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BARRON'S

BARRON'S

FIFTH EDITION
Murray Bromberg
Principal Emeritus

Andrew Jackson High School
Queens, New York
Melvin Gordon
Reading Specialist

New York City Schools

©Copyright 2008, 2000. 1993, 1987, 1971 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.
AU rights reserved.
No part of this book may be reproduced or distributed in any form or

by any means without the written permission of the copyright owner.
AU Inquiries should be addressed to:

Barron's Educational Series, Inc.
250 Wireless Boulevard
Hauppauge, NY 11788

www.barro...educ.com
Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 2007050610

ISBN-13: 978-0-7641-3864-5
ISBN-10: 0-7641-3864-2
Ubrary of

eo..-.

C.talo.....-bl-PubUcatlon Data

Bromberg. Murray.
1100 words you need to know I Murray Bromberg, Melvtn Gordon. - 5th ed.
p. em.
Cover title: Barron's 1100 words you need to know
Includes index.
ISBN-13: 978-0-7641-3864-5
ISBN-10: 0-7641-3864-2
l. Vocabulary. I. Gordon. Melvin. II. Title. III. Title: Eleven hundred words
you need to know. IV. Title: Barron's 1100 words you need to know.
PE1449.B643
428.1-dc22

2008

PRINTED IN 1HE UNITED SJ'ATES OF AMERICA

2007050610

CONTENTS
Fl,lll Pronunciation Key ............................................vi
WEEKS 1-46 ...............................................•.... 1

Burted Words .................................................. 290
Words in Context ............................................... 294
Arlswers ...................................................... 295
Final Review Test ............................................... 312

Panorama of Words ............................................. 319
Bonus Weeks .................................................. 367
VOC/QUarE ..................................................381

Index ........................................................ 391

INTRODUCTION
Recently, Amazon. com rated 1100 Words You Need to Know the Number 1 bestseller in its
category. We're proud of that distinction and of the vocabulary building help that we have
provided for the million people who have purchased copies of the book since its first edition
appeared.
Now, in this Anniversary Edition, we have added a Bonus section of new words in context,
idioms, and exercises that will assist you in mastering the challenging words as you find them
in your listening, reading, viewing, and conversing. The new material is consistent with our
successful blueprint of interest, variety, relevance, and repetition. By investing 15 minutes
daily with this new book, you will soon see a dramatic improvement in your vocabulary.

To the Teacher: 1100 Words was originally designed as a 36-week program to conform to
school schedules. The additional ten weeks were included as an extra credit section. Now,
for this Anniversary Edition, we have added bonus weeks and new words to enrich your
growing vocabulary.
Murray Bromberg
Melvin Gordon

FULL PRONUNCIATION KEY
a

a

a

bat, trap
rage, lace
jar, farther

j
k
1

m
b

ch
d

bag, sob
chill, such
done, said

n

ng
0

e

e

er

.met, rest
ease, see
fern, learri

0
6
oi

ou
f

g
h
-

1

feel. stiff
gone, big
him, hold
inch, pin
ivy, hive

p
r
s
sh
t
th
:r:H

vi

just, enjoy
kin, talk
lose, hurl
mice, cram
not, into
song, ring
rot, cot
tow, blow
cord, lord
toil. boil
mouse~ bout
pest, cap
red, art
see. best
crush, crash
time, act
this, math
they, booth

u
ii
v

w
y
z
zh
;}

bull, pull
dual. sue
vast, have
wish, wood
youth, yes
zoo, zest
pleasure, treasure
stands for:
a-in around
e in waken
i in cupid
o in demon
u in brush

NEw WoRDS

voracious
~ra.·sms

indiscriminate
in· dis krfm · ~ nit

READING WISELY
The youngster who reads voraciously, though indiscriminately, does not necessarily gain in wisdom over the teenager
who is more selective in his reading choices. A young man
who has read the life story of every eminent athlete of the
twentieth century, or a coed who has steeped herself in every
social-protest novel she can get her hands on, may very well
be learning all there is to know in a very limited area. But
books are replete with so many wonders that it is often
discouraging to see bright young people limit their own
experiences.

eminent
em' a mot
steeped

stept
replete
ri' plet·

Sample Sentences On the basis of the above paragraph, try to use your new words in the
following sentences. Occasionally it may be necessary to change the ending of a word; e.g.,
indiscriminately to indiscriminate.
1. The football game was _ _ _ _ _ _ with excitement and great plays.
2. The _ _ _ _ _ _ author received the Nobel Prize for literature.
3. My cousin is so

in schoolwork that his friends call him a bookworm.

4. After skiing, I find that I have a

appetite.

5. Modern warfare often results in the _ _ _ _ _ _ killing of combatants and
innocent civilians alike.

Definitions Now that you have seen and used the new words in sentences, and have
the definitions "on the tip of your tongue," try to pair the words with their meanings.
6. voracious

a. of high reputation, outstanding

7. indiscriminate

b. completely ftlled or supplied with

8. eminent

c. choosing at random without careful selection

9. steeped

d. desiring or consuming great quantities

10. replete

e. soaked, drenched, saturated

TODAY'S IDIOM

to eat humble pie-to admit your error and apologize
After his candidate had lost the election, the boastful
campaign manager had to eat hwnble pte.
ANSWERS ARE ON PACE 295

1

NEW WORDS

abound
~bound'

technology
nor~ je

tek

SOLVING THE SERVANT PROBLEM
The worlds of science-fiction abound with wonders. Yet
modem technology progresses so rapidly that what may be
today's wild dream may be next year's kitchen appliance. A
British scientist has prognosticated that within ten years
every suburban matron will have her own robot servant. One
task this domesticated automaton will not have to contend
with will be scouring the oven because even today the
newest ranges can be "programed" to reduce their own
baked-on grime to easily disposed of ashes.

prognosticate
t~ kat

prog nos'

automaton

o tom'~ ton
matron

rna: tr~n

Sample Sentences Now that you've seen the words used in context, and-hopefully-have
an il~ea of their meanings, try to use them in the following sentences. Remember that a
wor( -ending may have to be changed.
1. The mayor refused to

as to his margin of victory in the election.

2. The time is approaching when human workers may be replaced by _ _ _ _ __
3. A clever salesman will always ask a _ _ _ _ _ _ if her mother is at home.
4. The western plains used to
slaughtered by settlers.

with bison before those animals were

5. Man may be freed from backbreaking labor by the products of scientific

Definitions Test yourself now by matching the new words with the definitions. If you are
not sure of yourself, cover the top half of this page before you begin.
6. abound

a. an older married woman

7. technology

b. branch of knowledge dealing with engineering, applied
science, etc.

8. prognosticate

c. a robot; a mechanical "person"

9. automaton

d. to exist in great numbers

10. matron

e. to predict or foretell a future event

TODAY'S IDIOM

a pig in a poke-an item you purchase without having seen; a disappointment
The mail order bicycle that my nephew bought turned out to be a pig in
a poke, and he is now trying to get his money back.
2

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

NEw Woaos
paradox
par'; doks
realm
relm

IT'S A MAN'S WORLD
How paradoxical that the world's greatest chefs have all been
men! Cooking would clearly seem to be a field that lies
exclusively within women's realm. yet the wmals of cookecy
are replete• with masculine names: Brillat Savarin, Ritz, Diat,
Larousse. To compound the puzzle, there has rarely been a
tinge of rumor or scandal casting doubts on the masculinity
of these heroes of cuisine.

annals
an'n;lz
compound
kom pound'
tinge

(*replete-if you've forgotten the meaning, see page 1)

tlnj

Sample Sentences Try your hand now at using your new words by writing them in their
correct form (change endings if necessary) in these sentences:
1. His gloom was now
2. The

by the failing mark on his geometry test.
of sports are replete• with the names of great black athletes.

3. One of the great

of American life is that though minority groups have
suffered injustices, nowhere in the world have so many varied groups lived together
so harmoniously.
of garlic is all that's necessacy in most recipes.

4. A

5. The cruel king would not allow the prince to enter his
him to the forest, which abounded* with wild animals.

, restricting

(*abounded-studied previously, see page 2)
Definitions If you are having trouble in picking the right definitions, it may be best not to
do them in the order given, but to do the ones you are surest of first.
6. paradox

a. a trace, smattering, or slight degree

7. realm

b. a statement that at first seems to be absurd or
self-contradictocy but which may in fact tum out to be true
c. to increase or add to
d. historical records
e. special field of something or someone; kingdom

8. annals
9. compound (v.)
10. tinge (n.)

TODAY'S IDIOM

a flash in the pan-promising at the start but then disappointing
The rookie hit many home runs in spring training, but once
the season began he proved to be a }lash in the pan.
ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

3

NEW WORDS

WEEK

badger

1

•!• DAY

4

baj'O)r
implore

im plor'

HOW NOT TO GET YOUR WAY
It is difficult to change someone's opinion by badgering him.

drudgery

The child who begs his mother to "get off his back" when she
implores him for some assistance with the household
drudgery, may very well plead interminably for some special
privilege when he wants something for himself. How
paradoxical* that neither is able to perceive that no one likes
being nagged.

druj' O)r e
interminable

in ter· ffiO) nO) 1»1
perceive

par sev'

(*paradoxical-studied previously, see page 3)

Sample Sentences Getting the hang of it? Now go on to use the five new words in the

following sentences-remember, past tenses may be required.
1. She does her homework on Fridays to save herself from the _ _ _ _ _ _ of having
to do it durtng the weekend.

2. The teacher continually _ _ _ _ _ _ the pupil for the missing assignments.
3. The eminent scientist

difficulties in putting the invention into

practice.
4. The sick child's mother

the doctor to come immediately.

5. I listened to the boring lecture for what seemed an

fifty minutes.

Definitions Pick the letter of the definition that matches your new word and write it in the
answer space.

6. badger (v.)

a. unpleasant, dull, or hard work

7. implore

b. unending

8. drudgery

c. to plead urgently for aid or mercy
d. to understand, know, become aware of

9. interminable
10. perceive

e. to pester, nag, annoy persistently

TODAY'S IDIOM

to pour oil on troubled waters-to make peace, to calm someone down
When I tried to pour oU on troubled waters, both the angry husband
and his wife stopped their quarrel and began to attack me.
4

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

WEEK

1

•!• DAY

5

REVIEW

You have accomplished something worthwhile this week. In learning twenty useful words
and four idioms, you have taken a step toward a greater mastery of our language. As a
result of today's lesson, you will become aware of those words that require greater study on
your part for complete success in these first lessons.
Take the following quiz by matching the best possible definition with the word you have
studied. Write the letter that stands for that definition in the appropriate answer space.

REVIEW WORDS
1. abound
2. annals
3. automaton
4. badger
5. compound
6. drudgery
7. eminent
8. implore
9. indiscriminate
10. interminable
11. matron
12. paradox
13. perceive
14. prognosticate
15. realm
16. replete
17. steeped
18. technology
19. tinge
20. voracious
IDIOMS
21.
22.
23.
24.

DEFINITIONS
to be completely soaked in something
b. to be able to tell what will happen in the future
c. someone's special field
d. to continually nag
e. carelessly chosen
f. related to science of engineering
g. to add to
h. beg for assistance
i. of outstanding reputation
j. a mature woman
k. small amount of
I. dull, difficult work
m. desiring huge amount
n. existing in great number
o. historical records
P· to come to have an understanding of
q. completely filled with
r. machine that behaves like a person
s. seemingly self-contradictory situation
t. unending
a.

to eat humble pie
a pig in a poke
a flash in the pan
to pour oil on troubled waters

Now check your answers on
page 295. Make a record of
those words you missed. You
can learn them successfully
by studying them and by
using them in your own
original sentences. If you
neglect them, then the effort
you have put into your
vocabulary building

campaign up to this point
will have been wasted.

u. a blind item; poor purchase
v. admit to defeat
w. a star today, a flop tomorrow
x. to try to make peace

WORDS FOR
FURTHER STUDY

MEANINGS

1. ------------------2. ------------------3. -------------------

4. ------------------5. ------------------5

SENSIBLE SENTENCES?
(From Week 1)
•:• Underline the word that makes sense in each of the sentences below.
1. The huge football player had a (voracious, replete) appetite.
2. Mter a seemingly (interminable, indiscriminate) wait, the surgeon came
to give us the news.
3. Without a (paradox, tinge) of evidence, the coroner could not solve the
murder.
4. In the (realm. annals) of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.
5. We invited the (eminent, steeped) engineer to address our club.
6. In the Catsldll Mountains, the woods (abotmd, implore) with deer.
7. I cannot (perceive, prognostfcate) why people voted for the corrupt
senator.
8. Night and day my kid brother (badgers, compotmds) me for money.
9. Science fiction movies usually feature (annals, crutomatons).
10. With his expertise in (drudgery, technology), my uncle is able to earn a
good salacy.

..

•.• Do these sentences make sense? Explain why.
11. The rookie was amazing during spring training but he turned out to be
ajlash in the pan.

12. I complained to the salesperson because he had sold me a pig in a
poke.

13. When I tried to pour oU on troubled waters, I only made matters worse.
14. Mter the election, when my candidate conceded his loss, I had to eat
hwnblepie.

6

ANSWERS ARE ON PAGE 295

WORDSEARCH 1

..

•.• Using the clues listed below, ftll in each blank in the following story
with one of the new words you learned this week.

Reggie the Con Man
In the of crime, there are few scoundrels who could match the
exploits of Reggie Hayes, who also used the names of Reginald Haven,
Ricardo Hermosa, Father Harris, and dozens of other aliases. Reggie's police
record, principally in Chicago and Baltimore, is®
with scams that
he perpetrated upon gullible people. Generally, his favorite target was a
®
who should have known better.
Dressed as a priest ("Father Harris"), he was most convincing, however. His
method of operation was to "find" a wallet stuffed with hundred dollar bills
outside a supermarket and then @
an unsuspecting woman to
share his good fortune, since there was no identification in the wallet. But
first, to establish her credibility, his victim had to put up a sum of money as
a testimonial to her good faith. Mrs. Emma Schultz, age 72, tearfully told the
police that she had withdrawn $14,000 fro~ her bank and placed it in a
shopping bag supplied by the helpful priest. He told her to hold onto the bag
while he went next door to a lawyer's office to make the sharing of their good
fortune legal.
wait, Mrs. Schultz discovered to her chagrin
After a seemingly
that the heartless thief had skipped out the back way, leaving her "holding
the bag"-a switched bag containing shredded newspaper-while he made
his getaway with her life savings.
@...::..5_ _ _

Clues

CD 3rd Day

®
®