Meat

disparate

"At the moment standardized
tests have a disparate racial and ethnic
impact." Abigail Thernstrom, "Testing, the
Easy Target," New York Times, 6/10/99

dispersed 'The police waded in and dispersed the protesting crowd." New York
Post, 10/23/99

10/10/99 '

disseminate "In the history of the world, no

discern "He could not see that the Justice's

other tool has allowed us to disseminate
more information than the Internet."
Computer World, 5/99

face was kindly nor discern that his voice
was troubled." William Faulkner, "Barn
Burning"

disciples "Rick and his disciples dominated
the entire summer scene, making it
unpleasant for those who were not part of
the inner circle." Ellis R. Sloane, CatskUl
Idyll [adapted!

dissent "In the totalitarian state that utopianism produced, dissent could not be tolerated." Anthony Lewis, "Abroad at Home,"
New York Times, 12/31/99

distraught

"On the veranda of Banker
White's house Helen was restless and
331

PANORAMA OF WORDS
distraught" Sherwood Anderson, "Sophis-

tication"

diversity "Mr. Oates said this rare docu:ment belonged in Queens because it is the
center of ethnic diversity for this country."
New York Times, 1/5/00

dulcet "Her dulcet tones and intelligent
reading of the story captivated the hearers."
"Our Town," New York Times. 10/7/99
duped "Barnum knew the American public
loved to be duped." W. L. Phelps. American
Entrepreneurs

divulged "The DNA tests divulged enough
evidence to free him from death row."
Newsweek, 2/17/98

duplicity "The duplicity of which he had
been guilty weighed on his spirit." H. C.
Bunner, "Our Aromatic Uncle"

docile "How long can they remain

duress "Under duress she was forced to
admit having lied during a 1994 deposition
in her breach of contract law suit."
Associated Press report. Newsday, 6/24/99

docile,

living under such terrible oppression?"
Business Week, 6/16/98

doddering 'The image of the aged as suffering from memory loss and doddering
mobility is far from accurate." AARP
Magazine, 9/99
doleful 'The patients were left in

doleful

plight, as the whole country resounded with
the consequent cry of 'hard times'."
Washington Irving, 'The Devil and Tom
Walker"

domicile "At night he returned peaceably
enough to his lonesome domicile." Theodore
Dreiser, 'The Lost Phoebe"

dormant "The disease may lie

dormant for

years before becoming active and dangerous." Johns Hopkins Health Letter, 5/97

dregs "Some certain dregs of conscience are
yet within me." William Shakespeare,
Richard III

drudgery

"And then she came to find
the paralytic aunt-housework-janitor's
drudgery." Anzia Yezierska. "Hunger"

dubious "Many scientists say its experimental merits are dubious." Margaret
Wente. "Fifth Column." Globe and Mail.
Toronto, 5/27/99

332

edifice "My love was like a fair house built
on another man's ground so that I have lost
my edifice by mistaking the place where I
erected it." William Shakespeare. The Merry
Wives of Windsor

efficacy "He runs his office with the greatest efficacy." Sally Quinn. Chicago Sun
Times, 12/9/79

effigy "ANGRY SERBS HANG UNCLE SAM
IN EFFIGY'' Headline over Associated Press
photo. New York Times. 8/23/99

effrontery "In view of his personal background, we were astonished at his qflrontery
in attacking the morals of the candidate."
Jewell Bellush and Dick Netzer. Urban
Politics

egotist

"It takes an egotL<;I to believe that
nature has provided these beauties as a
special act on his behalf." Freeman Tilden,
The National Parks

egregious

"It is mystifying why some
women still stick with Bill through so many
egregious episodes." Maureen Dowd, New
York Times. 6/2/99

elapsed 'True. a decent time had

elapsed.

and it was not even suggested that Waythorn

PANORAMA OF WORDS
had supplanted his predecessor." Edith
Wharton, The Descent of Man [adapted]

knew things she did not." Rose Macaulay,
The World My Wilderness

elicit "The experimental animal obviously

encomiums "Isn't it sad that we receive our

hoped to elicit a reproduction of the pleasurable sensations he had experienced
under laboratory conditions." Loren Eiseley,
"Man and Porpoise"

highest encomiums after we are gone and
unable to enjoy them?" James Farley, quoted in RujJles and Flowishes

encumbrance "Maxim decided to dispose

5/7/98

of the encumbrance of a whining wife and
three disrespectful teenagers by leaving
silently in the dead of the night." Everett
Dodds, Greener Pastures [adapted]

elusive "In his appearance there was some-

engrossed "The wasp was engrossed utter-

elucidate "The Secretary of State tried to
elucidate the government's policies. in the
troubled Middle East." New York Times,

thing attractive and elusive which allured
women and disposed them in his favour."
Anton Chekhov, "The Lady with the Dog"

emaciated

"Twiggy, whose fame was related to her emaciated look, is now better

known for her singing and dramatic talent."
Play review, New Jersey Star Ledger,
5/12/99

embellished "The prioress may not have
told the correct story in all its details and
she may even have embellished the story a
little bit to make it more attractive." Lin
Yutang, "The Jade Goddess"

eminent "It was unbelievable that a man so
eminent would actually sit in our dining
room and eat our food." V.S. Pritchett, "The
Saint"

emissary "The mayor sent an emissary to
the striking teachers in the hope of starting
negotiations." Jewell Bellush and Dick
Netzer, Urban Politics

emitted "The smoke that was emitted when
the bomb went off made some think it was a
firecracker but I thought it was a revolver
shot." Journal of Andre Gide, Vol. I

emulate "Her companions she loved and
admired but could not emulate for they

ly in her task." Alan Devoe, "The Mad
Dauber"

enhance "Her breadth of experience and
determination to enhance her knowledge
have increased her value to Con Edison."
Con Edison Report, Producing Excellence,
1998

enigma "He was an enigma-by this I mean
that he did not look soldierly nor financial
nor artistic nor anything definite at all." Max
Beerbohm, "A. V. Laider"

ennui "The ennui and utter emptiness of a
life of pleasure is fast urging fashionable
women to something better." Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, The Newport Convention

entourage "Sinatra was the greatest but I
was never a part of his entourage, his rat
pack." Comedian Buddy Hackett to New
York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, New York Daily
News, 7/14/99

entreaty

"The police captain made one
more entreaty for the unruly crowd to
leave." New York Post, 10/23/99

enunciated "At his press conference, Jerry
Springer enunciated his qualifications for a
Senate seat in Ohio." Francis X. Clines,
"Springer Considers Race for Senate," New
York Times, 8/4/99
333

PANORAMA OF WORDS
epithets "Four scowling men sat in the
dinghy and surpassed records in the invention of epithets." Stephen Crane, 'The Open
Boat"
epitome "My community considers a man
in uniform to be the living epitome of heroism." Lucius Garvin, Collected Essays
equanimity "We have to call upon our
whole people to stand up with equanimity to
the fire of the enemy." Winston Churchill,
speech, 1942

eradicate "The urologist said that prostate
cancer patients shouldn't hang their hopes
on having the vaccine eradicate the disease
in the near future." Associated Press,
"Vaccine Fights Prostate Cancer," Newsday,
10/21/99

erudite "The erudite historian, Prof. Garrett
Clark, will speak on 'Evaluating Democracy'
at our April meeting." Lancaster Library
Bulletin, Spring 2000
eruption "We have learned about this
ancient city, frozen in time by the eruption of
Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D." Grand Circle Travel
Booklet, 1999
escalation "There is a dangerous escalation
in Kashmir as India and Pakistan are
engaged in the worst fighting in decades."
Editorial, New York Times, 6/22/99
eschew

"When in Rome, we decided to

eschew Arithmetic." Ruth McKinney, "Proof

in Nine"

ethics ''The vast majority of employees perform in a highly satisfactory manner
because good work ethics exist in their
kitchens." Manual for School Food Servic~
Managers in N.Y.C. Public Schools !adapted]

cian who no longer has any influence."
Robert Wallace, "Not Him"

evaluate "Mr. Gooding hopes to find the
answer if his mentor gives him the chance
to evaluate the prisoner." Lawrence Van
Gelder, New York Times, 6/4/99
evanescent ''The incidents which give
excellence to biography are of a volatile and
evanescent kind." Samuel Johnson, 'The
Rambler" No. 30
eventuated "Her illness following the
chemotherapy eventuated in death."
Terrence Foy, St. Louis Blues
evince 'The vote on Roe vs. Wade will show
whether enough senators evince an interest
in overturning the 1973 Supreme. Court
decision." Elaine Povich, "Abortion Politics,"
Newsday, 10/22/99
exacerbated
"Jason Isringhausen's
injuries were exacerbated by his immaturity." Howie Rose, Mets Baseball Announcer,
Fox Sports, 6/8/99 !adapted]
excoriate "Senator Bradley refused to excoriate his opponent, preferring to take the
road in the campaign." ABC
Eyewitness T.V. News, 10/21/99

high

excruciating "An almost excruciating agitation results when a leaf falls into still water."
Jack London, "To Build a Fire"
exhort "There was no reason for me to
exhort the guys to play hard because they
were already giving me 110%." Mets
Baseball Manager Bobby Valentine on Radio
Talk Show WFAN, 10/21/99

exonerate "There is no reason to exonerate

euphemism "But now he was merely an

him from the ordinary duties of a citizen."
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Collected Legal

elder statesman, the euphemism for a politl-

Papers

334

PANORAMA OF WORDS
expatriate "For months she lived the noc-

extraneous 'The ballet struck me as extra-

turnal life of an expatriate American tango
bum." Jimmy Scott, "Flirting with the
Tango," New York Times, 6/11/99

neous and out of keeping with the rest of the
play." Wolcott Gibbs, More in Sorrow

extrinsic

between a moral action and an expedient
one." Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon

"Disdaining contributions from
extrinsic lobbying groups, the candidate
won my admiration and my vote." Lawrence
Burton, "Inside the Polls"

expedite "There was a pressing need to

exult

expedient "There exists the age old choice

expedite assistance to those suffering after
the earthquake." Newsday, 8/15/99

exploit "He has not wanted to exploit his
fame as a basketball star for political advantage." Boston Globe, 7/27/99

expunge "If the offender made

"YANKEES EXULT OVER PEl III IE'S
PERFORMANCE" Headline, Sports Section,
Newsday, 6/19/99

exultation "We face the year 2000 with a
combination of concern and exultation."
Newsweek, 12/15/99

it to adulthood without further problems, everything
would be expunged." James Kilpatrick, "Boy
Learns Constitution-the Hard Way,"
Burlington Vermont Free Press, 6/12/99

fabricate "Perhaps the dialogues that you
fabricate are nothing more than monologues." Miguel Unamuno, "Mist"

expurgate "Lenny resisted any attempt by

servant to work at a private agenda." H. L.
Woods

the law to expurgate his language dealing
with personal and private behavior." "Lenny
Bruce, Voice of Shock," Atlantic Monthly,
5/86

extant "Rumors are extant that the Federal
Reserve members are greatly concerned
about the irrational exuberance of
investors." Bloomberg Financial News,
4/12/98

extinct "There are many warnings that loss
of habitat will make many species extinct in
the near future." "The Rotunda," Publication
of the American Museum of Natural History,
5/5/98

fa~ade "He hid behind thefa~ade of public

facet "As soon as one becomes computerliterate, a new technical facet is introduced
that challenges us once again." New York
Times, 10/25/99

facetious

"Politicians must be careful
about any facetious comment that can be
turned into an opponent's advantage."
Jewell Bellush and Dick Netzer, Urban
Politics

facile

"We are usually more facile with
words we read than with words we use to
write or speak.·· Charlton Laird, The Miracle
of Language

extol "They extol the largely nonexistent
virtues of bygone eras." Artemus Abruzzi,
Commonsense

factitious "The opposition was challenged

extortion "To the prince who goes forth
with his army, supporting it by pillage and
extortion, this open-handedness is necessary." Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince

fallacious "The demand was plausible, but

by a factitious outpouring of what appeared
to be popular support for the. government."
Robert Kaplan, Balkan Tragedy
the more I thought about it, the more falla-

335

PANORAMA OF WORDS
cious it seemed." A. D. White, Scams and
Schemes (adapted!

falter "Should we falterin our determination to pursue an honorable solution to the
problems of the Middle-East. and face
unthinkable consequences?" I. F. Stone,
"The Weekly Reader"
fastidious "A single small elephant tusk
took no less than two months of fastidious
work to excavate." Brian Fagan, Time
Detectives

fatal "What caused him to lose the election
was his .fatal mistake of not raising sufficient funds to publicize himself." Jewell
Bellush and Dick Netzer. Urban Politics
fatuous "After only a few seconds of silence.
speakers of English seem obligated to say
something, even making a fatuous comment
about the weather." Bill Bryson, The Mother
Tongue
feasible "Everyone who has looked at the
smart guns said there is no quick . .feasible
way of doing this." Leslie Wayne. "Smart
Guns," New York Times, 6/15/99
feint "Young as Oliver was. he had sense
enough to make a .feintoffeeling great regret
at going away." Charles Dickens. Oliver
Twist
felicitous "The evening of hypnotism was
not a felicitous one: we were frightened that
we would lose our will or enter into unpleasant acts." Diary of Anais Nin
felon "I was surprised to see this notorious
felon become a regular at our bible discussion classes." Rabbi Myron David. A
Chaplain's Jail Tales (adapted!
ferment "She herself yearned for calm, but
lived in a neighborhood of ferment and daily
chaos." Alan Lelchuk. American Mischief
336

fervid 'Tm a mixture of my mother's determination and my father's fervid optimism."
Gwen Robyns. Light of A Star
fetish "Today the automobile has become a
fetish for one's standing and accomplishments." Mark Twain, Autobiography
fetters "The cruel fetters of the galley slaves
were wet with blood." Alex Haley, Roots
fiasco "Your $25 contribution to our fund
will bring you an hilarious tape of the _fiasco
of an elementary school's production of
'Peter
Pan.'"
Public
Broadcasting
Announcement, 12/25/98
fiat "Pitching Coach Bob Apodaca's fiat to
Met hurlers was simple: pitch fast. change
speeds, throw strikes." Howie Rose. baseball
announcer. Fox Sports, 7/8/99
flabbergasted "The President was flabbergastedwhen his private office recorded conversations were made public." Herbert
Brucker. Journalist

flagrant "Gene Savoy's _flagrant name dropping doesn't seem to bother any of the visitors on board." Brad Wetzler. "Crazy for
Adventure," New York Times, 6/6/99
flamboyant "Dame Judi Dench is not as
flambo~Jant

as the other British theatrical
Dames such as Vanessa Redgrave or Maggie
Smith." Playbill. Vol. 9. No. 55

flay "There is no shortage of critics who flay
the journalists for being sensation seekers
rather than news gatherers." Herbert
Brucker, Journalist
fledgling "Women's professional basketball,
recently a _fledgling sport, has taken root
and grown into a major spectator event."
Sports,9/14/99
flout "His ideas frightened the farmers. for
he would flout and ridicule their traditional

PANORAMA OF WORDS
beliefs with a mocking logic that they could
not answer." S. Raja Ratnam. "Drought"

frenetic "There is no place more frenetic
than a newspaper office when a major story
is breaking." Herbert Brucker, Journalist

fluctuated "He fluctuated between mindless
talk and endless silence." Alix Shulman,
"Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen"

foist "Eventually, advertisements began to
foist off the use of perfume as a way to snare
a man." E. S. Turner, The Shocking History
of Advertising [adapted]
foment "The petitioners were not attempting to foment violence by their peaceful
actions." Supreme Court Justice Hugo
Black, decision, 1960

forthwith "Get down to your Toyota dealer
forthwith and take advantage of our holiday
saleabration." Toyota advertisement, CBS
TV

fortuitous "Representative Foley resumed a
corridor interview, making a point about the
fortuitous beauty of bipartisanship." Francis
X. Clines, "Gun Control Debate," New York
Times, 6/18/99

frenzy "They had a sense of the wildest
adventure, which mounted to frenzy, when
some men rose on the shore and shouted to
them, 'Hello, there! What are you doing with
that boat?'" William Dean Howells. A Boy's
Town

fretful "When Mike Nichols directed Who's
Mraid of Virginia Woolf?' Warner Bros. was
fretful, worrying about the Legion of
Decency." Liz Smith, "Century's Choice,"
New York Post, 6/23/99

frugal "He was famouslyfrugal-'so tight he
damn near squeaked' says a colleague." Eric
Pooley, "How George Got His Groove," TIME,
6/21/99

fruitless

"Since launching a diplomatic
shuttle, the Russian envoy had spent
dozens of fruitless hours with the Yugoslav
dictator." Johanna McGeary, "Why He
Blinked," TIME, 6/14/99

frustrated "I will not be frustrated by reali-

fracas "Once the will was read. there fol-

ty." Ray Bradbury, Forever and the Earth

lowed a fracas that involved numerous law
suits andlasted years." Fortune, 2/16/91

fulsome "I was appreciative of his sincere

fractious "The fractious couple received a
tongue lashing from Judge Judy." Arnold
Feigenbaum. "Television Justice?"

frail "Thisfrail woman has the strength to
work where the strong turn away." "Mother
Teresa," New Republic, 10/16/97

fraught "Ev'ry sigh comes forth so fraught
with sweets, Tis incense to be offered to a
god." Nathaniel Lee, The Rival Queens

fray "To the latter end of a fray and the
beginning of a feast. Fits a dull fighter and a
keen guest." William Shakespeare, Henry N

and fulsome praise." Ruth McKinney, "A
Loud Sneer for Our Feathered Friends"

furtive "Hogan directed afurtive glance up
and down the alley." John Steinbeck. "How
Mr. Hogan Robbed a Bank"

futility "Resistance to changes in English
language rules often ends in futility ." Bill
Bryson, Mother Tongue

galvanize "While he could not galvanize an
audience, he could make them think."
George Jean Nathan, House of Satan

gamut "At one end of the gamut of slang's
humor is what Oliver Wendell Holmes called

337

PANORAMA OF WORDS
'the blank checks of a bankrupt mind.'"
Bergen Evans, "Now Everyone is Hip About
Slang"

garbled "A

garbledaccount of the matter

that had reached his colleagues led to some
gentle ribbing." H. G. Wells, 'The Man Who
Could Work Miracles"

garrulous 'The more he drank, the more
garrulous he became, until he suddenly
seemed to fade out." Lawrence O'Brien, W.
c. Fields

gaudy '1llis computer drawing program
permits children to express themselves in
the most gaudy art they can imagine."
Working Mother, 5/96

ened my horizons." I. F. Stone, Weekly
Reader

glib "It is not glib to maintain that truth
can never be contained in one creed." Mary
Augusta Ward, Robert Elsmere
gratuity "What form of gratuitywould compensate his informer's key bit of information?" Dashiell Hammett, Red Harvest
gregariousness "We will take with us one
thing alone that exists among porpoises as
among men; an ingrained gregariousness"
Loren Eiseley, "Man and Porpoise"
grimace "When informed of the death of his
best friend, he was unemotional, not a grimace marred his face." James Jones, The

gaunt "Her gauntexpression was mistaken

Thin Red Line

for weakness of spirit, whereas it told the
sad story of her life." George Eliot, Middle

grotesque "Nowadays, men have to work,
and women to many for money; it's a dreadfully grotesque world." Louisa May Alcott.

March

genocide ..Accounts of the destruction of

Little Women

masses of people recall that genocide is an
ancient practice." Otto Friedrich, Before the

guise "Freedom is not worth fighting for, if,
under its guise one tries to get as much as
he can for himself." Dorothy Canfield Fisher.

Deluge

genre "There is a certain difference between
a work called a romance and the genre
known as the novel." Nathaniel Hawthorne

germane "In assigning ratings to films, is it
not germane to consider the nature and
extent of violence shown?" The HoUywood
Reporter, 5/19/97
gesticulating .. Three times' was still all he
could say, in his thick, angry voice, ·gesticulating at the commissaire and glaring at
me." Francis Steegmuller, "The Foreigner"
gist "The gistof it is ... love is a great beautifier." Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
gleaned "I

gleanedwhat I could from col-

lege, but independent reading soon broad338

Seasoned Timber

gullible '"Charles the horse wa~ wonderful!'·
cried a gullible goose." James Thurber,
"What Happened to Charles"
gusto "Ali
confidence
with wit
Challenge,"

faced each fight with supreme
and challenged his opponents
and gusto" "His Greatest
Sports Illustrated, 5/5/97

habitat "Billy begins to be happy about life
only in an artificial but cozy habitat on
another planet." William Bly, Barron's Book
Notes, Slaughterhouse Five ·by Kurt
Vonnegut
halcyon 'The halcyon days we recall with
pleasure had many clouded moments."
Wolcott Gibbs, New Yorker, 4/8/49

PANORAMA OF WORDS
hapless "Parents, too, have an almost irresistible impulse to mold their children in
their own image or at least graft a few of
their own ambitions onto their hapless offspring." Arthur Gordon, "The Neglected Art
of Being Different"
harassing "Over the next weeks came more
amendments and harassing tactics including a motion to postpone selection of a new
capital." Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln:
The Prairie Years

harbingers

"It is easy enough to find harbingers of the episode in the early coverage
of Mrs. Dole's candidacy." TIME, 5/24/99

haven "The desire to escape the city has filtered down into every other economic group,
and as a result of the suburb's popularity,
that haven of refuge is itself filling up."
Lewis Mumford, "The Roaring Traffic's
Boom"
havoc "Excessive sensitiveness plays havoc
with children's nerves." Guy De Maupassant,
"Looking Back"
heinous "All crimes against a whole people
are measured by the heinous ones carried
out by Hitler." Civilization, 12/99
heresy "Calvin had written that heresy was
not an evil, deserving death." Herbert
Brucker, Journalist
heterogeneous "The family is

heteroge-

neous enough to make quite a good party in
itself." Rose Macauley, The World My
Wilderness

hirsute "The difference between this rock
concert and one 10 years earlier is the
marked decrease in hirsute young men."
TIME, 8/8/99
histrionics "Bobby Valentine's

histrionics

will be irrelevant, because Rule 51 states
that any manager who is ejected must

remain in the clubhouse until the game is
over." Jack Curry, "Valentine is Suspended
and Fined," New York Times, 6/11/99

hoard "Many people give freely of their
affections while you hoard yours." Joseph
Conrad, Victory
hoax "Frank Spencer, an anthropologist
who rummaged through the bones of controversy to theorize about the identity of the
mastermind behind the Piltdown Man hoax
of 1912, died on Sunday." Obituary notice,
New York Times, 6/12/99
homogeneous
"Archaeologists have
unearthed evidence showing that the people
of ancient Egypt were far from a homogeneous civilization." Brian Fagan, Time
Detective

hostile "He might commit some hostile act,
attempt to strike me or choke me." Jack
London, White Fang
humility "Early in life I had to choose
between arrogance and humility; I chose
arrogance." Frank Lloyd Wright
hyperbole "It is not hyperbole to state that,
most terribly, justice and judgment lie often
a world apart." Emmeline Pankhurst, My
Own Story

iconoclast "He was an iconoclast about
everything, except his love of money." Garry
Wills.. syndicated newspaper column.
3/8/79
idyllic "The brilliant Hawaiian sunrise
beckons you to a great breakfast as your
tour of the idyllic islands begins." Brochure
for Perillo Tours
ignominious "Henry Clay had ambition to
become president. but he faced an ignominious series of setbacks." H. Foner, Failed
Candidates

339

PANORAMA OF WORDS
ilk '"That's the standard line,' Ron said. 'as
promoted by some Japanese businessmen
and American spokesmen of their ilk.' ..
Michael Crichton. Rising Sun
imbibe "I got up and went downstairs and
into the kitchen to imbibe my first cup of
coffee before going to the barn." Glenway
Wescott. The Breath of Bulls

imminent "I admired the easy confidence
with which my chief loped from side to side
of his wheel and trimmed the ship so closely that disaster seemed ceaselessly imminent." Mark 1\vain, Life on the Mississippi

impeccable "That is why the so-called 'better' juvenile books. skillfully constructed.
morally sanitary, psychologically impeccable-don't really make much of a dent on
the child's consciousness." Clifton Fadiman,
"My Life is an Open Book"

impious ''The Sunis regard the Shias as
impious heretics." Matthew Arnold. Essays
in Criticism

implacable "It seemed folly for this young
man to hope to create a self-supporting
farm in such an implacable environment. ..
Leland Stowe, Crusoe of Lonesome Lake
implored "No beggars implored Scrooge to
bestow a trifle. no children asked him what
it was o'clock." Charles Dickens. A
Christmas Carol

importuned

"Many businessmen were

importuned to come to Washington... John
McDonald. On Capitol Hill

impresario "He was an egregious impresario of letters who kept a squad of writers
churning out copy marketed under his signature.'' C. J. Rolo. No Business Like Show
Business [adapted)

impede "Judge Jones has become known
for her anger at defense lawyers who try to
impede executions through legal maneuvers... David Firestone, "Death Penalty
Conference," New York Times. 8/19/99

conference, Gov. Bush declined to respond
directly to questions about his experience
with drugs ... Associated Press Report. "Next
Question. Please," 6/5/99

imperative

imprudent "We are not so imprudent as to

"But unlike the others. Mrs.
Hassan had yet another imperative: her son
Huseyin has leukemia and needs blood."
Edmund L. Andrews, "I Cannot Die," New
York Times, 8/19/99

imperceptibly "In the two decades since W.
Ugams had come to Boston, his status had
imperceptibly shifted.'' John Updike, New
Yorker, 10/22/60

imperturbable "The Prince de Ligne had
given the Empress Catherine the name of
imperturbable, or immoveable... Walter
Tooke, The Life of Catherine

impromptu "At an impromptu airport news

destroy the bees that work for us ... Robert
Tanner. Principles of Agriculture

impunity "Swaraj means that not a single
Hindu or Mussulman shall for a moment
crush with impunity meek Hindus or
Mussulmans." Mohandas K. Gandhi. ''The
Untouchables"

inadvertently "In our report on NASCAR
RACING. we inadvertently attributed a
quote to Doris O'Bryant." Correction made
by TIME editors, 6/21/99

inane
impetuous

"He displayed the impetuous
vivacity of youth... Samuel Johnson, ''The
Rambler" No. 27
340

"When left with nothing to talk
about, people resort to inane remarks about
the weather... Lawrence Kaminer. "A World
of Strangers"

PANORAMA OF WORDS
inanimate "We assumed that the inanimate
body in the rubble was dead but the dog,
trained to distinguish between live and dead
bodies, knew better." Stephen Kinzer,
"Turkish Earthquake Relief," New York
Times. 8/21/99
incapacitated "His searing empathy for the
parents of incapacitated clients is a product
of the still-raw pain over the 1980 suicide of
his younger brother." Jan Hoffman, "Public
Lives," New York Times, 6/18/99
inchoate "The general plan is inchoate
and incoherent and the particular treatments disconnected." Hillary Corke, Global
Economy

incipient "As columnist Jack Anderson was
about to write about the Secretary of State's
incipient departure, AI Haig panicked."
William Safire, "On Language," New York
Times, 6/20/99
incisive "Your hands are keen, your mind
incisive, your sensitivity deep, ·your vision
well honed." Thomas A. Dooley, "To a Young

Doctor"

inclement "The inclement weather that has
given us fits recently is over, and I'm looking
for blue skies for all of next week." Weather
forecast from ABC's Sam Champion,
Eyewitness News, 6/23/99
incoherent "So seldom do editors get what
they think they want that they tend to
become incoherent in their insistent repetition of their needs." Jerome Weidman,
"Back Talk"
incompatible "Once men tried to reach
heaven by building a tower, and I made their
formats incompatible." Garrison Keillor,
"Faith at the Speed of Light." TIME, 6/14/99
incongruous "He was clothed with tatters
of old ship's canvas: and this extraordinary
patchwork was held together by a system of

various and incongruous fastenings." Robert
Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island

incontrovertible "The Wilsons lived in a
universe of words linked into an incontrovertible firmament by two centuries of
Calvinist divines." John Dos Passos, U.S.A.
incredulous "The Nazi war on cancer?other readers may be as incredulous as I
was when this book came to my attention."
Michael Sherry, New York Times, 5/23/99
incumbent "As a Muslim, the Director of
Interfaith Affairs for the Islamic Center said
that it is incumbent on him to actively
engage others in the service of Allah." Jioni
Palmer, "Vigil to Address Growing Violence,"
Newsday, 10/10/99
indict "You can't indict a whole nation, particularly on such vague grounds as these
were." Robert M. Coates, "The Law"
indifference "David sees Ham who,
although now shows indlfference to life,
swims out to save people from a shipwreck."
Holly Hughes, Barron's Book Notes, David
Copperfield by Charles Dickens
indigenous "A MacArthur Foundation
grant was given to Dennis A. Moore for helping to preserve the language and culture of
indigenous groups in Brazil." Announcement of MacArthur Grants. 6/23/99
indigent "The bill would make modest
improvements in the way that counsel is
provided for indigent defendants." Bob
Herbert, "Defending the Status Quo." New
York Times, 6/17/99
indiscriminate "The indiscriminate spraying of pesticides add a new chapter, a new
kind of havoc." Rachel Carson, Silent Spring
indoctrinated "Teachers have indoctrinated
students in practical subjects like home ec."
341

PANORAMA OF WORDS
Jodie Morse, "Hitched in Home Room,"
TIME, 6/21/99

against a political entity." Supreme Court
Justice William Brennan, decision,10/64

indolent "This indolent weather turns a
student's thoughts toward last-minute truancy." Darcy Frey, "The Last Shot"

ingratiate 'This tax was abolished by
Richard III to ingratiate himself with the
people." Sir Francis Bacon, Henry VII

inebriated "Red Skelton's inebriated clown
who was guzzling Smuggler's Gin is one of
the all-time great comedy sketches." Paul
De Simone, "They Made Us Laugh" [adapted]

inherent "Harvey lacked graduate degrees
but his inherent knowledge of human nature
enabled him to be successful as a personnel
manager." "Rungs on the Corporate Ladder,"
American Management Association brochure

ineffectual "Medicare officials told the
White House that the proposed drug plan is
unrealistic and would be ineffectuaL" Robert
Pear, "Drug Plan Worries Democrats," New
York Times, 6/25/99

inhibition "With all this 'inhibition' stuff
and Freudian approach and 'group play,'
you get the distinct impression that people
are actually afraid of their kids." William
Michelfelder, The Fun of Doing Nothing

inert "The Japanese drifted inert in his life
jacket watching 449 approach until the bow
crossed in front of him." Robert J. Donovan,

iniquity "I lack iniquity Sometime to do me
service." William Shakespeare, Othello

PT 109

inevitable "The 'High Occupancy Vehicle'
lanes were an attempt to avoid the otherwise inevitable traffic delays on the
Expressway." Newsday, 9/23/99
inexorably "Note that it is all in one long
sentence, developing inexorably like the
slow decay of our lives." Clifton Fadiman,
"They Have Their Exits and Their
Entrances"
infallible "He had an infallible ear for the
way people spoke, and he imitated them in
his writing." Reader's Encyclopedia
infamous "The unsubstantiated computer
rumors for which the Internet is infamous
began flowing within hours of the arrival of
Jan. 1 in Asia." Barnaby Feder, "Internet's
Cheering Squad Nervously Watches Clock,"
New York Times, 1/1/00

initiate "The Russian army seems ready to
initiate a new offensive against the defenders of the capital of Chechnya." New York
Post, 1/10/00

innate "Nothing makes the weak strong or
the fearful brave as much as our bodies'
innate drive to stay alive." William Saftre,
"Why Die?," New York Times, 1/1/00
innocuous "Howell's seemingly innocuous
remark about Tanya's footware led to a torrent of curses from the petite brunette."
George Sokolsky, "Very Thin Ice"
inordinate "Was it, perhaps, because his
back had broken under his inordinate burden?" I. L. Peretz, "Buntcheh the Silent"
insatiable "One needs an insatiable curiosity to succeed in the new technical worldwide spread of information." Jared
Diamond, "Guns, Germs, and Steel"
insidious "For them, civilization is an

infraction

"Order cannot be secured
through fear of punishment for an irifraction
342

insidious but no less sure and deadly poison."
Hernando Bates, Central America

PANORAMA OF WORDS
integral "Let Office 2000 be an integral part
of your productivity tools." Newspaper ad for
Microsoft Office 2000
interjected 'The accountant interjected.
saying that you can buy a better house in
New Jersey than on Long Island for the
same money." Ken Moritsugu. "Nowhere to
Build," Newsday. 6/25/99
interlopers "Indeed, the magazine managers are treated as foreign interlopers."
Michael Woolf. "Tribune and Tribulation,"
New York. 7/5/99
interminably "In his clean white shirt and
blue jeans. with one hand resting carelessly
on the black box, he seemed very proper
and important as he talked interminably to
Mr. Graves and the Martins." Shirley
Jackson, "The Lottery"
internecine
"Eight thousand zealots
stabbed each other in internecine massacre." L. H. Farrar, Early Christians
interrogate

introspective "All had the thin. narrow
faces and large, wide-open eyes-introspective eyes." Ivan Cankar, "Children and Old
Folk"
inundated "We do know that the moon's
surface has not been eroded by wind or rain
or ice or snow and has not been inundated
by oceans. lakes or rivers." Lee A. DuBridge,
"Sense and Nonsense About Space"
invalidate "Some Reagan and Bush
appointees have proved far too willing to
invalidate decisions made by Congress and
the Executive branch." Cass R. Sunstein,
New York Times, 6/2/99
invective "I watched him walk into the
clubhouse. kick a bench and break a toe,
never once stopping the flow of invective."
Jack Altshul, "Why Should the Other Guy
Beat Me?"
inveighed "The County Executive inveighed
against scofflaws who owe a total of $60 million." Television news broadcast, CBS,
6/23/99

"The District Attorney of
Nassau County is set to interrogate a
Malverne police officer who was arrested on
shoplifting charges." Associated Press
report, New York Times, 8/20/99

inveterate 'The inveterate Boston Red Sox
fan faces seemingly endless disappointment." Peter Balakian, "Black Dogs of Fate"

intimidate "New language could target loi-

inviolable 'The coach broke an

terers with no apparent purpose other than
to intimidate others from entering those
areas." Margaret Hornblower, "Ending the
Roundups," TIME. 6/21/99

rule by striking one of his players." Don
DeLillo, End Zone

irascible "He became so irascible that with-

intrepid

in six months he lost his wife and half of his
office staff." Herman Wouk. Don't Stop the

"Scientists and support staff
began celebrating the new year along with a
planeload of tourists and seven intrepid
skiers." Malcolm Browne, "Absence of
Midnight Doesn't Darken Spirits," New York
Times, 1/1/00

inviolable

Carnival

irate "I got irate because people have been
yelling at me my whole life." Olivia Winslow.
"Cop Tells of a Confession," Newsday.
6/23/99

intrinsic "We appear to have lost the belief
that honesty is an intrinsic aspect of political leadership." Editorial, Christian Science
Monitor, 5/17/98

irrational "He became irrational and threatened to commit suicide." Darcy Frey, 'The
Last Shot"
343

PANORAMA OF WORDS
irrelevant "What has existed in the past
seems to him not only not authoritative. but
irrelevant. inferior. and outworn." George
Santayana. Character and Opinion in the
United States

itinerant "Hamlet greeted the group of itinerant actors and made them part of a plan
to trap Claudius." Barron's Educational
Series, Book Notes
jaunty "The cadet was very trim in his red
breeches and blue tunic, his white gloves
spotless, his white cockade jaunty. his heart
in his mouth." Alexander Woolcott.
"Entrance Fee"

jeopardized

"Cancellation of the event
would have jeopardized the financial survival of the organization." Nat Hentoff,
"Picket Lines are Labor's Free Speech,"
Village Voice, 6/15/99

jettison "He refused to jettison any of the
manners and behavior that made him seem
so odd." William Connor. Daily Mirror,
London, 1956

jocose "He caught the sound of jocose talk
and ringing laughter from behind the
hedges." George Eliot. Adam Bede

jostled "When the squeege man jostled him,
the police officer said that he feared for his
life." Kit Roane, "Squeege Man Scared Him,"
New York Times, 6/25/99

jubilant "When he finally reached Boston.
he received a jubilant welcome." Keith
Ayling, "Race Around the World"

jurisdiction "Lee's jurisdiction included the
monitoring of boxing within New Jersey."
Timothy Smith, "A Sport's Credibility," New
York Times, 6/20/99

boy-girl counterpoint." "Hot 'N Cole."
Newsday. 6/4/99

labyrinth ··He himself was so lost in the
labyrinth of his own unquiet thoughts that I
did not exist." Daphne Du Maurier. Rebecca

lacerations "He pressed only the already
tired horse at such speed that his spurs
made lacerations in its sides. and at last the
poor animal died." Honore De Balzac. A
Passion in the Desert

lackluster "The major reason for the

lackllL<>ter look in their eyes was their discovery

it is now possible to drive across the face of
the nation without feeling you've been anywhere or that you've done anything." John
Keats. "The Call of the Open Road"'

laconic "The dialogue is clipped. laconic.
understated to convey simmering underneath." John Simon. "The Worst Noel." New
York, 6/21/99

lampoon

"Many new TV shows succeed
because they lampoon the behavior of
teenagers." John Leonard. New York.
10/15/97

landmarks 'The remarkable trees formed
good landmarks by which the place might
easily be found again." Washington Irving.
'The Devil and Tom Walker"

largess "A

largess universal like the sun.
His liberal eye doth give to every one."
William Shakespeare. Henry IV

lassitude "To poets it's vernal lassitude but
to us it's simply spring fever." Brochure.
Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce

latent

"All our latent strength was now
alive." Winston Churchill. Their Finest Hour

laudable
juxtaposed "Theatrical vignettes are juxtaposed through alternating verses in clever

344

"American historians. in their
eagerness to present facts and their laudable anxiety to tell the truth, have neglocted

PANORAMA OF WORDS
the literary aspects of their craft." Samuel
Eliot Morrison, By Land and by Sea

lax "The fact that his employer was lax
on this score was one of many things that
he had to condone." Henry James,
"Brooksmith"
legerdemain "Federal investigators pursuing money-laundering schemes are concerned with alleged acts of legerdemain by
Russian banks." Tim L. O'Brien, "Bank in
Laundering Inquiry," New York Times,
8/20/99

legion "Though not Hollywood handsome,
Tommy's success with the fair sex was
legion." Janet Murphy, "Babylon on the
Hudson"
lethal "By evening we couldn't even get any

singing young staff member who inexplicably fell for her portly Newt." Robert Reno,
"Political Garbage," Newsday, 8/19/99

livid

"Livid with anger, the poster boy for
road rage jumped out of his red convertible
and came running toward us." Letter to the
Editor, "Big Road Hazard," Newsday,
8/19/99

loath "Still

I am loath simply to join the
conspiracy." "The Happy-Parents Conspiracy," New York Times, 5/23/99

loathing

"He had braced himself not to
become entangled in her loathing for him."
Phillip Roth, American Pastoral

longevity "The

longevity of metal parts is
increased by this new process." Report,
General Motors Corporation

more people indoors where they would have
had some protection from the lethal fallout."
Florence Moog, "The Bombing of St. Louis"

lucrative "Very quickly it became a surpris-

lethargic

ingly lucrative property." David McCullough,
The Great Bridge

"Ricky Henderson's lethargic
stroll toward second base led the sports
reporters to blast him in yesterday's
papers." Ralph Kiner, baseball announcer,
Fox Sports News, 10/4/99

lugubrious

levity

lurid "We thought the rookie's tale was too

"There was something about the
company's president that made levity seem
out of place." Lloyd Sperling, A Boiler Room
Operation

libel "Issues such as freedom of speech and
libel are going to have to be rethought as the

Internet makes everyone a potential publisher in cyberspace." Thomas L. Friedman,
"Boston E-Party," New York Times, 1/1/00

liquidation "Hiding the forty-six comrades
who were scheduled for liquidation became
much easier." David Hackett, The

"Lugubrious notices on the
passing of old friends were a feature of the
local paper." TIME, 8/20/99

lurid to be believed, but it turned out to be
true." Chuck Cavanna, Life in the Minors

lush "Can one run for political office without the promise of lush campaign contributions from many sources?" "Steve Forbes; In
His Own Debt," Parade, 9/15/99

Machiavellian "Is there any clearer example
of Machiavellian plotting than that of Iago in
'Othello'?" John Simon, Reverse Angle

Buchenwald Report

magnanimous "There was no way he was

lithe

going to be magnanimous and share this
prized baseball with anyone who claimed a
share of the glory." Don DeLillo, Underworld

"Tasteless headlines screamed
'Newtie's Cutie' to describe the lithe hymn-

345

PANORAMA OF WORDS
maimed

maimed or destroyed seem to be most pop-

to Progress of PBS," The News Gazette.
Champaign-Urbana, 10/21/99

ular with today's youngsters." Harold Owen,
Jr., "The Motion Picture"

manifest "English is one of the great bor-

maladjusted "The natural assumption is

rowing languages. more manifest in the origin of so many of our words." Bill Bryson,

"Films in which characters are

that the teenage killers at Columbine H.S.
were maladjusted youngsters but some
neighbors denied that." Letters to the
Editor. Washington Po.>t, 7 I 14/99

malady "Homesickness can be a disease as
trivial as a slight cold or it can be a deadly
malady." Z. Libin, "A Sign of Summer"
malevolent

"Our military action against
the malevolent head of the Serbian government has finally ended." Newsweek. 4/8/99

malign "His chosen weapon is the verbal
hand grenade by which he can outrage and
malign." Kenneth Tynan. "On Don Rickles,"
New Yorker. 2/20/78

malignant "The wailing chorus turned into
a malignant clamor that swirled into my
ears like an icy breeze." Kenneth Roberts,

Mother Tongue

manifold

"China's Xinhua News Agency
treated manifold claims of procedural error
with disbelief." "Trying to Build Bridg s in
China," TIME. 6/28/99

martinet "The prospect of having to talk to
Sheila's principal. a real martinet. made him
nervous, but he steeled himself to do it."
John Yount, "The Trapper's Last Shot"

masticate "Trying to masticate a huge hamburger with an open mouth is a no-no."
Advice from Ms. Manners, syndicated
columnist, 6/4/98

mastiffs "That island of England breeds
very valiant creatures: their mastWs are
of
unmatchable
courage."
William
Shakespeare. Henry V

Oliver Wiswell

materialism "Democracy always makes for
malleable "Is the mayor able to change
from an apparently rigid personality to one
more malleable to differences?" Alec
Kuczynski, "The Mayor's Makeover." New
York Times Magazine, 8/1/99

malnutrition "The children of the Albanian
refugees are suffering from malnutrition.
and they need our help." Red Cross Appeal
for Funds

materialism. because the only kind of equality that you can guarantee to a whole people
is physical." Katherine F. Gerould, Modes
and Morals

matrons "For ladies they had the family of
the American consul and a nice bevy of
English girls and matrons. perhaps Lady
Hamilton herself." Edward Everett Hale, The
Man Without a Country

mammoth "She began to repair the ravages

maudlin "Uncle Billy passed rapidly into a

made by generosity added to love-a
tremendous task. dear friends-a mammoth
task." 0. Henry, "The Gift of the Magi"

state of stupor, the Duchess became
maudlin •.and Mother Shipton snored." Bret
Harte, "The Outcasts of Poker Flat"

mandate "With a federal mandate to convert to digital broadcasting by 2003, public
1V stations are facing large capital expenditures." Ellis Bromberg, "Federal Money Vital

megalomania "Charlie desperately wanted

346

Armaxco to lease space in what so far was
the worst mistake of his career. the soaring
monster that his megalomania led him to

PANORAMA OF WORDS
call Croker Concourse." Tom Wolfe, A Man

mollify "The mayor attempted to mollify his

in Full

critics by pointing to the increased safety 1n
the city." New York Daily News, 8/15/99

mendacious "Hillary joined in efforts to
dismiss as mendacious tarts all the women
who claimed to have been involved with her
husband." Maureen Dowd, "The Boy Can't
Help It," New York Times, 8/4/99

monolithic "Gertrude Stein was a stolid,

menial

moribund "After being moribund for years,

"It is difficult to visualize the numbers of menial laborers required to build the
famous Egyptian pyramids." E. A. Wallis
Budge, The Mummy

heavy presence, monolithic, unladylike." Liz
Smith, "When Love Was the Adventure,"
TIME, 6/14/99
interest in electric automobiles has revived."
Car and Driver, 6/97

mortality

South Africa, one needed a highly placed
mentor." Nadine Gordimer, Face to Face

"Socrates loves talk of fundamental things, of justice and virtue and wisdom and love and mortality." Hermann
Hagedorn, Socrates-His Life

mercenary "We all like money . . . but

mortify 'The comparisons between her sis-

mentor "To break into the political life of

Dickens surpassed most in a mercenary
approach to his writings." G. K. Chesterton,

ter's beauty and her own no longer would

Charles Dickens

mortify her." Jane Austen,
Prejudice

metamorphosis

motivate "The loss of our star quarterback

"For nearly a year, the
dauber, undergoing metamorphosis, inhabits its silken dung-stoppered cocoon inside
the mud cell." Alan Devoe, "The Mad
Dauber"

meticulous

seemed to motivate the team to play even
harder." Bill Parcells quoted in Sports
Illustrated. 9 I 12/98

mundane "Why bother with mundane mus-

later, in 1992,
Barnstead's meticulous records allowed
researchers to put names on six previously
unidentified TJtantc survivors." "Titanic and
Halifax," The Nova Scotia Museum

"Even

mien "He had the

ings when you can sit on the lawn and build
cities out of grass clippings?" Enid Nemy,
"The World is Her Cloister," New York Times,
6/20/99

munificent "His
mien of a man who has

been everywhere and through everything."
Arnold Bennett, The Old Wives Tale

milieu "In the

Pride and

munificent gift will enable
us to place computers in all the elementary
schools." Newsday. 6/20/98

murky "Mud dumping from the bottom of
milieu of a heated baseball

championship contest, tickets are being
sold at highly inflated prices." New York
Post, 10/10/99

modified "Some schools claimed that the

Long Island has created a murky picture."
"Fishermen's Woes," Newsday, 6/22/99

myriad "Genius is not born with sight, but
blind: it is influenced by a myriad of stimulating exterior circumstances." Mark Twain,
"Saint Joan of Arc"

standard test was a lot harder than a modified version." Ching-Cheng Ni, "Fewer
Rumbles on Earth Test," Newsday,

nadir "He knew he had reached the nadir of

6/23/99

his baseball career when they sent him to a
347

PANORAMA OF WORDS
minor league team." Roger Kahn, The Boys
of Summer

na"ive "Woodrow Wilson was nai·ve to believe
Yugoslavia could be formed after World War
1." Letter to the Editor, New Yorker, 6/26/99
nascent !he once nascent Women's
National Basketball Association has arrived
and is healthy and prosperous." New York
Times, 7 I 17/99
nebulous "There is a nebulous line between
confidence and over-confidence." Editorial,
Wall Street Journal. 4/8/99
nefarious "A nefarious employee can still
download secret weapons information to a
tape, put it in his pocket and walk out the
door." William Safire, "Culture of
Arrogance," New York Times, 6/ 17/99
negligible

"These politicians have voted
themselves a big pay raise for the negligible
amount of work they do... The Queens
Tribune,8/6/98

nepotism "Political allies and family members filled government jobs as nepotism
flourished." Paul Alter, This Windy City

nettled "He was pretty well nettled by this
time, and he stood in front of a bureau mirror, brushing his hair with a pair of military
brushes ... James Thurber, "More Alarms at
Night"
neurotic "We shall lose all our power to
cope with our problem if we allow ourselves
to become a stagnant, neurotic, frightened
and suspicious people." Walter Lippmann,
"The Nuclear Age"
neutralize "The quinine that can

348

noisome "The noisome conditions in the
refugee camps were a disgrace and a danger." Newsday, 8/7/99
nomadic After buying the big trailer, they
spent a nomadic year visiting national parks
out west." "On the Road Again," Travel Ideas
International

nominal "As the nominal head of his party,
the governor was courted by all the Sunday
morning talk shows." Archer Karnes,
"Politics and Poker"
nondescript "Jane Austen can picture ordinary, commonplace and nondescript characters in ways denied to me." Walter Scott.
Journal, 1826

nonentity "With sufficient financial backing, almost any political nonentity could
become a national contender." Washington
Post, 6/15/98
nostalgia "The various objects one picks up
just before leaving a foreign country are apt
to acquire an extraordinary souvenir-value,
giving one a foretaste of distance and nostalgia" Corrado Alvaro, "The Ruby"
nuance "With Minnie Driver adroitly mining each nuance of social primness, Jane is
the first Disney cartoon heroine to provide
her own comic relief." Richard Corliss, "Him
Tarzan, Him Great," TIME, 6/14/99
nullify "Allowing our parks to decay is a
sure way to null~fy the beauty given to us by
nature." Freeman Tilden, The National
Parks

nurtured "The Telecommunications Act of
neutralize

his venom is called courage." Elmer Davis,
But We Were Bom Free

nirvana "Nirvana is in putting your child to
sleep. and in writing the last line of your
poem." Kahlil Gil bran, Sand and Foam

1996 introduced competition that has nurtured demand for communications generally
and for Internet service specifically." Seth

PANORAMA OF WORDS
Schessel. "A Chance to Become Really Big,"
New York Times, 6/15/99

nutritive "They searched for anything that
had nutritive value, but often found nothing." "The Irish Famine," Harpers, 5/73

obese "The rush to lose weight by unproven
methods often leads to complications for
obese people." Johns Hopkins Health Letter,
Summer 1997

obliterate "They went out to smvey the

occult

"Somehow, horror films have
changed from one main figure who threatens a town or young women, to occult spirits that take over a normal human for
unknown reasons." Pauline Kael, I Lost It at
the Movies

octogenarian

"Octogenarian film and stage
director Elia Kazan received a mixed reception when he came up to collect his Lifetime
Achievement Award." Associated Press
report, 4/7/98

land for a possible railroad, but met with
Indians on the warpath and were obliterated." Freeman Tilden, The National Parks
(adapted)

ominous "There was a Sabbath lull in the

obloquy "Hitler and his Nazis showed how

omnipotent "In those comic strips there

evil a conspiracy could be which was aimed
at destroying a race by exposing it to contempt, derision, and obloquy." Supreme
Court Justice William 0. Douglas. decision,
10/52

obscure "This book has serious purpose
even if many will find that purpose obscure."
Decision of Supreme Judicial Court of
Massachusetts, 11/62

obsequious "and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obseWilliam Shakespeare,

quious sorrow."
Hamlet

obsess "To obsess over acquisitions is especially damaging to human felicity." Llewelyn
Powys. Earth Memories

air, which. in a settlement unused to
Sabbath influences. looked ominous." Bret
Harte, "The Outcasts of Poker Flat"
was always a cruel and omnipotent villain."
Letter, New York Times, 9/13/99

omnivorous

"He became an omnivorous
reader of the classics." T. S. Lovering, Child

Prodigies

opprobrium

"General Sherman is still
viewed with opprobrium in these parts of the
South he once destroyed." Edmund Wilson,
Patriotic Gore

opulent "Poirot followed him, looking with
appreciation at such works of art as were of
an opulent and florid nature." Agatha
Christie, "The Dream"

originated "The early Egyptian rulers, in
order to stop the practice of cannibalism,

lescence, Roman numerals still exert a

originated the method that protected the
dead-mummification." E. A. Wallis Budge,
The Mummy

peculiar fascination over the inquiring
mind." Isaac Asimov, "Nothing Counts"

ostensibly "The race was ostensibly to test

obviate

the reliability of the automobiles." Keith
Ayling, The Race Around the World

obsolescence "Mter five centuries of obso-

"Modest pre-emptive acting can
obviate the need for more drastic actions at
a later date that could destabilize the economy." Alan Greenspan, quoted in New
Jersey Star Ledger, 5/6/99

ostentatious "He affected simplicity, partly
because he was ugly. but more because
being ostentatious might have irritated

349

PANORAMA OF WORDS
those of whom he always spoke of as 'my fellow citizens.· " Emil Ludwig, Michelangelo

Henry Adams, The Education of Henry
Adams

oust "Politics will still exist as in the
Republican campaign to oust Bill Clinton."
James Pinkerton,
"Mediocre Pols,"
Newsday, 6/17/99

paragon "An angel! or, if not An earthly
paragonf' William Shakespeare, Cymbeline

overt "It is peculiarly shocking that Brutus
practices overt self-deception." Harold
Bloom, Shakespeare

swum a poor race." Len Sussman, "Born to
Swim"

pall

..A

pall had descended upon Mr.

Timberlake, and I understood why he did
not talk to me about the origin of evil." V. S.
Pritchett, "The Saint"

palliate "Reducing the testosterone would
palliate the cancer, the oncologist believed,

but it wouldn't be a cure." Dr. MeiV)'ll Elliot,
"Medicine in the News"

paltry "Marvin was baffled by the

paltry

amount of money the widow was asking for
her husband's elegant Rolls Royce." Barnett
Lesser, "One Man's Will"

panaceas "Mrs. Clinton said that she was
in Rochester to listen and learn not to offer
panaceas for all civic problems." Associated
Press report, "Pre-Campaign Strategy,"
9/9/99

pandemonium "Then, summoning the wild
courage of despair, in pandemonium, a
throng of revellers at once threw themselves
into the black apartment." Edgar Allan Poe,
"The Masque of the Red Death"
parable "When I had trouble keeping the
kindergarten class quiet. I found that telling
them a parable (the tortoise and the hare,
for example) would get their undivided
attention." Lana L. Grossberg, A Teacher's

paramount "For him, winning was paramount coming in second meant he had

pariahs "Apart from the other castes were
the outcasts: India's untouchables, or pariBarbara
Walker,
Women's
ahs."
Encyclopedia

paroxysms "The coughing did not even
come out in paroxysms, but was just a feeble, dreadful welling up of the juices of
organic dissolution." Thomas Mann, The
Magic Mowttain

parsimonious "His parsimonious thrift was
relieved by a few generous impulses." V. L.
Parrington, Main Currents in American
Thought

passe "Everything old is new again is the
theme for the designer's adoption of passe
styles and making them fashionable again."
Sophia Leguizamo, "New From Milan"
pathetic "He is the latest loser trying to
solve his pathetic life behind a gun."
Editorial, New York Post, 7/30/99
paucity "In the dictator's best-case scenario, he can hope for continuing control,
thanks to a paucity of opponents." Massimo
Calabresi, "Is This the End for Milosevic?,"
TIME, 6/21/99

True Confessions

pecuniary "The most unpleasant thing of
all was that his pecuniary interests should
enter into the question of his reconciliation
with his wife." Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

paradox "Here was a paradox like the stellar universe that fitted one's mental faults."

pedagogue "He is neither bandit nor pedagogue. but, like myself a broken soldier,

350

PANORAMA OF WORDS
retired on half pay for some years." Stephen
Vincent Benet, "The Curfew Tolls"

perfunctory "Doc Martindale made a perfunctory examination and told Eli there was

penance "I have done

nothing to wony about." MacKinlay Kantor,
"The Grave Grass Quivers"

penance for con-

demning Love, Whose high imperious
thoughts have punished me With bitter
fasts, with penitential groans." William
Shakespeare, The n.vo Gentlemen of Verona

penchant "Annabel had a penchant for silver fox coats but Midge said they were common." Dorothy Parker, "The Standard of
Living"
penitent "When father strode into the coal
and ice office, he came out, the penitent
clerk with him, promising to deliver a block
of ice in time for dinner." Clarence Day, Life
with Father

pensive "It was only when he found himself
alone in his bedroom in a pensive mood that
he was able to grapple seriously with his
memories of the occurrence." H. G. Wells,
The Man Who Could Work Miracles
penury "Afflicted by

penury, it appeared

that Putois had joined a gang of thieves who
were prowling the countryside." Anatole
F'rance, "Putois"

perceive "The subjects, as you

perceive,

were alarming but very agreeable." Anton
Chekhov, "A Slander"

peregrination "Each step he took represented an inward peregrination." Gretel
Ehrlich, "On the Road With God's Fool"
peremptory "Mr. Greenspan encouraged
his fellow Federal Reserve Board members
today to undertake a peremptory attack
against inflation." Reuters, "Financial News
Letter," 3/99
perfidious "Alfred E. Ricks was the

peifulious toad's designation who sold worthless

shares in the Blue Gopher Mine." 0. Henry,
"The Man Higher Up"

permeated

"The play is permeated with
scriptural imagery, notably a Last Supper."
Robert Brustein, New Republic, 6/7/99

pernicious "This chapter exposes a

pernicious obstacle to students and teachers

engaging in serious work together." Robert
L. Fried, The Passionate Teacher

perpetrated "Thanks to Mr. DeLay, we
learn that violence perpetrated by gun owners is really the product of larger forces."
Editorial, "Mr. DeLay's Power Play," New
York Times, 6/20/99
perpetuate "The laws would often do no
more than perpetuate a legislator's acts of
injustice." Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The
Social Contract

persevered "The Knicks persevered as first
Patrick Ewing and then Johnson went down
with injuries." George Vecsey, "Sports of the
Times," New York Times, 6/22/99
perspicacious "Nobody deserves the
Lifetime Achievement Award more than
Army Archerd, who is not only perspicacious, but a gentleman as well." Liz Smith,
Newsday, 6/2/99
pertinent "What seems pertinent is to
observe that jazz gravitated toward a particular kind of environment in which its existence was probable." Arnold Sungaard,
Jazz, Hot and Cold

peruse "Stopping to peruse her mail, Raven
didn't notice that the front door was ajar."
Dolores Kent, Instant Gratification
perverse "There is something contemptible
in the prospect of a number of petty states
with the appearance only of union, jarring,
351

PANORAMA OF WORDS
jealous, and perverse." Alexander Hamilton,
speech, 1782

pesky "Oranges down there is like a young
man's whiskers; you enjoy them at first, but
they get to be a pesky nuisance." Ring W.
Lardner, "The Golden Honeymoon"
phenomenon "This phenomenon is characterized by a temporary reversal of the normal atmospheric conditions, in which the
air near the earth is warmer than the air
higher up." Berton Roueche, "The Fog"
phlegmatic

"Duncan had a phlegmatic
fourth quarter, dooming the Spurs' opportunity to humble the New York Knicks." 1V
announcer, NBA Finals, 6/22/99

phobia "My phobia was such that the
slightest touch produced twinges of pain."
Guy De Maupassant, "Looking Back"
pinnacle "Their little barber-shop quartet
reached the pinnacle of their career with a
first-place finish on Major Bowes' 'Amateur
Hour.' " David and Marge Buchanan, "No
Business Like You Know What"
pique "In a fit of pique he raised his pistol
to take aim at me but Masha threw herself
at his feet." Aleksandr Pushkin, "The Shot"

platitudes "The topic was, 'What Is Life?'
and the students labored at it busily with
their platitudes." Philip Roth, American
Pastoral

plethora

"SUFFERERS CONFRONT A

PLE.l'HORA OF POLLEN" Headline, New
York Times, 6/5/99

plight "I had the sense that his loneliness
was not merely the result of his personal
plight." Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome
poignant "Keen, poignant agonies seemed
to shoot from his neck downward through
every fiber of his body and limbs." Ambrose
Bierce, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek
Bridge"
pondered "As I made my way back, I pondered the significance of what I'd seen."

Nicholas Kristof, "1492: The Prequel"

potent "Those huge differences in income
found in our society must have potent causes." Jared Diamond, Guns, Germs. and Steel
potentates "The racing season at Saratoga
invited all manner of society-from potentates to paupers." Lanny Richards. "They're
Off!"

pittance "To be paid a mere pittance and
yet to be suspected of theft; never in her life
had she been subjected to such an outrage."
Anton Chekhov, "An Upheaval"

potential "We realized that this system had
worked because the potential targets were
so many that the Germans could not get a
definite idea of where we would strike."
Ewen Montagu. The Man Who Never Was

placards "Yet a mile away at the ultraorthodox Mea Shearim neighborhood, wall
placards now warn residents not to have
Internet-linked computers in their homes."
Thomas Friedman, "All in the Family," New
York Times, 6/22/99

potpourri "A potpouni of fresh fruits and
cool cottage cheese make for a delicious
lunch treat when the temperatures rise into
the high 90s." Martha Stewart. CBS News,
5/23/98

plaintiff "When the attorney for the palsied
plaintiff finished, there wasn't a dry eye in

the courtroom." Rose Axelsohn,
Defense Rests" [adapted!

352

'The

pragmatic "His conservative approach to
investing has made millions of dollars for
those who share Warren Buffet's pragmatic
philosophy."
"Master of Berkshire-

PANORAMA OF WORDS
Hathaway," Profile of Warren Buffet. New
York Times

precedent "One can imagine a time when
the voters ignore precedent and elect a
woman to the office of President of the
United States." Barbara Walker, The

rity. and he felt he was entitled to sit back
and enjoy his happiness." Ronald Byron.
"Happy Days for Harrison Gumedi"

pretext "Our mother had been expressly

Women's Encyclopedia

enjoined by her husband to give Madame
Cornouiller some plausible pretext for refusing." Anatole France, "Putois"

precipitate "The weight of a finger might

prevalent "On the all-news channels the

precipitate the tragedy, hurl him at once into

most prevalent images were from a helicopter pursuing the police chase." New York
Post, 7/30/99

the dim, gray unknown." Stephen Crane,
"An Episode of War"

precluded "I would be avenged: this was a
point definitely settled-but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk." Edgar Allan Poe, "The
Cask of Amontillado"
precocious "Pediatricians interviewed this
week were somewhat divided on the value of
1V viewing by precocious children." Lawrie
Miflin, "Tough Rules for 1V," New York
Times, 8/4/99

prelude "Bounderby's prelude to his main
point was very well received by Mrs. Sparsit
who said, 'Very sagacious indeed, sir.·"
Charles Dickens. Hard Times
premise "That train of reasoning has all the
various parts and terms-its major premise
and its conclusion." T. H. Huxley, "We Are
All Scientists"
premonition "There seemed to be a gentle
stir arising over everything-a very premonition of rest and hush and night." Mary
Wilkens Freeman, "The New England Nun"
prerogative "Governor Pataki exercised his
prerogative as titular head of the party to

endorse Mayor Rudolph Giuliani." Editorial,
"Truce Among New York Republicans," New
York Times. 8/7/99

prestigious "He had finally reached his present prestigious position of wealth and secu-

prevarication "They must honestly swear
to this oath without prevarication or reservation." Supreme Court Justice Byron
White, speech, 12/ 1/64

privations "It aroused a strong response in
our hearts when he told about their sufferings and privations." Selma Lagerlof.
Harvest

procrastinated "Mr. Brooksmith

procrastinated for several days before accepting my

offer." Henry James, "Brooksmith"

prodigious "He knew from the moment he
left the ground that it was a prodigious
jump." Joseph N. Bell, "The Olympics
Biggest Winner"

prodigy

"I grant you Clive-Clive was a

prodigy. a genius and met the fate of genius-

es." Stephen Vincent Benet. "The Curfew
Tolls"

proffer "Orin came to

prq[[er his condolences when, wonder of wonder. he fell in
love with the grieving widow." Terence
Cavanaugh, "An Ill Wind"

profligate "Her innocent appearance had a
peculiar attraction for a vicious profligate,
who had hitherto admired only the coarser
types of feminine beauty." Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The Brothers Karamazov

353

PANORAMA OF WORDS
profound "So why no profound works on
the need for $660 million in tax credits for
companies that burn chicken droppings?"
Editorial, "Tax-Cut Favors," New York
Times, 8/7/99
profuse "He offered

profuse apologies for

his show of exasperation, and he volunteered to read to her, something in French."
Aldous Huxley, "The Giaconda Smile"

progeny "First, let me tell you whom you
have condemn'd: Not me begotten of a shepherd swain, But issued from the progeny of
kings." William Shakespeare, Henry N

prognostication "Nay, if an oily palm be
not a fruitful prognostication· I cannot
scratch my ear." William Shakespeare,
Antony and Cleopatra
prohibition "The U.S. public is slowly coming around to accepting the idea that a prohibition against the easy access to hand
guns is inevitable." Roger Rosenblatt, "Get
Rid of the Damned Things," TIME, 8/9/99

prolific "Isaac Asimov was a truly prolific
writer, seemingly able to complete a book
every two weeks." Art Nichols, Selling Your
Manuscript

promulgated "The rules and regulations
are promulgated for the guidance of administrative employees, bureau heads, and
supervisors." "Rules and Regulations for
Administrative Employees," NYC Board of
Education

propinquity "It occurred to him that Varick
might be talking at random to relieve the
strain of their propinquity." Edith Wharton,
The Desert of Man

propitious "Sometime later, I will find a propitious ground and bury you there in the
same grave." Shen Chunlieh, "In Memory of
a Child," 1619

propriety "There is a propriety and necessity of preventing interference with the course
of justice." Supreme Court Justice Oliver
Wendell Holmes, decision, 10/28
proximity "Stryker had built a small cannery in close proximity to the house where
the turtles were raised in shallow tanks."
Edmund Wilson, "The Man Who Shot
Snapping Turtles"
prudent 'Those who thought the prudent
thing to do at the end of 1999 was to stay
away from flying resulted in the slowest day
of the year for every airline." TIME, 1I 12 I 00
pugnacious "Two pugnacious guard dogs in
the railyard eliminated the nightly vandalism in a hurry." Lewis Tumulty, "Civic
Pride"
puissant 'The combination of the drugs has
become a puissant cocktail in the fight
against AIDS." Medical report, CBS News,
9120198

pungent 'The pungent aroma of the cream
puffs told Sadie that the man from Goobers
had arrived." Katherine Mansfield, "The
Garden Party"

propagate "The Republican leadership
planned to propagate their philosophy for a
huge tax cut during the summer recess."
Wolf Blitzer, CNN Nightly News, 7 I 14/99

puny man, and you will have proof of that
directly." Max Beerbohm, "A. V. Laidler"

propensity "You had a propensity for telling
simple and professional tales before the
war." Joseph Conrad, "The Tale"

qualms "The manager had qualms about
allowing him to continue playing with an
injured hand." Sports Illustrated, 6116198

354

puny "I have said that I am a weak and

PANORAMA OF WORDS
quandary for people in China. a country

lions to discover their histories." Brian
Fagan. Time Detective

where the observance of non-political
Western celebrations is a relatively recent
phenomenon." Elizabeth Rosenthal, "Party?
What Party?." New York Times, 1I 1I 00

raucous "The 1968 Democratic nominating
convention in Chicago was the scene of raucous confrontations." I. F. Stone, Weekly

quandary

"New Year's Eve presented a

Reader

quarry 'The state troopers had tracked
their quarry to the thickly wooded area near
the crime scene." Newsday, 4110198

quell "He also did not quell the speculation
surrounding Van Gundy's status as coach."
Mike Wise, New York Times, 5125199
quip 'The audience screamed and applauded hysterically at every musical number,
every quip. every little movement on the
stage." Liz Smith, Newsday, 612199
rabid "Politicians avoid the appearance of
being rabid on issues that seem to be evenly viewed by the voters." Arthur Willner,
"Taking Sides"

raconteur "As a popular raconteur. George
Jessel was prized as a speaker at award ceremonies." The Hollywood Reporter, 7 I 18196
railed "He cursed and railed, and finally
declared he was going to trail the raiders."
Zane Grey, Raiders of the Purple Sage
raiment "No matter what her raiment.
Marilyn Monroe looked absolutely fabulous
on the screen." Billy Wilder quoted by Earl
Wilson, Chicago Tribune, 2128176
rampant "What's more curious about the
determination to end social promotions is
that the practice is far from rampant."
Romesh Ratnesar, "Held Back," TIME,
6114199
rash "Thou art as rash as fire to say That
she was false." William Shakespeare, Othello
rationalize

"It is the task of the scientist to
rationalize the remains of extinct civiliza-

razed "In the gorge, continually razed by
the clawing wind, he would probably find
his other dog." Francisco Coloane, "Cururo
... Sheep Dog"
realm "In all the churches of the realm the
Blessed Sacrament is exposed night and
day, and tall candles are burning for the
recovery of the royal child." Alphonse
Daudet, "The Death of the Dauphin"
rebuke "The defeat of the charter revision
was viewed as a rebuke of his policies."
Editorial, New York Times, 1117199
recanted "The government's key witness in
the case recanted her testimony, claiming
she had been intimidated by prosecutors."
Rob Polner, "Set Back for Prosecutors," New
York Post, 6123199

recoil "It is a gesture of response to my
remarks, and it always makes me recoil with
a laugh." Thomas Mann, "A Man and His
Dog"
recondite "If it seems too re,condite for anyone but dwellers in the groves of Academe,
one must consider rhyming slang which
originated in the underworld." Bergen
Evans, "Now Everyone Is Hip About Slang"
redolent "The scene-a decrepit classroom,
redolent of moldy books, and the pencil
shavings of generations of boys being
ground into the hardwood floor." Jon Robin
Baitz, The Film Society

redress "There has been much discussion
about the fairest way to redress centuries of
355

PANORAMA OF WORDS
discrimination." "A Time to Begin." Readers
Digest. 5/92

refute !he tobacco industry has stopped
trying to refute the charge that smoking is
both dangerous and addictive." U.S. News
and World Report. 2/3/98
relegated lhey were to be relegated to the
outer circle of my life." Van Wyck Brooks.

repose "Good night. good night! as sweet
repose and rest Come to thy heart as that
within my breast." William Shakespeare,
Romeo and Juliet

reprehensible "She thought that the prisoners. no matter how morally reprehensible
their crimes. still should have the benefit of
pretrial representation." Jimmy Breslin's
syndicated column. Newsday. 6/15/99

Helen Keller

remiss "If the mayor thought that one of his
commissioners had been remiss in following
instructions. he would fly into a rage and
throw his glasses at him." David Rockefeller
on Mayor LaGuardia, New York Times,
10/10/99

remote !he pull of the remote stars is so
slight as to be obliterated in the vaster
moments by which the ocean yields to the
moon and sun." Rachel Carson, The Sea
Around Us

remuneration "Please mail your resume
along with your expected remuneration to
our Director of Personnel." Want ad. New
York Times. 7/7/99
repented "At his court martial. the officer
admitted to the charges and repented."
"General Demoted," Washington Post.
9/2/99

repertoire "He led a secret life as a forger of
paintings. with the most famous as part of
his repertoire." Peter Landesman. New York
Times, 7 I 18/99

repressed "General McClellan repressed his
feelings about President Lincoln but he
expressed his private anger in letters to his
wife." David Herbert Donald. Lincoln
reprimand ''The difficulty lay in the fact the
man had previously received a reprimand
from his employer regarding his easy-going
ways with the men under him in his departmcnt." James Thurber. "Let Your Mind
Alone"
reproached "When reminded that he knew
little history. Henry Ford reproached his
critics by reminding them that history
would know him." Quoted in The Will Rogers
Book, Paula Love. editor. 1961
repudiate "If upheld, the decision would
repudiate one of the Administration's environmental achievements." Editorial. New
York Times. 5/19/99

repugnant !he behavior of the few rioters
at the rock concert was repugnant to the
huge.
peaceful crowd." "Woodstock
Revisited," TIME. 6/7/99
repulse

''The cannons were set up to

replenish "We'll dip down into our farm

repulse a possible invasion but none was

system to replenish our stock of left-handed
pitchers." Bobby Valentine. ABC-1V Sports

ever attempted.·· Col. F. X. Prescott. "History
as Our Teacher"

Interoiew

replete "When a composition is so

replete

with errors. I call attention to only a few. the
most important ones." Fran Weinberg,
English teacher. NYC High Schools
356

reputed !he language of Iceland has
changed so little that modern Icelanders are
reputed to be able to read sagas written
thousands of years ago." Bill Bryson. Mother
Tongue

PANORAMA OF WORDS
requisite "Secrecy is more requisite than
ever during the sensitive negotiations over
the release of our prisoners." I. F. Stone,

reverts "She dreamily reverts to the hour
when old age will throw down his frosts
upon her head." Walt Whitman, "Dreams"

Weekly Reader

resourceful "The crew of the

$20 million
independent film had to be very resourceful

to hold down costs." Beth L. Kiel, "Allen in
Hollywood," New York, 6/21/99

respite "The plan enabled the oiler and the
correspondent to set respite together."
Stephen Crane, '!he Open Boat"
restrictive "Mr. el Hage said that the law
was too restrictive. claiming that he had
nothing to do with violent acts." Benjamin
Weiser, "Terrorism Suspect," New York
Times, 6/23/99
reticent "He was as inquisitive about the
country as he was reticent about his business there." Frances Gilchrist Woods,
"Turkey Red"
retort "There is no need to retort to an
employee who has written a critique of your
original warning letter." NYC Board of
Education's Food Service Division, Guide for

reviled "Former Haitian President Aristede
was reviled by orphanage graduates who
claimed that he had lied to them about the
promise of jobs." Associated Press story,
"Haiti Gunmen Confront Police," New York
Times. 6/25/99
rhetoric "Nothing good can come out of the
rhetoric of hatred that will be heard at the
rally." New York Congressman Charles
Rangel, ABC 1V News, 9/2/99

rife "Cyberspace is rife with sweatshops but
very few people realize it." Karl Taro
Greenfield, "Living the Late Shift," TIME,
6/28/99
rift '!he 1993 tear gas assault on the
Branch Dividian cult has created a rift
between the FBI and the Attorney General's
office." Associated Press report, "FBI Video
Released," Newsday, 9/3/99

Managers

romp "She was expected to win the governor's race in a romp." Wolf Blitzer, CNN
News, 2/2/98

retrospect "I shivered in retrospect when I
thought of that afternoon meeting in the
freezing hall." Anna L. Strong, The Chinese

roster '!he roster of stars for our gala celebration includes Cher, Meatloaf. and Lyle
Lovett." Las Vegas hotel ad

Conquer China

reverberated "When that putt plunked into
the hole yesterday, the 40,000 people
exploded in a roar that reverberated
through more than a century of U.S. Open
history." Dave Anderson, "Longest Final
Putt," New York Times, 6/21/99

rudimentary "Some of them were singing,
some talking, some engaged in gardening,
hay-making, or other rudimentary industries." "The Other Side of the Hedge," E. M.
Forster
rue ..When they make a mistake they will

revere "Paul McCartney and other celebri-

rue it." Randi Feigenbaum, .. Realtors' Deal
Irks Lawyers," Newsday, 9/3/99

ties who yet revere the name of rock-androll great Buddy Holly will host a tribute to
him at the Roseland Ballroom." Letta Taylor,
'lribute to Buddy," Newsday, 9/3/99

ruminated "Lou Gehrig, the great N.Y.
Yankee star, ruminated on his career as he
left because of an incurable illness: 'I con357

PANORAMA OF WORDS
sider myself the luckiest man on the face of
the earth.'" Speech. 7/4/39

sanction "He received his father's sanction
and authority." George Meredith, Diana of
the Crossways

rustic 'This week a

rustic setting in the

Berkshire Hills was a gathering place for a
group that is dedicated to preserving the
Yiddish language." Tina Rosenberg, "Living
an American Life in Yiddish," New York
Times, 9/3/99

saga 'The

saga of the Kennedy family has

enthralled and saddened us." Barbara
Walters. quoted in New York Times,
7/10/99

sage "I am not a visionary, nor am I a
sage-I claim to be a practical idealist."
Mohandas Gandhi quoted by John Gunther,
Procession, 1965

salient "The salient feature of the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 is
that it prohibits discrimination against the
disabled." Robert McFadden, "Court Ruling
on Disabled Teacher Is Annulled," New York
Times, 6/25/99
sally 'The next morning we decided to sally
forth to try to find a site for our new home."
Stephen Leacock, "How My Wife and I Built
Our Home for $4.90"
salubrious "For my later years there
remains the salubrious effects of work: stimulation and satisfaction." Kathe Kollwitz,
Dia.ries and Letters, 1955
salvation "Maybe it is connected with some
terrible sin, with the loss of eternal salvation. with some bargain with the devil."
Aleksandr Pushkin, "The Queen of Spades"

sanctuary ''The identity of Rinehart may be
a temporary sanctuary for the narrator, but
it is another identity he must reject if he is
to find himself as a person." Anthony
Abbott, Invisible Man
sanguine "I'm not sanguine about the
Knicks' chances to upset the San Antonio
Spurs." Telephone caller to WFAN Sports
Radio Program, 6/8/99
satiety "One of the soldiers was given leave
to be drunk six weeks, in hopes of curing
him by satiety." William Cowper, Selected
Letters

saturate "Vanilla sweetens the air, ginger
spices it; melting nose-tingling odors saturate the kitchen." Truman Capote, "A
Christmas Memory"
schism "The schism between the manager
and his best pitcher spilled over from the
locker room onto the field." Bob Klapisch.
The Worst Team That Money Could Buy
scion "AI Gore is the Good Son, the early
achieving scion from Harvard and
Tennessee who always thought he would be
President." Maureen Dowd, "Freudian FaceOff," New York Times, 6/15/99
scoffed "No one was injured except the
woman who had scoffed at the belief."
Leonard Fineberg, "Fire Walking in Ceylon"
scrutinized "The jockey waited with his
back to the wall and scrutinized the room
with pinched, creepy eyes." Carson
McCullers, "The Jockey"

sanctimonious "There has never been a
shortage of sanctimonious arguments for
starting a war." Peter Finley Dunne, Mr.

scurrilous articles about them that started
to crop up in the tabloids." Charles Blauvelt,

Dooley Remembers

Edward and Wally

358

scurrilous "They were infuriated by the

PANORAMA OF WORDS
scurry "Some small night-bird, flitting
noiselessly near the ground on its soft
wings, almost flapped against me, only to
scurry away in alarm." Ivan Turgenev,
"Bezhin Meadows"
sedate

"Few public places maintain a

sedate atmosphere equal to the majestic

sinister 'The man had a cordially sinister
air." Hernando Tellez, "Ashes for the Wind"
site 'The site of the bison herd's destruction
was a tall cliff over which they were driven."
Brian Fagan, Time Detectives
skirmish 'They never meet but there's a

chambers of the Supreme Court." Milton
Konvitz, editor, Bill of Rights Reader

skirmish of wit between them." William
Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

sedentary "Seeger had seen him relapsing
gradually into the small-town hardware
merchant he had been before the war,
sedentary and a little shy." Irwin Shaw, "Act
of Faith"

slovenly 'The twenty-six year old's slovenly
appearance belied the fact that he was one
of the Silicon Valley's brightest stars."
Reuben Cowan, "Today Dot-Com"

senile "Being on golfs Senior Tour doesn't
mean that we're senile." Leon Jaroff, 'Those
Rich Old Pros," TIME, 9/27/99
serenity "At the top, they planted the crucifix and gathered round, moved by the
serenity." Sontag Orme, "Solemnity and
Flash in the Land of Jesus," New York
Times, 1/1/00
servile "Uriah Heep, so physically repulsive
and hypocritically servile, fascinated David
at first but later revolted him." Holly
Hughes, Barron's Book Notes, David
Copperfield by Charles Dickens
shibboleths Dialects are sometimes used
as shibboleths to signal the ethnic or social
status of the speaker." Bill Bryson, Mother
Tongue

sinecure

"Matthew Arnold's job was a

sinecure, allowing him plenty of time to trav-

el and write lyrics." Nicholas Jenkins, "A
Gift Improvised," New York Times, 6/20/99

singular 'The fate that rules in matters of
love is often singular, and its ways are
inscrutable, as this story will show." Meyer
Goldschmidt, "Henrik and Rosalie"

sojourn "He returned from a long sojourn in
Europe." Alan McCulloch. Encyclopedia of
Australian Art

solace "He read in a Bible that he had
neglected for years, but he could gain little
solace from it." Theodore Dreiser, 'The Lost
Phoebe"
solicited "The police chief said that
Commissioner Safir had not yet solicited his
opinion on the question." "Police Chief Says
Officers Deserve Raise," New York Times,
6/15/99
somber 'There was a

somber and moving
tribute for his last game at Yankee
Stadium." John Updike, New Yorker,
10/22/94

sophistry "No amount of sophistry could
disguise the obvious fact that the legislation
was biased against one particular office
holder." New York Times, 9/2/99
sordid 'The workmen used revolting language; it was disgusting and sordid."
Katherine Mansfield, 'The Garden Party"
spate "'There has been a spate of tell-all
memoirs, destroying the organization's special status." Jewish Monthly, 9/99
359

PANORAMA OF WORDS
spew

"It was obvious as the miles of electronic tape began to spew out the new patterns of American life that the census was to
be of historic dimension." Theodore H.
White, The Making of the President

stigmatized "People who so much as whisper during a performance are stigmatized as
barbarians." Joseph Wechsberg, The Best
Things in Life

stipulated "I shall come out from here five

in spontaneous candidness." Thomas Lee
Bucky, "Einstein: An Intimate Memoir"

minutes before the stipulated term, and
thus shall violate the agreement." Anton
Chekhov, "The Bet"

sporadic

strident "No matter how strident or insult-

6/14/99

ing he became, he was not interrupted by
the police." New York Daily News, 9/5/99

spurious "The only known picture, albeit a

strife "Either there is a civil

spontaneous ''Professor Einstein burst out

"TROOPS ENCOUNTER SPORADIC VIOLENCE" Headline, Newsday.

spurious one, had been printed some years
earlier." James Monaghan, Diplomat in
Carpet Slippers

strife, Or else
the world, too saucy with the gods. Incenses
them to send destruction." William
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar

squeamish "My brother, who voted for Mr.

stunted "Their physical and mental devel-

Mbeki and who has faith in his leadership,
is not squeamish." Mark Mathabane, "South
Africa's Lost Generation"

stagnant "The place was small and close,
and the long disuse had made the air stagnant and foul." T. E. Lawrence, The Desert of
the Stars

staunch "Known as a

staunch supporter of

opment became stunted during childhood."
Roger Pineles, Shame of the Cities

stupor

"If your child watches late night
television and comes home from school in a
stupor, she's not getting enough sleep."
"Getting Enough Sleep," Working Mother,
5/98

stymied "The family has been stymied in its

the Republican agenda, the young politician
astounded us all by his defection." Monte
Halperin, "Party Turncoat?"

attempt to remove a dead relative from the
juror rolls." Associated Press story, "Jury
Duty Summonses Don't Stop Despite
Death," New York Times, 6/25/99

steeped "Edward Francis had steeped him-

subjugated "The country had been bitterly

self in the internal mystery of the guinea
pig." Paul De Kruif, Hunger,Fighters

stentorian "He proclaimed the fact in stentorian tones that were easily heard throughout the auditorium." A. A. Berle, The 20th
Century Capitalist Revolution

stereotypes "Treating the most respected
leader in the land that way confrrms the
worst stereotypes and that really hurts us."
Alessandra Stanley, "Asking a Favor of the
Pope," New York Times, 6/12/99
360

divided, so ruthless in its determination to
keep the black majority subjugated." Sheryl
McCarthy, "Mandela Was South Africa's
Perfect Choice," Newsday, 6/ 17/99

subservient

"From the earliest times,
including the Bible, women have been
counseled to be subservient to men."
Barbara G. Walker, The Women's
Encyclopedia

substantiate "The Queens District Attorney
said that there were not enough facts to

PANORAMA OF WORDS
substantiate the charges against the tour
operator so no prosecution would take
place." Queens Courier. 1/18/00

advocated." Carl Dreyer, "The Roots of AntiSemitism"

superfluous "He drove through the beautisubterfuge "He was a free-will agent and he

ful countryside in silence; conversation
would have been superjluous." Travel and
Leisure, 10/94

chose to do careful work. and if he failed, he
took the responsibility without subteifuge."
Maijorie Kinnan Rawlings. "A Mother in
Mannville"

supine "The clergy as a whole were there-

subterranean "Another celebrity expected

fore obedient and supine." G. M. Trevelyan.
Carlyle

during the three games at Madison Square
Garden is Ed Norton-the actor, not the
subterranean sanitation professional."
Richard Sandomir, "N.B.A. Finals," New
York Times. 6/21/99

succinct "In clear and succinct tones, our
division head proceeded to tear me to
shreds in front of the entire staff." Elleyn
Falk, "They Promised Me a Rose Garden"

succulent "Use this coupon to get $1 off on
a succulent holiday turkey." Advertisement,
Waldbaum's Supermarket, 11/99

succumbed "This young gentleman was of
an excellent family but had been reduced to
such poverty that the energy of his character succumbed beneath it." Edgar Allan Poe,
"The Murders in the Rue Morgue"
sullen "My decision to leave put her into a
sullen silence. broken only by a mumble
under her breath." Alan Lelchuk, "American
Mischief'

supplication "The last supplication I make
of you is that you will believe this of me."
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

surfeit "A suifeit of the sweetest things The
deepest loathing to the stomach brings."
William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's
Dream

surge "In one wild surge they stormed into
a police station, where the bewildered officers tried to maintain order." James
Michener, "The Bridge at Andau"

surmised

"The commanding officer surmised that the other ship in the cove was a
coaster." Joseph Conrad, Tales of Hearsay

surreptitiously

"He was surreptitiously
negotiating to have 70 percent of the payments turned over to himself." David C.
Johnson, "Tax Evasion Scheme," New York
Times, I I 1/00

susceptible "Wrestling matches are suscepsultry "The sun would shine up there in the
lengthening spring day and pleasant
breezes blow in sultry summer." Maurice
Walsh, The Quiet Man

tible to being heavily scripted, as ardent
fans know." Edward Wyatt, "Pinning Down a
Share Value," New York Times, 8/4/99

symptomatic "The widespread dislocation
sumptuous "In the summer the table was
set, and the sumptuous meals-well, it
makes me cry to think of them." Mark
Twain, Autobiography

superficial "His teachings had only a superficial relationship to the orthodox religion he

and downsizing in hospitals is symptomatic
of relentless cost pressures." Carol
Eisenberg, "Nurses Contend With System's
Ills," Newsday, 6/22/99

taboo "The modern motion pictures have
shown so much that once was considered
361

PANORAMA OF WORDS
taboo." Harold H. Owen, Jr.. The Motion
Picture

tacit "There is a tacit agreement in a civil
conversation that each avoid making of it a
monologue." Rebecca West, 'There Is No
Conversation"
tainted

"The defense argued that poor
police procedures had tainted the evidence."
Newsday, 6/19/98

tangible "I hated it, not because of our one
overcrowded closet, but because of intrusions and discomforts of a far less tangible
nature." Mary Ellen Chase, "A Room of My
Own"

tenacious

"Their talent and tenacious
actions on the court will at last reward
them." Darcy Frey. The Last Shot

termagant 'This book deals with the matrimonial adventures of an extremely rich and
bullying termagant." Saturday Review,
11/99

terminate "A continuation of such chronic
lateness may lead us to terminate your
employment." Regulations of the NYC Board
of Education's Office of School Food &
Nutrition Services

terse "The mayor sent a

terse letter to the
school's chancellor over his cancellation of a
meeting." New York Times, 8/5/99

tantalized "We were tantalized by a glimpse
of a brown bear and her cubs in the wood."
Travel and Leisure, 10/97

therapy "He will have to undergo long-term

tantamount "Opponents of the proposed
agreement claim it is tantamount to a surrender of holy land." USA. Today, 1I 13/00

throng

taut "His face grew

taut as he was questioned about his use of illegal drugs in his
youth." New York Post. 8/19/99

technology "Mr. Greenspan noted that 'history is strewn' with miscalculations about
technology
developments."
Richard
Stevenson, "Fed Chief on New-Age
Economy," New York Times, 6/15/99
temerity "In the first month of his service
in the House, the young Congressman had
the temerity to challenge his party's
Speaker; it was a mistake." Blanche Kassell,
Up on the Hill

tenable "He took the tenable position that
lawyers should never cross examine a witness without knowing the answer before
asking the question." Harper Lee, To KUl a
Mockingbird

362

therapy before considering playing baseball
again." The Washington Post, 7/9/99

"When the throng had mostly
streamed into the porch, the sexton began
to toll the bell." Nathaniel Hawthorne, 'The
Minister's Black Veil"

thwarted 'The man who made up the name
for flies must have been thwarted in a lifelong desire to have children, and at last
found that outlet for his suppressed babytalk." Robert Benchley. "The Lure of the
Road"

timorous "He was a timorous incompetent
who was lucky to have good men under
him." W. A. Swanberg, Citizen Hearst
tinged

"The sermon was tinged, rather
more darkly than usual, with the gentle
gloom of Mr. Hooper's temperament."
Nathaniel Hawthorne, 'The Minister's' Black
Veil"

tolerated 'They despise anyone who hasn't
had the luck to be born Masai, but for one
reason and another. they tolerated me."
Robert W. Krepps. "Pride of Seven"

PANORAMA OF WORDS
tortuous "The

tortuous descent down the
mountain resulted in one additional fatality,
this time a sure-footed Sherpa guide."
Winston Adair, "Everest·Takes Its Toll"

tradition "The town had a century-old tradition-an eight-hour canoe race." Brenda

tussle

"It often doesn't pay to tussle with
your child to take music lessons." Working
Mother, 5/96

tyro

Flock, "The Race"

tranquil "Over this house, most

resulting in so many civilian casualties."
TIME. 8/25/98

tranquil

"The computer training center will
soon turn a tyro into a successful user."
Senior News, 9/99

and complete, Where no storm ever beat,
She was sole mistress." Phyllis McGinley,
"The Doll House"

ubiquitous "Che Guevera has become ubiq-

transient "City championships and nation-

fee mugs and posters, pops up in rock songs
and operas." Ariel Dorfman, "Che," TIME.
6/14/99

al tournaments, however thrilling, are transient moments." Darcy Frey, The Last Shot

tremulous "'Will Pa get hurt?' asked Jane
in a tremulous voice." Jessamyn West, "Yes,
We'll Gather at the River"

trenchant "Mr. Salinger's views on celebrity are often funny and trenchant." Clyde
Haberman, "A Recluse Meets His Match,"
New York Times, 6/18/99

trend

"We should make every effort to
reverse the trend in popular music towards
violent lyrics." Portland Oregonian. 8/12/99

uitous; his figure stares out at us from cof-

ultimate 'The

ultimate possibility for hero
and chorus alike is stated in Father
Mapple's sermon, and it is to become a
saint." W. H. Auden, "The Christian Tragic
Hero"

umbrage "I do not take

umbrage when I'm
looked over, I do when I'm overlooked." Mae
West, The Wit and Wisdom of Mae West,
Joseph Weintraub, Editor

unabated "'The summer list of auto fatali-

riothing is considered as a trivial discovery."
Brian Fagan, Time Detectives

ties continues unabated as three more
Southampton teens are killed in a Sunday
crash." W. Mariano, "A Final Farewell,"
Newsday,6/25/99

truncated

unconscionable "Viewers of 1V's coverage

trivial "In the study of past civilizations,

"It will be much harder if their

state (Palestine) is so truncated, so cut up,
that it is not viable." Anthony Lewis, 'The
Irrelevance of a Palestinian State," New York
Times, 6/20/99

of disasters find it unconscionable for
mourning family members to be shown and
interviewed so close up we can see the
tears." John Stephens, New York, 4/16/98

turbulent "Up to the turbulent surface
came a peculiar-looking craft, risen from
the calm but dangerous depth of the ocean."
Lt. Don Walsh, "Our Seven-Mile Dive to the
Bottom"

unctuous "Today's car salesmen are a far
cry from the high-pressured and unctuous
ones of the past." Car and Travel, 9/99

turpitude "The government must be held
responsible for these acts of moral turpitude

underwrite "We are pleased to feature
those local businesses who help to underwrite our programs." Patterns, monthly
magazine of WILL, Champaign, Illinois
363

PANORAMA OF WORDS
universal "With the approach of the new
millennium we see an almost universal fear
of major disruptions." TIME, 9 I 19/99

vapid "The new James Bond movie lacks
the excitement of the many before and is a
vapidcopy." Newsday, 10/25/98

unkempt "Budget cuts have resulted in
overcrowded and unkempt camping sites in
our parks." Freeman Tilden, The National

vehemently "The President spoke

Parks

unmitigated 'The crossword puzzle is the
unmitigated sedentary hobby of Americans."
Bill Bryson, Mother Tongue

vehemently against any large tax cut." New York
Times, 9/16/99

veneer "Since then, she has frequently
tried to crack the veneer of role, surface,
and pose." Mark Stevens, "Spice Girls," New
York, 6/21/99

unsavory "Punishing students by assigning
them more work, has made education unsavory and unappealing to the average student." H. C. McKown, "The Three R's Today"

venerable "Despite their huge popularity
the most venerable papers refused to accept
crossword puzzles as more than a passing
fad." Bill Bryson, Mother Tongue

unwieldy "Today's light weight, compact
cameras are a far cry from the unwieldy
ones used by early photographers." Popular
Photography, 9/96

venial "The coach tried to overlook the

urbane "Their prose is less ornate, their
urbane satire more muted." Book review,
New York Times

usurp "There is a constant struggle as one
branch of government attempts to usurp
some of the powers of the other." Milton
Konvitz, editor, Bill of Rights Reader
utopia "I was held spellbound by the middle-class utopia. without a blot, without a
tear." William James, "What Makes Life
Significant"
vacillated "In planning for the book I

vacillated between a selective, but deeper

approach or a general, more limited
approach." Milton Konvitz, editor, Bill of

venial errors of his players and concentrated on the serious ones." Sports Rlustrated,
5/12/99

venom "The point envenom'd tool Then,
venom do thy work." William Shakespeare,
Hamlet

vertigo "Iron workers on beams, hundreds
of feet above Broadway, were immune to
periods of vertigo." Architectural Digest,
1/93
vestige 'They kept at the rescue efforts as
long as there was a vestige of hope for the
earthquake victims." TIME, 8/30/99
vexatious "This vexatious law suit dragged
on interminably, becoming a legend in the
process." Charles Dickens, Bleak House

Rights Reader

viable "The organism remains viable in the
soil for years." Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

valor "Thrice have the Mexicans before us
fled, Their armies broken, their prince in triumph ·ted; Both to thy valor, brave young
man, we owe." Sir Robert Howard & John
Dryden, The Indian Queen

vicissitudes "Her husband was not only
faithful but patient in the face of remarkable
vicissitudes." Eliza Jane Berman, Noble

364

Minds

PANORAMA OF WORDS
vigil

"The U.N. peacekeeping troops are
keeping a vigil over the disputed area." New
York Times, 9/21 /99

vigilant ..1 deny not but that it is of great
concernment in the church and commonwealth to have a vigilant eye how looks
demean themselves." John Milton,
"Aereopagitica"

vituperation "To justify his action he used
vituperation. calling his enemies 'detestable
pests.'" Barbara G. Walker. The Women's
Encyclopedia

vivacious "The performance of this

vivacious leading lady made the play a delight."
New York Post, 10/15/98

vogue "Examining the private lives of our
vilified "One who belongs to the most vilified minority in history is not likely to be

unaware of the freedoms guaranteed by our
constitutions." Supreme Court Justice Felix
Frankfurter, decision, October 1943

vindicated "His family was certain that his
actions would be vindicated when all of the
facts became available." "Pilot Blamed in
Crash," New York Posi. 11/26/99
virile "The danger to our virile economy
from weaknesses in the Far East should not
be overlooked." Wall Street Journal.
5/16/98

political leaders is in vogue this election
period." New York, 9/4/99

volition "To prove her innocence, she took
a lie detector test of her own volition." New
York Times. 9/21/99

voluble "He came to hate Ray Gribble and
his voluble companions of the submerged
tenth of the class." Sinclair Lewis, "Young
Man Axelbrod"

voluminous

"The testimony in the case
relating to the President's actions has
become voluminous.'' Washington Post.
5/15/99

virtuosity "Employing his virtuosity as an
orchestrator of suspense, the author puts
Lector in Florence, Italy, speaking impeccable Italian." Paul Grey. "Dessert. Anyone?,"
TIME, 6/21/99

voracious "We spent a good number of our
waking hours feeding voracious stoves."
Jean Stafford, "New England Winter"

virulently "Another part of my hope was for

vulnerable "Any vulnerable area in an otherwise strong person or structure is known
as an Achilles heel." Barbara G. Walker, The

communities of people of colour that, for the
most part, have been virulently homophobic." Mark Haslam, "When Bigotry Kills,"
Globe and Mail, Toronto, 3/5/99

vitiate "This act is an attempt to vitiate the
separation of powers upon which our
democracy is founded." Justice Earl
Warren. Bill of Rights Reader. 1957
vitriolic "The speaker's vitriolic comments
about ethnic and religious groups brought
condemnation from the mayor." New York
Daily News. 9/5/98

Women's Encyclopedia

wan "Why so pale and wan. fond lover?
Prithee. why so pale?" John Suckling,
"Encouragement to a Lover"
wane "Japan, once an economic power, has
seen its influence wane." New York Times,
8/1/99
wary "These figures were

wanJ in their
movements and perfectly silent afoot."
Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim

365

PANORAMA OF WORDS
wheedle "'The first step of a politician is to
wheedle the editorial backing of a newspaper." Frederick Nebel, A Free Press

whet 'The accepted purpose of coming
attractions in movie theatres is to whet the
viewers' desire to see the film." John Simon,
Reverse Angle
whimsical "'This is not a whimsical idea-it
is a serious plan." Calvin Klein, New York
Magazine, 9/15/95
wince "He took the cruel blow without a
wince or a cry." A. Conan Doyle, 1he Last
Book of Sherlock Holmes

wistful "I am sad when I see those wistful
ads placed by the lovelorn in the classified

366

columns." E. B. White, The Essays of E. B.
White

wrest "'Their attempt to wrest control of the
company was thwarted by the Colonel and
his three supporters on the board." Edmund
Ward, Jr., "Bulls and Bears" [adapted]
yen "She could not resist the yen to see
how her classmates had progressed so she
agreed to attend the class reunion."
Woman's Home Companion, 9/94
zealous "James I was zealous in prosecuting
Scottish sorcerers." George Lyman Kittredge,
Witchcraft in Old and New England
zenith "At the zenith of her fame as a musical star, she was assassinated by a crazed
fan." H. Hudson, People, 7/21/97

BONUS

WEEK

A ·:·

DAY

NEW WORDS

1

impregnanble
im preg" m 1»1

toxic
tok' sik

TITANIC MYSTERY
On Aprtl 14, 1912, an incident took place that became a front
page stocy in newspapers all over the world. It is a tale that
has continued to capture the attention of movie and theatre
goers, of opera and television audiences, of novelists and
playwrights-it's the stocy of the allegedly impregnable Titanic,
the unsinkable majestic ocean liner that tumbled to the bottom
of the icy Atlantic waters with 1600 passengers still aboard.
How could such a toxic tragedy have occurred? Could it
have been avoided? How could the naval patriarch, Captain
Edward Smith, no neophyte he, have allowed the disaster to
happen? What were the extenuating circumstances that led to
the death of that glorious White Star queen?
In September 1985, the hulk of the Titanic was found on the
ocean's floor, providing many answers to the questions that
seamen and landlubbers had wrestled with over the years.

patriarch
pi tre ark'
neophyte

ne' ~fit
extenuating
ik sten' y00 it tng

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. Coal miners are often subject to

fumes.

2. Robert's defense lawyer pointed out the

conditions of the case.

3. Although Sarah was skillfu1 at math, she was a

at computers.

4. A company of marines was unable to penetrate the seemingly _ _ _ _ __

fortress.
5. Grandfather is the recognized _ _ _ _ _ _ of our family.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. impregnable

a. harmful

7. toxic

b. elder

8. extenuating

c. incapable of being entered

9. neophyte

d. beginner

10. patriarch

e. excusable

TODAY'S IDIOM

a dry run- trial, test, exercise
Before opening night, the actors had several dry runs.

______
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

]
367

NEW WoRDS

BONUS

forebodings
for bo' dings
emanting
em' ana ting

WEEK

A

•!• DAY

2

WHAT WENT WRONG?

Investigators found that a series of mistakes led to the
miscreant
sinking of the Titanic. A wireless message had come in from
mis' kre ~nt
a French liner, warning of ice ahead, but that was a
thousand miles away, and so, no need to worry. On April 13,
protocol
the vessel Rapphannoek also warned the Titanic of dangerous
pro' ta kol
ice ahead. On the following day, there came a spate* of other
warnings from a Cunard ship, a Dutch liner, and the White
circuitous
Star Bal~all telling of icebergs about 250 miles from the
sar kyoo' i tas
Titanic's current position. Next came the German Amerika,
echoing the same forebodings, followed by the California.
cautioning the Titanic about the field ice. Finally, the Mesaba
called attention to an enormous belt of ice stretching directly
across the Titanic's path. All the messages emanating from sister ships should have had a
profound* effect on Smith and company.
No one miscreant could be fmgered, but a host of crew members were certainly
blameworthy. Why didn't Captain Smith's officers react to those messages? Notations were
indeed made on slips of paper but largely ignored and forgotten. There was no standard
protocol for the handling of such messages; if there had been, Captain Smith would certainly
have taken a circuitous route so as to avoid the dangerous icebergs.
Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. Cindy took a _ _ _ _ _ _ route home to avoid the class bullies.
2. Caesar's wife had

3. The rulings
4. The class
5. Failing to follow

about danger facing her husband.
from the local court were cheered by the conservatives.
was made to remain after school.
got Sophia into trouble at the office.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. forebordings

a. one who behaves badly

7. emanating

b. forms of ceremony

8. miscreant

c. premonitions, evil omens

9. protocol

d. roundabout

10. circuitous

e. coming from
TODAY'S IDIOM

to throw someone a curve-to do the unexpected
When I least expected it, Helen threw me a curve.

368

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

BONUS

WEEK

A ·:·

DAY

NEW WORDS

3

knell

nel
macabre
rna ka' bra

DEATH KNELL FOR THE TITANIC

And then it happened. White in its innocence, a monstrous
ramifications
iceberg smashed into the luxury liner, ripping an ugly gash of
ram· a fi ka shans
250 feet along the starboard and causing a fatal wound.
Within seconds, thousands of cubic feet of water had
rapacious
penetrated the shattered hull. One after another, dominolike,
ra pi' shas
the watertight compartments and bulkhead were flooded. The
unthinkable had happened despite the absolute guarantees
insurgent
of the shipbuilders, Harland & Woolf.
in sur· jant
There followed a macabre scene as the ship's band, clad in
their tuxedos, continued to play show tunes while hordes of
terrified passengers, many in nightclothes, rushed toward the
lifeboats. The crew called out, "Women and children first," but their lack of an orderly plan
for loading would have profound* ramljications. In fact, some boats that could hold 30 were
sent into the Atlantic with only a handful of people-generally first -class passengers.
As panic began to take hold, the realization that there weren't enough lifeboats exacerbated*
the situation, bringing out the worst in a rapacious few. Several insurgent males ignored the
crew and jumped into descending lifeboats. It was an act of shame they would have to live with
for the rest of their lives.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. The

dictator used mustard gas against his enemies.

2. Additional troops were dispatched to deal with the

threat.

3. When the _ _ _ _ _ _ sounded, the students closed their books and their minds.

4. Some critics were unhappy about the bloody
5. Heidi was concerned about the

scenes in the movie.
of her employer's new policy.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. knell

a. complications

7. macabre

b. greedy, taking by force

8. ramifications

c. gruesome

9. rapacious

d. rebellious

10. insurgent

e. sound of a bell
TODAY'S IDIOM

to cross the Rubicon-a limit that allows for no return (The Rubicon was a river
in Italy that Julius Caesar's army crossed, knowing there was no retreat.)
When I crossed the Rubicon by signing the contract,
I knew I could never go back on my commitment.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

369

NEW WORDS

BONUS

glut

WEEK

A ·:·

DAY

4

glut
risible
~

riz'

THE LAWYERS' TURN

1:»1

As one might have expected, manifold* law suits against the

dilatory

White Star Line began to crop up within weeks of the sinking
and rescue. The glut of billionaires on board (Astors,
Wideners, Guggenheims, Strausses, et al.} did not file any
specious
claims, but other cases went all the way to the Supreme
spe sh~s
Court and kept lawyers and judges busy for the next four
years. The average claim had been for a modest $1500, and
denouement
the average award, paid by the White Star Line, was a risible
da
man'
$1000. White Star's top notch legal staff was accused of
using dilatory tactics, tiring the claimants until they agreed
to settle for a mere pittance*. Their lawyers called many
claims specious and rejected them out of hand.
The denouement of the story is rather sad. American and British maritime law had long
given special protection to ship owners on the grounds that their business was such a risky
one. And so there was a limit to the amount of money that White Star could be assessed. In
the end, they paid only 4% of the $16 million originally demanded by the survivors and were
happy to close the books on the ocean disaster. We can imagine that if a similar tragedy
were to take place today, the settlements would be in the hundreds of millions.
dil' ~tore

noo

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.

1. The play's

came with three dead bodies on the stage.

2. Umpires do not like pitchers who use
3. In debating,

styles.

arguments are rarely effective.

4. What Hany felt was

Sally thought was pathetic.

5. Our choir has a _ _ _ _ _ _ of tenors and a shortage of sopranos.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. glut

a. delaying

7. Iisible

b. laughable

8. dilatory

c. oversupply

9. specious

d. deceptively attractive

10. denouement

e. outcome
TODAY'S IDIOM

to brave the elements-to go out in bad weather
Despite the freezing rain, Cynthia decided to brave the elements.

370

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

BONUS

WEEK

REVIEW WORDS
1. circuitous
2. denouement
3. dilatory
4. emanating
5. extenuating
6. forebodings
7. glut
8. impregnable
9. insurgent
10. knell
11. macabre
12. miscreant
13. neophyte
14. patriarch
15. protocol
16. ramifications
17. rapacious
18. risible
19. specious
20. toxic
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

A

•!• DAY

5

DEFINITIONS
a. coming from
b. a rebel
c. aged male family leader
d. gruesome
e. roundabout
f. complications
g. tending to delay
h. forms of ceremony
i. lessening the seriousness
j. sound of a bell
k. premonitions, evil omens
I. greedy, taking by force
m. harmful, destructive
n. oversupply
o. deceptively attractive
p. cannot be entered by force
q. laughable, ludicrous
r. one who behaves badly
s. beginner, novice
t. outcome

a dry run
to throw someone a curve
to cross the Rubicon
to brave the elements

u. a limit that allows for no return
v. trial exercise
w. do the unexpected
x. go out in bad weather

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 388. Make a record
of those words you missed.

REVIEW

MEANINGS

1. ----------------2. ----------------3. -----------------

4. ----------------5. -----------------

371

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Week A)



•.• Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.
1. When the (ramifications, knell) of his action were explained, Roger
apologized.
2. There is no known antidote for the (specious, toxic) poison.
3. Following (forebodings. protocol). Ben bowed before the emperor.
4. The young (patriarch, miscreant) was brought before the judge.
5. Seeking his prey, the lion took a (circuitous, dUatory) route on the trail
·
of the deer.
6. Victor's weak explanation elicited* a (risible, rapacious) reaction from
his teacher.
7. The (insurgent. neophyte) forces launched a successful attack.
8. We thought the (knell, denouement) of the play was ridiculous.
9. Harmful fumes were (emanating. extenuating) from the laboratory.
10. Critics rated the (impregnable, macabre) play to be the season's best.

372

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

WORDSEARCH A
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

An Unusual Perk
A study ..;;.. declared that one in eight adults in our major cities has diabetes, a
®
disease. Many. however. are not aware that they have it or how
®
it can be. There is a ®
of evidence revealing that the
high blood sugar that affects diabetics is more characteristic of Asian
Americans, African-Americans, and Hispanics than of the white population.
Unfortunately. many of the victims of diabetes do not take immediate steps
to deal the with disease. New York City's health commissioner has warned of
the ®
of a failure to control the high blood sugar: blindness,
amputations. and heart disease. In fact, diabetes is the nation's fastest
growing major disease.
Clues

®
®

2nd Day
1st Day
5th Day

@ 4th Day

®

3rd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

373

NEW WORDS

BONUS

dolorous

WEEK

8

•!• DAY

1

do Ia Ids

enervated
en' ~r va tid

GOOD NEWS-AND BAD

On Palm Sunday, April 9, 1865, General Ulysses S. Grant
suffrage
sent a terse• dispatch to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. It
suf' rij
contained the long-awaited sentence that the Confederate
General Robert E. Lee had surrendered. The dolorous Civil
cabal
War that had crippled the young nation was finally over.
ka hal'
President Lincoln was only 56 at the time, but he looked
twenty years older. The burden of being a wartime president
odious
had so enervated Lincoln that Surgeon General Barnes
o' de ~s
feared an imminent• nervous breakdown. When Grant's
news reached Lincoln, he went to the front windows of the
White House and waved to the crowd below. He proceeded to
make a brief speech about the problems of Reconstruction and advocated* the granting of
suffrage to Negro soldiers.
Among the listeners was a Southern patriot, the popular actor John Wilkes Booth, almost
as famous in the theater as his father, Junius. "That's the last speech he will ever make,"
said Booth to a fellow member of his cabal of conspirators. Booth's odious plan was to
assassinate Lincoln whom he hated passionately, while an associate, George Atzerodt, would
do the same to Vice-President Andrew Johnson.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. The dictator lied when he claimed he favored

for women.

2. We were surprised when Ted's happy expression turned into a
3. The members of the revolutionary
4. Sylvia's

one.

were arrested and jailed.

remarks caused the audience to turn against her.
by his long walk, Jose took to his bed.

5.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. dolorous

a. right to vote

7. enervated

b. secret group of plotters

8. suffrage

c. worn out

9. cabal

d. sad

10. odious

e. despicable
TODAY'S IDIOM

to kill the goose that laid the golden egg-to spoil a good deal
By being greedy, the accountant killed the goose that laid the golden egg.

374

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

BONUS

WEEK

B ·:·

DAY

NEW WORDS

2

prescient
pre' she ~nt
verbatim

wr hi' tim

THE DREAMS OF LINCOLN AND BOOTH

Lincoln's family and friends remembered that the President
reverie
had a prescient dream in March, several weeks before th~ fatal
rev'
~r e
day, and provided them with a verbatim account. He told of
entering the East Room in the White House where a throng• of
thespian
people were gathered around an open coffin. In his reverie,
thes'
pe an
Lincoln asked a soldier, "Who is dead in the White House?"
'The President," was the reply. "He was killed by an assassin."
despot
Mrs. Lincoln said, "I'm glad I don't believe in dreams or I
des'
p3t
should be in terror from this time forth." Lincoln's was the
calming voice, "Let's try to forget it. I think the Lord in His
own good time and way will work this out all right."
Of course, all who loved Abe Lincoln would have been deeply agitated if they had known
what John Wilkes Booth was planning. As a Southern secessionist, he despised the
President. As a thespian. he romanticized the action that he could take to rid the nation of
a cruel warmonger. Although he had not taken an active part in the Civil War, he was
convinced that he could contribute to the Confederate cause by kidnapping the bearded
despot. It wasn't exactly clear in his mind whether he would "capture" Lincoln and take him
to Richmond where he could be exchanged for Confederate prisoners of war-or whether he
would just put a bullet in the President's head.
Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.

1. Yearning to be a

, Roger took lessons from a dramatic coach.

2. When he lost control of the militia, the
3. Claiming to be
woman.

was forced to flee.

, the fortune teller took advantage of the gullible*

4. With remarkable talent, the reporter was able to quote speeches _ _ _ _ __
5. In her _ _ _ _ _ _ , Ellen saw herself as the next U.S. President.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.

6. prescient

a. dream

7. verbatim

b. actor

8. reverie

c. able to predict

9. thespian

d. word for word

10. despot

e. tyrant
TODAY'S IDIOM

to carry coals to Newcastle-a waste of time
(since Newcastle had a great deal of coal)

Telling the racing car driver how to drive is like carrying coals to Newcastle.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

375

NEW WORDS

BONUS

pathological
path'~ loj i kal

WEEK

B ·:·

DAY

3

articulate

ar tik' y~ lit

THE ASSASSINS MAKE READY

The pathological yet articulate Booth had rounded up several cograndeur
conspirators and shared his delusions of grandeur with them.
gran' J~r
He had produced a polemic that convinced his crew that it would
be a patriotic thing to capture the President. One of them was
polemic
assigned to shut off the master gas valve at Ford's Theatre when
~ lem· ik
Mr. and Mrs lincoln were seated there at the play. With all the
lights out, Booth would bind and gag the President. Two men
impasse
would lower Uncoln onto the stage, and then cany him out the
im' pas
rear door to a covered wagon waiting in the alley. They would
head for Port Tobacco and then feny across the Potomac to their
ultimate• destination, Richmond, Virginia.
Several dry runs• had not worked out for the cabalists* who were about to reach an impasse
when Booth learned that Uncoln would be celebrating General Grant's victories with a party at
Ford's Theater on the night of April 14. He promised the small group that destiny was at hand;
their bold act, he said, would make their names famous forever in the annals of U.S. history.
In the late afternoon of April 14, Booth watched a rehearsal of the play that would be
performed that evening. He had reviewed his action plan and the escape route, and he
believed it to be foolproof. He mouthed the phrase he would use after killing Lincoln, "Sic
Semper Tyrannis" ("Thus always to tyrants").
The curtain was about to go up on one of the darkest days in the country's history.

Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. The

was broken when the union agreed to management's offer.

2. In history class, we studied the

of Greece and the glory of Rome.

3. Hal was surprisingly

for a high school freshman.

4. The defense lawyer admitted that his client was a _ _ _ _ _ _ liar.

5. The team captain's _ _ _ _ _ _ led to a fist fight in the locker room.

Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. pathological

a. well-spoken

7. articulate

b. magnificence

8. grandeur

c. disordered in behavior

9. polemic

d. deadlock

10. impasse

e. controversial argument
TODAY'S IDIOM

an axe to grind-to pursue a selfish aim
Senator Smith was in favor of the bill, but we knew that he had an axe to grind.

376

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

BONUS

WEEK

B

•!• DAY

4

NEW WORDS

regimen

ref a m~n
denigrated

"NOW HE BELONGS TO THE ACES"

den· i gnit ed

At 8:25 the Uncolns arrived at the theater. When they entered
guile
Booths 7 & 8, as regimen dictated, the band played "Hail to the
gil
Chief." The 1675 members of the audience stood to honor the
great man. and then the play commenced. It is reported that
mortal
Booth said to a drunk who had denigrated his acting skill, "When
mar·
tl
I leave the stage, I will be the most famous man in America."
At about 10 P.M., with extreme guile, Booth had managed to
inflicted
be behind Box 7 in the darkness of the hallway. He saw the
in
fltkt'ed
silhouette of a head above the horsehair rocker. Derringer in
his hand, he aimed it between the President's left ear and his
spine. The shot was drowned out by laughter on the stage.
Shouting "Revenge for the South," Booth climbed over the ledge of the box and jumped onto
the stage, breaking his leg in the process.
In pain, Booth limped out the stage door where his horse was waiting and made his getaway.
Days later, however, he was cornered in a Virginia barn and shot. Three of the cabal* members
were arrested and hanged.
At the theater, a 23-year-old doctor attended to the wounded President. He found that the
lead shot had lodged in Lincoln's brain, a bad sign. Several soldiers carried Mr. Uncoln across
the street to a private house. His family physician came and so did the Surgeon General. The
President struggled throughout the long night, but it was apparent that a mortal wound had
been ir!flicted. and he could not be saved.
At 7:22A.M. it was over; two silver coins were placed on the assassinated President's eyes.
Then Secretary Stanton uttered the famous words, "Now he belongs to the ages."
Sample Sentences Insert the new words in the following sentences.
1. The blow to the boxer's jaw turned out to be a
one.
2. Using
, the magician pulled the wool over the spectators' eyes.
3. Aunt Ethel's morning _ _ _ _ _ _ called for three cups of coffee.
4. When her boss
Martha's stenographic ability, she quit.
5. The prison guards
torture on some of the inmates.
Definitions Match the new words with their meanings.
6. regimen
a. leading to death
7. denigrated
b. defamed
8. guile
c. a system of control
9. mortal
d. trickery
10. inflicted
e. imposed upon
TODAY'S IDIOM

to throw one's hat in the ring-to run for political office
Before a gathering of the party's faithful, the local congressman
threw his hat in the ring for the position of senator.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

377

REVIEW
REVIEW WORDS
1. articulate
2. cabal
3. denigrated
4. despot
5. dolorous
6. enervated
7. grandeur
8. guile
9. impasse
10. inflicted
11. mortal
12. odious
13. pathological
14. polemic
15. prescient
16. regimen
17. reverie
18. suffrage
19. thespian
20. verbatim
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

BONUS

WEEK

DEFINITIONS
a. absolute ruler
b. hateful, despicable
c. secret group of plotters
d. actor
e. disordered in behavior
f. defamed one's character
g. a controversial argument
h. able to speak clearly
i. able to know beforehand
j. greatness of character, magnificence
k. word for word
I. worn out
m. a system of control
n. to impose something painful
o. deadlock
p. a daydream
q. subject to death
r. the right to vote
s. sorrowful
t. trickery, deceit

an axe to grind
to carry coals to Newcastle
to throw one's hat in the ring
to kill the goose that laid the
golden egg

u. to pursue a selfish aim
v. a waste of time
w. to run for office
x. to spoil a good deal

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY
Check your answers on
page 388. Study the words
you missed.

1.

2. ---------------3.
4.

5.

378

B ·:·

MEANINGS

DAY

5

WORDSEARCH B
•!•

Using the clues listed below, fill in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Perks Are In
Do you know what a Mperk" is? Simply put, it's an extra reward, a special
staffer
benefit given to sweeten the job for an employee. Now an at Serus, a software maker in California's Silicon Valley, has skillfully
described an incredible perk given to him and his fellow workers-a thrillpacked parachute plunge as they jumped from a plane 14,000 feet above the
ground.
MOur employees work hard and can become _@____ , " said a Serus
executive, Mand we want to invigorate them with sky dives, as well as cruises,
beauty treatments at spas, birthday parties, maid services, and other creative
might conjure up."
perks that our ®
Of course, company executives are deeply interested in keeping productive
staff members from quitting and going to work for competitors. And so, the
host of perks they offer reflect the@
behind their generosity. MCash
bonuses won't have the same effect," a CEO said. In a®
remark he
declared, Mit's like a parent who throws money at his child when what the
youngster really wants is attention."
Clues
Q) 3rd Day
@ 1st Day
@ 1st Day

@ 4th Day

®

2nd Day

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

379

SENTENCE COMPLETIONS
(From Weeks A and B)



•.• Each sentence below has two blanks, indicating that something has
been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five sets of words labeled A
through E. Choose the set of words that, when inserted, best fits the
meaning of the sentence as a whole.

1. The _ _ _ dictator used _ _ _ to achieve his goals.
a. rapactous ... gutle
b. articulate ...protocol
c. odious... regimen
d. dilatmy...ramiftcatlons
e. presctent. .. polemics
2. Having overcome the _ _ _ _ _ _ , the executive had high hopes
for the future.

a. specious...cabal
b. circuitous... knells
c. dolorous ...forebodings
d. mortal... reverte
e. toxic...insurgents
3. The _ _ _ _ _ _ fled the country with the millions he had stolen
from the treasury.

a. impregnable ... neophyte
b. pathological...despot
c. dilatocy... miscreant
d. Iisible...insurgent
e. articulate... patriarch
4. The _ _ _ circumstances were clearly explained by the play's _ __

a. extenuating... denouement
b. prescient...knell
c. macabare.. .forebodlngs
d. circuitous... protocol
e. odious... polemic
5. "'We have had a
of _ _ _ tactics," the judge declared. "and I
will not put up with it."
a.
b.
c.
d.

regimen ... toxic
glut...dllatocy
cabal...odious
grandeur...verbatlm
e. bnpassse... suffrage

380

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

VOC/QUOTE
•!•

Select the best word from the five choices to fit in the blanks below.

1. "There are no political _ _ _ except in the imagination of political quacks."
-Francis Parkman

b. panaceas

a. compounds

c. milieus

e. diatribes

d. ethics

2. "The effect of my
is that always busy with the preliminaries and antecedents,
I am never able to begin the produce."

-Henri Amiel
a. genre

b. expedient

c. iniquity

d. bias

e. prognostication

3. "Once philosophers have written their principal works, they not infrequently simply

become their own _ __
-Theodore Haecker
a. accomplices

c. cynics

b. disciples

e. badgers

d. arbiters

4. "I hate the aesthetic game of the eye and the mind, played by those

who

'appreciate' beauty."
-Pablo Picasso
a. connoisseurs

b. charlatans

c. rustles

d. stentorian

e. paragons

takes such very good care that its prophecies of woe to the
5...Anglo-Saxon
erring person shall find fulfillment."
-George Gissing
a. foreboding

b. morality

d. polemic

c. protocol

e. guile

6. 'The universe is not friendly to _ _ _ and they all perish sooner or later."
-Don Marquis
a. icons
7. "

b. patriarchs

c. despots

d. insurgents

e. perennials

means influence."
-,Jack London

a. Affluence

b. Cupidity

c. Complicity

d. Decorum

e. Proximity

8. "No one wants advice-only

-,John Steinbeck
a. corroboration

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

b. alacrity

c. delineation

d. dissent

e. jurisdiction

381

VOC/QUOTE
9. "If by the time we're sixty, we haven't learned what a knot of
contradiction life is, we haven't grown old to much purpose."

and
-John Cowper POW'JS

a. vertigo

b. sunnise

c. sophistry

d. privation

e. paradox

10. 'The concept of 'Momism' is male nonsense. It is the refuge of a man seeking excuses

for his own lack of _ __
-Pearl Buck

a. regimen

b. virility

d. temerity

c. grandeur

e. satiety

is the dabbling within a serious field by persons who are ill equipped to
meet even the minimum standards of that field, or study, or practice."
-Ben Shahn

11. ..

a. Amnesty

b. Artifice

c. Decadence

d. Propriety

e. Dilettantism

12. "Accustomed to the

of noise, public relations, and market research, society is
suspicious of those who value silence."
-John Lahr

a. realm

b. veneer

c. surfeit

d. diatribe

e. cacophony

13. "In almost every act of our lives we are so clothed in

and dissemblance that
we can recognize but dimly the deep primal impulses that motivate us."
-James Ramsey Ullman

a. volition

b. rationalization

c. sophistry

d. impunity

e. heresy

14. "When men talk honestly about themselves, one of the themes that crops up is a

_ _ _ for the old days, at least for an idealized version of them."
-Myron Brenton

a. pretext

b. landmark

c. nostalgia

d. fetish

e. candor

15. "We love a congenial _ _ _ because by sympathy we can and do expand our spirit

to the measure of his."
-Charles H. Cooley
a. egotist

b. nonentity

c. iconclast

d. ascetic

e. disciple

16. "Man is certainly a

animal. A never sees B in distress without thinking C
ought to relieve him directly."
-Sydney Smith

a. discreet

382

b. benevolent

c. banal

d. whimsical

e. somber

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

VOC/QUOTE
17. "I cannot tolerate _ _ _ . They are all so obstinate. so opinionated."

-Joseph McCarthy
a. arbiters

b. culprits

c. dregs

d. expatriates

e. bigots

18. "We look upon

as degrading. Our mothers' voices still ring in our ears: 'Have
you done your homework?'"
~Wilhelm Stekhel

a. indolence

b. opulence

c. levity

d. invective

e. histrionics

19. "By far the most dangerous foe we have to fight is _ _ _ -indifference from

carelessness, from absorption in other pursuits."
~Sir

a. umbrage

b. apathy

c. repose

d. nepotism

William Osler

e. histrionics

20. "One who sees the _ _ _ everywhere has occasion to remember it pretty often."

-Oliver Wendell Holmes
a. inevitable

b. precedent

c. efficacy

d. idyllic

e. mundane

21. '!here's life for a
in the characters he plays. It's such a beautiful physical
escape. I enjoy the transformation of personality."

-Sir John Gielgud

b. miscreant

a. thespian

c. termagant

d. tyro

e. sage

22. "The writing of a biography is no

task: it is the strenuous achievement of a
lifetime. only to be accomplished in the face of endless obstacles."
-Havelock Ellis

a. paltry

b. facile

c. lucrative

d. impious

e. egregious

23. "Cleanliness, said some _ _ _ man, is next to godliness. It may be, but how it came
to sit so near is the marvel."
-Charles Lamb
a. abstemious

b. banal

c. cornely

d. sage

e. devout

24. "I should like most candid friends to be anonymous. They would then be saved the
painful necessity of making themselves _ __
-J. A. Spender
a. venial

b. odious

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

c. sanctimonious

d. fractious

e. benevolent

383

VOC/QUOTE
25. "A stricken tree is beautiful, so dignified, so admirable in its _ _ _ longevity; it is,
next to man, the most touching of wounded objects."
-Edna Ferber
a. rash

b. vulnerable

c. potential

e. omnipotent

d. singular

26. "Grandparents are frequently more
with their grandchildren than with their
children. A grandparent cannot run with his son but can totter with his grandson."
-Andre Maurois
a. raucous

b. congenial

c. sedate

e. vexatious

d. tenacious

27. "It is unjust to the child to be born and reared as the 'creation' of the parents. He is
of them both."
himself, and it is within reason that he may be the very
-Ruth Benedict
a. veneer

b. requisite

d. profuse

c. antithesis

e. anathema

28. 'This, indeed, is one of the eternal
of both life and literature-that without
passion little gets done: yet without control of that passion, its effects are largely
ill or null."
-F. L. Lucas
a. trends

b. subterfuges

c. harbingers

e. paradoxes

d. fiats

29. "What has maintained the human race if not faith in new possibilities and courage to
_ _ _ them."
~aneAddams

a. divulge

b. flout

c. advocate

d. initiate

e. mandate

30. "No sooner do we take steps out of our customary routine than a strange world
_ _ _ about us."
~.B. Priestly
a. surges

b. wanes

31. "As the two
shocking truths."

c. recants

d. juxtaposes

e. galvanizes

cultures began to mingle, they encountered some revealing and
-Nelson DeMille

a. venerable

b. transient

c. sedentary

d. disparate

e. servile

32. "Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so mired in _ __
-Bertrand Russell
a. futility

384

b. vituperation

c. subterfuge

d. foment

e. iniquity

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 388

VOC/QUOTE
33. ..Most quarrels are _ _ _ at the time, incredible afterwards."
-E. M. Forster

a. rash

b. salient

c. trenchant

d. inevitable

e. whimsical

34. ..We live at the mercy of a - - - ' - word. A sound, a mere disturbance of the air sinks
into our very soul sometimes."
-Joseph Conrad
a. reviled

b. malevolent

c. vexatious

d. irmocuous

e. evanescent

35. "There must be some good in the cocktail party to account for its immense _ __
among otherwise sane people."
-Evelyn Waugh

a. vogue

b. cupidity

c. calumny

e. asperity

d. audacity

36...One drifting yellow leaf on a windowstll can be a city dweller's fall,
melancholy as any htllside in New England."

and
-E. B. White

a. somber

b. cryptic

c. pungent

d. aloof

e. doleful

37. ..For generations of German plutocrats, duelling was a bastion against weakness,

effeminacy, and _ __
-Arthur Krystal

a. redress

b. sophistry

c. decadence

d. temerity

e. vituperation

38. ..No one weeps more
than the hardened scoundrel as was proved when a
sentimental play was performed before an audience of gangsters whose eyes were
seen to be red and swollen."
-Hesketh Pearson

b. vapidly

a. copiously

c. raucously

d. nominally

e. laudably

39. ..My greatest problem is my dislike of

, of battle. I do not like wrestling
matches or arguments. I seek harmony. If it is not there, I move away."
-Anais Nin

a. artifice

b. avarice

c. celerity

d. belligerence

e. diversity

40. "The only agreeable existence is one of idleness, and that is not, unfortunately, always
_ _ _ with continuing to exist at all."
-Rose Macauley

a. bogus

b. compatible

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

c. culpable

d. felicitous

e. inviolable

385

VOC/QUOTE
41. "Diaries are sometimes meant to be a
record of one's daily waking hours.
Sometimes they are an unconscious relief from the day's tensions."
-Edna Ferber
a. zealous

b. tacit

c. terse

e. prudent

d. supine

42. "Was there ever a wider and more loving conspiracy than that which keeps the

_ _ _ figure of Santa Claus from slipping away into the forsaken wonderland
of the past?"
-Hamilton Mabie

a. vigilant

b. venerable

c. sedate

d. frenetic

e. factitious

43. "For him who has no concentration! there is no _ __
-Bhagavad Gita
a. tranquility

b. respite

c. solace

e. humility

d. equanimity

44. "Real excellence and _ _ _ are not incompatible; on the contrary, they are
twin sisters."
-Jean Lacordiare
a. potential

b. inhibition

d. equanimity

c. propinquity

e. humility

45. "Children are cunning enough behind their innocent faces, though _ _ _ might be
a kinder word to describe them."
-Nan Fairbrother
a. recondite

·b. prudent

c. fatuous

d. incisive

e. inexorable

46. "It is not easy to _ _ _ of anything that has given us truer insight."
-John Spalding
a. repent

b. rue

c. recant

d. eschew

e. cant

47. 'There is no diplomacy like
. You may lose by it now and then, but it will
be a loss well gained if you do. Nothing is so boring as having to keep up a deception."
-E. V. Lucas
a. hyperbole

b. chicanexy

c. serenity

e. opprobrium

d. candor

48. "In America I was constantly being introduced to
persons by people who were
unmistakably superior to those notables and most modestly unaware of it."
-John Ayscough
a. eminent

386

b. ostentatious

c. mendacious

d. intrepid

e. garrulous

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

VOC/QUOTE
49. "It is because nature made me a
man, going hither and thither for
conversation that I love proud and lonely things."
-W. B. Yeats

a. magnanimous

b. fastidious

c. doleful

d. banal

e. gregarious

50. "My greatest problem here, in a _ _ _-loving America, is my dislike of polemics. of

belligerence, of battle."
-Anais Nin

a. docile

b. polemic

ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 388

c. fastidious

d. implacable

e. nebulous

387

ANSWERS
•!• WEEK

A

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

toxic
extenuating
neophyte
impregnable
patriarch

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

c
a
e
d
b

Day 4

Day 3

circuitous
foreboding
emanating
miscreant
protocol

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
e
a
b
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

rapacious
Insurgent
knell·
macabre
ramifications

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

e
c
a
b
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

denouement
dilatory
specious
risible
glut

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
b
a
d
e

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
b
d
a
e

Day 5
REVIEW

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

•!• WEEK

e 7. n 13.
t 8. p 14.
g 9. b 15.
a 10. J 16.
1 11. d 17.
k 12. r 18.

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?

s
c
h
f

19.
20.
21.
22.
I 23.
q 24.

m
v
w

u
X

WORDSEARCH A

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

ramifications
toxic
protocol
miscreant
circuitous
risible
insurgent
denouement
emanating
macabre

emanating
toxic
rapacious
glut
ramifications

8

Day 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

0

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

suffrage
dolorous
cabal
odious
enervated

Day 2
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

d
c
a
b
e

thespian
despot
prescient
verbatim
reverie

Day 4

Day 3
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
d
a
b
e

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Impasse
grandeur
articulate
pathological
polemic

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
b
e
d

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

mortal
gulle
regimen
denigrated
Inflicted

Day 5
REVIEW

l.h 7. J 13.
2. c 8. t 14~
3. f 9. 0 15.
4. a 10. n 16.
5. s 11. q 17.
6. I 12. b 18.

e
g
i
m
p
r

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

d
k
a
b
c
d

16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

b
e
a
b
a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WORDSEARCH B

SENTENCE COMPLETION

articulate
enervated
reverie
guile
prescient

l.a
2. c
3. b
4. a
5. b

·:· VOC/QUOTES
1.
2.
3.
4.

s.

b
e
b
a
b

388

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

c
a
a
e
b

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

e
b
b
c
a

21.
22.
23.
24.
25.

a
b
d
b
c

26.
27.
28.
29.
30.

b
c
e
c
a

31.
32.
33.
34.
35.

d
a
d
b
a

36.
37.
38.
39.
40.

c
c
a
d
b

41.
42.
43.
44.
45.

c
b
a
e
b

46.
47.
48.
49
50.

a
d
a
e
b

PANORAMA OF WORDS-BONUS EDITION
articulate 'The senator's supporters were
upset by the adjectives used to describe
him: clean and articulate." Editorial, The

glut 'The world in that age had a glut rather
than a famine of saints." R. S. Fuller. Holy
War

New York Times

cabal "If a cabal's secrets are revealed to
the wind, you should not blame the wind for
revealing them to the trees." Kahlil Gibran

circuitous "Although it took a cricuitous
route, the curveball finally reached the
catcher's mitt." Red Smith

denigrated

"Napoleon's henchmen denigrated the memocy of Voltaire whose name
the Emperor abhorred." Christopher Morley

denouement

"We all sat awaiting the
denouement of the play in silence." Mayne
Reid

despot 'The universe is not freindly to
despots, and they all perish sooner or later."
Don Marquis, The Almost Perfect State

dilatory "Between dilatory payment and
bankruptcy there is a great distance."
Samuel Johnson
dolorous "Diabetic patients are constantly
tormented by dolorous sensations." William
Roberts

emanating

'The feudal idea viewed all
rights as emanating from a head landlord."
John Stuart Mill

enervated "I have had one of my many
spasms which has almost enervated me."
Lord Nelson, Letters

extenuating "In Clive's case there were
many extenuating circumstances." Dame
Rose Macaulay

grandeur "I have studied the glories of
Greece but am more impressed by the
grandeur of Rome." Rainer Maria Rilke

guile "Oh, that deceit should steal such
gentle shapes, And with a virtuous vizard
hide foul guile." Shakespeare, Richard III

impasse "We expect the impasse between
Britain and Iran to be resolved this
weekend." United Nations Press Release

impregnable 'The Maginot Line, a French
system of fortifications. was considered
impregnable at the start of World War II. The
Columbia Encyclopedia

inflicted "Many of the cares that we are
inflicted with are but a morbid way of
looking at our privileges." Sir Walter Scott

insurgent "The insurgents' improvised
explosive devices killed six more American
soldiers yesterday." Michael Ware, CNN 1V
Broadcast
knell

"Hear it not, Duncan: for it is a

knell I That summons thee to heaven or to
hell." Shakespeare, Macbeth

macabre "The Mardi Gras parade featured
rowdy celebrants wearing macabre masks
and colorful costumes." Eliza Berman, Let
tf:te Good Times Roll

miscreant 'This is the basic. measure of
damages, and it's owed by the miscreants to
the company and shareholders." Ben Stein,
State of the Union

foreboding

"We are more disurbed by
forebodings of a calamity which threatens
us than by one which has befallen us." John
Lancaster Spalding

mortal "All is mortal in nature. so is all
nature in love mortal in folly." Shakespeare.
As You Like It

389

PANORAMA OF WORDS-BONUS EDITION
neophyte "1be elaborate masked ritual of
the courtroom holds attraction only for the
neophyte and layman." David Riesman

rapacious

"Charles V levied fmes with

rapacious exactness." James Robertson

regimen ..1 guarantee weight loss when my
odious "You told a lie, an odious damned

regimen is followed strictly." Dr. Robert Atkins

lie." Shakespeare, Othello

pathological

"A pathological liar is one

whose lies are suggestive of a mental
disorder." Webster's Medical Dictiortary

patriarch "If a patriarch wants to put his
foot down, the only safe place to do it in
these days is in a note-book." Florida ScottMaxwell

polemic "My greatest problem here, in a
polemic-loving America, is my dislike of
polemics, of belligerence, of battle." Anais
Nin, The Diaries of Anais Ntn
prescient "The Spanish Republic fell in
April 1939, and World War II began soon
after because those prescient fighters had
not been heeded." Edward Rothstein,
Spanish Civil War

protocol "The most advantageous protocol
is very rarely the one I did follow." Andre
Gide

ramifications "I don't live in a laboratory; I
have no way of knowing what ramifications
my actions will have." Hugh Prather

390

reverie "All through the ages, people have
regarded their reveries as sources of
wisdom." Rollo May
risible .. He is the most risible misanthrope I
ever met with." Tobias Smollett, Humphrey
Clinker

specious

"It was a specious argument but
delivered so effectively that it was con~
vincing." Murray Bromberg, Wagers of Sin

suffrage

"My successor was chosen by
general suffrage." John Marsden

thespian ..I regard Liev Schreiber as the
outstanding thespian of our times." Ben
Brantley, Theatre Critic, The New York
Times

toxic ..A hope. if it is not

big enough, can
prove toxic; for hope is more essentially an
initant than a soporific." William Bolitho

verbatim "Court reporters have to be able
to take 250 words a minute in their
verbatim accounts." Court Reporters;
Association Guide

INDEX
A
abhor, 147, 320
abjure, 204, 320
abortive, 108, 320
abound, 2, 320
abrogate, 91, 320
abstemious, 121. 320
absurd, 147, 320
access. 91, 320
accommodate, 108, 320
accomplice, 90, 320
accost. 8, 320
acknowledged, 136, 320
acme, 222, 320
acrimonious, 29, 320
acute. 161, 320
adamant. 167, 320
adherent. 177, 320
admonish, 28, 320
adroit, 10, 320
advent, 254, 320
adversary, 178, 321
adverse, 53, 321
advocate, 55, 321
aegis, 154, 321
afflict, 46, 321
affluent, 33, 321
alacrity, 20, 321
allay. 205, 321
alleged, 91, 321
alleviate. 195, 321
allude, 253, 321
aloof, 267, 321
altruistic, 98, 321
ambiguous. 196, 321
ameliorate, 264, 321
amicable, 56, 321
amnesty, 115, 321
amorous, 99, 321
analogous. 139, 321
anathema, 73, 321-322
annals, 3, 322
anomaly, 190, 322
anthropologist. 145, 322
antipathy, 227, 322
antiquated, 209, 322
antithesis, 97. 322
apathy. 178, 322

appalled, 280, 322
appellation, 134, 322
arbiter, 192, 322
arbitrary. 40, 322
archaic, 198, 322
ardent, 164, 322
array. 164, 322
articulate, 376, 389
artifact, 145, 322
artifice, 259, 322
artless, 260, 322
ascend, 45, 322
ascertain, 283, 322
ascetic, 129, 322-323
asinine, 210. 323
asperity. 93, 323
aspirant. 23, 323
aspire. 84, 323
asset, 53, 323
assiduous, 103, 323
astute, 55, 323
atrophy, 264, 323
attenuated, 192, 323
attest, 105, 323
atypical. 180, 323
au courant. 211, 323
audacity, 235, 323
augment, 248, 323
austere, 228, 323
automaton, 2, 323
avarice, 173, 323
aversion, 159, 323
avid, 11. 323
awesome, 152, 323

B
badger, 4, 324
bagatelle, 279, 324
balk, 117, 321
banal. 179, 324
barometer, Ill, 324
bedlam, 170, 324
begrudge, 260, 324
belated, 239, 324
belittle, 21, 324
belligerent, 20, 324
benevolent, 265, 324
bereft, 165, 324

besiege, 46, 324
besmirch, 166, 324
bias, 87, 324
bigot, 53, 147, 324
b~e. 145, 196, 324
blase, 258. 324
blatant, 54. 324
bliss, 177, 324
blunt. 11 7. 325
bogus, 255. 325
bona fide, 130, 325
brash, 21. 325
brigand,277,325
bristle, 16. 325
buff, 110, 325
bulwark, 97, 325
burgeoned. 283. 325

c
cabal, 374, 389
cache, 98, 325
cacophony. 170, 325
cajole, 11, 325
callous, 242. 258. 325
callow, 280, 325
calumny, 210, 325
canard, 271. 325
candid, 220, 325
candor. 184. 325
cant. 246, 325
capitulate, 235, 325
capricious. 261. 325
carnage, 270, 326
castigate, 22, 326
catastrophic, 142, 326
caustic, 14, 326
celerity, 195, 326
cessation. 16, 326
chagrin, 34, 326
charisma, 286, 326
charlatan. 186, 326
chicanery, 236, 326
chimerical, 136, 326
circuitous, 368, 389
clandestine, 27, 326
cliche, 217, 326
clique, 245, 326
coerce, 66, 326

391

cogent, 161, 326
cognizant, 41, 326
comely, 259, 326
commodious, 209, 326
compassion, 221, 326
compatible, 172, 326-327
compensatory, 142, 327
complacent, 202, 327
complicity, 90, 327
component, 104, 327
compound, 3, 327
comprehensive, 66, 327
concoct, 102. 327
concomitant, 191, 327
concur, 27. 327
condescend, 184, 327
condolence, 17, 327
condone, 196,327
conducive, 230, 327
confidant(e), 36, 327
conflagration, 153, 327
confront, 227, 327
congenial, 154, 327
conjecture, 68. 327
conjugal, 111, 328
connoisseur, 205, 328
connubial, 134, 328
consternation, 33, 328
constrict, 165, 328
construe, 30, 328
consummate, 102, 328
contemptuous, 14 7, 328
contort, 248, 328
controversial, 93, 328
cope, 133, 328
copious, 222, 328
corpulent, 277, 328
corroborate, 66, 328
coterie, 98, 328
countenance, 214, 328
coup, 114, 328
covert, 133, 328
covet, 223, 328
crave, 109, 328
criterion, 266, 328
cryptic, 81, 329
culminate, 164, 329
culpable, 90, 329
culprit, 28, 329

392

cumbersome, 208, 329
cumulative, 135, 329
cupidity, 98, 329
cuny, 252, 329
cursory, 96, 329
curtail, 81, 329
cynic, 265, 329

D
dearth. 284, 329
debacle, 215, 329
debilitate, 202, 329
debris, 152, 329
decade, 140, 329
decadence. 128, 329
decapitate, 280, 329
declaim, 92, 329
decorum. 186, 329
decrepit. 239, 330
deem, 110, 330
defamatory, 271. 330
degrade, 220, 330
deleterious, 191, 330
delineation. 241, 330
delude, 136, 330
deluge. 270, 330
delve, 261. 330
demeanor, 241, 330
demur. 134, 330
denigrated, 377, 389
denote, 253, 330
denouement,370, 389
depict, 222, 330
deplorable, 153, 330
deploy, 105, 330
deprecate, 271, 330
deride. 34,330
derived, 284, 330
derogatory, 120, 330
desist, 59, 330
despot. 375, 389
destitution, 128, 330-331
desultory, 129, 331
deter, 205, 331
detriment, 154, 331
devout, 272, 331
dexterity, 221, 331
diatribe, 71, 331
dilatory, 370, 389

dilettante, 180, 331
diminutive, 273, 331
discern, 33, 331
disciple, 129, 331
discreet, 203, 331
disdain, 20, 331
disgruntled, 171, 331
disheveled. 209, 331
dismantle. 116, 331
disparage. 35, 331
disparate, 121. 331
dispersed. 152, 331
disseminate. 283, 331
dissent, 192. 331
distraught, 29. 331-332
diversity, 259, 332
divulge. 208, 332
docile. 236. 332
doddering, 155. 332
doleful, 60, 332
dolorous, 374, 389
domicile, 67. 332
dormant. 283, 332
dregs. 23. 332
drudgery. 4. 332
dubious. 36. 332
dulcet, 273, 332
dupe. 15, 332
duplicity, 29, 332
duress. 28. 332

E
edifice, 122. 332
efficacy. 191. 332
effigy, 41 , 332
effrontery, 215, 332
egotist. 167. 332
egregious. 29. 332
elapse, 67, 332-333
elicit, 30,333
elucidate, 246. 333
elusive, 61, 333
emaciated, 45, 333
embellish, 98, 333
emanating, 368, 389
eminent. 1, 333
emissary, 278, 333
emit, 79, 333
emulate. 198, 333

encomium, 285, 333
encumbrance, 183,333
enervated, 374, 389
engrossed, 62, 333
enhance, 11, 333
enigma, 105, 333
ennui, 259, 333
entourage, 54, 333
entreaty, 148, 333
enunciate, 141. 333
epithet, 93, 334
epitome, 221, 334
equanimity, 172, 215, 334
eradicate, 171, 334
erudite, 230, 334
eruption, 152, 334
escalation, 135, 334
eschew, 35, 334
ethics, 27, 334
euphemism, 17, 334
evaluate, 104; 334
evanescent, 204, 334
eventuate, 79, 334
evince, 159, 334
exacerbate, 42, 334
excoriate, 272, 334
excruciating, 48, 334
exhort, 178, 334
exonerate, 115, 334
expatriate, 115, 335
expedient, 258, 335
expedite, 195, 335
exploit, 170, 335
expunge, 73, 335
expurgate, 260, 335
extant, 122, 335
enenuating,367, 389
eninct, 183, 335
enol, 245, 355
enortlon, 53, 335
enraneous, 196,335
enrtnsic, 92, 335
exult, 105, 335
exultation, 165, 335

facetious, 198, 335
facile, 245, 335
factitious, 285, 335
fallacious, 102, 335-336
falter, 165, 336
fastidious, 211, 336
fatal, 234, 336
fatuous, 248, 336
feasible, 33, 336
feint, 20, 336
felicitous, 228, 336
felon, 9, 336
ferment, 192, 336
fervid, 189, 336
fetish, 145, 336
fetter, 92, 336
fiasco, 35, 336
flat, 115, 336
flabbergasted, 215, 336
flagrant, 28, 336
flamboyant, 73, 336
flay, 241, 336
fledgling. 185, 336
flout, 41, 336-337
fluctuate, 209, 337
foist, 235, 337
foment, 203, 337
foreboding, 368, 389
forthwith, 42, 337
fortuitous, 71, 337
fracas, 178, 337
fractious, 74, 337
frail, 272, 337
fraught, 103, 337
fray, 40, 337
frenetic, 259, 337
frenzy, 23, 337
fretful, 48, 337
frugal, 97, 337
fruitless, 65, 337
frustrate, 61, 337
fulsome, 127, 337
furtive, 9, 337
futility, 270, 337

F

G
galvanize, 183, 337
gamut, 139, 337-338
garbled, 65, 338

fabricate, 10, 134, 335
fa~ade, 210, 335
facet, 234, 335

garrulous, 179, 338
gaudy, 183, 338
gaunt, 216, 338
genocide, 286, 338
genre, 220, 338
germane, 230, 338
gesticulate, 10, 338
gist, 161, 338
glean, 203, 338
glib, 233, 338
glut, 370, 389
grandeur, 376, 389
gratuity, 260, 338
gregarious, 96, 338
grimace, 210, 338
grotesque. 221. 338
guile, 377, 389
guise, 267, 338
gullible, 105, 338
gusto, 179, 338

H
habitat, 96, 338
halcyon, 228, 338
hapless, 9, 339
harass, 40, 339
harbinger, 4 7, 339
haven, 78, 339
havoc, 85, 339
heinous, 241, 339
heresy, 189, 339
heterogeneous, 139, 339
hirsute, 216, 339
histrionics, 61, 339
hoard, 154, 339
hoax, 104, 339
homogeneous, 233, 339
hostile, 158, 339
humility, 167, 339
hyperbole, 286, 339

iconoclast, 229, 339
idyllic, 183, 339
ignominious, 223, 339
ilk, 71,340
imbibe, 155, 340
imminent, 62, 340
impasse, 376, 389

393

impeccable, 103, 340
impede, 171, 340
imperative, 146, 340
imperceptible, 248, 340
imperturbable, 239. 340
impetuous, 202, 340
impious, 254, 340
implacable, 39. 340
implore, 4, 340
importune, 78,340
impregnable, 367, 389
impresario, 53, 340
impromptu, 273, 340
imprudent, 146, 340
impunity, 30, 340
inadvertent, 15, 340
inane, 27, 340
inanimate, 145, 341
incapacitated, 134, 341
inchoate, 81. 341
incipient, 15. 341
incisive, 86, 341
inclement, 59, 341
incoherent, 71. 341
incompatibility, 133, 341
incongruous, 17. 341
incontrovertible, 78, 341
incredulous, 80, 341
incumbent. 192 1 341
indict, 120, 341
indifference, 135, 341
indigenous, 96, 341
indigent. 40, 341
indiscriminate, 1, 341
indoctrinate, 127, 341-342
indolent, 179, 342
inebriated, 178, 342
ineffectual, 55. 342
inert. 62, 342
inevitable, 160, 342
inexorable, 28, 342
infallible, 1 71. 342
infamous, 15, 342
inflicted, 377, 389
infraction, 242, 342
ingratiate, 223, 342
inherent, 110, 342
inhibition, 71, 342
iniquity, 265. 342

394

initiate, 153, 342
innate, 108, 342
innocuous, 190, 342
inordinate, 141. 342
insatiable, 173, 342
insidious, 253, 342
insurgent, 369, 389
integral, 72, 343
intetject, 61, 343
interloper, 96, 343
interminable, 4, 343
internecine, 284, 343
interrogate, 208, 343
intimidate, 20, 343
intrepid, 8, 343
intrinsic, 160, 252, 343
introspective, 141, 343
inundate, 65, 343
invalidate, 91, 343
invective, 166, 343
inveigh, 84, 343
inveterate, 167. 343
inviolable, 148, 343
irascible, 141, 343
irate, 9, 343
irrational. 173, 343
irrelevant, 109, 344
itinerant, 111. 344

jaunty, 74, 344
jeopardize, 80, 344
jettison, 160, 344
jocose, 184, 344
jostle, 15, 344
jubilant, 186, 344
jurisdiction, 39, 344
juxtapose, 133, 344

K
knell, 369, 389

L
labyrinth. 104, 344
laceration, 22, 344
lackluster, 14, 344
laconic, 8, 344
lampoon, 214. 344
landmark. 92, 344

largess, 266, 344
lassitude, 191, 247. 344
latent. 110, 344
laudable, 35. 344-345
lax, 67, 345
legerdemain, 233, 345
legion, 114, 345
lethal, 86, 345
lethargic, 158, 345
levity. 123. 345
libel, 271. 345
liquidation, 90, 345
lithe, 177. 345
livid,279,345
loath, 55, 345
loathe, 14, 345
longevity, 155, 345
lucrative, 160, 345
lugubrious, 123, 345
lurid, 68, 345
lush. 128, 345

M
macabre, 369, 389
Machiavellian. 240, 345
magnanimous, 246, 345
maim, 264. 346
maladjusted, 139, 346
malady, 56. 346
malevolent, 273, 346
malign, 184. 346
malignant, 4 7. 346
malleable, 233. 346
malnutrition, 46, 346
mammoth, 85, 346
mandate, 142, 346
manifest, 261, 346
manifold, 103. 346
martinet, 279, 346
masticate, 35, 346
mastiff, 60, 346
materialism. 130. 346
matron, 2, 346
maudlin, 123, 346
megalomania, 114.
346-347
mendacious, 115. 347
menial. 196, 347
mentor, 245. 347

mercenary, 266, 347
metamorphosis, 129, 347
meticulous, 67, 347
mien. 216, 347
milieu, 190, 34 7
miscreant, 368, 389
modify, 108, 347
mollify. 266, 347
monoltthic, 40, 347
moribund, 173, 347
mortal, 377, 389
mortaltty, 140, 347
mortify, 184, 347
motivate, 229, 347
mundane, 17, 347
munificent. 286, 347
murky, 104, 347
myriad, 109,347

N
nadir, 173, 347-348
naive. 222. 348
nascent, 229, 348
nebulous, 120, 348
nefarious, 56, 348
negltgtble, 258, 348
neophyte, 367, 390
nepotism, 284, 348
nettle, 84, 348
neurotic, 140,348
neutraltze, 142. 348
nirvana, 130, 348
noisome, 211, 348
nomadic, 93, 348
nominal, 72, 348
nondescript. 180, 348
nonentity, 215, 348
nostalgia, 117, 348
nuance, 11. 348
nullify, 270, 348
nurture, 130, 348-349
nutritive, 255, 349

0
obese, 177, 349
obltterate, ·153, 349
obloquy, 285, 349
obscure, 165, 349
obsequious. 127. 349

obsess, 60. 349
obsolescence, 36, 349
obviate, 68, 349
occult, 202, 349
octogenarian, 22, 349
odious, 374, 390
ominous, 16, 349
omnipotent, 185, 349
omnivorous, 121, 349
opprobrium, 240. 349
opulence, 127, 349
ortgtnate, 148, 349
ostensible, 189, 349
ostentatious, 74. 349-350
oust, 42, 350
overt, 84, 350

p
pall,252,350
palltate, 136, 350
paltry. 196, 350
panacea, 171, 350
pandemonium. 240,350
parable, 214, 350
paradox, 3, 350
paragon, 93, 350
paramount, 158,350
partah.267,350
paroxysm. 39, 350
parsimonious, 116, 350
pass~. 234, 350
pathetic, 177, 350
pathological, 376, 390
patirtarch,367,390
paucity, 29, 350
pecuniary, 116, 350
pedagogue, 141, 350-351
penance, 129, 151
penchant, 280, 351
penitent, 204, 351
pensive, 217, 351
penury, 223, 351
perceive, 4, 351
peregrination, 111, 351
peremptory, 185, 351
perfidious, 223, 351
perfunctory, 34, 351
permeate, 80, 351
pernicious, 30, 351

perpetrate, 102, 351
perpetuate, 142, 351
persevere, 92, 351
perspicacious, 139, 351
pertinent, 60, 351
peruse, 59, 351
perverse, 34, 351-352
pesky, 120, 352
phenomenon, 140,352
phlegmatic, 65, 352
phobia, 230, 352
pinnacle, 164, 352
pique, 180, 352
pittance, 211, 352
placard, 72, 352
plaintiff, 271, 352
platitude, 179, 352
plethora, 9, 352
pltght. 133, 352
poignant, 66, 352
polemic, 376, 390
ponder, 128, 352
potent, 272, 352
potentate, 283, 352
potential, 135, 352
potpourri, 253, 352
p~atic,267,352-353

precedent, 185,353
precipitate, 86, 353
preclude, 91. 353
precocious, 34, 353
prelude, 136, 353
premise, 80, 353
premonition, 59, 358
prerogative, 284, 353
prescient. 375, 390
presttgtous, 72, 353
pretext, 10, 353
prevalent, 158, 353
prevancation,286,353
pnvation,46,353
procrastinate, 234, 353
prodtgtous, 195,353
prodigy, 165, 353
proffer, 254, 353
profligate, 114, 353
profound, 195, 354
profuse, 273, 354
progeny, 99, 354

395

prognosticate, 2, 354
prohibition, 146, 354
prolific, 97, 354
promulgate, 21, 354
propagate, 190, 354
propensity. 205, 354
propinquity, 170, 354
propitious, 80, 354
propriety. 254, 354
protocol, 368, 390
proximity, 247, 354
prudent, 189, 354
pugnacious, 21, 354
puissant. 123, 354
pungent, 167, 354
puny. 152, 354

Q
qualm, 260, 354
quandary,258, 355
quarry, 203, 355
quell,36, 355
quip, 68, 355

R
rabid, 198, 355
raconteur, 278, 355
rail, 277, 355
raiment, 277. 355
ramifications, 369, 390
rampant, 27, 355
rapacious, 369, 390
rash, 68, 355
rationalize. 229, 355
raucous, 255, 355
raze, 85, 355
realm, 3, 355
rebuke, 159, 355
recant, 90, 355
recoil, 59, 355
recondite, 135, 355
redolent, 121, 355
redress, 242, 355-356
refute, 216, 356
regimen, 377, 390
relegate, 84, 356
remiss, 158, 356
remote, 4 7, 356
remuneration, 72, 356

396

repent. 266, 356
repertoire, 248, 356
replenish, 261, 356
replete, 1, 356
repose, 121. 356
reprehensible, 39, 356
repress, 81, 356
reprimand, 14, 356
reproach, 204, 356
repudiate, 16, 356
repugnant, 221, 356
repulse, 85, 356
reputed, 272, 356
requisite, 261, 357
resourceful, 103, 357
respite, 48, 357
restrictive. 117, 357
reticent. 8, 236, 357
retort, 236, 35 7
retrospect, 166, 357
reverberating, 48, 357
revere, 172, 357
reverie, 375, 390
revert, 42, 357
reviled, 120; 357
rhetoric, 245, 357
rife, 117, 357
rift, 278,357
risible, 370, 390
romp, 110, 357
roster, 264, 357
rudimentary, 11. 357
rue, 153,357
ruminate, 278, 357-358
rustic, 186, 358

s
saga, 239, 358
sage, 154, 358
salient, 62, 358
sally, 33, 358
salubrious, 198, 358
salvation, 130, 358
sanctimonious, 214, 358
sanction, 253, 358
sanctuary, 45, 358
sanguine, 65, 358
satiety, 252, 358
saturate, 99, 358

schism. 73, 358
scion, 127, 358
scoff, 21, 358
scrutinize. 56. 358
scurrilous, 23, 358
scurry, 86. 359
sedate, 172, 359
sedentary, 97, 359
senile, 155, 359
serenity, 172. 359
servile, 227. 359
shibboleth, 255, 359
sinecure. 87, 359
singular, 87. 359
sinister, 46, 359
site, 208, 359
skirmish. 39, 359
slovenly, 203, 359
sojourn, 227. 359
solace, 23, 359
solicit, 55, 359
somber, 202, 359
sophistry. 285, 359
sordid, 22. 359
spate, 254, 359
specious, 370, 390
spew, 54, 360
spontaneous. 108, 360
sporadic. 67, 360
spurious. 189, 360
squeamish, 62. 360
stagnant. 234, 360
staunch, 240, 360
steeped, 1, 360
stentorian, 87, 360
stereotype, 86, 360
stigmatize, 235, 360
stipulate, 17, 360
strident. 191, 360
strife, 114. 360
stunted, 264, 360
stupor. 217. 360
stymie. 41. 360
subjugate, 78', 360
subservient. 265. 360
substantiate. 255, 360-361
subterfuge, 102, 361
subterranean, 79, 361
succinct, 196. 361

succulent, 252, 361
succumb, 48, 361
suffrage. 374, 390
sullen. 278, 361
sultry, 122. 361
sumptuous. 116. 361
superficial. 159, 361
superfluous. 228, 361
supine. 85, 361
supplication. 128. 361
surfeit. 190. 361
surge. 45, 361
surmise. 81. 361
surreptitious. 78, 361
susceptible, 140, 361
symptomatic, 61. 361

T
taboo, 146. 361-362
tacit. 236. 362
taint. 146, 362
tangible, 22. 362
tantalize. 235. 362
tantamount, 204, 362
taut. 279, 362
technology, 2, 270, 362
temerity, 99, 362
tenable, 228. 362
tenacious, 210. 362
termagant. 280, 362
terminate, 42. 362
terse. 161, 362
therapy, 229, 362
thespian, 375, 390
throng. 8, 362
thwart, 4 7. 362
timorous, 7 4, 362
tinge. 3, 362
tolerate, 30, 362
tortuous. 11 1, 363
toxic. 367, 390

tradition, 148, 363
tranquil. 45. 363
transient, 161. 363
tremulous. 16, 363
trenchant. 122. 363
trend, 233. 363
trivial. 196, 363
truncated. 7 4. 363
turbulent. 41, 363
turpitude, 242, 363
tussle, 160, 363
tyro, 285, 363

u

ubiquitous. 47, 363
ultimate. 79, 363
umbrage. 246, 363
unabated, 123, 363
unconscionable. 240. 363
unctuous. 265, 363
underwrite, 116, 363
universal. 14 7. 364
unkempt, 211, 364
unmitigated, 209, 364
unsavory, 220, 364
unwieldy, 247, 364
urbane, 109. 364
usurp, 196, 364
utopia, 73. 364

v

vacillate, 239. 364
valor, 87. 364
vapid, 24 7. 364
vehemently. 222. 364
veneer, 109, 364
venerable, 197. 364
venial. 220. 364
venom, 54. 364
verbatim, 375, 390
vertigo, 230, 364

vestige, 267, 364
vexatious. 56, 364
viable. 79, 364
vicissitudes. 122. 364
vigil. 208. 365
vigilant. 10. 365
vilify. 246. 365
vindicate. 241. 365
virile. 155. 365
virtuosity, 99. 365
virulent, 54, 365
vitiate, 247. 365
vitriolic. 166,365
vituperation, 242. 365
vivacious. 216. 365
vogue, 159. 365
volition. 227. 365
voluble, 36. 365
voluminous. 166. 365
voracious. 1, 365
vulnerable. 148, 170. 365

w

wan, 60, 365
wane, 180, 365
wary. 205. 365
wheedle. 186, 366
whet. 217, 366
whimsical. 214. 366
wince. 217, 366
wistful. 277, 366
wrest. 14. 366

y
yen, 279, 366

z
zealous, 66, 366
zenith. 185. 366

397

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